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Westerville City School District Project Lead the Way Engineering Pathway

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Westerville City School District Project Lead the Way Engineering Pathway
Westerville City School District
Project Lead the Way Engineering Pathway
COURSE OF STUDY
(SCXXX): Introduction to Engineering Design
Westerville City Schools Mission
Recommended Grade Level:
Course Length:
Credits:
Course Weighting:
1.0
9, but open to all students in grades 9-12
Full Year, 1 Period
1.0
To prepare students to contribute
to the competitive and changing
world in which we live.
Course Description
Introduction to Engineering Design (IED) is a high school level foundation course in the PLTW Engineering Program. In IED students
are introduced to the engineering profession and a common approach to the solution of engineering problems, an engineering design
process. Utilizing the activity-project-problem-based (APP) teaching and learning pedagogy, students will progress from completing
structured activities to solving open-ended projects and problems that require them to develop planning, documentation,
communication, and other professional skills.Through both individual and collaborative team activities, projects, and problems, students
will problem solve as they practice common engineering design and development protocols such as project management and peer
review. Students will develop skills in technical representation and documentation of design solutions according to accepted technical
standards, and they will use current 3D design and modeling software to represent and communicate solutions. In addition the
development of computational methods that are commonly used in engineering problem solving, including statistical analysis and
mathematical modeling, are emphasized.
Course Rationale
To uphold the district’s mission and foster college and career readiness, Project Lead the Way’s Introduction to Engineering Design
(IED) provides opportunities to develop highly transferable skills in collaboration, communication, creativity, and critical thinking which
are relevant for any post-secondary coursework or career. IED will enable students to use cutting-edge advanced manufacturing
techniques while solving problems that matter. It will improve students’ abilities to innovate, enhance math and science skills,
strengthen students’ communication abilities, and foster interest in future engineering courses.
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1
IED will be the first course in a pathway of Engineering Design courses expected to be available to students in the future. Course
options for years two through four of the pathway may include Principles of Engineering (POE), Civil Engineering & Architecture,
Computer Integrated Manufacturing, Digital Engineering and/or Environmental Sustainability.
Scope and Sequence
Quarter
1
2
Unit
Approximate Length
1 - Design Process
15 days
2 - Technical Sketching and Drawing
15 days
3 - Measurement and Statistics
15 days
4 - Modeling Skills
15 days
5 - Geometry of Design
15 days
6 - Reverse Engineering
15 days
7 - Documentation
25 days
8 - Advanced Computer Modeling
15 days
9 - Design Team
30 days
10 - Design Challenge
15 days
3
4
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2
Portrait of a Graduate
Westerville students participating in the Engineering Pathway . . .
Will graduate with the following skills:
● organization and time management
● collaboration
● critical thinking (analysis of parts and the system, review of others’ ideas, logical application)
● problem solving
● verbal and written communication through a variety of media and with multiple audiences
Will master the following content:
● design and implementation as part of the engineering process
● math concepts throughout Algebra and Geometry
● specialized software or other technical tools (i.e., Auto CAD)
● technical writing
● technical reading
● effects of engineering as related to ethics, society and environmental impact
Will have the following attitudes/personal attributes:
● strong work ethic
● responsibility
● pride in their work
● perseverance
● flexibility
● curiosity
● creativity
● risk-taker
And will have the following experiences:
● solving authentic, open-ended problems all the way to resolution and implementation
● participating in competitions or challenges to showcase skills and talents
● working with equipment used in industry participating in field experiences: job shadowing, mentorship, learning from industry
professionals, and summer job opportunities
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Cognitive Demand
Cognitive Demand is how content (the what) interacts with cognition process (the how). It refers to the kind and level of thinking
required of students in order to successfully engage with and solve the task (Stein, Smith, Henningsen, & Silver, 2000).
Cognitive Demands
DEMONSTRATING SCIENCE KNOWLEDGE (D)
Requires student to use scientific inquiry and develop the ability to think and act in ways associated with
inquiry, including asking questions, planning and conducting investigations, using appropriate tools and
techniques to gather and organize data, thinking critically and logically about relationships between evidence
and explanations, constructing and analyzing alternative explanations, and communicating scientific
arguments. (Slightly altered from National Science Education Standards)
Note: Procedural knowledge (knowing how) is included in Recalling Accurate Science.
INTERPRETING AND COMMUNICATING SCIENCE CONCEPTS (C)
Requires student to use subject-specific conceptual knowledge to interpret and explain events, phenomena,
concepts and experiences using grade-appropriate scientific terminology, technological knowledge and
mathematical knowledge. Communicate with clarity, focus and organization using rich, investigative scenarios,
real-world data and valid scientific information.
Increasing complexity
DESIGNING TECHNOLOGICAL/ENGINEERING SOLUTIONS USING SCIENCE CONCEPTS (T)
Requires student to solve science-based engineering or technological problems through application of scientific
inquiry. Within given scientific constraints, propose or critique solutions, analyze and interpret technological and
engineering problems, use science principles to anticipate effects of technological or engineering design, find
solutions using science and engineering or technology, consider consequences and alternatives, and/or
integrate and synthesize scientific information.
RECALLING ACCURATE SCIENCE (R)
Requires students to provide accurate statements about scientifically valid facts, concepts and relationships.
Recall only requires students to provide a rote response, declarative knowledge or perform routine
mathematical tasks. This cognitive demand refers to students’ knowledge of science fact, information,
concepts, tools, procedures (being able to describe how) and basic principles.
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Project Lead the Way Content Standards
Unit 1: Design Process (approximately 15 days)
Expectations for Learning
The goal of this unit is to introduce students to the broad field of engineering and a design process that engineers use to develop
innovative solutions to real problems. Students become familiar with the traditional big four disciplines of engineering and the
extensive array of career opportunities and engineering problems addressed within each discipline. A design process is presented as
a structured method for approaching and developing solutions to a problem. The art and skill of brainstorming is emphasized as
students begin to develop skill in graphically representing ideas through concept sketching.
Essential Questions
1. How might we create the best possible solution to a
problem?
2. What is the most effective way to generate potential
solutions to a problem? How many alternate solutions
should you generate?
3. What are the most pressing engineering/technical
problems of our time?
4. What is an engineer and what types of work do they do?
Enduring Understandings
● An engineering design process involves a characteristic
set of practices and steps used to develop innovative
solutions to problems.
● Brainstorming may take many forms and is used to
generate a large number of innovative, creative ideas in a
short time.
● Technical professionals clearly and accurately document
and report their work using technical writing practice in
multiple forms.
● Sketches, drawings, and images are used to record and
convey specific types of information depending upon the
audience and the purpose of the communication.
● Engineering consists of a variety of specialist sub-fields,
with each contributing in different ways to the design and
development of solutions to different types of problems.
Learning Targets *The cognitive demand is noted next to each learning target.
● Identify and define the terminology used in engineering design and development. *R
● Identify the steps in an engineering design process and summarize the activities involved in each step of the process. *R
● Complete a design project utilizing all steps of a design process and find a solution that meets specific design requirements. *T
● Construct a testable prototype of a problem’s solution. *T
December 2015
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Key Concepts/Vocabulary
assess, assessment, brainstorm, client, creativity, criteria, constraint, design, design brief, design process, design statement,
designer, engineer, engineering notebook, innovation, invention, piling-on, problem identification, product, prototype, research
Assessments
● Project-based: Aerodynamic Distance Challenge
● Teacher created Unit Assessments with guidance from PLTW Teacher Community
Instructional Strategies and Materials
*This section will be completed once teachers have been trained on the PLTW IED curriculum and can access lessons via the PLTW
learning management system.
December 2015
6
Unit 2: Technical Sketching and Drawing (approximately 15 days)
Expectations for Learning
The goal of this unit is for students to develop an understanding of the purpose and practice of visual representations and
communication within engineering in the form of technical sketching and drawing. Students build skill and gain experience in
representing three-dimensional objects in two dimensions. Students will create various technical representations used in
visualization, exploring, communicating, and documenting design ideas throughout the design process, and they will understand the
appropriate use of specific drawing views (including isometric, oblique, perspective, and orthographic projections). They progress
from creating free hand technical sketches using a pencil and paper to developing engineering drawings according to accepted
standards and practices that allow for universal interpretation of their design.
Essential Questions
Enduring Understandings:
1. How can we clearly convey the intent of a design to
● Technical drawings convey information according to an
someone unfamiliar with the original problem or the
established set of drawing practices which allow for
solution?
detailed and universal interpretation of the drawing.
2. How is technical drawing similar to and different from
● Hand sketching of multiple representations to fully and
artistic drawing?
accurately detail simple objects or parts of objects is a
3. What can cause a technical drawing to be misinterpreted
technique used to convey visual and technical information
or to be inadequate when conveying the intent of a design
about an object.
to someone unfamiliar with the original problem or
● Two- and three-dimensional objects share visual
solution?
relationships which allow interpretation of one perspective
4. In what ways can technical drawings help or hinder the
from the other.
communication of problem solution in a global community?
● The style of the engineering graphics and the type of
5. Why are spatial-visualization skills so important to
drawing views used to detail an object vary depending
engineering success?
upon the intended use of the graphic.
Learning Targets *The cognitive demand is noted next to each learning target.
● Generate and document multiple ideas or solution paths to a problem through brainstorming. *C
● Identify and define technical drawing representations. *R
● Identify the proper use of each technical drawing representation. *R
● Identify line types. *R
● Determine the minimum number and types of views necessary to fully detail a part. *R
● Choose and justify the choice for the best orthographic projection of an object to use as a front view on technical drawings. *D
● Apply tonal shading to enhance the appearance of a pictorial sketch and create a more realistic appearance. *T
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● Hand sketch 1-point and 2-point perspective. *T
● Hand sketch isometric views and orthographic projections at a given scale. *T
● Create drawings or diagrams as representations of objects, ideas, events, or systems. *T
Key Concepts/Vocabulary:
cabinet pictorial, cavalier pictorial, center line, construction line, depth, dimension, dimension line, documentation, drawing, edge,
ellipse, extension line, freehand, grid, height, hidden line, isometric sketch, leader line, line, line conventions, line weight, long-break
line, manufacture, measurement, multi-view drawing, object line, oblique sketch, orthographic projection, perspective sketch, pictorial
sketch, plane, point, profile, projection line, projection plane, proportion, scale, section lines, shading, short-break line, shape, sketch,
solid, technical working drawing, three-dimensional,tone, two-dimensional, vanishing point, view, width
Assessments
● Project-based: Miniature Train, Model Creation
● Teacher created Unit Assessments with guidance from PLTW Teacher Community
Instructional Strategies and Materials
*This section will be completed once teachers have been trained on the PLTW IED curriculum and can access lessons via the PLTW
learning management system.
December 2015
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Unit 3: Measurement and Statistics (approximately 15 days)
Expectations for Learning
The goal of this unit is for students to become familiar with appropriate practices and the applications of measurement (using both U.
S. Customary and SI units) and statistics within the discipline of engineering. Students will learn appropriate methods of making and
recording measurements, including the use of dial calipers, as they come to understand the ideas of precision and accuracy of
measurement and their implications on engineering design. The concepts of descriptive and inferential statistics are introduced as
methods to mathematically represent information and data and are applied in the design process to improve product design, assess
design solutions, and justify design decisions. Students are also provided with practice in unit conversion and the use of
measurement units as an aid in solving practical problems involving quantities. A spreadsheet program is used to store, manipulate,
represent, and analyze data, thereby enhancing and extending student application of these statistical concepts.
Essential Questions
1. How can statistical data and analysis be used to inform,
justify, and validate a design or process?
2. If error is unavoidable in measurement, how can we
indicate our confidence in the precision of a measurement
we make?
3. What is dimensional analysis and how can it help solve
problem involving quantities?
4. Why do engineers generally adhere to a set of
dimensioning standards and guidelines?
Enduring Understandings
● Error is unavoidable when measuring physical properties,
and a measurement is characterized by the precision and
accuracy of the measurement.
● Units and quantitative reasoning can guide mathematical
manipulation and the solution of problems involving
quantities.
● Dial calipers and other tools can be used to make highly
accurate measurements that improve the accuracy of the
design process, and confidence intervals can be used to
record and communicate measurements effectively.
● Dimensions are included on technical drawings according
to accepted practice and an established set of standards
so as to convey size and location information about
detailed parts and their features.
● Statistical analysis of univariate data facilitates
understanding and interpretation of numerical data and
can be used to inform, justify, and validate a design or
process.
● Descriptive and inferential statistics, as well as
spreadsheets, can be used to analyze data and then
inform the design process.
December 2015
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Learning Targets *The cognitive demand is noted next to each learning target.
● Identify the steps in an engineering design process and summarize the activities involved in each step of the process. *R
● Complete a design project utilizing all steps of a design process, and find a solution that meets specific design requirements.
*T
● Calculate statistics, represent data, distinguish between sample statistics and use a spreadsheet program to store and
manipulate raw data. *D
● Use function tools within a spreadsheet program to calculate statistics for a set of data including mean, median, mode,
quartiles, range, and standard deviation. *D
Key Concepts/Vocabulary
accuracy, arrowheads, caliper, class interval, convert, data, data set, dimension, dimension lines, dot plot, frequency, graph,
histogram, International Organization for Standardization (ISO), International System of Units (SI), line plot, mean, measure, median,
mode, normal distribution, numeric constraint, precision, scale, scatter plot, significant digits, standard deviation, statistics, unit, US
Customary Measurement System, variation
Assessments
● Project-based: Fling Machine Challenge
● Teacher created Unit Assessments with guidance from PLTW Teacher Community
Instructional Strategies and Materials
*This section will be completed once teachers have been trained on the PLTW IED curriculum and can access lessons via the PLTW
learning management system.
December 2015
10
Unit 4: Modeling Skills (approximately 15 days)
Expectations for Learning
This unit introduces students to a variety of modeling methods and formats used to represent systems, components, processes, and
other designs. Students are provided experience in interpreting and creating multiple forms of models common to engineering as they
apply the design process to create a design solution. Students create graphical models of design ideas using sketches and
engineering drawings and create graphs and charts to represent quantitative data. In this unit students are introduced to three
dimensional computer modeling. They learn to represent simple objects in a virtual 3D environment that allows for realistic
interactions and animation. The modeling software is also used to provide an efficient method of creating technical documentation of
objects. Students are provided the opportunity to create a physical model of a design solution to be used for testing purposes.
Mathematical modeling is introduced, and students learn to find mathematical representations (in the form of linear functions) to
represent relationships discovered during the testing phase of the design process.
Essential Questions
1. What is the role of models in the design process?
2. How reliable is a mathematical model?
3. How can we use technology to make the design and
manufacture of a product more efficient and less prone to
error?
4. What is the purpose of a portfolio? How do you decide
what information to include in a portfolio?
Enduring Understandings
● Technical professionals use a variety of models to
represent systems, components, processes and other
designs including graphical, computer, physical, and
mathematical models.
● Computer aided drafting and design (CAD) software
packages facilitate the creation of virtual 3D computer
models of parts and assemblies.
● Physical models are created to represent and evaluate
possible solutions using prototyping technique(s) chosen
based on the presentation and/or testing requirements of a
potential solution.
● Solving mathematical equations and inequalities involves a
logical process of reasoning and can be accomplished
using a variety of strategies and technological tools.
● A function describes a special relationship between two
sets of data and can be used to represent a real world
relationship and to solve problems.
Learning Targets *The cognitive demand is noted next to each learning target.
● Create three-dimensional solid models, multi-view drawing and orthographic projections of parts within CAD from sketches or
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dimensioned drawings using appropriate geometric and dimensional constraints. *R
● Utilize project portfolios to present and justify design projects. *C
Key Concepts/Vocabulary
annotate, assembly, assembly drawing, Cartesian coordinate system, component, Computer Aided Design (CAD), degree of
freedom, design brief, design statement, domain, extrusion, function, geometric constraint, marketing, mathematical modeling, mockup, model, origins, packaging, pattern, physical model, plane, prototype, range, revolution, rotation, round, scale model, scoring, solid,
solid modeling, subassembly, translation, working drawings
Assessments
● Project-based: Puzzle Design Challenge
● Teacher created Unit Assessments with guidance from PLTW Teacher Community
Instructional Strategies and Materials
*This section will be completed once teachers have been trained on the PLTW IED curriculum and can access lessons via the PLTW
learning management system.
December 2015
12
Unit 5: Geometry of Design (approximately 15 days)
Expectations for Learning
In this unit students are provided opportunities to apply two- and three dimensional geometric concepts and knowledge to problem
solving and engineering design. Fluency in these geometric concepts is essential in every phase of the design process as problems
are defined, potential solutions are generated to meet physical constraints, alternate design solutions are compared and selected,
final designs are documented, and specifications are developed. Geometric concepts are also important in the appropriate application
of geometric and dimensional relationships and constraints for effective use of three-dimensional computer modeling environments
that employ parametric design functionality. In this unit students use geometric concepts and physical properties to solve a wide
variety of problems, progressing from computations of surface area, weight, or volume in order to provide cost estimates to the
identification of materials based on physical property observations. Students will also use 3D computer models to compute physical
properties that can be used in problem solving and creation of design solutions.
Essential Questions:
Enduring Understandings
1. What are physical properties and why are they important to
● Two- and three-dimensional objects share visual
the design of a product?
relationships which allow interpretation of one perspective
2. What advantage does Computer Aided Design (CAD) and
from the other.
Drafting provide over traditional paper and pencil design?
● Geometric shapes and forms are described and
3. How does the material chosen for a product impact the
differentiated by their characteristic features.
design of the product?
● Physical properties of objects are used to describe and
model objects and can be used to define design
requirements, as a means to compare potential solutions
to a problem, and as a tool to specify final solutions.
● Computer aided design (CAD) and drafting software
packages incorporate the application of a variety of
geometric and dimensional constraints and model features
to accurately represent objects.
Learning Targets *The cognitive demand is noted next to each learning target.
● Complete a design project utilizing all steps of a design process, and find a solution that meets specific design requirements.*T
● Convert quantities between units in the SI and the US Customary measurement systems.*C
● Convert between different units within the same measurement system including the SI and US Customary measurement
systems. *C
● Measure linear distances (including length, inside diameter, and hole depth) with accuracy using a scale, ruler, or dial caliper
December 2015
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and report the measurement using an appropriate level of precision.*C
● Solve real world and mathematical problems involving area and surface area of two- and three-dimensional objects.*C
Key Concepts/Vocabulary
acute triangle, angle, area, axis, center of gravity, centroid, circle, circumscribe, cylinder, density, diameter, ellipse, fillet, Inscribe,
mass, meniscus, obtuse triangle, parallelogram, Pi (π), polygon, principal axis, prism, quadrilateral, radius, rectangle, right triangle,
round, square, surface area, tangent, title block, triangle, vertex, volume
Assessments
● Project-based: Miniature Train Design
● Teacher created Unit Assessments with guidance from PLTW Teacher Community
Instructional Strategies and Materials
*This section will be completed once teachers have been trained on the PLTW IED curriculum and can access lessons via the PLTW
learning management system.
December 2015
14
Unit 6: Reverse Engineering (approximately 15 days)
Expectations for Learning
This unit exposes students to the application of engineering principles and practices to reverse engineer a consumer product.
Reverse engineering involves disassembling and analyzing a product or system in order to understand and document the visual,
functional, and/or structural aspects of its design. In this unit students will have the opportunity to assess all three aspects of a
product’s design. Students will learn the visual design elements and principles and their application in design. They will perform a
functional analysis to hypothesize the overall function and sequential operations of the product’s component parts and assess the
inputs and outputs of the process(es) involved in the operation of the product. Students will physically disassemble the product to
document the constituent parts, their properties, and their interaction and operation. After carefully documenting these aspects of the
visual, functional, and structural aspects of the product, students will assess the strengths and weaknesses of the product and the
manufacturing process by which it was produced.
Essential Questions
1. What considerations should be made when reverse
engineering a product?
2. What makes a product aesthetically pleasing or eyecatching?
3. How are principles and elements of design used with
engineering practice to develop a successful product?
4. Why might a consumer product design not be
commercially successful?
5. When is it acceptable for a company to reverse engineer
and reproduce a successful consumer product designed
by another person/company?
Enduring Understandings
● Reverse engineering involves disassembling and
analyzing a product or system in order to understand and
document the visual, functional, and/or structural aspects
of its design.
● Visual elements and principles of design are part of an
aesthetic vocabulary that is used to describe the visual
characteristics of an object, the application of which can
affect the visual appeal of the object and its commercial
success in the marketplace.
● Technical professionals use the results of reverse
engineering for many different purposes such as
discovery, testing, forensics, improvement or redesign, and
producing technical documentation of a product.
● Technical professionals clearly and accurately document
and report their work using technical writing practice in
multiple forms.
● Sketches, drawings, and images are used to record and
convey specific types of information depending upon the
audience and the purpose of the communication.
December 2015
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Learning Targets *The cognitive demand is noted next to each learning target.
● Evaluate and compare multiple materials and fastener choices for a product design. *T
● Measure linear distances. *R
● Measure mass. *R
● Determine the minimum number and types of views necessary to fully detail a part. *C
● Hand sketch isometric views and orthographic projections. *T
● Create three-dimensional solid models of parts within CAD from sketches. *T
● Generate CAD multi-view technical drawings. *T
● Utilize an engineering notebook to clearly and accurately document the design process. *C
● Describe the process of reverse engineering. *D
● Justify the use of reverse engineering *D
● Demonstrate positive team behaviors and contribute to a positive team dynamic. *R
Key Concepts/Vocabulary
aesthetic, asymmetry, balance, color, contrast, element, emphasis, form, Gestalt, graphic design, harmony, message analysis,
pattern, pictograph, principle, proportion, radial symmetry, reverse engineering, rhythm, shape, space, symbol, symbolism, symmetry,
texture, typography, unity, value, variety
Assessments
● Project-based: Reverse Engineering with Automoboxes
● Teacher created Unit Assessments with guidance from PLTW Teacher Community
Instructional Strategies and Resources
*This section will be completed once teachers have been trained on the PLTW IED curriculum and can access lessons via the PLTW
learning management system.
December 2015
16
Unit 7: Documentation (approximately 25 days)
Expectations for Learning
In this unit students will enhance their basic knowledge of technical drawing representations learned earlier in the course to include
the creation of alternate (section and auxiliary) views and appropriate dimensioning and annotation of technical drawings. Students
will also be introduced to the reality of variation in dimensional properties of manufactured products. They will learn the appropriate
use of dimensional tolerances and alternate dimensioning methods to specify acceptable ranges of the physical properties in order to
meet design criteria. Students will apply this knowledge to create engineering working drawings that document measurements
collected during a reverse engineering process. These skills will also allow students to effectively document a proposed new design.
Students will use 3D computer modeling software to model the assembly of the consumer product, as such a model can be used to
replicate functional operation and provide virtual testing of product design.
Essential Questions
1. How do you define a problem so that it can be effectively
communicated and yield the best possible solution?
2. How does one know that a given design solution is the
best possible solution?
3. How might a given solution be more or less acceptable to
various types of stakeholders?
4. How do you select the best possible solution from multiple
alternatives?
5. How do engineers communicate an object’s dimensional
information including the margin of acceptable error?
Enduring Understandings
● Specific notes and general notes in combination with
dimensions are included on technical drawings according
to accepted practice and an established set of standards
so as to convey size and location information about
detailed parts, their features, and their configuration in
assemblies.
● Computer aided drafting and design (CAD) software
packages facilitate virtual modeling of assemblies and the
creation of technical drawings. They are used to efficiently
and accurately detail assemblies according to standard
engineering practice.
● A degree of variation always exists between specified
dimensions and the measurement of a manufactured
object which is controlled by the use of tolerances on
technical drawings.
● A problem and the requirements for a successful solution
to the problem should be clearly communicated and
justified.
● A solution path is selected and justified by evaluating and
comparing competing design solutions based on jointly
developed and agreed-upon design criteria and
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constraints.
Learning Targets *The cognitive demand is noted next to each learning target.
● Complete a design project utilizing all steps of a design process, and find a solution that meets specific design requirements.
*T
● Utilize research tools, resources (such as the Internet), and engineering notebooks. *C
● Write a design brief to communicate the problem, problem constraints, and solution criteria. *C
● Generate and document multiple ideas or solution paths to a problem through brainstorming. *C
● Hand sketch orthographic projections. *C
● Create three-dimensional solid models of parts within CAD from sketches or dimensioned drawings using appropriate
geometric and dimensional constraints. *D
● Generate CAD multiview technical drawings. *D
● Create assemblies of parts in CAD. Manipulate the assembly model to demonstrate the movement. *T
● Create a CAD assembly drawing, detailed drawing and final drawing set. *T
Key Concepts/Vocabulary
aligned dimension, allowance, American Society Standards Institute (ASSI), audience analysis, auxiliary view, baseline dimensioning,
balloon, bilateral tolerance, blind hole, broken-out section, chain dimensioning, clearance fit, countersink, counterbore, cutting plane
line, datum, datum dimensioning, decision matrix, detail drawing, detail view, dual dimensions, fillet, foreshortened, full section, half
section, general notes, interference,interference fit, least material condition, limit dimension, market research, maximum material
condition, normal size, part drawing, parts list, pitch, reference dimension, round, section view, size dimension, spotface, survey, tap,
taper, technical writing, tolerance, transition fit, unidirectional dimension, unilateral tolerance, working drawings
Assessments
● Project-based: Apollo 13 Carbon Dioxide Emergency Challenge
● Teacher created Unit Assessments with guidance from PLTW Teacher Community
Instructional Strategies and Materials
*This section will be completed once teachers have been trained on the PLTW IED curriculum and can access lessons via the PLTW
learning management system.
December 2015
18
Unit 8: Advanced Computer Modeling (approximately 15 days)
Expectations for Learning
In this unit students will learn advanced 3D computer modeling skills. These advanced skills include creating exploded and animated
assembly views of multi-part products. Students will learn to use mathematical functions to represent relationships in dimensional
properties of a modeled object within the 3D environment. Students will also develop and apply mathematical relationships to enforce
appropriate dimensional and motion constraints. Students will reverse engineer and model a consumer product, providing appropriate
parametric constraints to create a 3D model and realistic operation of the product.
Essential Questions
1. How do you decide what to include in a set of working
drawings? What views are needed? What other
information is important?
2. How can assembly models, exploded assemblies, and
animated assemblies of an object or a proposed design be
used in and beyond the design process?
Enduring Understandings
● Engineers perform reverse engineering on products to
study their visual, functional, and structural qualities.
● Engineers use reference sources and computer-aided
design (CAD) systems to calculate the mass properties of
designed objects.
● Teamwork is essential to solving complex problems.
● Being a responsible engineer means considering the
ethical, environmental, social, and economic impacts of a
design.
● The design process is a logical and systematic tool that
engineers use to solve problems.
Learning Targets *The cognitive demand is noted next to each learning target.
● Complete a design project utilizing all steps of a design process, and find a solution that meets specific design requirements.
*T
● Identify three dimensional objects generated by rotations of two-dimensional shapes and vice versa. *R
● Identify and differentiate geometric constructions and constraints such as horizontal lines, vertical lines, parallel lines,
perpendicular lines, colinear points, tangent lines, tangent circles, and concentric circles. *R
● Identify the proper use of each technical drawing representation including isometric, orthographic projection, oblique,
perspective, auxiliary, and section views. *R
● Determine the minimum number and types of views necessary to fully detail a part. *R
● Choose and justify the choice for the best orthographic projection of an object to use as a front view on technical drawings. *D
● Create a set of working drawings to detail a design project. *T
● Hand sketch orthographic projections. *T
December 2015
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● Create three-dimensional solid models of parts within CAD from sketches or dimensioned drawings. *T
● Utilize an engineering notebook.*C
Key Concepts/Vocabulary
exploded assembly, formula, numeric constraint, parameter, parametric modeling, phantom line, ratio, rib
Assessments
● Project-based: Train or Button Maker, (Extra: Wooden Puzzle)
● Teacher created Unit Assessments with guidance from PLTW Teacher Community
Instructional Strategies and Materials
*This section will be completed once teachers have been trained on the PLTW IED curriculum and can access lessons via the PLTW
learning management system.
December 2015
20
Unit 9: Design Team (approximately 30 days)
Expectations for Learning
In this unit students will work as a collaborative team with geographically separate team members, thereby requiring virtual
communications. Through the design process, the team will experience shared decisionmaking as they work to solve a new design
challenge. They will reflect on the ethical responsibilities of engineers as they investigate different materials, manufacturing
processes, and the short and long term impacts that their decision-making may potentially have on society and on the world.
Essential Questions
● What are the advantages and disadvantages of a design
team approach versus an individual approach in the
problem solving process?
● How do engineers and technical professionals impact
society and the environment?
● What are the ethical responsibilities of an engineer?
● What strategies, skills, and tools are effective in facilitating
communication and problem solving among team
members that cannot meet face-to-face?
● How can the use of a project schedule positively influence
the design process?
Enduring Understandings
● The design process has greatly improved the quality of
new products and processes.
● Communicating ideas accurately through the use of word,
speech, and technical sketching/drawing improves
products and processes.
● Teamwork is essential to solving complex problems.
● Cross-cultural teamwork is an effective means to solving
common problems.
● Being a responsible engineer means considering the
ethical, environmental, social, and economic impacts of a
design.
Learning Targets *The cognitive demand is noted next to each learning target.
● Complete a design project utilizing all steps of a design process, and find a solution that meets specific design requirements.*T
● Use presentation software effectively to support oral presentations. *C
● Assess the development of an engineered product and discuss its impact on society and the environment. *T
● Describe the contributions of engineers from different engineering fields in the design and development of a product, system,
or technology. *R
● Identify and explain how the basic theories of ethics relate to engineering. *R
● Incorporate the use of the visual elements and principles of design in the design of an engineered product. *T
● Identify team member skill sets needed to produce an effective team. *R
● Identify and assign team member roles. *C
● Identify strategies to resolve team conflict. *R
● Demonstrate positive team behaviors and contribute to a positive team dynamic. *T
● Establish common goals, equitable workloads, accountability, and create a set of team norms. *T
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● Practice appropriate conflict resolution strategies within a team environment. *T
● Participate on a virtual team using remote collaboration tools to support team collaboration and problem solving. *T
Key Concepts/Vocabulary
arbitration, attorney general, by-product, carcinogen, consensus, critique, ecosystem, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA),
ergonomics, ethical, ethics, evaluate, gantt chart, hazard, impact, landfill, mediation, negotiation, norms, Occupational Safety and
Health Administration (OSHA), product lifecycle, protocol, raw material, recycle, refurbish, refuse, residue, synergy, trade-off, virtual
team, waste
Assessments
● Project-based: Design and build a wheelchair for a person in a third world country that can be maintained with local
resources.
● Teacher created Unit Assessments with guidance from PLTW Teacher Community
Instructional Strategies and Materials
*This section will be completed once teachers have been trained on the PLTW IED curriculum and can access lessons via the PLTW
learning management system.
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Unit 10: Design Challenges (approximately 15 days)
Expectations for Learning
In this unit students will work in small collaborative teams to implement the design process and use skill and knowledge gained during
the course to solve a culminating design challenge and document and communicate their proposed solution.
Essential Questions
1. How might we create the best possible solution to a
problem?
2. What does one need to know in order to design the
solution to a problems?
3. How can we effectively communicate a design for a
solution to a real world problem?
Enduring Understandings
● Sketches, statistics, modeling, and computer software can
be used in combination to inform the design process,
resulting in functional design solutions to real problems.
● Strategies for working as part of a team can be utilized to
maximize team productivity and collaboration when
working on a collaborative design project.
Learning Targets *The cognitive demand is noted next to each learning target.
● Complete a design project. *T
● Define and justify a design problem. *C
● Present and justify design specifications, and clearly explain the criteria and constraints associated with a successful design
solution. *C
● Explain design requirements and function claims using STEM principles and practices. *C
● Write a design brief. *C
● Generate and document multiple ideas. *D
● Jointly develop and apply a decision matrix. *C
● Utilize an engineering notebook to clearly and accurately document the design process. *D
● Identify and assign team member roles. *C
● Define the term group norms and discuss the importance of norms in creating an effective team environment. *C
● Identify strategies to resolve team conflict. *C
● Demonstrate positive team behaviors and contribute to a positive team dynamic. *C
● Establish common goals, equitable workloads, accountability, and create a set of team norms. *C
● Contribute equitably to the attainment of group goals based on assigned roles. *C
● Practice appropriate conflict resolution strategies within a team environment. *C
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Key Concepts/Vocabulary
team member roles, group norms
Assessments:
Project-based: Spinning Amusement Park Ride Challenge
Teacher created Unit Assessments with guidance from PLTW Teacher Community
Instructional Strategies and Resources
*This section will be completed once teachers have been trained on the PLTW IED curriculum and can access lessons via the PLTW
learning management system.
Considerations for Intervention and Acceleration
The rigorous and highly relevant PLTW Introduction to Engineering Design curriculum is built upon high quality, research-based
instructional strategies. Teachers may to need to provide targeted Tier II support (e.g., remediation of particular skills and concepts, as
well as scaffolded or supplemental instruction) beyond the Tier I level of universal instruction to underachieving students. Intensive and
individualized Tier III instruction (e.g., skill-specific intervention, one-on-one teaching, enrichment activities) may be necessary for
students with significant underachievement or learners who are excelling through the standard curriculum and need additional
educational challenges.
Considerations for Cultural Diversity, Inclusivity and Relevancy
Where possible teachers will create opportunities to incorporate the histories, values, beliefs and perspectives of people from different
cultural backgrounds to meet the needs of all our learners.
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Common Core State Standards - English/Language Arts
Teachers should incorporate the English/Language Arts Common Core State Standards throughout the course.
Reading
Key Ideas
1. Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of science and technical texts.
2. Determine the central ideas or conclusions of a text; provide an accurate summary of the text distinct from prior knowledge or
opinions.
3. Follow precisely a multistep procedure when carrying out experiments, taking measurements, or performing technical tasks.
Craft and Structure
1. Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific
or technical context relevant to grades 9-10 texts and topics.
2. Analyze the structure of the relationships among concepts in a text, including relationships among key terms (e.g. force, friction,
reaction force, energy).
3. Analyze the author’s purpose in providing an explanation, describing a procedure, or discussing an experiment in a text.
Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
1. Integrate quantitative or technical information expressed in words in a text with a version of that information expressed visually (e.g.
in a flowchart, diagram, model, graph, or table).
2. Distinguish among facts, reasoned judgment based on research findings, and speculation in a text.
3. Compare and contrast the information gained from experiments (including their own experiments), simulation, video, or multimedia
sources with that gained from reading a text on the same topic.
Writing
Text Types and Purposes
1. Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content.
a. Introduce claim(s) about a topic or issue, acknowledge and distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and
organize the reasons and evidence logically.
b. Support claim(s) with logical reasoning and relevant, accurate data and evidence that demonstrate an understanding of the topic
or text, using credible sources.
c. Use words, phrases, and clauses to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and
evidence.
d. Establish and maintain a formal style.
e. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented.
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2. Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/experiments, or technical
processes.
a. Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information into broader categories as
appropriate to achieving purpose, including graphics (e.g. charts, tables), formatting (e.g. headings), and multimedia when useful
to aiding comprehension.
b. Develop the topic with relevant, well-chosen facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples.
c. Use appropriate and varied transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts.
d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.
e. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone.
f. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented.
3. Students’ narrative skills continue to grow throughout high school. The standards require that students be able to incorporate
narrative elements effectively into arguments and informative/explanatory texts. In science and technical subjects, students must be
able to write precise enough descriptions of the step-by-step procedures they use in their investigations or technical work that others
can replicate them and (possibly) reach the same result.
Production and Distribution of Writing
1. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and
audience.
2. With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing,
rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed.
3. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and present the relationships between information and ideas
clearly and efficiently.
Research to Build and Present Knowledge
1. Conduct short research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question), drawing on several sources and
generating additional related, focused questions that allow for multiple avenues of exploration.
2. Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, using search terms effectively; assess the credibility and
accuracy of each source; and quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism and following a
standard format for citation.
3. Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis reflection and research.
4. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for reflection and revision) and shorter time frames ( a single sitting or a day or two)
for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
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Acknowledgements
Westerville City Schools appreciates the effort and work done by the committee to develop this course.
Anne Baldwin, College and Career Readiness Coordinator, Westerville City Schools
Beth Eddy, Science Teacher, Westerville South HS
David Elliott, Math Teacher, Westerville Central HS
Laura Ferguson, Science and Math Teacher, Westerville North HS
Scott Gaddis, Assistant Principal, Westerville North HS
David Hayward, Educational Technology Integration Coach, Westerville City Schools
Mike Huler, Math Curriculum Specialist, Westerville City Schools
Lyndsey Manzo, Science Curriculum Specialist, Westerville City Schools
Steve Quelette, Math Teacher, Westerville South HS
Kenton Scharff, Science Teacher, Westerville Central HS
Alayna Stastny, Math Teacher, Westerville North HS
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