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IBM WebSphere Virtual Enterprise Implementation: Is There Anything Really Free? TAP-1161 Ben Patrick,

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IBM WebSphere Virtual Enterprise Implementation: Is There Anything Really Free? TAP-1161 Ben Patrick,
Ben Patrick,
Lead DBA/Middleware Admin
Ohio National Financial Services
IBM WebSphere Virtual Enterprise Implementation:
Is There Anything Really Free?
TAP-1161
© 2013 IBM Corporation
Please Note
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functionality described for our products remains at our sole discretion.
Performance is based on measurements and projections using standard IBM
benchmarks in a controlled environment. The actual throughput or performance
that any user will experience will vary depending upon many factors, including
considerations such as the amount of multiprogramming in the user’s job stream,
the I/O configuration, the storage configuration, and the workload processed.
Therefore, no assurance can be given that an individual user will achieve results
similar to those stated here.
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© 2013 IBM Corporation
Ohio National Profile
Founded in 1909
Headquarters: Cincinnati, Ohio
Licensed in 47 states, D.C, Puerto Rico
Subsidiary companies in New York and Santiago,
Chile
US: Approximately 50,000 affiliated
representatives
10,000 Career and Personal Producing General
Agents
40,000 Institutional Reps selling through banks
and brokerage firms
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Ohio National Profile
Excellent ratings, unchanged since 1991
A+
AA
A1
A.M. Best
S&P
Moody’s
965 corporate headquarters associates
In 2012, #1 Top Workplace in Cincinnati
among large companies (Media)
Follows national recognition as “Best Place to
Work”
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Ohio National Strengths
Producer of competitive, high value products
Life Insurance: Term, Whole Life, Universal Life, Variable
Universal Life
Disability Income Insurance
Annuities: Fixed Annuities, Variable Annuities, Retirement
Plans
Securities through ONESCO, full-service broker-dealer
23 consecutive years of life insurance sales
growth in 2012; Sales totaled a record breaking
126.2 million
Variable annuity sales totaled $2.8 billion, a 72.2
percent increase over 2011.
We execute!
5
6
Business Mix Balance
Traditional Distribution
Traditional Distribution
VUL
<1%
Universal Life
20%
Whole Life
40%
DI <1%
Var Annuity
17%
Term Life
20%
Fixed Annuity
<1%
Pension
1%
Agent Commissions (NAFYC) 2QYTD 2013
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The environment at ONFS
• Windows Centric (core competency)
• Vendor Applications, we integrate
• Some homegrown applications
• Experimented with some applications on the IFL but wasn’t
cost effective, due to limited number of applications
supporting Linux
‒ dll issues for others
‒ Not vendor supported
‒ Single Point of failure
• Constant discussion on cutting costs.
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© 2013 IBM Corporation
Then to 2010
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© 2013 IBM Corporation
We had a growing problem, time for a forward strategy
• Homogeneous
‒ Do one thing and do it well
• Prepare for future before you need it
‒ Capacity on demand
‒ Rapid response to requests for an environment
‒ Rapid response to application demands
• Follow a consistent model
‒ Test, QA, and Production should be mirror images
‒ Predictable results
‒ Predictable growth
• Answer the nagging question of cost
‒ Blah blah if you run jboss its free
‒ Or better yet, just run jboss in test to cut development costs.
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© 2013 IBM Corporation
VS
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© 2013 IBM Corporation
So we need an environment to expose our business applications.
We need something….
that is vendor supported.
that our homegrown applications will function within.
that supports our business lifecycle.
that developers can effectively utilize.
that has a development environment predicative of production.
that if it breaks we have someone to ask for help on demand.
that will protect our business.
that will grow as we grow.
that integrates with existing environment
A11 partner that can help us achieve our goals…
© 2013 IBM Corporation
We need solutions, to our application
server needs,
that won’t cost…
• An arm
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• And a leg?
© 2013 IBM Corporation
Is anything really free?
• The assessment of application server cost was/is
limited to initial product acquisition and support
costs, the easy hard dollars
‒ In reality, the total cost for developing, deploying and
maintaining critical software applications is much higher.
‒ Training costs and employee discomfort
‒ Adoption rates
• Cost is often cited as the primary motivator toward
Open Source Software. After all, if the software is
free, doesn't that mean that IT saves money?
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© 2013 IBM Corporation
Open Source Application Server is not free
although it may appear so on the surface.
Looking at Software license and subscription costs are just the tip of the
iceberg.
Gartner research note G00165072, March 2009:
“Products available for free (such as open source), or those that are a "same cost"swap out, can cost more during three- to five-year
period than a first-time commercial purchase costing thousands of dollars.
ftp://ftp.support.lotus.com/software/websphere/application-infrastructure/application-server/WebSphere_v7_vs_JBossEAP_v5_TCO.pdf
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© 2013 IBM Corporation
So what’s below the
surface?
Developer, admin and end-user
training cost
Cost of selection of vendor software
Requirements analysis and capture
cost
Integration costs
Quality, end user testing, and
acceptance cost
Deployment cost
Operation support cost
Application enhancements and bug
fix costs
Runtime price/performance costs
Product upgrade costs
Downtime and SLA costs (planned
and unplanned)
Risk
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© 2013 IBM Corporation
Read the fine print
JBoss - Forrester Consulting – 2009 Site Experience
‒ Organizations can reduce their license and maintenance/support costs by
adopting the JBoss platform. The magnitude of this benefit will depend on the
points of comparison with JBoss’ products and their costs.
‒ Organizations may be able to realize developer productivity gains with JBoss
Enterprise Application Platform, depending on the components they adopt and
the specific points of comparison with their prior development environments.
Similar to all software, mere adoption of JBoss Enterprise Application Platform
will not guarantee developer productivity gains.
‒ As is the common case with application migration, organizations may need to
involve a number of developers when replacing the legacy platform with JBoss
Enterprise Application Platform from conventional middleware. This effort may
lead to a rise in initial IT support staff during the opening phase of the
implementation. The increase in the number of developers will add to the
upfront IT support costs, which in turn will reduce the project ROI.
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© 2013 IBM Corporation
Doing more with more
• A key metric was the improvement in the number of JBoss
Enterprise Middleware environments managed per system
administrator. The number of servers running JBoss Enterprise
Middleware managed per system administrator more than
doubled, increasing from an average of 38 servers per
administrator before JBoss to 84 servers per administrator after
deploying Jboss
‒The customer name for the interview was provided by Red Hat
‒This study is not an analysis of competing products. To compare competing products,
readers should conduct their own analyses employing the framework provided in
this study.
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© 2013 IBM Corporation
Our Experience
• Difficult to get ramped up and adopted
‒ vendor relationship proved to not be straight forward
‒ Didn’t feel we were taken seriously
• Initial installations by comparison were painfully slow
• Developers had issues with creating jdbc resources
• Gung-Ho attitude in the beginning
‒ Turned into reluctance to adopt given the experience
• We got things to “work” but found we had a Yugo instead of James
Bond’s Aston Martin
• Security view
‒ IBM updates often vs others who do infrequent patching
• At the end of the day we choose a partner, support, we choose
WebSphere.
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© 2013 IBM Corporation
WebSphere Hardware Virtualization
• I fought virtualization under WebSphere 5.0, 5.1 and 6 due
to performance issues
• I turned and preached for virtualization with hundreds of
slides and talk on why we need to virtualize under WAS 6.1
and ESX 5
What I said :
“We need to invest in ESX and migrate the physical
licensed servers to virtual it will decrease the hardware
costs and software costs as they are killing us”
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© 2013 IBM Corporation
What management heard
“wonk wonk spend money acronym expletive”
• What of all the servers we currently own?
• Can’t we run Jboss? (This question will never die)
• How are you saving money by spending it?
• When will we see a return?
• Who pays for the next big something?
• How long will it last, and what if it doesn’t?
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© 2013 IBM Corporation
Is it better to have an OX
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© 2013 IBM Corporation
Is it better to have an OX or a 1000 chickens
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© 2013 IBM Corporation
Initial ESX Foundation Savings
• Displaced roughly 79 physical servers with 4
physical ESX
• Virtual Hardware 5yr savings of $347,576
• WebSphere OS server build timeline converted to
several hours and fully security certification in a
fraction of 2 – 4 week original physical build time.
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© 2013 IBM Corporation
Then to 2010
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© 2013 IBM Corporation
WebSphere infancy – From 0 – 96 JVMs in 5 yrs
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© 2013 IBM Corporation
WebSphere Adoption – 96 – 275 in 2 yrs
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© 2013 IBM Corporation
WebSphere – Midlife Crisis 275 to 490+ < 1 yr
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© 2013 IBM Corporation
Virtual Sprawl – Flood gate requests
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© 2013 IBM Corporation
Free Lunch – Additional Servers, are no cost.
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© 2013 IBM Corporation
Selling WVE
• Hundreds of slides and talk on why we need WVE in a small shop.
What I said :
“We need to invest in WVE to support
our SOA strategy of producing and
consuming ACORD-compliant
transactions, along with internal and
external facing web-based applications in
a loosely-coupled architecture, enhancing
our company agility and readiness.”
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© 2013 IBM Corporation
What management heard
“wonk wonk spend more money wonk acronym wonk acronym wonkity
wonk acronym acronym wonkity wonk wonk”
• “you said when we virtualized, you could make it last for 5 years”
• “WebSphere is too expensive we should run Tomcat or JBoss like
everyone else.”
• “Why do you want to keep buying stuff”
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© 2013 IBM Corporation
Selling WVE (what we needed)
• Prevent mid-day outages due to coding fixes
• Have a real-time view of what’s going on in a single and
central location
• Ensure rapid deployment of applications and environments
to accommodate projects
• Ensure response times, and pressures to application load
• Pre-validate applications deployed in production so there
are no big bang surprises
• Perform and stage deployments during normal business
hours
• Validating, updating and upgrading applications
• Let me get some sleep
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© 2013 IBM Corporation
What has WVE done for us?
Small Cost Reductions: Low Hanging Fruit
• Fewer OS installs
• Fewer TSM/vRanger Backup software
• Fewer Antivirus
• Electrical savings
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© 2013 IBM Corporation
Building on that Foundation
•WVE displaced 158 Virtuals with 12 Windows
2003 servers
•WebSphere Instance/Clusters build timeline
converted to minutes compared to 2 – 4 week
original build time of server plus 2 -3 days software
build/certification
•Software savings calculation
‒ Minimum License savings cost for predicted 158 servers min
single processor @70 PVU (10500 PVUs) displaced with
4500 PVU = $300,832
‒ Reality number is more like = $4.4M savings*
Based on 158 quad core servers and net new license cost of $100 per core 2 70 PVU
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© 2013 IBM Corporation
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© 2013 IBM Corporation
WVE Roadmaps a year ago…
• To Date
– 30 Production Apps
– 60 QA Apps
– 26 Test
• To Do
– 40 test, qa, prod migrations to go (some are being
replaced, sunset, or require older versions of ND)
– Migrations to 2008
– Migration of WVE 7.0.x
– Migration of ND 7.0.0.x
And a year later…
• Increased production application count from 30 to 47
• QA 60 to 70 Applications
• Test 26 to 140 Applications
• Migrated all servers to W2K8 < 10 Business days
• Able to roll website updates without an outage
• Daily application updates with no outage
• Workload balancing based on batch/real-time
• Advance notification of problems
• Native tool insights without 3rd party apps
• We reduced our WebSphere footprint, while still adding additional
applications, how?
‒ No deployment managers per application
Just 3 now
‒ Reduced the Node Agents
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© 2013 IBM Corporation
And a year later…
• Added a second ESX Cluster to be moved offsite
• Total 80 cores in the Clusters
• Not running a Star Configuration -> Yet
• Production/QA Servers are Supervised/Several are Automatic
• Test Servers are Automatic except those that are RMI based/batch work
not through the ODR
• Leveraging Health Policies ( modified from defaults)
• Service Policies are default except where SLA is driving the work, but
generally speaking we haven’t had an issue from shared services.
• Don’t use “validation” we use prebuilt and staged Dynamic Cluster
• Elastic growth is also done with prebuilt and staged Dynamic Clusters to
control static files, variables, and license model.
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© 2013 IBM Corporation
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© 2013 IBM Corporation
Final thoughts
• Culture eats strategy for lunch…
• we still have lots to do as we integrate to/with Extreme Scales Caching
• Features are driving spikes on the rail of success
• Is there anything really free?
‒ Full cap license model on ESX licensed with Windows DataCenter
‒ No per instance cost of windows
‒ No per instance cost of WebSphere
WVE baked in with WebSphere 8.5
Extreme Scale baked in with WebSphere 8.5.x
‒ Achievable wants and needs in place and measureable
‒ Partnered with a company that brings me solutions and has a vested interest
in those solutions.
‒ Positioned to take future enhancements
Is there anything really free? Pretty close but No, but my acquisition costs are now
and enhancements are paying.
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