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1 SPAN/LING 3312 Pedagogical Issues in Spanish Bilingual

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1 SPAN/LING 3312 Pedagogical Issues in Spanish Bilingual
SPAN/LING 3312
Pedagogical Issues in Spanish
Bilingual Education Majors Section
LING 3312 - CRN 16609 & SPAN 3312 - CRN 16610
Professor: María Eugenia Conde-Pérez, [email protected]
Office: LART 129, (915) 208-7825 (cell)
Office Hrs.: M, W from 12:-1:00 pm & from 3:30-4:20 pm, or by appointment.
Classes: Mondays and Wednesdays 4:30-5:50, LART 308
Course description
Overview of differences between academic and colloquial Spanish; and discussion of the different
varieties of Spanish (including Standard Spanish). Spanish spelling and punctuation. Attention to
aspects of Spanish and English that help explain problems in acquisition, language-specific
discourse styles and challenges of translation. Discussion of how oral reading, spoken language
and written texts contrast and influence classroom discourse. Analysis of quality translations and
their impact on teaching.
This course is taught entirely in Spanish, although some readings may be in English.
Objectives:
•
Issues of dialect: Students will come to understand the difference between standard
Spanish on the one hand and the varieties of Spanish that are popularly spoken on the
other hand. Students will also understand the “register” difference between academic
Spanish and colloquial Spanish.
•
Issues of contrastive Spanish/English linguistics: Students will learn about substantive
issues in Spanish linguistics with comparisons to English linguistics when these are
helpful. Among the topics in Spanish linguistics are: Spanish phonetics and phonology,
Spanish spelling and punctuation including the written accent, Spanish vocabulary and
how Spanish words are formed, the structure of the Spanish sentence, and so forth.
•
Issues in discourse analysis: Students will learn to note and understand the differences
between the following three types of discourse: reading aloud, natural spoken language,
and written text. To be examined are the linguistic aspects of reading and writing.
•
Students will be taught to examine and appreciate the differences between the English
and the Spanish version of the same text (in translation). Students will also be taught to
appreciate the extent to which Spanish sentences contain more embedding and are
consequently longer than their English equivalents.
•
Students will become aware of the difference between a good translation and a bad one.
1
Why this course is difficult for most people:
(1) This is not a course in composition, conversation, or general language development; thus a
superior knowledge of spoken or even written Spanish is no guarantee of anything. (2) There is
quite a lot of terminology to be mastered. (3) Linguistics is a science and therefore it demands
precision, exactitude and an ability to classify and analyze. (4) Grammar as such (let alone
Linguistics, which is just grammar taken a bit higher into more abstract analysis) is not usually
well taught.
How to study for this course:
Prepare for each and every class. Linguistics is not history or political science, where a lot of
crash reading the night before an exam can get you through. To pass (let alone do well in) a
Linguistics course, you must know a lot of terminology and understand how the terms relate to
each other and to do that you must keep up with the work on a daily basis. Read the lesson in
advance; write out the exercises; attend each class; ask questions during class; form a study
group and spend time studying with its members, explaining to them the material and listening to
their explanations; take a hands-on approach to the material; come talk to me in person (or by email) if you have any problems or doubts. Don’t wait till you’re totally lost and confused.
Tentative
Mes
Agosto
No.
Clase
1
2
Día
lunes
miércoles
Fecha
24
26
Tema
Introducción al curso
Introducción a la lingüística
• Hualde, Olarrea y
Escobar.
2006.
Introducción
a
la
lingüística hispánica, cap. 1, pp.
1-31.
3
lunes
31
4
miércoles
2
miércoles
9
Pinker, Steven. 1994. The
language instinct. An instinct to
acquire an art, (pp.15-24) and
Baby born talking -- describes
Heaven (pp. 262-296)
Adquisición del lenguaje 2: Habla
bilingüe, cambio de código.
•
5
Tarea 1: Escribe
algo sobre ti.
Adquisición
del
lenguaje
1:
Adquisición simultánea y sucesiva.
•
Sept.
Tarea
Peccei, Jean Stilwell. 2006. Child
Language. Section A, pp. 36-41.
Tarea 2: Escribe
algo sobre tu
familia.
Lengua y dialecto. Los distintos
españoles. El español estandard. Los
registros formales e informales.
• Hualde, Olarrea y Escobar.
2006.
Introducción
a
la
lingüística hispánica, cap. 6, pp.
329-360. Leer todo el capítulo
6
lunes
14
pero no se preocupen por
aprender lo que está en las
siguientes secciones: 2, 2.1,
2.2, 3.1,3.1.1., 3.1.2, 3.1.3,
3.2.2, 3.2.3 y 3.4
Habla y escritura. Habla, lectura en
voz alta y textos escritos.
Tarea 3: Escribe
una carta a un
2
familiar o amigo
Octubre
Nov.
Dic.
7
8
9
10
11
miércoles
lunes
miércoles
lunes
miércoles
16
21
23
28
30
Repaso para el examen 1
Examen 1
Los sonidos del español 1 (fonología)
Los sonidos del español: La sílaba.
La ortografía del español y los
acentos 1.
La ortografía del español y los
acentos 2.
Las categorías sintácticas 1.
12
lunes
5
13
miércoles
7
14
15
lunes
miércoles
12
14
16
lunes
19
17
18
miércoles
lunes
21
26
Repaso para el examen 2
Examen 2
19
miércoles
28
20
lunes
2
La sintaxis del español: la frase
nominal 1
La sintaxis del español: la frase
nominal 2
21
miércoles
4
22
lunes
9
23
24
miércoles
lunes
11
16
Repaso para el examen 3
Examen 3
25
miércoles
18
26
lunes
23
27
miércoles
25
La sintaxis del español: la oración
simple
La sintaxis del español: la oración
compleja 1
La sintaxis del español: la oración
compleja 2
28
lunes
30
29
miércoles
2
Las categorías sintácticas 2
Morfología: La formación de palabras
en español 1
Morfología: La formación de palabras
en español 2
La sintaxis del español: la frase verbal
1
La sintaxis del español: la frase verbal
2
La sintaxis del español: la oración
compleja 3
Buenas y malas traducciones.
Determinando
la
competencia
Tarea
Fonología
4:
Tarea
Ortografía
5:
Tarea 6: Escoge
10 palabras y
sepáralas
en
morfemas.
Tarea 7: Escribe
un texto en el
tiempo pasado
Tarea 8: Escribe
un texto en el
futuro.
Tarea 9: Escribe
un texto en el
que uses el
condicional “Si
yo
fuera
millonario…”
Tarea 10: Los
tiempos
verbales
Tarea
11:
Escríbele
una
carta a tu jefe
explicándole por
qué mereces un
aumento
de
sueldo.
Tarea
Escribe
12:
4
3
lingüística.
oraciones con
cláusula
nominal, 4 con
cláusula
adjetival y 4 con
cláusula
adverbial.
En
cada caso 2
deben llevar el
verbo
de
la
cláusula
en
indicativo y 2 en
subjuntivo.
Repaso para el Examen Final
Examen Final
4
Course Policies: (No exceptions under any circumstance)
Admission to the course: Prerequisites.
Either
(1) direct placement by scoring at least an 84 on the Spanish Placement Test thus placing
into "33xx = any third-year Spanish course" or
(2) having passed Spanish 2302 or 2304 or equivalents elsewhere. UTEP's Banner/Goldmine
system enforces all this.
Evaluation
There are four exams. In addition there will be a homework assignment each week. There are no
papers, oral reports or quizzes for undergraduate students.
Exams
Homework
80%
20%
Graduate students are required to write a 10 page paper on a topic related to the best way of
teaching any of the Spanish grammar points we will study. Graduate students should meet with
the professor to discuss their topic. For graduate students the grade will be determined as follows
Exams
Homework
Final paper
60%
20%
20%
Homework: Most homework will be short texts that you will write (except when there is an
exercise assigned). These texts should have the following characteristics:
• One page long
• Typed in computer in Arial point 12
• Paragraphs should be spaced at 1.5
Texts will be graded according to spelling, correct accentuation and correct use of
Spanish grammar.
Exams: The exams are mostly multiple-choice. You must bring to each exam (i) a scantron form,
(ii) a soft-lead pencil, (iii) a bottle of Liquid Paper/correction fluid, and (iii) a ballpoint pen. Each
machine-gradable exam may also contain some questions to be answered in writing. Do NOT
bring scratch paper to the exam; its use is not allowed. You can use the exam itsef.
If you think I graded your exam incorrectly, you must tell me right after I have returned the
exam, so you should let me know by person or e-mail (not phone) by the end of the next day.
Since final exams are not returned to students unless they come to my office and ask for them,
the only way for you to check the way I graded your final is to come to my office and go over the
final there.
No one may start taking an exam more than halfway into the exam period.
5
Policy on Missing Exams:
If you do not take an exam at the assigned time, you have until before the next class meeting to
make up the missed exam. It is your responsibility to talk to me about scheduling the make-up. If
you know in advance you won’t be able to take an exam, come talk to me before the exam date.
If you do not make up the missed exam by the agreed-upon time, you will receive a zero on that
exam. This zero is averaged into your course grade. You can reschedule one exam only. If you
do not show up on time for the other exam, there are no circumstances under which I will allow a
make-up.
There are no make-ups for finals. If you or a proxy inform me--in person, by phone or by e-mail-BEFORE the designated time of the start of the final exam that you will not be on hand to take it
as scheduled, I will give you an Incomplete in the course if that is what you want. But if you do
NOT so inform me, you receive a zero on the final.
Attendance:
I automatically drop you immediately upon your fifth absence, on the day when that absence
occurs. You are permitted four absences in total. Four absences per semester is very liberal, so
there are no exceptions whatsoever to this policy for any reason at all, including hospitalization or
jail. However, it is dangerous to miss even one class during the semester, for much of what I say
in class will complement the textbook, and it is also the case that several exercises are reviewed
in class, not collected as homework, so the answers can only be gotten by attending.
The only extra credit is for perfect attendance. Here is how the extra credit works: I take
roll at the beginning of each class. All students present every class from will receive three extra
points on their course grade. (For example, if your end-of-semester grade-point average is 87.25,
thus giving you a 'B', those three extra points will raise that to a 90.25, an 'A'.) If you arrive late or
leave early, you have half and absence and therefore no perfect attendance Students absent at
only one roll-taking receive two extra points. Students absent at two roll-takings receive one extra
point. Students absent at three or more receive no extra points. There is no such thing as an
"excused" non-receipt of extra points. You are either in class or you’re not.
Grading System:
A = 100-90
B = 89-80
C = 79-70
D = 69-60
F = 59-O.
Auditing:
In keeping with university policy, anyone wishing to audit must have signed up in the Academic
Services Building to do so before the end of the Census Day (September 10). The university's
policy on auditing is written out in the Schedule of Classes.
Students with disabilities:
If you have or suspect a disability and need accommodations, you should contact
Disabled Students Services Office (DSSO) at 747-5184 or at [email protected] or come by Room
106 Union East Building.
6
Academic Dishonesty:
Academic dishonesty is prohibited and is considered a violation of the UTEP Handbook
of Operating Procedures. It includes, but is not limited to, cheating, plagiarism, and collusion.
Cheating may involve copying from or providing information to another student, possessing
unauthorized materials during a test, or falsifying research data on reports or papers. Plagiarism
occurs when someone intentionally or knowingly represents the words or ideas of another
person’s as ones’ own. And, collusion involves collaborating with another person to commit any
academically dishonest act.
Academic dishonesty is an assault upon the basic integrity and meaning of a University.
Cheating, plagiarism, and collusion in dishonest activities are serious acts which erode the
University’s educational and research roles and cheapen the learning experience not only for the
perpetrators, but also for the entire community. It is expected that UTEP students will understand
and subscribe to the ideal of academic integrity and that they will be willing to bear individual
responsibility for their work. Materials (written or otherwise) submitted to fulfill academic
requirements must represent a student’s own efforts.
Any act of academic dishonesty attempted by a UTEP student is unacceptable and will
not be tolerated. Violations will be taken seriously and will be referred to the Dean of Students
Office for possible disciplinary action. Students may be suspended or expelled from UTEP for
such actions.
7
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