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PHYS 1111 Introductory Physics – Mechanics, Waves

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PHYS 1111 Introductory Physics – Mechanics, Waves
SPRING 2015 Department of Physics & Astronomy, UGA
PHYS 1111 Introductory Physics – Mechanics, Waves (as of Jan. 03/2015)
The course syllabus is a general plan for the course; deviations announced to the class by the instructor
may be necessary.
Course
Description:
Oasis Title:
Prerequisite:
Grading System:
Instructor:
Office:
Email:
Sections:
Office hours:
Text:
Clickers:
Academic Honesty:
In-class rules:
Attendance policy:
Labs:
Lab syllabus:
Homework:
The first semester of a two-semester introductory course in physics. A
knowledge of algebra and trigonometry is assumed. Mechanics (forces,
Newton's laws of motion), wave phenomena, and thermodynamics.
INTRO PHYS MECH
MATH 1090 or MATH 1113
A-F (Traditional)
Dr. Andrei Galiautdinov
220
[email protected]
27121 1:25p-2:15p MWF
2:15p-3:15p MW
Physics, vol. 1, 4th Edition (3rd & 2nd OK), James S. Walker (Pearson AddisonWesley)
None
As a University of Georgia student, you have agreed to abide by the
University’s academic honesty policy, “A Culture of Honesty,” and the
Student Honor Code. All academic work must meet the standards described in
“A Culture of Honesty” found at: www.uga.edu/honesty. Lack of knowledge of
the academic honesty policy is not a reasonable explanation for a violation.
Questions related to course assignments and the academic honesty policy
should be directed to the instructor.
No laptops, pagers, cellphones, iPads, iPods, or any other
electronic/communication devices are permitted in the classroom.
Optional
- Labs begin the second week of classes, Jan. 12 – 16.
- Attendance mandatory.
- Students who are not assigned a lab grade due to non-attendance will
automatically receive a failing grade (“F”) for the course.
- May be found here: http://www.physast.uga.edu/courses
Your homework assignments will be posted and automatically graded on
LON-CAPA*, http://spock.physast.uga.edu
*Users will be added after the drop/add period ends. After that, it will be your
responsibility to keep track of the HMWK deadlines.
Exams:
-
Midterm exam rules:
-
Homework rules:
-
No make-ups.
Collaboration OK.
There will be three (3) midterm exams on selected chapters, and one
(1) final optional cumulative exam.
No make-ups or re-scheduling permitted.
One (1) standard sheet containing anything you want (e.g., physical
constants, formulae, diagrams, problem solutions, etc.), all
handwritten. You may write on both sides.
A simple (non-graphing, non-symbolic, non-programmable) scientific
calculator. No other electronic device(s) permitted.
Incompletes:
Grading policy:
I rarely assign “Incompletes.” When I do*, it is in accordance with the UGA
policy, provided all of the following applies:
- You received a non-failing grade in all attempted labs (> 70%);
- You received a non-failing grade (> 70%) on at least two midterm
exams;
- No violation of the Academic Honesty Policy took place in the course
of the semester.
*You must remove the “I’’ by the end of the semester subsequent to its assignment.
5% HMWK (no make-up; must be completed online before the deadline)
35% LABS (attendance mandatory; see above for details)
20% EXAM 1 (18 problems; no partial credit; no re-scheduling)
20% EXAM 2 (18 problems; no partial credit; no re-scheduling)
20% EXAM 3 (18 problems; no partial credit; no re-scheduling)
20% EXAM 4 (optional, cumulative; 18 problems; no partial credit; no rescheduling)
Cut-offs:
The worst of the four exam grades is dropped.
__________________________________________________________
100% TOTAL = 5% HMWK + 35% LABS + 60% EXAMS
F: [0, 60)
D: [60, 68)
C-: [68, 70) C: [70, 75) C+: [75, 78 )
B-: [78, 80) B: [80, 85) B+: [85, 88)
A-: [88, 90) A: [90, 100]
NOTE: No rounding; 89.99 = A-, etc.
Your grades will be posted on eLC-New, http://elcnew.uga.edu
1. Read each chapter before it is discussed in class.
2. Attend every lecture.
3. Participate actively in discussions.
4. Re-read chapter carefully after class.
5. Do assigned homework.
6. Solve as many end-of-chapter problems as possible.
7. Concepts first. Do NOT plug-and-chug.
8. Use a buddy system: find a friend with whom to discuss physics.
9. Think about physics on a regular basis.
10. If everything fails, consider dropping the class before the deadline and
re-taking it at a later time.
Tutors are available either for free through the UGA Tutoring Program at
Tutors:
Milledge Hall, http://tutor.uga.edu, or for pay through the Physics Department,
http://www.physast.uga.edu/tutors.
NOTE: In physics, learning can be frustrating and nonlinear. Often you have to work for a long time
(many days and even weeks) without feeling that you are making much progress. Then, suddenly,
everything falls into place and it all makes sense. But until the “click,” you can’t be sure how much
time you need to “get it” and it’s difficult to plan…
Grades:
How to do well in this
class:
As you solve a physics problem, stop and ask yourself:
What (exactly) are you doing? Why are you doing it? How does it help you?
Spring 2015 Schedule
Week
1
2
3
Day
M
Date
Jan. 05
T
W
Jan. 06
Jan. 07
R
F
M
T
W
R
F
M
T
W
Jan. 08
Jan. 09
Jan. 12
Jan. 13
Jan. 14
Jan. 15
Jan. 16
Jan. 19
Jan. 20
Jan. 21
Reading
Ch. 1
Topic
INTRO TO THIS COURSE
3 types of basic physical quantities
Unit conversion; dimensional analysis
Significant figures; scientific notation
Intro to Physics
2.1
2.2
1D KINEMATICS
Structure of mechanics; reference frames
Position, distance, & displacement
Average speed & velocity
2.3, 2.4
2.5, 2.6
Instantaneous velocity; Acceleration
Motion with constant acceleration; Applications
2.7
Freely falling objects
2.7
3.1
3.2
3.3
R
F
Jan. 22
Jan. 23
M
Jan. 26
4.1
4.2
4
5
3.4
3.5
T
W
R
F
M
Jan. 27
Jan. 28
Jan. 29
Jan. 30
Feb. 02
T
W
R
F
M
Feb. 03
Feb. 04
Feb. 05
Feb. 06
Feb. 09
T
W
R
F
M
T
W
Feb. 10
Feb. 11
Feb. 12
Feb. 13
Feb. 16
Feb. 17
Feb. 18
4.3-5
5.1-5
5.6
5.7
6.1, 6.2
6
7
6.3
6.5
9.1-3
Freely falling objects (cont.)
MLK Day
VECTORS
Scalars vs. Vectors
Coordinate systems & vector components
Adding & subtracting vectors
Unit vectors
Position, displacement, velocity, & acceleration
vectors
2D KINEMATICS
Motion in two dimensions
Projectile motion
Projectile motion (cont.)
PROBLEM SOLVING
NEWTON’S LAWS OF MOTION
Force; Catalogue of forces; Newton’s Laws; Free-body diagrams
Weight; Normal forces
Inclines; Examples
APPLICATIONS OF NEWTON’S LAWS
Frictional forces; Strings & Springs
Translational Equilibrium
Circular motion, centripetal acceleration
EXAM 1 (Chapters 1-6)
IMPULSE & LINEAR MOMENTUM
Momentum & Impulse
8
R
F
M
T
W
Feb. 19
Feb. 20
Feb. 23
Feb. 24
Feb. 25
9.4, 9.5
9.6
7.1-3
R
F
M
Feb. 26
Feb. 27
Mar. 02
T
W
R
F
M
T
W
R
F
M
T
W
Mar. 03
Mar. 04
Mar. 05
Mar. 06
Mar. 09
Mar. 10
Mar. 11
Mar. 12
Mar. 13
Mar 16
Mar. 17
Mar. 18
7.1-3
8.1
9
10
11
M
Mar. 23
T
W
Mar. 24
Mar. 25
12
R
F
Mar. 26
Mar. 27
M
Mar. 30
13
8.3, 8.4
LCE; Work done by non-conservative forces
Spring Break
EXAM 2 (Chapters 7-9)
12.4
12.5
NEWTON’S THEORY OF GRAVITY
Newton’s Law of Gravity
Little g and big G
Gravitational attraction of spherical bodies
Withdrawal deadline
Kepler’s Laws of orbital motion
Motion of satellites
Gravitational potential energy
Energy conservation
10.1
ROTATIONAL KINEMATICS
Angular position, Velocity, and Acceleration
14
R
F
M
15
12.3
10.2
10.3
13.1
13.2
13.3
T
W
R
F
M
T
W
Mar. 31
Apr. 01
Apr. 02
Apr. 03
Apr. 06
Apr. 07
Apr. 08
Rotational kinematics
Connection b/w linear & rotational quantities
OSCILLATIONS
Periodic motion
Simple harmonic motion (SHM)
Connection b/w uniform circular motion & SHM
13.4
Mass on a spring
13.5
13.6
Energy conservation in SHM
The pendulum (simple & physical)
10.5
ROTATIONAL ENERGY & MOMENT OF INERTIA
Rotational kinetic energy and moment of inertia
11.1
11.2
11.3
11.4
ROTATIONAL DYNAMICS & STATIC EQUILIBRIUM
Torque
Torque & Angular acceleration
Zero torque & static equilibrium
Center of mass & balance
Apr. 09
Apr. 10
Apr. 13
Work, work done by a variable force, WkET (cont.)
POTENTIAL ENERGY & LCE
Conservative & Non-conservative forces
Work & potential energy
12.2
Mar. 19
Mar. 20
WORK & KINETIC ENERGY
Work, work done by a variable force, WkET
8.2
12.1
R
F
LCM, Inelastic collisions, Recoil
Elastic collisions
T
W
Apr. 14
Apr. 15
R
F
Apr. 16
Apr. 17
M
Apr. 20
T
W
R
F
M
T
W
R
F
Apr. 21
Apr. 22
Apr. 23
Apr. 24
Apr. 27
Apr. 28
Apr. 29
Apr. 30
May 01
M
May 04
T
W
R
F
M
T
May 05
May 06
May 07
May 08
May 11
May 12
16
17
18
19
11.5
11.6
11.7
14.1,2,4,8
14.5,6
Dynamic applications of torque
(2nd NL for rotations)
Angular momentum
LCAM
WAVES AND SOUND
Types of waves, waves on a string, sound waves, standing waves
Sound intensity; The Doppler effect
EXAM 3 (Chapters 10-14)
Advising
EXAM 4 (12:00-3:00; optional, cumulative, no re-scheduling)
Grades due (5 PM)
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