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– IT Governance - Syllabus MIS 5202

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– IT Governance - Syllabus MIS 5202
MIS 5202 – IT Governance - Syllabus
Instructor
Information
Office
Information
Office Hours
CRN
18225
Rich Flanagan
[email protected]
209C Speakman Hall
(215) 204-3077
Tuesdays 9:30 – 11:30, Wednesday 1:30-3:30
Section
1 Location TBD
Time
Tuesday 5:30 – 8:00
Course Objectives
In this course you will learn how to audit an organization’s use of its information technology
assets. Key topics are:
1. Is the organization using IT to further its business objectives?
2. How does the organization align its IT investments to its business strategy?
3. Does the organization have a strong control environment?
4. Does the organization have an information architecture and a technical direction?
5. Is the organization assessing and managing its IT risks in a controlled way?
6. Is the IT team optimized to deliver the services the organization is expecting?
7. Is the organization getting the value it expects?
By examining how an organization makes IT investment decisions, implements new assets, delivers
services, assesses risk and measures its own performance, the IT auditor can assure the organization is
meeting its fiduciary, compliance and security responsibilities.
Grading
Item
Participation
Cases/Projects
Exams (2)
Final Exam
Total
Percent of Total
Points
20%
30%
25%
25%
100%
Participation
Much of your learning will occur as you prepare for and participate in discussions about
the course material. The assignments, cases, and readings have has been carefully
chosen to bring the real world into class discussion while also illustrating fundamental
concepts.
To encourage participation, 20% of the course grade is earned by preparing before class
and discussing the topics between and in class. Evaluation is based on you consistently
demonstrating your engagement with the material. Assessment is based on what you
contribute, not simply what you know.
1)
Preparation before class – By the start of most classes you will post on our
class blog a brief summary of the readings, including the cases, assigned for the
upcoming class period (see the course schedule). Bring a copy for your
reference during the discussion.
Your weekly summary will briefly address and summarize:
a. One key point you took from each assigned reading. (One or two sentences
per reading)
b. One key point you learned from the readings as a whole. (One or two
sentences maximum)
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MIS 5202 – IT Governance - Syllabus
c. One question that you would ask your fellow classmates that facilitates
discussion.
2)
Participation during class – We will typically start each discussion with
“opening” questions about the assigned readings and case study. I may ask for
volunteers, or I may call on you. Students called on to answer should be able to
summarize the key issues, opportunities, and challenges in the case study. All
students should be prepared to answer these questions.
Another important aspect of in-class participation is completion of in-class
assignments and contribution to break out activities.
3)
Participation between classes – To facilitate ongoing learning of the course
material, we will also discuss course material on the class blog in between class.
You will post case study analyses to the course website. Reading and
commenting on these analyses will further the quality of our in-class discussions.
Also, I will post a discussion question on the class blog every Thursday. The
question will relate to the assigned reading, a topic discussed in class, or a
relevant current event. Every student is expected to read and contribute to the
online class discussion each week.
The criteria for participation includes attendance, punctuality, level of preparation,
professionalism, answering questions, discussing readings, discussing case studies,
contributing to group activities, and contributing to a positive learning environment.
Recognizing that students sometimes have unavoidable conflicts, the baseline for
expected participation is assessed on one less week than the number of assigned
weekly write-ups.
Case Study Analyses
In addition to preparing to discuss each of the assigned cases studies, students will also
prepare an in-depth analysis of three case studies during the semester. I will provide a
list assigning you to the cases you are responsible for.
For each case study I will provide several discussion questions. Pick one question and
respond to it in depth. Your analysis should not exceed one single-spaced page using 11
point Times New Roman font with one-inch margins. Do not prepare a separate cover
page, instead put your name, the class section number (MIS5202.001), and the case
name in the top-left corner of the header.
To submit your case study analysis post it on the class blog no later than Monday at 5
PM, the day before the case study is to be discussed in class. Please copy your analysis
in clear text onto the blog.
Late submissions for this deadline will result in no credit earned for this
assignment.
There is no one particular style for a good case study analysis. But, there are some
common elements to excellent submissions (additional, grade-specific criteria are
provided at the end of this syllabus):
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MIS 5202 – IT Governance - Syllabus

The opening of the analysis makes it immediately clear which case study and what
question is being addressed.

You have cited specific details regarding key facts and issues of the case. Instead of
general observations about information technology or organizations that apply to any
problem, draw details from the case study itself. Analyses, observations, and
suggestions should be tied directly to those key facts and issues. You can also draw
on the other readings in the course to inform and support your arguments.

After analyzing the details of the case study, discuss how its specific issues have
broader application. In other words, use your analysis to provide some advice to
managerial decision-makers that can be applied to other situations beyond this case.

Provide a balanced perspective. For example, when making a recommendation
explain the pros and cons, providing both the rationale (the why) as well as its
feasibility (the how). Well-considered recommendations include discussion of
potential issues with your solution and conditions that should be in place for your
recommendation to be successful.
Exams
We will have two short exams during the semester. These will be multiple choice tests using practice
CISA examination questions. Together these exams are weighted 25% of your final grade
Final Exam
The final exam will use all multiple-choice CISA practice examination questions. The exam will be
comprehensive. Everything we cover during the semester could appear on the final. The final exam is
weighted 25% of your final grade.
Page 3 of 8
MIS 5202 – IT Governance - Syllabus
ISACA
Other
Gartner
Harvard
Press
Readings
CISA Review Manual 2012, ISACA
COBIT 5: Enabling Processes
The IT Risk Framework
IT GOVERNANCE USING COBIT® AND VAL ITTM STUDENTBOOK, 2ND EDITION
ISACA
COBIT Quick Start, 2nd Edition
http://www.isaca.org/Knowledge-Center/Research/ResearchDeliverables/Pages/COBITQuickstart-2nd-Edition.aspx
"What is Portfolio Management?”, Rad & Levin, AACE International Transactions; 2008;
"An Introductory Overview of ITIL V3", itSMF, Best Management Practice Partnership
“Managing Quality for Information Technology”,
http://www.qualitydigest.com/mar99/html/body_itech.html
“Total Quality Management, Chapter 5” Reid
http://www.wiley.com/college/sc/reid/chap5.pdf
Practical IT Policies & Procedures, M. Sisco – Available only online through the library
“Understanding IT Controls and COBIT”
“Outsourcing Buying Trends and Drivers…”,
“Outsourcing Contract Terms and Conditions: An Understanding of the 19 Articles in a
Master Service Agreement”
"Running IT Like a Business"
"The Security Processes that you Must Get Right"
"Effective Communications: Performance Dashboards"
"Effective Communications: IT Strategy”
"Effective Communications: IT Satisfaction Surveys”
"Effective Communications: Policies”
"Effective Communications: IT Updates”
IT Governance Archetypes for Allocating Decision Rights, Peter Weill, Jeanne W.
Ross May 13, 2004 Product number: 8087BC-PDF-ENG
Mechanisms for Implementing IT Governance, Peter Weill, Jeanne W. Ross, May 13,
2004, 8089BC-PDF-ENG
Define Your Operating Model: Designing a Foundation for Execution, Jeanne W.
Ross, Peter Weill, David C. Robertson , Aug 08, 2006, Product number: 8070BC-PDFENG
Taking on the Challenge of IT Management in a Global Business Context: The Alcan
Case - Part A, Line Dube, Carmen Bernier, Vital Roy, May 01, 2009, Product number:
HEC020-PDF-ENG
MDCM, Inc. (A): Strategic IT Portfolio Management, Mark Jeffery, Joseph F. Norton,
Derek Yung , Jan 01, 2006, Product number: KEL172-PDF-ENG
iPremier (A): Denial of Service Attack (Graphic Novel Version), Robert D. Austin,
Jeremy C. Short, Jun 25, 2009, Product number: 609092-PDF-ENG
The Harvard Business School Publishing articles and cases are available from HBSP at
the following link http://cb.hbsp.harvard.edu/cb/access/14510796
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MIS 5202 – IT Governance - Syllabus
Tentative Schedule
Date
Topic
8/28
9/4
Class introduction,
Business Strategy,
IT Governance:
What is it? Why do
we need it?
The Importance of a
Security and Control
Framework
Readings & Assignment
CISA & COBIT 5
The Xiameter Case
IT Governance Using Cobit & ValIT,
Chapters 1-3
“Understanding IT Controls and COBIT
IT Strategy and
Enterprise
Architecture
‘IT Governance Archetypes for Allocating
Decision Rights’
‘Mechanisms for Implementing IT
Governance’
9/18
Key IT Decisions and
Mechanisms for
Making Them
Define Your Operating Model
9/25
IT Organization,
Roles, Policies
“Running IT Like a Business”,
IT Governance Using Cobit & ValIT,
Chapters 4-5
10/2
IT Policy
Development
Practical IT Policies & Procedures, Scisco
10/9
Key IT Policies for
Most Organizations
TechRepublic
IT Policy project Due
9/11
Class Assignment
Neighborhood Grocer
Case
Dentdel Case
Taking on the Challenge
of IT Management in a
Global Business Context
Exam 1
CISA Review, pp
86-90,99-102
COBIT 5: AP01
CISA Review, pp
92-95,
COBIT 5: AP02,
AP03
COBIT 5: AP08
CISA Review, pp.
111-116,
COBIT 5: AP07
Claimproof Insurance
Case
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MIS 5202 – IT Governance - Syllabus
10/16
QMS and the
Management of IT
Controls
“Managing Quality for Information
Technology”
“Total Quality Management Chapter 5”
10/23
Resource
Management
"What is Portfolio Management",
MDCM, Inc. (B):
Strategic IT Portfolio
Management
10/30
Contracting
Exam 2
11/6
Assessing IT Risk
“Outsourcing Contract Terms and
Conditions”
“Outsourcing Buying Trends and
Drivers…2012”
The IT Risk Framework
11/13
Managing IT Risks
"The Security Processes that you Must
Get Right"
iPremier (A): Denial of
Service Attack (Graphic
Novel Version)
CISA Review, pp
COBIT 5: AP12,
AP1399-102,
11/27
Maturity Models
COBIT QuickStart
TampaBay Office
Furniture Case
CISA Review, pp
113-114,
12/4
Communications &
"Effective Communications: IT Strategy,
Balanced Scorecards Policies, IT Updates, IT Satisfaction
Surveys, Performance Dashboards"
12/6-7 STUDY PERIOD
12/11 FINAL Exam
COBIT 5: AP11
CISA Review, pp.
96-97,
COBIT 5: AP05,
AP06
CISA Review, pp
103-109,
COBIT 5: AP09,
AP10
All World Airlines Case
City Medical Partners
Case
Final Exam
Page 6 of 8
MIS 5202 – IT Governance - Syllabus
Grading Criteria
The following are the criteria used for evaluating assignments. You can roughly translate a letter grade
as the midpoint in the scale (for example, an A- equates to a 91.5).
Criteria
Grade
The assignment consistently exceeds expectations. It demonstrates originality of
thought and creativity throughout. Beyond completing all of the required elements,
new concepts and ideas are detailed that transcend general discussions along
similar topic areas. There are few mechanical, grammatical, or organization issues
that detract from the ideas.
A- or A
The assignment consistently meets expectations. It contains all the information prescribed
for the assignment and demonstrates a command of the subject matter. There is sufficient
detail to cover the subject completely but not too much as to be distracting. There may be
some procedural issues, such as grammar or organizational challenges, but these do not
significantly detract from the intended assignment goals.
B-, B, B+
The assignment fails to consistently meet expectations. That is, the assignment is complete C-, C, C+
but contains problems that detract from the intended goals. These issues may be relating to
content detail, be grammatical, or be a general lack of clarity. Other problems might include
not fully following assignment directions.
The assignment constantly fails to meet expectations. It is incomplete or in some other way
consistently fails to demonstrate a firm grasp of the assigned material.
Additional Information
Availability of
Instructor
Exams
o
o
Attendance Policy o
o
Class Etiquette
o
o
o
o
o
Below C-
Please free to use office hours (without an appointment) to discuss
any issues related to this class.
While every student is encouraged to visit with me during office
hours to help them gain a better understanding of material which
they didn’t fully understand when they were in class, office hours
are NOT for helping students catch up on material they missed
because they were absent.
Class discussion in intended to be an integral part of the course.
Accordingly, full attendance is expected by every member of the
class.
If you are absent from class, speak with your classmates to catch
up on what you have missed.
Please be respectful of the class environment.
Class starts promptly at the start time. Please make EVERY effort
to be on time, as I will communicate important information in the first
few minutes of class.
Cell phones must be turned off and put away during class.
Refrain from personal discussions during class. Please leave the
room if you need to speak to another student for more than a few
words. If a student cannot refrain from engaging in private
conversation and this becomes a pattern, the students will be asked
to leave the classroom to allow the remainder of the students to
work.
There will be two examinations during the semester. The exams
cannot be made up, regardless of the reason for absence.
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MIS 5202 – IT Governance - Syllabus
Appropriate use of o
Technology in the
classroom
o
Please turn off cell phones at the start of class. If you have an
urgent, personal situation and may be receiving an important phone
call during class, please let me know this at the beginning of class,
sit near the door, and step out of the classroom if you need to take a
call.
Please bring your laptop or tablet to class. We want to explore
these topics and there is a wealth of materials available online. I do
expect that you will use your laptop for our course only while in
class.
Plagiarism, Academic Dishonesty and Citation Guidelines
If you use text, figures, and data in reports that was created by others you must identify the source and
clearly differentiate your work from the material that you are referencing. If you fail to do so you are
plagiarizing. There are many different acceptable formats that you can use to cite the work of others
(see some of the resources below). The formats are not as important as the intent. You must clearly
show the reader what is your work and what is a reference to somebody else’s work.
Plagiarism is a serious offence and could lead to reduced or failing grades and/or expulsion from the
university. The Temple University Student Code of Conduct specifically prohibits plagiarism (see
http://www.temple.edu/assistance/udc/coc.htm).
The following excerpt defines plagiarism:
Plagiarism is the unacknowledged use of another person’s labor, ideas, words, or assistance.
Normally, all work done for courses — papers, examinations, homework exercises, laboratory
reports, oral presentations — is expected to be the individual effort of the student presenting the
work. There are many forms of plagiarism: repeating another person’s sentence as your own,
adopting a particularly apt phrase as your own, paraphrasing someone else’s argument as your
own, or even presenting someone else’s line of thinking in the development of a thesis as
though it were your own. All these forms of plagiarism are prohibited both by the traditional
principles of academic honesty and by the regulations of Temple University. Our education and
our research encourage us to explore and use the ideas of others, and as writers we will
frequently want to use the ideas and even the words of others. It is perfectly acceptable to do
so; but we must never submit someone else’s work as if it were our own, rather we must give
appropriate credit to the originator.
Source: Temple University Graduate Bulletin, 2000-2001. University Regulations, Other
Policies, Academic Honesty. Available online at: http://www.temple.edu/gradbulletin/

o
o

o
o

o
o
For a more detailed description of plagiarism:
Princeton University Writing Center on Plagiarism:
http://web.princeton.edu/sites/writing/Writing_Center/WCWritingRes.htm
How to successfully quote and reference material:
University of Wisconsin Writers Handbook
http://www.wisc.edu/writing/Handbook/QuotingSources.html
How to cite electronic sources:
Electronic Reference Formats Recommended by the American Psychological Association
http://www.apastyle.org/elecmedia.html
Acknowledgements
Thanks to David Schuff and Robert E. Davis for their assistance in preparing this syllabus
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