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MATH - DUSD

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MATH - DUSD
Helping Your Child
Understand Mathematics
Price Math Morning
Presented by Melissa Canham & Glenda Martinez
Math Teacher Specialists
[email protected] and [email protected]
The Evolution of Math Education
“WHERE”
THE
MATHEMATICS
WORKS
Problem
Solving
Computational
& Procedural
Skills
“HOW”
THE
MATHEMATICS
WORKS
“DOING”
MATH
Conceptual
Understanding
“WHY”
THE
MATHEMATICS
WORKS
Why Does My Child’s
Child’sMath
Math
Look Different?
Different?
Look
Past Practice – Focus on Memorization
 Today – Focus on Understanding

– Emphasis is placed on thinking and
understanding.
– Students now need to be active learners
and explain their thinking.
– Students are now asked to apply the math,
not to just repeat it.
The Standards for Mathematical Practice
1.
Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
2.
Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
3.
Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of
others.
4.
Model with mathematics.
5.
Use appropriate tools strategically.
6.
Attend to precision
7.
Look for and make use of structure
8.
Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.
New Student Expectations
ELA, Social Studies,
and Tech Subjects
1.
Demonstrate
independence.
2.
Build strong content
knowledge.
Science
1.
Ask questions (for science)
and defining problems
(for engineering).
2.
Develop and use models.
Respond to the varying
demands of audience,
task, purpose, and
discipline.
3.
Plan and carry out
investigations.
4.
Analyze and interpret
data.
4.
Comprehend as well as
critique.
5.
Use mathematics and
computational thinking.
5.
Value evidence.
6.
6.
Use technology and
digital media
strategically and
capably.
Construct explanations
(for science) and design
solutions (for engineering).
3.
7.
Understand other
perspectives and
cultures.
Mathematics
1.
Make sense of problems
and persevere in solving
them.
2.
Reason abstractly and
quantitatively.
3.
Construct viable
arguments and critique
the reasoning of others.
4.
Model with mathematics.
5.
Use appropriate tools
strategically.
6.
Attend to precision.
7.
Engage in argument from
evidence.
7.
Look for and make use of
structure.
8.
Obtain, evaluate, and
communicate
information.
8.
Look for and express
regularity in repeated
reasoning.
Sources: CCSS ELA student portraits, NGSS practices, CCSS mathematics practice
MATH
M1. Make sense of problems
& persevere in solving them.
M2. Reason abstractly &
quantitatively.
M7. Look for & make use of
structure.
M8. Look for & express
regularity in repeated
reasoning.
SCIENCE
S2. Develop and use models.
S5. Use mathematics &
computational thinking.
M4. Model with mathematics.
M6. Attend to precision.
S1. Ask questions & define
Problems.
S3. Plan & carry out
Investigations.
S4. Analyze & interpret data.
S6. Construct explanations &
design solutions.
E2. Build a strong base of knowledge
through content rich texts.
E5. Read, write, and speak grounded in
evidence.
S8. Obtain,
M3 and E4. Construct viable
evaluate &
arguments & critique reasoning of
communicate
Information.
E6. Use technology others.
S7. Engage in argument from evidence. E3. Obtain, synthesize,
& digital media
and report findings
strategically & capably
clearly and effectively
M5. Use appropriate
in response to task
tools strategically
and purpose.
E1. Demonstrate independence in reading complex texts, and writing
and speaking about them.
E7. Come to understand other perspectives & cultures through
reading, listening, and collaborations.
Sources: CCSS ELA student
portraits, NGSS practices,
CCSS mathematics practice
ELA
Adapted from work of Tina
Cheuk, Stanford University
Why Problem Solving?

Allows students to bring their own
meaning into the problem.

Helps students develop strategies that
make sense to them
How Can Parents Help?
1.
Unpack Word Problems
– Help your child understand the context
•
Visualize what is happening in the story
•
Help them put themselves in it
– If your child can see the problem, they
then will be better prepared to make
sense of the problem on their own.
•
Helps them come up with their own strategies
to solve the problem, something kids usually
struggle with
Let’s Try Unpacking a Problem

Our class has 7 boxes of doughnuts.
There are 10 doughnuts in each box.
We also have 3 extra doughnuts. How
many doughnuts do we have all
together?
Sofia’s Strategy:
“The answer is in the number
choices. For (3,1), it is 31 because you
have 3 tens and 1 one. For (7, 3) it is 73.
For (12, 4) the answer is 124 because
you have 12 tens and 4 ones.”
How Can Parents Help?
2.
Listen to your child’s thinking
and ask questions.
• Why do you think that?
• Can you explain how you got that?
• How do you know?
• Does your answer make sense?
• Can you solve it a different way?
How Can Parents Help?
3.
Practice/reinforce at home
– Try not to tell you child a strategy, it
will come with understanding and
practice.
– Ask your child word problems as they
come up in every day life.
– Play games with your child.
– Where’s the Math?
– Always ask ‘WHY?’!
How Can Parents Help?
4. Be Positive About Math!
– Maybe you were not good at math, but
your kid does not have to know that. Have
a good attitude and they will too.
– Show the importance of learning math by
helping your child connect math with daily
life.
• Point out your own activities that involve
mathematics
Today’s Visit

Transitional Kindergarten
Activities developing number sense.

Kindergarten
Ben had 10 yellow m&m's, 10 blue m&m's, and 10 red m&m's.
How many m&m's does Ben have? Draw a picture to represent
your thinking.

1st and 2nd Grade
(2, 10) (8, 10) (12, 10) (2, 20) (12, 5)
Marco bought ____ bags of candy to give out to friends. Each
bag has ____ pieces of candy in it. How many pieces of candy
does Marco have to give out to his friends?
Today’s Visit

3rd Grade
Melanie is having a picnic for her family. She has 42 cookies.
There are 7 people in her family. If each person gets the same
number of cookies, how many cookies will each person get?
4th Grade
Landon emptied his piggy bank and found 5 quarters, 9 dimes,
3 nickels, and 17 pennies.
How much money did Landon find in his piggy bank?
Landon used some of the money he found in his piggy bank to
buy an ice cream cone. If the ice cream cone costs $0.78, how
much money does Landon have left?
 5th Grade
I am planning an art project for my niece’s birthday party. Each
child will need 1/4 of a package of clay to do the project. If
there will be 14 kids at the party, how many packages of clay do
I need?

Classroom Task

Write down 3 ways that your child’s
math experience is different than how
you experienced math.
Comments, Questions,
Concerns?
Presented by Melissa Canham &
Glenda Martinez
Math Teacher Specialists
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