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LOCAL PLAN Development Management Local Plan
LOCAL PLAN
Development Management
Local Plan
Adopted July 2015
PJ60416
Strategic Policy, Freepost RSLH-ARTC-GXRA, The Planning Service, Legal, HR &
Regulatory Services, London Borough of Hackney, 3rd Floor, 2 Hillman Street, London,
E8 1FB
Planning and Compulsory Purchase Act 2004, Section 23
Town and Country Planning (Local Planning) (England) Regulations 2012
The Hackney Development Management Local Plan (DMLP)
Adopted 22nd July 2015 by Hackney Council
CHAPTER HEADINGS
CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION .............................................................................................................. 1
CHAPTER 2: SUMMARY OF HACKNEY’S DMLP ............................................................................... 7
CHAPTER 3: DELIVERING SUSTAINABLE GROWTH ..................................................................... 11
CHAPTER 4: A DYNAMIC AND CREATIVE ECONOMY ................................................................... 29
CHAPTER 5: PROVIDING BETTER HOMES...................................................................................... 59
CHAPTER 6: CLEANER SAFER GREENER ...................................................................................... 79
CHAPTER 7: CLIMATE CHANGE AND ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY ............................ 101
CHAPTER 8: TRANSPORT ............................................................................................................... 119
CHAPTER 9: MONITORING AND IMPLEMENTATION .................................................................... 133
GLOSSARY ........................................................................................................................................ 135
APPENDICES
APPENDIX 1: SCHEDULE OF CHANGES TO CORE STRATEGY PROPOSALS MAP...................... I
APPENDIX 2: CRITICAL DRAINAGE AREAS AND LOCAL FLOOD RISK ZONES...................... XXV
APPENDIX 3: SCHEDULES AND MAPS OF PRIMARY AND SECONDARY
SHOPPING FRONTAGES.............................................................................................................. XXXIII
APPENDIX 4: MARKETING EVIDENCE AND MARKETING STRATEGY ........................................ LV
APPENDIX 5: LIST OF SAVED UDP POLICIES TO BE REPLACED .............................................. LXI
APPENDIX 6: MATRICES OF CONFORMITY OF DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT
LOCAL PLAN POLICIES WITH CORE STRATEGY AND LONDON PLAN POLICIES ............... LXVII
APPENDIX 7: NATIONAL PLANNING POLICY FRAMEWORK CHECKLIST ........................ LXXXVII
SCHEDULE OF DMLP POLICIES
DELIVERING SUSTAINABLE GROWTH
POLICY DM1 – HIGH QUALITY DESIGN
POLICY DM2 – DEVELOPMENT AND AMENITY
POLICY DM3 – PROMOTING HEALTH AND WELL-BEING
POLICY DM4 – COMMUNITIES INFRASTRUCTURE LEVY AND PLANNING CONTRIBUTIONS
POLICY DM5 – PROTECTION AND DELIVERY OF SOCIAL AND COMMUNITY FACILITIES AND
PLACES OF WORSHIP
POLICY DM6 – ARTS, CULTURE AND ENTERTAINMENT FACILITIES
13
16
18
21
24
26
A DYNAMIC, CREATIVE ECONOMY
POLICY DM7 – NEW RETAIL DEVELOPMENT
POLICY DM8 – SMALL AND INDEPENDENT SHOPS
POLICY DM9 – CHANGING THE USE OF SHOPS IN TOWN CENTRES
POLICY DM10 – CHANGE OF USE OF SHOPS OUTSIDE TOWN CENTRES AND
LOCAL SHOPPING CENTRES
POLICY DM11 – EVENING AND NIGHT-TIME ECONOMY USES
POLICY DM12 – HOT-FOOD TAKE-AWAYS AND SCHOOLS
POLICY DM13 – STREET MARKETS
POLICY DM14 – RETENTION OF EMPLOYMENT LAND AND FLOORSPACE
POLICY DM15 – NEW BUSINESS FLOORSPACE
POLICY DM16 – AFFORDABLE WORKSPACE
POLICY DM17 – DEVELOPMENT PROPOSALS IN PRIORITY EMPLOYMENT AREAS (PEAS)
POLICY DM18 – RAILWAY ARCHES
32
34
38
39
42
43
44
47
50
52
55
57
PROVIDING BETTER HOMES
POLICY DM19 – GENERAL APPROACH TO NEW HOUSING DEVELOPMENT
POLICY DM20 – LOSS OF HOUSING
POLICY DM21 – AFFORDABLE HOUSING DELIVERY
POLICY DM22 – HOMES OF DIFFERENT SIZES
POLICY DM23 – RESIDENTIAL CONVERSIONS
POLICY DM24 – STUDENT HOUSING
POLICY DM25 – HOUSES OF MULTIPLE OCCUPATION (HMO)
POLICY DM26 – SHARED AND SUPPORTED HOUSING
POLICY DM27 – HOTELS
60
61
64
66
68
70
73
75
77
CLEANER, GREENER, SAFER
POLICY DM28 – MANAGING THE HISTORIC ENVIRONMENT
POLICY DM29 – ADVERTISEMENTS
POLICY DM30 – TELECOMMUNICATIONS
POLICY DM31 – OPEN SPACE AND LIVING ROOFS
POLICY DM32 – PROTECTION AND ENHANCEMENT OF EXISTING OPEN SPACE AND THE
LEE VALLEY REGIONAL PARK
POLICY DM33 – ALLOTMENTS AND FOOD GROWING
POLICY DM34 – SITES OF NATURE CONSERVATION AND / OR GEODIVERSITY VALUE,
WALTHAMSTOW RESERVOIRS SPECIAL PROTECTION AREA AND WALTHAMSTOW
MARSHES SITES OF SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC INTEREST
POLICY DM35 – LANDSCAPING AND TREE MANAGEMENT
POLICY DM36 – RESIDENTIAL MOORINGS
82
85
86
89
92
93
95
97
99
CLIMATE CHANGE AND ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY
POLICY DM37 – SUSTAINABILITY STANDARDS FOR RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT
104
POLICY DM38 – SUSTAINABILITY STANDARDS FOR NON-RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT
POLICY DM39 – OFFSETTING
POLICY DM40 – HEATING AND COOLING
POLICY DM41 – CONTAMINATED LAND
POLICY DM42 – POLLUTION AND WATER AND AIR QUALITY
POLICY DM43 – FLOODING AND FLOOD RISK
105
105
106
108
112
116
TRANSPORT
POLICY DM44 – MOVEMENT HIERARCHY
POLICY DM45 – DEVELOPMENT AND TRANSPORT
POLICY DM46 – WALKING AND CYCLING
POLICY DM47 – PARKING, CAR FREE AND CAR CAPPED DEVELOPMENT
121
124
126
130
ABBREVIATIONS USED IN THIS DOCUMENT
AAP – Area Action Plan
ALGG – All London Green Grid
AMR – Authority Monitoring Report
APA – Archaeological Priority Area
AQA – Air Quality Assessment
AQAP – Air Quality Action Plan
BAME – Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic
BREEAM – Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method
CAZ – Central Activities Zone
CCG – Clinical Commissioning Groups
CCHP – Combined Cooling, Heat and Power Systems
CDA – Critical Drainage Areas
CHP – Combined Heat and Power
CIL – Community Infrastructure Levy
CIRIA – Construction Industry Research and Information Association
CLP – Construction and Logistics Plan
CPZ – Controlled Parking Zone
DCLG – Department for Communities and Local Government
DEFRA – Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
DfT – Department for Transport
DMLP – Development Management Local Plan
DPD – Development Plan Document
DpH – Dwellings per Hectare
DSP – Delivery and Servicing Plan
EA – Environment Agency
EIA – Environmental Impact Assessment
EIP – Examination in Public
EQIA – Equalities Impact Assessment
FALP – Further Alterations to the London Plan
FORS – Freight Operator Recognition Scheme
FRA – Flood Risk Assessment
GLA – Greater London Authority
HGV – Heavy Goods Vehicle
HIA – Health Impact Assessment
HMO – Houses in Multiple Occupation
HRA – Habitat Regulations Assessment
LDF – Local Development Framework
LFRZ – Local Flood Risk Zone
LLDC – London Legacy Development Corporation
LLFA – Lead Local Flood Authority
LP – Local Plan
LSIS – Locally Significant Industrial Sites
LVRP – Lee Valley Regional Park
MfS – Manual for Streets
MOPAC – Mayor’s Office for Policing and Crime
NPPF – National Planning Policy Framework
NPPF – National Planning Policy Framework
NWLP – North London Waste Plan
OAPF – Opportunity Area Planning Framework
OIA – Other Industrial Areas
PCT – Primary Care Trust
PEA – Priority Employment Area
PPG – Planning Practice Guidance
PTAL – Public Transport Accessibility Level
RIGS – Regionally Important Geological Site
RP – Registered Provider
RSL – Registered Social Landlord
SA – Sustainability Appraisal
SALP – Site Allocation Local Plan
SCS – Sustainable Communities Strategy
SFRA – Strategic Flood Risk Assessment
SIL – Strategic Industrial Land
SINC – Sites of Importance for Nature Conservation
SME – Small and Medium Enterprise
SPA – Special Policy Area
SPD – Supplementary Planning Document
SPG – Supplementary Planning Guidance
Sq.m – Square metre
SRN – Strategic Road Network
SSSPD – South Shoreditch Supplementary Planning Document
SuDS – Sustainable Drainage Systems
TfL – Transport for London
TLRN – Transport for London Road Network
TPO – Tree Preservation Order
UDP – Unitary Development Plan
FOREWORD
I am pleased to introduce Hackney's Development Management Local Plan (DMLP),
an integral element of the Council’s ‘Local Plan’. I would like to take this opportunity to
thank everyone for their comments over the course of the preparation of the Plan,
which has helped shape it into a distinctive strategy for making Hackney an even better
place in which to live or work.
The DMLP contains a range of criteria-based, detailed development management
policies for Hackney. It will be used as the main policy tool to assess and determine
planning applications across the borough, support the on-going regeneration of the
borough, and provides greater certainty to potential applicants and developers on the
likelihood of proposals being granted planning permission.
The DMLP and Policies Map, read together with the Core Strategy (2010) and the
London Plan (2015), replace the Hackney Unitary Development Plan 1995. The DMLP
provides more detailed policies than the Core Strategy, which is the Council’s
overarching strategic spatial planning document for the borough. The Policy areas
covered include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
promoting healthier lifestyles;
protecting and improving the borough’s retail centres;
protecting and improving employment land and floorspace;
protecting and delivering appropriate housing and affordable housing;
securing high quality, sustainable and inclusive design, and protection of
the borough’s heritage assets;
providing, protecting and enhancing open space, areas of nature
conservation and bio-diversity value;
delivering adequate supporting infrastructure;
promoting sustainable transport choices; and
mitigating the impacts of climate change.
Anticipating growth both in population and our local economy, we want to continue to
improve the borough as a place to live, learn, work, visit, be brought up and invest in,
a place whose environment is enjoyed and appreciated by all our communities.
Jules Pipe, Mayor of Hackney
DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
INTRODUCTION
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CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION
1.1
What is the Development Management Local Plan?
1.1.1 Hackney has replaced the 1995 Unitary Development Plan (UDP) with its Local
Plan. The Local Plan itself comprises a suite of individual planning policy
documents, known as Development Plan Documents (DPD). The Council’s
Core Strategy, the over-arching, strategic, spatial planning document for the
Borough, was adopted by the Council in November 2010, and is a DPD itself.
The Core Strategy replaced a number of UDP policies. It also sets the strategic
context for the development of further DPDs. Now that the Core Strategy has
been adopted, the Council is taking forward a number of key planning policy
documents to guide and manage development in the Borough.
1.1.2 This document is the Development Management Local Plan (DMLP), which
sets out detailed, generally criteria-based, planning policies which the Council
will be using to assess planning applications within the Borough along with
other DPDs. The DMLP has been subject to extensive consultation and a
number of responses were received during the process of forming this
document. These responses have shaped and informed this final adopted
version of the DMLP. The previous stages which led to the creation of this final
version are available to view on the Council’s website. A Duty to Co-operate
Report and Consultation Report is also available on the website, setting out
how the Council has attempted to actively and constructively engage with
consultees.
1.1.3 The DMLP has replaced saved UDP policies. Appendix 5 lists those saved UDP
policies that are superseded by the DMLP policies.
1.1.4 This document has been subject to a Sustainability Appraisal, Equalities Impact
Assessment, and Habitats Directive Assessment. These documents are
available at:
http://www.hackney.gov.uk/Development-Management-DPD.htm
1.2
Relationship with the Sustainable Community Strategy (SCS), Core
Strategy and other Local Plan documents:

Core Strategy and SCS - the DMLP contains policies that elaborate and
provide more detail on the adopted Core Strategy policy, in respect of particular
development pressures in Hackney that are not addressed by national and
regional policy. The policies are in line with the spatial vision and objectives
set out in the Core Strategy, the spatial expression of the Council’s Sustainable
Community Strategy. The policies also outline the circumstances in which
planning permission will, or will not, be granted. Appendix 6 shows the
relationship between Core Strategy policies and DMLP policies.

Area Action Plans (AAP) - Hackney has adopted Area Action Plans for Manor
House, Dalston, and Hackney Central. In those areas, the policies and
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DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
proposals in the AAPs apply to development proposals. Where the AAP policies
are silent the DMLP policies will apply.
In assessing and proposing
development schemes in the AAP areas, both the DMLP and the relevant AAP
must be read together.
1.3

Site Allocations Local Plan (SALP) - the Council is also producing the SALP.
The SALP will provide site specific policy on a number of identified key strategic
sites in the Borough on which change and development is expected, to assist
in the delivery of the needs of the Borough (such as housing and employment
uses) by safeguarding and allocating uses for these sites, and will provide some
certainty about how the sites will be developed in the future, and for what
purpose. The SALP contains key principles for sites, essentially proactively
providing high-level policies. The DMLP policies will also be used to assess in
detail, applications on those sites. The SALP allocates sites across the
Borough but outside the AAP areas; the AAPs allocate sites in their respective
areas.

North London Waste Plan - in addition, the Council is also working with six
other North London boroughs to produce the North London Waste Plan.

CIL and supplementary planning guidance – the Council adopted a
Communities Infrastructure Levy (CIL) Charging Schedule in April 2015. The
Supplementary Planning Document (SPD) on Planning Contributions was also
adopted in July 2015.

Mayoral Development Corporation - the London Legacy Development
Corporation (LLDC) (a Mayoral Development Corporation) has been put in
place with responsibility for the long-term planning, development, management
and maintenance of the Olympic Park and its facilities from the London 2012
Games. On the 1st October 2012, the LLDC acquired powers both to prepare
plans and to determine planning applications within the LLDC area, which
includes Hackney Wick. The LLDC has adopted a Local Plan for the area. This
supersedes the Hackney Wick AAP.
National and Regional Planning
1.3.1 The policies in this document need to be read in conformity with national
planning policy guidance contained in the National Planning Policy Framework
(NPPF), and regional planning policy contained in the Further Alterations to the
London Plan 2015 (FALP). The FALP is a part of the Council’s ‘Development
Plan’ along with other DPDs. The policies in this document have been
produced in conformity with National and Regional policy. Appendix 7 contains
a compliance checklist of the policies against the NPPF.
1.3.2 The policies contained within this plan are considered to comply with the
principles of the NPPF in taking a positive approach that reflects the
presumption in favour of sustainable development contained within in it. When
considering development proposals, the Council will take a positive approach
that reflects the presumption in favour of sustainable development contained in
the National Planning Policy Framework. The Council will always work
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DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
proactively with applicants jointly, to find solutions which mean that proposals
can be approved wherever possible, and to secure development that improves
the economic, social and environmental conditions of the area.
1.3.3 Planning applications that accord with the policies in the Core Strategy, this
DMLP and other relevant documents of Hackney’s Local Plan (and, where
relevant, with policies in adopted Neighbourhood Plans) will be approved
unless material considerations indicate otherwise.
1.3.4 Where there are no policies relevant to the application or relevant policies are
out of date at the time of making the decision, the Council will grant permission
unless material considerations indicate otherwise – taking into account whether
any adverse impacts of granting permission would significantly and
demonstrably outweigh the benefits, when assessed against the policies in the
National Planning Policy Framework taken as a whole; or specific policies in
that Framework indicate, that development should be restricted.
1.3.5 Given that the Localism Act has come into effect, for clarification, it is intended
that the policies contained within this document are strategic development
management policies that any neighbourhood plans in the Borough must either
comply with or take into account.
1.3.6 This document is a DPD that is consistent and conforms with the Council’s
adopted Core Strategy (over-arching Borough-wide Spatial Strategy) and will
form part of the Council’s Local Plan. It has been prepared in accordance with
the Town and Country Planning (Local Development) (England) Regulations
2004 (as amended by the 2008, 2009 and 2012 Regulations) (the Regulations).
1.3.7 The Government has introduced or proposed to introduce a number of reforms
to the planning system in recent years. Up to date information on these reforms
can be found at the following website:
http://www.planningportal.gov.uk/permission/commonprojects/changeofuse
1.3.8 At the time of writing this Plan, up to the examination hearing of the Plan, the
adopted London Plan was the July 2011 version. It is considered that the
policies in the DMLP are in general compliance with this London Plan.
Appendix 6 contains a matrix of compliance between the DMLP policies and
the London Plan (July 2011) policies. However, since post-examination
hearing, a new London Plan was adopted in March 2015.
1.3.9 The policies within this document are considered to generally comply with
national and regional policy. However, it is generally not considered appropriate
within policies and justifications for policies to repeat the content of the NPPF,
and FALP policies, except where pertinent to do so.
1.4
Production of this Development Plan Document
1.4.1 The process for preparing the DMLP follows a regulatory process under the
requirements of the Regulations. These stages of the process are set out
below:
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DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
ix.
Gathering background information and evidence;
Developing draft policies and consulting on them (Public Participation) –
this consultation occurred between July and October 2012;
Assessing consultation responses, discussing with consultees and
amending the document where appropriate – this took place between
October 2012 and May 2013;
Consultation on the revised version (Publication Version) of the DMLP
seeking further consultation feedback on revised policies – this took
place between July and October 2013;
Assessing the responses to the Publication Version and suggesting
amendments to the document as appropriate – this took place between
October and December 2013;
‘Submission’ of the document to the Planning Inspectorate and notifying
respondees to previous consultation, and collating any further responses
to send to the Inspectorate – this took place in December 2013;
An examination in public (EIP) where the document is assessed by an
Inspector from the Planning Inspectorate – this took place in September
2014;
Receipt of the Inspector’s report – July 2015;
Review of Inspector’s report and adoption of the Plan – August 2015.
1.5
Monitoring and Implementation
1.5.1
The effectiveness of the adopted policies within the DMLP will be monitored
and reviewed annually through the Council’s Authority Monitoring Report, with
the DPD amended to reflect any necessary policy changes.
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DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
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DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
SUMMARY OF
HACKNEY’S DMLP
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
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DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
CHAPTER 2: SUMMARY OF HACKNEY’S DMLP
2.1.1
The policies in this Plan have been developed and shaped through extensive
consultation with a wide range of consultees, including the GLA and TfL,
English Heritage, the Environment Agency, Thames Water, amenity/interest
groups and individuals, developers and RSLs, neighbouring local authorities
and Council Ward Members.
2.1.2
Consultation feedback on the various versions of the DMLP have generated
constructive and well considered comments to help shape and improve the
document. As noted in Chapter 1, the consultation responses and changes
to the document can be viewed on the Council’s website. In terms of the
Council’s ‘Duty to Co-operate’ requirement, officers have constructively and
positively attempted to engage with a range of key stakeholders and
consultees in the production of this document. A Duty to Co-operate report is
also contained on the Council’s website.
2.1.3
The policies in this Plan are considered to comply with national and regional
policy, and with the Council’s Core Strategy, and promote sustainable growth,
development and regeneration within the Borough, while seeking to protect
and enhance its heritage assets and open space. In particular, the Plan
supports the ‘Growth Area’ strategy of the Core Strategy for sustainable
development in the areas of Dalston, Hackney Central, Shoreditch and the
City Fringe, the ‘Kingsland Corridor’, and Manor House. The DMLP seeks to
balance sustainable development and growth through seeking to ensure that
development proposals are appropriate in terms of design and impact on
neighbouring occupiers, and are supported by adequate physical and social
infrastructure. It also seeks to ensure that the Borough has a supply of varied
land use types to support the needs of residents and businesses. As such,
the policies in this plan include the following objectives:






Support the delivery and protection of housing within the Borough, of
mixed size and tenure to provide affordable as well as market homes,
and a strong proportion of family sized homes
Ensure an adequate supply of employment land is retained (while
avoiding the long term protection of sites where there is no reasonable
prospect of a site being used for that purpose, having regard to market
signals), and allowing improvement and the introduction of new uses on
such land, to support the creation of employment and location of
businesses within the Borough
Promote high quality design in all development, protect and enhance
heritage assets, and ensure that buildings are sustainable and do not
have a negative impact on neighbouring occupiers
Ensure provision of adequate supporting infrastructure within the
Borough, both physical and social, including community, arts and culture
facilities
Promote healthy lifestyles and well-being
Protect and enhance bio-diversity and open space
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DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN



2.1.4
Protect and improve the retail and leisure offer within the Council’s
centres, and support a managed approach to the night-time economy
Ensure that development is well designed and at low risk to flooding
Promote sustainable transport choices, such as the use of public
transport, walking and cycling, reducing the use of private vehicles, and
ensuring that development does not adversely impact highway safety.
This document is generally structured to reflect the chapter structure of the
Core Strategy, although Chapter 3 (Delivering Sustainable Growth) and
Chapter 4 (Supporting Neighbourhoods and Communities) of the Core
Strategy have been combined in this document. Additionally, a chapter on
Transport has been incorporated in this document rather than located in the
Climate Change chapter as per the Core Strategy. As such, this document
contains the following chapters: –







Chapter 3 - Delivering Sustainable Growth – contains policies on design,
managing the impact of development, healthier lifestyles, planning
contributions and Community Infrastructure Levy, social and community
and infrastructure, and arts, culture and entertainment facilities.
Chapter 4 – A Dynamic and Creative Economy – contains policies on
retail and leisure development, night-time economy uses, office
development, visitor and tourist economy, and employment land,
floorspace and uses.
Chapter 5 – Providing Better Homes – contains policies supporting the
provision of housing including affordable and family housing in the
Borough, the appropriate location of hotels and student housing, Houses
in Multiple Occupation (HMOs), and shared and supported housing.
Chapter 6 – Cleaner, Safer, Greener – contains policies on preserving
and enhancing the Borough’s heritage assets, protection, provision and
improvement of open space, bio-diversity and nature conservation,
landscaping and tree management, and residential moorings.
Chapter 7 – Climate Change and Sustainability – contains policies which
include reducing energy consumption and improving the performance of
new development, decentralised energy, contaminated land, flooding
and flood risk.
Chapter 8 – Transport – contains policies promoting sustainable forms
of transport, highway safety, and car-free and car-capped development,
Chapter 9 – Implementation and Monitoring – sets out arrangements for
the monitoring and implementation of policies.
2.1.5
Each policy is preceded by supporting text, which provides context and
explanation of the policy, and may provide guidance on how the requirements
of the policy can be met. Supporting text is followed by a policy set out in a
policy box, numbered as Policy DM1 to DM47.
2.1.6
The appendices incorporate details of supporting information to the policies,
as follows: -
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DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN







DMLP Policies Map and Schedule of Changes to Core Strategy
Proposals Map (Appendix 1),
Critical Drainage Area and Local Flood Risk Zones (Appendix 2),
Schedules and maps of primary and secondary shopping frontages
(Appendix 3),
Marketing Evidence and Marketing Strategy requirements for changes
of use relating to retail, employment and community uses, the provision
of new employment premises and the loss of designated heritage assets
(Appendix 4),
List of saved UDP policies the DMLP policies have replaced (Appendix
5),
Matrices of Conformity of Development Management Local Plan policies
with the London Plan and Core Strategy policies (Appendix 6),
Compliance checklist with the NPPF (Appendix 7).
2.2
Evidence Base
2.2.1
The evidence base used to produce the policies in this document is partly
based on the evidence base used for the Core Strategy. This information is
indexed
on
the
LDF
Core
Strategy
Evidence
pages
at
http://www.hackney.gov.uk/ep-evidence-base.htm
Additional evidence was used to produce and support the policies in this
document. This information is indexed on the DMLP Evidence pages at
http://www.hackney.gov.uk/dmlp-evidence-base.htm
2.2.2
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DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
DELIVERING
SUSTAINABLE
GROWTH
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DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
CHAPTER 3: DELIVERING SUSTAINABLE GROWTH
3.1.1 This chapter sets out development management policies to help deliver well
designed and sustainable growth and development in Hackney. The policies
are strategic in that they link to other policies within the document. The chapter
contains an overarching design policy, and policies on managing the impact of
development with regard to amenity, promoting healthier lifestyles, and CIL and
planning contributions, as cross cutting policies. It also sets out policies to
protect existing, and support new, proposals for social and community facilities,
and arts, culture and entertainment facilities.
3.1.2 The Core Strategy seeks to accommodate growth by making more effective
and intensive use of land. However, there are limits to growth where
intensification produces diminishing returns in terms of quality, amenity,
incompatible uses and increased pressure on local infrastructure and
amenities. The policies in this chapter aim to manage and balance development
optimising intensity of compatible uses with local context, design principles,
amenity and local infrastructure. Getting the balance right to promote and
deliver sustainable growth reinforces the need for high quality sustainable
design policies.
3.2
High Quality Sustainable Design
3.2.1 The Council is committed to design excellence and a key strategic objective is
to promote high quality, sustainable design and exemplar development. This
relates not just to the aesthetic appearance of the environment, but also about
enabling an improved quality of life and economic growth. The acceptance of
mediocre design in the interest of attracting development is no longer tolerated.
In recent years, the quality of design in general has improved dramatically, and
the Council has a strong reputation for facilitating and ensuring this, through
such mechanisms as its Design Review Panel. It is considered necessary for
the Council to have detailed development management design policies to help
guard against some of the poor design of the past, and to sustain a high
standard for the future. In setting a high standard, the Council challenges
developers to meet and exceed recognised ‘best-practice’ standards such as
minimum space standards for residential development and quality set out in the
London Plan (April 2015) and the GLA’s Housing SPG (November 2012), and
subsequent amendments. In particular, the Council will support a culture of
continuous improvement in quality, design and performance for new
development including for alterations and extensions.
3.2.2 The design of tall building development proposals in all the identified Tall
Buildings Opportunity Areas must adopt a rigorous design and impact approach
involving detailed local area analysis of site characteristics and the fabric of the
surrounding environment and views as well as take into account the criteria for
the management of tall buildings set out respectively in the Hackney Tall
Building Strategy (2005), and the English/CABE’s ‘Guidance on Tall Buildings
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(2007), and subsequent updates1. National, regional and local level design
guidance and best practice standards, where appropriate, should be applied in
the design of all development. Applicants should also refer to the detailed
policies relating to the height of development proposals within the Area Action
Plans for Dalston, Hackney Central, Hackney Wick and Manor House, and the
policy guidance in the South Shoreditch Supplementary Planning Document
(SSSPD).
3.2.3 Mixed-use development will be a common development type within the
Borough. Developing a mix of uses on individual sites and across an area can
be beneficial in a number of ways, such as reducing the need to travel between
homes, jobs and services, providing a range of activities through the day,
allowing an efficient use of land, and providing more opportunities for the
development of housing. Design solutions for mixed-use developments should
ensure that uses are compatible in the long-term.
3.2.4 For most proposals, it should be clearly outlined in the Design and Access
Statement how the design was developed and what the scheme aims to
achieve.
3.2.5 The following detailed policy sets out the design criteria that must be
incorporated and addressed within development proposals. The policy is
detailed in order to support the delivery of high quality design in the Borough,
rather than ‘signposting’ national guidance documents. The policy will be
applied to the individual circumstances of each development proposal. Further
design policies relating to Managing the Historic Environment, Advertisements
and Telecommunications, and Climate Change and Sustainability, are
contained in chapters 6 and 7 of this Plan and the Hackney Core Strategy.
3.2.6 As indicated by Core Strategy 7 “Working with Infrastructure Partners” the
impact and demands on infrastructure and the capacity of existing services and
utilities to accommodate development individually and collectively is critical to
sustainable growth. Applicants are therefore encouraged to engage with the
appropriate bodies and other stakeholders regarding the infrastructure needs
of a proposed development. In some circumstances this may make it necessary
for developers to carry out appropriate studies to ascertain whether the
proposed development will lead to overloading of existing infrastructure. Where
appropriate physical improvement or financial contributions to meet the
demand or necessarily upgrade will be sought from the development, and any
improvements may have to be completed prior to occupation. Every application
will be assessed against the relevant policies and proposals and their particular
circumstances including viability (Also see paragraphs 7.3.6, 7.8.14, 7.8.15,
7.8.16 and Policy DM43).
3.2.7 The policy sets out requirements in relation to both the setting and context of a
development site, and the more general considerations such as the use of high
quality, durable and sustainable materials, and the relationship between
Historic England & Design Council’s consultation guidance “Tall Buildings – Advice on plan-making,
submitting, assessing and deciding planning proposals” (October 2014).
1
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development and the surrounding public realm. A number of issues need to be
considered in the round, such as ensuring access for people with mobility
difficulties and ‘designing-out crime’ which ensure high quality design. The
policy also contains requirements regarding the viewing corridor of St. Paul’s
Cathedral, contained within the Mayor of London’s London View Management
Framework SPG March 2012 and the City of London’s ‘St. Paul’s Heights’
Policy. Specifically, parts of Hackney fall within the background consultation
area of strategic Linear View 8 Westminster Pier to St Paul’s Cathedral and 9
King Henry VIII’s Mound, Richmond to St Paul’s Cathedral of the Mayor of
London’s London View Management Framework (London Plan policies 7.11
and 7.12, and SPG (March 2012)). When assessing the potential impact of
proposed schemes especially on strategically important heritage assets and
views, the guidance and policies of the relevant neighbouring authorities (for
sites on Borough boundaries), and Hackney‘s Core Strategy Policy 24 “Design”,
and AAPs and SSSPD, need to be taken into consideration.
POLICY DM1 - HIGH QUALITY DESIGN
The Council will require all developments including alterations and extensions to be
of high quality design. It must be demonstrated that development proposals have
addressed the following criteria.
A. Setting and Context
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
Reinforce and complement local distinctiveness and vernacular to create a
positive sense of place;
Respect the visual integrity and established scale, massing and rhythm of
the building, frontages, group of buildings or street scene (including
characteristic building lines and plot widths), of which they form a part;
Retain, enhance and/or create open spaces, views, landmarks,
characteristic rooflines and other townscape features which make a positive
contribution to the character of the area;
Improve legibility and movement through a site, and repair fragmented urban
form and the pattern of a block or locality;
In the wider context, be of a height and massing which responds to and is
compatible with the townscape, landscape, urban setting and adjacent
buildings, has regard to heritage assets and to the particular circumstances
of the site;
Optimise the distinctive character of the existing buildings, landscape and
topography;
Provide and ensure adequate sunlight, daylight and open aspects to all parts
of the development and adjacent buildings and land, and ensure that
proposals are not obtrusive in relation to adjacent buildings.
B. General
i.
Use high quality, durable materials;
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ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
ix.
x.
xi.
xii.
Incorporate sustainable design and construction measures and materials,
demonstrating how sustainable development principles and resilient
measures to climate change have been incorporated;
Be well laid-out internally, ensuring that proposals would not lead to cramped
layouts, and allow for adequate circulation space, storage and installations
such as furniture;
Conserve and enhance the Borough’s heritage assets and settings (see
Policy DM28);
Ensure that development takes account of existing or planned social and
physical infrastructure and contributes to additional infrastructure where
necessary, so that development is adequately served by public transport,
utilities, energy infrastructure, and a range of social and community facilities;
Be designed to reduce the need to travel and minimise car use;
Include waste and recycling storage facilities on-site;
Be designed to provide a safe and inclusive environment, designed to be
accessible to people with disabilities, and incorporate the principles of
‘designing out crime’, ‘Secured by Design’ as appropriate;
Ensure mixed-use developments are designed to reduce the impacts of
horizontal or vertical adjoining uses to ensure high standards of amenity;
Ensure that developments will improve the quality, clarity and sense of
spaces around and between buildings and enhance legibility and provide a
clear distinction between public and private spaces;
Take a holistic approach to landscape and public realm design and ensure it
is considered as part of the whole development, uses high quality durable
finishes, materials and furniture, integrates with adjoining development and
public space from the outset, and includes ‘designing out crime principles’;
and
Factor in whole-life costs of development – developments should be
designed and use building materials and systems that minimise building
operation and maintenance costs, and environmental impact, for the lifetime
of the development.
C. Strategic View Background Area
The Council will resist developments within the background consultation areas of St
Paul’s Cathedral, Linear View 8 Westminster Pier to St Paul’s Cathedral and 9 King
Henry VIII’s Mound, Richmond to St Paul’s Cathedral, in accordance with the City
of London’s ‘St. Paul’s Heights’ Policy, which would have an adverse impact on the
setting of the Cathedral or on the visual relationship between the Cathedral and the
City’s eastern cluster of tall buildings. Redevelopment of buildings, which currently
adversely impact on the strategic views, will be required to aim not to detract from,
and where possible to, improve the views and not infringe on any part of the defined
background area.
3.3
Managing the Impact of Development and Amenity
3.3.1 Hackney seeks to sustainably manage growth so that it takes place in the most
appropriate locations, meeting the Borough’s needs while continuing to
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conserve and enhance the features that make Hackney an attractive, vibrant
and interesting place to live, work and visit. Promoting and protecting high
standards of amenity is a key element of ensuring sustainable growth and the
continued regeneration of the Borough, and will be a major consideration when
the Council assesses development proposals. While seeking to ensure high
standards of amenity, the environmental, social and economic benefits that
development can bring need to be weighed up proportionately in considering
proposed development schemes.
3.3.2 Amenity can be compromised in a number of ways through development, such
as through detrimental loss of daylight and sunlight to existing and adjacent
occupiers; loss of privacy and outlook due to the proximity and design of
development; harmful noise, odour, vibration and air pollution from existing and
proposed developments, typically commercial activities and other activities
such as rail; conditions with potential for danger to highway safety; and causing
detrimental micro-climate effects.
3.3.3 The design and layout of buildings must enable sufficient sunlight and daylight
to penetrate into and between buildings, and ensure that adjoining land or
properties are protected from unacceptable overshadowing. The Building
Research Establishment (BRE) provides guidance on site layout planning to
achieve good sunlighting and daylighting (BRE Site Layout Planning for
Daylight and Sunlight: a guide to good practice 1991). The Council will use this
guidance to assess whether acceptable levels of daylight and sunlight are
available to habitable spaces.
3.3.4 Artificial lighting creates a sense of safety and can enable activities in the
evenings and at night. It can be used to highlight landmark buildings and add
vitality to streets. However, poorly designed internal and external lighting or
lighting that operates for an excessive period of time is a form of pollution that
can harm the quality of life for those living nearby, affect wildlife and waste
energy. Noise pollution and vibration can have a major effect on amenity and
health and can be a particularly significant issue in Hackney given the dense
and mixed urban fabric nature of the Borough. Fumes and odour pollution from
commercial activities can have a detrimental impact on health and the
environment. Hackney suffers from poor air quality which development can
exacerbate. Detailed policies on pollution issues in relation to development are
contained within Chapter 7.
3.3.5 In the past, planning guidance for privacy has been concerned with achieving
visual separation between dwellings by setting a minimum distance of 18-21
metres between facing homes. These are still useful yardsticks for visual
privacy, but adhering rigidly to these measures can limit the variety of urban
space and housing types in the city, and can sometimes unnecessarily restrict
density. Thus, given the urban context of the Borough flexibility will be applied,
particularly in consideration of the density of a scheme, and design measures
incorporated to minimise overlooking and protect privacy. This is consistent
with the GLA’s Housing SPG (November 2012).
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3.3.6 Large developments in particular can alter a local climate. Building colours can
either reflect or absorb heat, leading to variations in local air temperature.
Buildings can also affect the flow of air and cause wind tunnels and
downdraughts. All developments should consider local topography and the
local microclimate in their design, and proposals must demonstrate they have
addressed the potential impact on local conditions.
3.3.7 Developments must be well-designed internally and laid out, avoiding cramped
layouts and awkwardly shaped rooms, and allowing for adequate circulation
space, storage, utility rooms and installations such as office or domestic
furniture. For residential development, the Council will assess applications for
new dwellings against the London Plan Policy 3.5 and the GLA’s Housing SPG
(November 2012), and subsequent amendments, and, where appropriate,
against any future Council supplementary planning guidance. Only in
exceptional circumstances may single person units of below 37sq.m be
permitted, where they are of exemplar design and contribute to the
achievement of other objectives and policies of this plan.
3.3.8 The following policy sets out the potentially harmful impacts of development on
amenity that proposals need to avoid.
POLICY DM2 - DEVELOPMENT AND AMENITY
Development proposals should be appropriate to their location and should be
designed to ensure that they will not result in significant adverse impacts on the
amenity of occupiers and neighbours. The individual and cumulative impacts of
development proposals on amenity will be considered in considering their
acceptability. The consideration of the merits of development proposals will be
balanced against the impact on amenity.
Amenity considerations include the impacts of developments on:
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
Visual privacy and overlooking;
Overshadowing and outlook;
Sunlight and daylight, and artificial light, levels;
Vibration, noise, fumes and odour, and other forms of pollution;
Microclimate conditions;
Safety of highway users.
Residential development should be well designed and not lead to substandard
layouts, unit sizes, room sizes and awkward room shapes and private amenity
space.
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3.4
Promoting Health and Well-being in Hackney
3.4.1 Core Strategy policy 12 (Health and Environment) encourages development
that enables all Hackney’s residents to lead a more healthy and active lifestyle.
The City and Hackney Health and Wellbeing Profile 2011/12 states that the
health of people in the Borough overall is generally poor. Residents experience
higher rates of infant mortality, coronary heart disease, cancer and diabetes
than the national average. Residents are also more likely to live with a longterm limiting illness or disability than in other places across England. There are
particular concerns around children, with higher levels of obesity and lower
levels of physical activity than the national average. Promoting health and wellbeing and reducing health inequalities is a key Council objective, and is
reflected through Hackney’s Sustainable Community Strategy.
3.4.2 There are two broad interlinked factors that influence the general health and
well-being of communities. The first revolves around behaviour, lifestyles, diets
and exercise. Social and cultural factors may influence behavioural choices
which may have an impact on the well-being of individuals. The second main
factor is the built environment and how it can address existing and influence
changes in lifestyle and help shape positive health outcomes.
3.4.3 Healthcare facilities such as GP surgeries, dental surgeries and hospitals are
sources for both treatment and, importantly, education, especially around diets
and lifestyles including exercise. However, the Council seeks to secure a local
environment conducive to preventing health problems through a clean and safe
environment and the design of buildings to encourage people to be physically
active. Poor environmental quality and arrangement of development can have
a detrimental impact or exacerbate health inequalities. The creation of new or
enhancement of existing usable open space can make them more attractive
and easier to access for both formal and informal forms of physical activity
which could range from walking to organised sport. Play space facilities are
important for exercise for children, and the Hackney Pathfinders programme
has resulted in the enhancement of play space facilities. However, informal
outdoor areas are often more interesting for older children and can result in the
same health benefits as exertions in formal play areas or through organised
play.
3.4.4 Affordable schemes to encourage people to access indoor facilities, including
the dual use of provision such as school gyms, church halls and purpose built
facilities is advocated in the Core Strategy. Furthermore, the emerging ‘Fit for
the Future; A Sports and Physical Activity Strategy’ for Hackney sets out ways
of supporting such activities and increase the impact they have on residents
and communities.
3.4.5 A number of other factors influence health and well-being. Hackney
experiences high levels of air and noise pollution that need to be addressed.
The availability of services and facilities easily accessible on foot and bicycle,
and a safe network of pedestrian and cycle routes, are important to encourage
exercise and reduce pollution through vehicle use. Proposals such as Home
Zones and shared spaces that result in child friendly streets that are designed
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to minimise traffic speeds and flows are to be welcomed. This in turn will allow
public realm and streets in residential areas to be used as informal areas for
social interaction and perhaps children’s play. Access to healthy food, and the
design and type of business uses within new developments, are important in
addressing health issues. Provision and access to arts, culture and
entertainment facilities are important in contributing to mental well-being.
3.4.6 The following policy is essentially a strategic development management policy,
expanding on the Core Strategy by setting out the Council’s intentions and
requirements for development in the Borough to help promote health and wellbeing. It provides a strategic link to specific policies contained within this
document, such as design, amenity, protection and improvement of health,
leisure, arts and cultural facilities, and planning contributions/Communities
Infrastructure Levy policies in this Chapter 3, a policy on a restriction on the
location of hot food takeaways in close proximity to schools in chapter 4,
provision and enhancement of communal open space and protection and
improvement of public open space policies in chapter 6, reducing energy
consumption and carbon dioxide emissions, and pollution policies, in chapter
7, and promoting sustainable forms of transport in chapter 8.
3.4.7 It also sets out a requirement for the submission of Health Impact Assessments
(HIAs) for very large-scale developments (generally where Environmental
Impact Assessments are required for a scheme) in accordance with London
Plan Policy 3.2. The key aim of a HIA is to prospectively identify the impacts of
development on the wider determinants of health, and to identify and effect
measures to mitigate adverse impacts and enhance beneficial impacts.
POLICY DM3 - PROMOTING HEALTH AND WELL-BEING
Development in the Borough should promote health and well-being. Measures to
ensure this include as follows:
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
Ensuring that development is designed to promote physical activity, through
appropriate arrangement of buildings and uses, access, open space and
landscaping, the provision of facilities to support walking and cycling, and
schemes meet ‘Secured by Design’ principles;
Integrating development with the public realm and public transport, and in
particular ensuring that local facilities and services are easily accessible by
foot or bicycle;
Ensuring that supporting infrastructure is in place to support development,
such as providing or contributing to open space, child play facilities, indoor
and outdoor leisure provision, and healthcare facilities;
Development should not have an adverse impact on the environment, such
as through air, noise and water pollution, and remediation of contaminated
land prior to development must be undertaken.
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The Council will require the submission of Health Impact Assessments for major
schemes of 100 housing units or more, or 10,000 sq.m or more for all other uses2,
considered to have potential impacts on health and well-being, depending on the
nature and scale of such development, to be considered at pre-application stage.
In order to promote health and well-being, mental health and spiritual well-being the
Council will;
A. Protect and improve social and community facilities such as healthcare
facilities, community halls and indoor leisure provision, and arts and cultural
facilities, and ensure that development contributes appropriately to
supporting infrastructure (see Policy DM4);
B. Protect, increase and enhance open space provision, allotments and food
growing schemes, biodiversity and nature conservation assets, and the
provision of improved children’s play facilities;
C. Seek to manage access to hot food takeaways such as by restricting
proposals for new hot food takeaways from location within 400 metres of
secondary schools, and working with businesses and developers to promote
healthier lifestyles through design and types of use within developments;
D. Seek to expand the network of safe pedestrian and cycle routes to ensure
that areas dedicated to vehicular circulation are designed with pedestrian
safety and needs of vulnerable groups in mind, and
E. Seek to ensure that new developments incorporate measures designed to
minimise traffic flows and speeds that will result in child-friendly streets in
residential areas that can be used as informal areas for social interaction and
children’s play.
3.5
Provision and Delivery of Infrastructure – Communities Infrastructure
Levy and Planning Contributions
3.5.1 Ensuring there is sufficient infrastructure to support future development is vital
to achieving sustainable growth in the Borough. Infrastructure includes
transport, public realm, open space, leisure and recreational facilities,
education, childcare, health, community facilities, utilities, and emergency
services. The infrastructure requirements of the Borough are and will be
assessed on a regular basis, the most recent assessment is contained within
the Council’s Infrastructure Assessment (June 2014). Policies in Chapter 5 of
the Core Strategy support the use of planning contributions for social and
community infrastructure.
3.5.2 Funding for infrastructure to support new development is facilitated by planning
legislation through the Community Infrastructure Levy (CIL), and ‘planning
contributions’. The Council adopted its CIL Charging Schedule to support the
provision of strategic infrastructure in the Borough in April 2015. CIL is
generally charged on developments that are of more than one residential
2
Mayor’s Best Practice Guidance Health Issues in Planning (2007)
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dwelling and create additional floorspace, or generate additional floorspace of
more than 100 sq.m. The Council’s Planning Contributions Supplementary
Planning Document (SPD) sets out the planning contributions required through
planning applications to help fund supporting infrastructure required to mitigate
the site-specific impact of development. Both the Council’s CIL Charging
Schedule and revised Planning Contributions SPD have been subject to an
economic viability assessment to ensure that both would not detrimentally
impact the viability of development in Hackney. The assessment also factored
in consideration of the Mayor of London’s CIL for Crossrail.
3.5.3 The Core Strategy does not reference CIL given the timing of the legislation
and the adoption of that document. As such, policy DM4 links the requirement
for development proposals to contribute to supporting strategic infrastructure to
the CIL Charging Schedule, and to non-strategic infrastructure and measures
required to mitigate the impact of development through planning contributions.
3.5.4 Where planning contributions are sought in relation to CIL chargeable
developments, the level and nature of the planning obligations required will be
considered in light of the CIL levy payable. Planning obligations will only be
sought in relation to specific measures identified as necessary which will not be
funded through CIL. In order to make a development acceptable in planning
terms, planning contributions may be used in relation to matters including but
not limited to affordable housing; micro, small or affordable workspace or retail
space; highway and footway reinstatement and highways agreements; Travel
plans; highway agreements; construction and other employment placements;
sustainable design and construction statements; Health Impact Assessments
and Management plans. Legal agreements (‘Section 106 agreements’) will be
used to secure such contributions, and will also include provision for ongoing
monitoring costs and legal fees.
3.5.5 In Hackney there are two levels of CIL that are able to be charged – the Mayoral
CIL and Hackney’s Borough-level CIL. The Mayoral CIL came into effect on 1
April 2012. Hackney’s CIL came into effect on 1 April 2015.
3.5.6 There are exemptions to the Mayoral CIL, which mean that organisations or
individuals would not be liable to pay Mayoral CIL for the development of such
uses. The following types of development will normally be exempt from the
payment of the Mayoral CIL: Health and Education uses; Social housing
provided by a local housing authority, Registered Social Landlord or Registered
Provider of Social Housing and Shared Ownership Housing, subject to the
specific provisions of Regulation 49; Charities where the development will be
used wholly or mainly for charitable purposes; and structures or buildings that
people only enter for the purpose of inspecting or maintaining fixed plant or
machinery.
3.5.7 Hackney’s CIL also has exemptions. The following types of development will
normally be exempt from the payment of local CIL: affordable housing; and
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buildings with other charitable uses (if controlled by a charity). Hackney is also
able to offer an exemption on proven viability grounds, which would be available
for 12 months, after which time viability of the scheme concerned would need
to be reviewed.
3.5.8 In relation to employment placements, the Council is committed to ensuring that
residents seeking work have the right skills to gain employment. The Council
will seek contributions for employment training purposes in relation to its
Sustainable Training and Employment Scheme, particularly for proposals that
involve the loss of employment land and floorspace, and will seek employment
and apprenticeship positions for Hackney residents in the construction and
operation of new developments.
3.5.9 Where applicants state that financial viability prevents the delivery of planning
contributions sought by the Council, applicants will need to submit a financial
appraisal to demonstrate this, and demonstrate any other over-riding positive
planning benefits of a scheme. CIL payments will be taken into account when
assessing the level of planning contributions payable and the development
viability of a scheme.
3.5.10 Planning contributions and CIL will operate in a complementary way. More
detail on how Policy DM4 on the CIL liability thresholds and the planning
contributions will be implemented will be outlined in the Mayor of London’s CIL
Charging Schedule, the Hackney CIL Charging Schedule and the Planning
Contributions SPD.
POLICY DM4 - COMMUNITIES INFRASTRUCTURE LEVY AND PLANNING
CONTRIBUTIONS
Development proposals meeting the relevant CIL liability thresholds will be required
to comply with the Council’s CIL Charging Schedule, and the Mayor of London’s
CIL Charging Schedule.
The Council will require planning contributions, subject to the financial viability of
the scheme and any other over-riding positive planning benefits, to mitigate the sitespecific impacts of development to ensure that such developments are acceptable
in planning terms. Planning contributions will only be sought when they meet the
tests set out in paragraph 204 of the NPPF. Such contributions will be secured
through S106 legal agreements. Planning contributions will also be subject to the
criteria set out in CIL Regulations (2010) 122 and 123 (or any successors) which
require any financial contribution or contributions in kind towards infrastructure to
meet a number of criteria.
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3.6
Social and Community Facilities
3.6.1 Social and community facilities in the context of this chapter include uses and
activities which contribute to making an area more than just a place to live.
Social and community facilities are distinct from other uses in that they support
the quality of life and health and well-being of the local population and are there
to meet their needs at all stages of their lives. At a local level, it includes, but is
not limited to, nurseries, education and health facilities, sports and leisure
facilities, libraries, emergency service facilities, public toilets, community
facilities such as public houses, youth centres, meeting halls, and places of
worship. Arts, culture and entertainment facilities, which the Council seeks to
protect through policy DM6, include arts venues and galleries, theatres,
museums and public realm art.
3.6.2 Recent research3 shows that the number of operational pubs in Hackney has
fallen from 229 in 1983 to 104 in 2013. This represents a 56% loss in the last
thirty years. Public houses are defined as community facilities in the NPPF and
it is recognised that they can play an important role in the social fabric of
communities. Public houses which are important to the community would be
identified by their community asset value and sufficient evidence of need.
3.6.3 Many of the Borough’s communities also require appropriate premises and
facilities for the purpose of religious worship. The Council will support the
retention of existing places of worship, and support the delivery of new facilities
where they meet an identified need in the community, subject to other Plan
policies.
3.6.4 The Council’s Infrastructure Assessment 2014 sets out the current and future
demand and supply of infrastructure in the Borough. It is clear that, with the
projected population growth, and the fact that the Borough lies within an area
of regeneration, there is a need to protect, improve and provide new social and
community facilities. This is particularly in light of the implications of the
Government’s Comprehensive Spending Review 2010, and the need for
savings and efficiencies nationally. This has had highly significant implications
for infrastructure delivery, and the delivery, for example, of health and education
services for example has and will no doubt change in future with less capital
available.
3.6.5 Community facilities may come under pressure from uses which attract higher
land values. Once these sites are lost to other uses it can be very difficult to
find alternative sites, especially for use by voluntary groups. Demand for
different types of community facilities will change over time, but it is important
these sites and facilities are retained to meet the future needs of Hackney
residents. Additionally, development can lead to increased pressure on
Hackney’s existing social and community facilities and infrastructure, either
cumulatively or individually.
3
Public Houses in Hackney 1983-2013: Campaign for Real Ale, An Evidential Study, James Watson, Dale
Ingram, CAMRA (2013).
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3.6.6 The protection and enhancement of the Borough’s social and community
facilities is supported by strategic policies in the London Plan and the Core
Strategy. Hackney’s Infrastructure Assessment, ‘refreshed’ in 2014, based on
up to date information from service providers on current and future demand and
supply, and population forecasts for the Borough, essentially emphasises that
social and community facility provision is relatively good in the Borough, but
that there will be deficiencies within the medium term from 2015/16, and that
the level of provision of social and community facilities should not decrease.
Key headlines in the Assessment are that:





There will be a shortage of primary education places from 2014/15;
In the medium to long term an additional secondary school is likely to be
needed;
A combination of an increase in the statutory school leaving age and an
increased willingness for 16-19 year olds to study in the Borough will increase
demand for places;
Regarding health provision, the changes to funding and delivery have resulted
in funding gaps and uncertainty which means the local NHS is currently reevaluating their approach to the planned investment in health centres in the
Borough, which would most likely have been able to meet expected demand
for primary health care services. Some areas are likely to need to increase the
supply of services which will be reliant on supporting infrastructure; and
The Mayor’s Office for Policing and Crime (MOPAC) is assessing its future
requirements, taking into account funding available. Future provision identifies
the need for a custody centre, several ‘Community Policing Facilities’ and ‘Front
Counters’ (Police Shops) across the Borough, and a patrol base.
3.6.7 In addition to the Infrastructure Assessment, the Area Action Plans for Dalston,
Hackney Central, Hackney Wick and Manor House identify area-specific
infrastructure required to support growth in those areas. Further local
infrastructure requirements may come forward in neighbourhood plans.
3.6.8 The following policy incorporates the need for new developments to contribute
to social and community infrastructure provision, and sets out criteria for the
protection, improvement and provision of social and community facilities.
Essentially, the Council seeks to protect and retain such facilities, ensure reprovision of facilities in redevelopment schemes, and facilitate the provision of
appropriate new facilities. For proposals involving the loss of such facilities or
floorspace, it will need to be demonstrated that the facility no longer meets any
current or future need or has been assessed as not suitable for any other
community use for which there is a defined need in the locality, and the loss of
the facility would not have a detrimental impact on social and community
service provision to the Borough’s communities. This can be demonstrated
through evidence from service providers (e.g. the City and Hackney Primary
Care Trust, if relating to health facilities) and/or providing marketing evidence
to show that premises have been offered at a reasonable charge to appropriate
user groups (e.g. community groups or voluntary organisations in the case of
community halls). Compensatory or mitigation measures may be sought
through improvements, or contributions to the cost of running and maintenance,
of an existing facility close to the development.
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3.6.9 The shared/dual use of facilities is considered appropriate as a means to assist
in service delivery and improving facilities, providing there is no detrimental loss
of social and community facility provision. Where community facilities, such as
community halls and indoor leisure facilities, are reprovided, the Council
through legal agreement will seek to ensure that the facilities are available to
the community groups seeking to use them at a discounted rate. This is to
ensure that such facilities are accessible to Borough residents.
3.6.10 In certain circumstances, there may be a need to rationalise both the services
and estates of some key public services in order to ensure that services
provided to the community are from more accessible properties, and this may
result in the net loss of some community floorspace. In these exceptional
circumstances, the net loss of community floorspace can be considered where
the proposals are part of the rationalisation of the estates of key public services,
such as the Emergency Services, the City and Hackney PCT (or replacement
body), MOPAC, and the Learning Trust.
3.6.11 It is important that facilities are located close to the people who use them, and
that they are easily reached by a choice of means of transport, particularly
walking, cycling and public transport. The Borough’s Growth Areas (Dalston
Major Town Centre, Hackney Central District Town Centre, the Railway
Corridors, South Shoreditch, New Communities in Woodberry Down and
Hackney Wick) identified in the Core Strategy are generally the most
appropriate locations for those that may attract large numbers of people, and
need to be served well by public transport and which rely on the concentration
of other services. Some facilities may not be possible in such centres so in
certain circumstances development may be acceptable outside. Smaller
facilities which will attract people from a local area should be located within their
catchment area or in other locations where they are easily reached by the
community they serve.
POLICY DM5 - PROTECTION AND DELIVERY OF SOCIAL AND COMMUNITY
FACILITIES AND PLACES OF WORSHIP
The Council will protect existing social and community facilities including places of
worship and public houses (such facilities are identified in paragraph 3.6.1) by
resisting their loss, unless a replacement facility that meets the needs of the
community is provided, or the community facility is no longer required in its current
use and it has been demonstrated that it is not suitable for any other community use
for which there is a defined need in the locality. Where the latter is the case,
evidence will be required to show that the loss would not create, or add to, a shortfall
in provision for the specific community use and demonstrate that there is no demand
for any other suitable community use on the site. The applicant will need to
demonstrate that all reasonable efforts have been made to preserve the facility.
Evidence should include but not be limited to 12 months of marketing evidence
which follows the guidelines outlined in Appendix 4. Exceptions to this policy will be
considered where the proposals are part of the rationalisation of the estates of key
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public services, such as the Emergency Services, the City and Hackney PCT (or
replacement body) and the Learning Trust, and a net loss of floorspace can be
considered.
Proposals for new and extended social and community facilities will be supported.
Major developments should preferably be located in defined Growth Areas (Dalston
Major Town Centre, Hackney Central District Town Centre, the Railway Corridors,
South Shoreditch, New Communities in Woodberry Down and Hackney Wick) and
Shopping Centres.
Smaller scale proposals must demonstrate that the facility has good access by
public transport, walking and cycling routes. Facilities must meet the requirements
for end users, and meet current legislative standards where relevant, and must
comply with other policies in this Plan, particularly in regard to design, amenity and
highway safety.
The shared use of social and community facilities is supported, provided that it can
be demonstrated that such shared use will not adversely affect the level of social
and community provision in the local area or across the Borough.
Developments that result in additional need for facilities will be required to contribute
towards enhancing existing facilities, or provide/contribute towards new facilities.
This contribution will be addressed through CIL and/or Planning Contributions
(please see Policy DM4) as appropriate.
The Council will seek to ensure through legal agreement that community facilities
provided through development remain as such in perpetuity.
3.7
Arts, Culture and Entertainment Facilities
3.7.1 The contribution of arts, culture and entertainment is significant to Hackney’s
community needs, economic development, vitality and regeneration. There are
a significant number of artists, designers and other creative professionals, and
the creative industries contribute strongly to the local economy. The Borough
hosts a wide range of festivals including Hackney’s Space Festival, Hackney
WickED and Hackney Fringe Festival which attract a large number of visitors.
There a number of art galleries, such as The White Cube gallery, museums
including the Geffrye Museum and Sutton House, and theatres including
Hackney Empire and the Arcola Theatre.
3.7.2 Public art brings a wide range of benefits to the whole community, from the
economic benefits that high quality art brings to the developer, to the
educational opportunities inherent both in the creation of and reflection upon
public art. Art can help in the process of regeneration, fostering social inclusion
and community involvement. Public art can also contribute to the Borough’s
streetscape.
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3.7.3 Strategic planning policy in the London Plan and the Council’s Core Strategy
support the protection and improvement of arts, culture and entertainment
facilities within the Borough. The London Plan identifies the Olympic Park and
the Lee Valley Regional Park as Strategic Cultural Areas. Dalston, Hackney
Central and Hackney Wick AAPs place a strong emphasis on the provision of
facilities in those areas, building on the existing strong presence of these
activities. Shoreditch, partly within the Central Activities Zone contained within
the London Plan, has a strong existing arts and culture presence. Many art and
cultural facilities make use of temporarily vacant shops and other buildings and
spaces, providing vitality that would otherwise not exist. The purpose of a policy
to protect and improve arts, culture and entertainment activities and facilities in
the Borough is to:






Maximise the benefits from arts, cultural, leisure and entertainment facilities
arising from the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games and Legacy;
Encourage new arts, culture, leisure and/or entertainment developments in
areas identified for cultural growth both regionally and locally;
Resist the loss of existing arts, culture, leisure and/or entertainment facilities in
locations identified as areas of cultural growth subject to local market
conditions;
Encourage contributions towards art and cultural activity subject to scheme
viability;
Support arts, culture and entertainment facilities which enhance the public
realm or open spaces;
Support the temporary use of vacant buildings for arts and creativity activity.
3.7.4 The following policy sets out the Council’s approach to the consideration of
proposals for or affecting arts, culture and entertainment facilities.
POLICY DM6 - ARTS, CULTURE AND ENTERTAINMENT FACILITIES
The Council will protect arts, culture and entertainment facilities by resisting their
loss, unless a replacement facility is reprovided, or it is demonstrated that the facility
is no longer required in its current use.
Proposals for large4 arts, culture and entertainment facilities, and public art
installations should preferably be located within the Borough’s Growth Areas and
Shopping Centres where public transport accessibility is high and there is a
concentration of existing services. Proposals outside of the Borough’s ‘shopping
centres’ must meet the sequential approach outlined in DM7.
Smaller scale proposals must demonstrate that the facility has good access by
public transport, walking and cycling routes. Proposals must comply with other
policies in this Plan, particularly in regard to design, amenity and highway safety.
4
1000m2 gross threshold is derived from Government guidance on the scale of major development.
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The dual use of sites for a mix of arts and culture related uses will be supported.
The Council will, where appropriate, support the use of vacant Growth Area or town
centre units for temporary arts related activities.
Where a development results in the loss of facilities, a contribution towards public
art or creative projects will be required in accordance with the Council’s Planning
Contributions SPD. Contributions will be sought from all new major developments
in Hackney’s Strategic Cultural Area, Central Activities Zone and Shopping Centres
towards public art or art projects (see Policy DM4).
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A DYNAMIC AND
CREATIVE
ECONOMY
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CHAPTER 4: A DYNAMIC AND CREATIVE ECONOMY
4.1.1 This chapter follows the format of the Core Strategy “A Dynamic & Creative
Economy” chapter to combine, under one chapter, planning polices for the local
economy and employment areas, and for retail development and town centres.
This includes policies on evening and night-time economy uses. The Core
Strategy essentially sets out a spatial strategy with growth focussed in certain
areas (the Growth Areas), including some of the ‘shopping centres’ within the
Borough, but also recognises the need to retain employment land and
floorspace to meet the needs of residents and businesses (including those
seeking to locate in the Borough). This chapter has been written in the context
of reforms to the planning system, such as changes to permitted development
rights to allow change of use from offices (B1a) to residential (C3), and changes
to Class A and other town centre uses to allow for a wider range of uses, without
the need for planning permission. Given these changes are currently time
limited (starting from May 30th 2013) the following policies remain applicable to
any change of use application.
4.1.2 The Borough’s ‘shopping centres’ (referring to all designations) in the Core
Strategy follow a hierarchy with Dalston as the Major Town Centre, Hackney
Central, Stoke Newington and Finsbury Park as District Centres, and 14 ‘Local
Centres’ including Stamford Hill and Manor House. A variety of ‘town centre’
uses are directed to these centres, with the main focus of larger retail
development in the Major and District Centres. Some retail development is also
appropriate within Shoreditch within the Central Activities Zone.
4.1.3 Employment land (generally ‘B’ class uses) is dispersed across the Borough,
but some key concentrations are in Hackney Wick, the south around
Shoreditch/Hoxton/Haggerston, and in the centre of the Borough around
Dalston and Hackney Central. The Core Strategy designates a number of
‘employment areas’ within the Borough, with different typologies (Core Strategy
policy 17). To reflect the changing nature of the local economy from a heavier
industrial, manufacturing and distribution base to a need to provide higher
grade, more modern and less ‘heavy’ commercial uses, the Priority
Employment Area (PEAs) and Other Industrial Area designations allow for
mixed use development where appropriate. However, there is still a need to
ensure land supply for these ‘heavier’ type industries, while providing land and
floorspace for new types of businesses, particularly knowledge-based economy
and the creative and cultural sector of which the Borough has a high
concentration with growing demand. The Borough is at the ‘forefront’ of the
Government’s ‘Tech City’ initiative, and also new typologies of commercial
floorspace will come through within the Olympic Park in Hackney Wick over
time. Given this, and the release of employment land in recent years, the Core
Strategy’s position is to protect employment land and floorspace last used for
employment use anywhere in the Borough.
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4.1.4 Hackney also has a strong evening and night-time economy, particularly in
certain locations such as Shoreditch, Dalston, Hackney Central and Stoke
Newington which brings with it strong economic, cultural and vitality benefits for
the Borough, but also certain pressures which require management and
regulation.
4.2
Shopping Centres
4.2.1 Whilst the Core Strategy provides an overall strategy for the town centres, the
key issue to address in this document is in relation to retail uses and how to
promote, support and manage development and changes of use in Hackney’s
shopping centres5 so that they remain competitive and attractive.
4.2.2 In line with national and regional planning policy advice and the Core Strategy,
it is important that Hackney’s town centres are the focus of both convenience
and comparison retail growth. The Council is committed to supporting and
promoting its town centres including enhancing the diversity of their retail offer
by taking a pro-active approach in directing and encouraging growth within
them. Because of their accessibility the Council considers these centres as
sustainable places suitable for the provision of a wide range of shopping
facilities and services. New town centre proposals should, therefore, be located
in the identified designated major, district and local shopping centres. The
Council will apply a sequential test and impact assessment to planning
applications for main town centre uses that are not located in the existing
designated centres above a locally set threshold. The type and scale of any
proposed development should reflect the role and function of the designated
centres within Hackney’s shopping hierarchy. While it is acknowledged that the
CAZ provides a mix of uses, it is not a designated town centre in Hackney, and
as such it is not considered a focus for retailing and other town centres uses,
especially considering that Hackney does not contain any designated CAZ
Frontages as defined by the 2011 London Plan. Any retailing, entertainment or
leisure uses proposed within PEAs, irrespective of being within the CAZ or not,
are to comply with Policy DM17 and therefore should be in a quantum which
acts in a supporting capacity to the core employment generating uses required
in PEAs. Any proposal for either or a combination of A Class, leisure or
entertainment use above 200sq.m and outside of a designated town centre will
need to be accompanied by a sequential test and impact assessment
demonstrating that there would be no adverse impact on the vitality and viability
of all the designated town centres as a whole.
5
References to “shopping centres” apply only to designated Dalston Major Shopping Centre, the District
Shopping Centres of Hackney Central, Stoke Newington, and Finsbury and the 14 Local Shopping Centres of
Stamford Hill, Well Street, Broadway Market, Stoke Newington Church Street, Stoke Newington Road,
Kingsland Road (Waste), Upper Clapton Road, Lower Clapton Road, Chatsworth Road, Hoxton Street,
Lauriston Road, Shacklewell Lane, Manor House and Wick Road but exclude small parades of shops which are
not designated. These designated shopping centres are shown on the Policies Map and can be referred to as town
centres.
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4.2.3 Given that Hackney’s town centres are vital for the well-being of the local
residents and economy, and face stiff competition from other nearby
surrounding town centres, it is important that they are promoted and developed
in a way that allows them to strengthen their local distinctive offers, improve
and enhance consumer choice and are able to adapt to future changes and
challenges. The Council will therefore require applications for main town centre
uses to be located in its town centres, then in edge-of-centre locations and only
if suitable sites are not available would out-of-centre sites be considered. When
considering edge-of-centre and out-of-centre proposals, preference would be
given to accessible sites that are well connected to the town centre, and to
proposals which satisfy the sequential test and are not likely to have significant
adverse impact on the vitality and viability of all the designated town centres as
a whole.
4.2.4 In assessing any A Class, entertainment or leisure development, the Council
will take into account the scale, location and nature of proposed development,
and will require the submission of a sequential test and an impact assessment
from the applicant. The impact assessment should include assessment of the
impact of the proposal on existing, committed and planned public and private
investment in the designated town centre/s in the catchment area of the
proposal, and the impact of the proposal on the designated town centre/s’
vitality and viability, including local consumer choice and trade in the designated
town centre/s and wider area, up to at least five years from the time the
application is made. The NPPF allows Local Planning Authorities to set local
thresholds to be applied in relation to requiring an impact assessment. Policy
DM7 sets a threshold for Hackney of 200sq.m. This threshold is considered
appropriate given that Hackney’s town centres are characterised by relatively
small sized shop units. The GLA’s London Small Shops Study 2010 identifies
small shops and workspaces of typically around 70 – 90sq.m. This is
considered too low as a threshold at this level would implicate the majority of
retail proposals including a single retail unit in Hackney. 200sq.m will capture
larger proposals which are more likely, when located outside of existing centres,
to have adverse effects on existing shopping centres, unless demonstrated
otherwise. The 200sq.m threshold is also consistent with former PPS 4 which
has been replaced by the NPPF. Above this local threshold the Council will
require both a sequential test and an impact assessment to be undertaken for
main town centre uses not in an existing town centre. Therefore proposals for
new or extensions to existing edge or out-of-centre main town centre uses in
excess of 200sq.m need to satisfy the sequential test and impact assessment
criteria if planning permission is to be granted. Where an application fails to
satisfy the sequential test or fails to provide satisfactory information or is likely
to have significant adverse impact on one or more of the factors listed in the
second sentence of this paragraph, the proposal will be refused planning
permission.
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4.2.5 An appropriate mix of goods and service provision is needed in order to retain
and develop the vibrancy and vitality of the town centres. Town centre uses
which remedy deficiencies in provision and/or improve and enhance local
distinctive offers will be encouraged. However, this must be at a level
appropriate to the centre, and should not be of the kind that would be out of
keeping with its role and function within the Borough’s shopping hierarchy
and/or damage the ability of nearby shopping centres to function, including
neighbouring borough’s centres.
4.2.6 New large scale retail and leisure development should incorporate mixed uses,
where appropriate, to ensure optimal use of land and the vibrancy and vitality
of town centres are improved and enhanced.
4.2.7 Area Action Plans for Dalston, Hackney Central and Manor House have been
adopted, and these set out the preferred uses within these town centres.
Development proposals must therefore comply with the policies contained in
these documents. The policies of this DMLP will apply where the AAP policies
are silent, and to parts of the town centres outside of an AAP boundary.
POLICY DM7 – NEW RETAIL DEVELOPMENT
The Council will seek to ensure that retail uses (Use Class A1) are predominantly
located within all its designated town centres. Development and uses must be
appropriate to the scale, character and function of the town centre in keeping with
its role and function within the Borough’s shopping hierarchy, and not harm the
vitality and viability of the centres as a whole.
Development and uses which seek to remedy deficiencies in facilities and services
which are important to the local community to ensure a wider retail offer and choices
for consumers will be supported.
Proposals for new, or extension to existing edge or out-of-centre, A Class,
entertainment or leisure development in excess of 200 sq.m gross floorspace will
be required to submit a sequential test and an impact assessment demonstrating
that there would be no adverse impact on the vitality and viability of all the
designated town centres as a whole. The Council will refuse planning permission
where there is evidence that proposals are likely to have significant adverse impacts
on the vitality and viability of all the designated town centres as a whole.
4.3
Small and independent shops
4.3.1 Hackney’s many small and independent shops help lend the Borough its special
character and contribute to the identity of its neighbourhoods. Specialist
shopping areas add to distinctiveness and attractiveness as a place to live and
visit. Small and independent shops provide an important role in servicing the
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day-to-day needs of local residents, workers and visitors and can provide
greater consumer choice and local employment. London Plan Policy 4.9 states
that boroughs should 'develop local policies where appropriate to support the
provision of small shop units' from large retail developments over 2,500m2 in
major town centres or use a lower threshold for retail developments in district
and local centres where appropriate, feasible and viable. The London Small
Shops Study (June 2010) defines a 'small shop' as being one of around 80m2
gross internal floorspace or less, occupied by an independent retail or service
outlet which has nine units or less in operation nationally (as per the Goad
definition).
4.3.2 The need for small shop units in Hackney is evidenced in the Council’s Retail
Centres Study, Stage 2, September 2011 and in Hackney’s Employment
Growth Options Study, Final Report, March 2006. Also responses from
consultations on the AAPs for the Borough’s Major and District Town Centres
of Dalston and Hackney Central respectively gave strong support for seeking
provision of affordable shop units suitable for small or independent traders. In
light of this and the special local circumstances of Hackney’s town centres, the
Council will seek to ensure the provision of affordable shop units in all its town
centres from retail developments of 1,000sq.m and over. In this regard, the
Council may impose planning conditions or seek to negotiate planning
obligations where appropriate, feasible and viable to require proposals for retail
developments of over 1,000sq.m within the Borough’s Town Centres, to
incorporate affordable small shop units suitable for occupation by small and
independent retailers, equivalent to at least 10% of the total amount of
proposed retail floorspace. The Council may also use this policy to mitigate the
loss of, and/or to provide or to support affordable shop units suitable for
occupation by small and independent traders. The policy may also be used,
subject to State Aid regulations, to support improvements and measures to help
strengthen the retail offer, attractiveness and competitiveness of the Borough’s
town centres and local shopping centres. The Council’s Planning Contributions
Supplementary Planning Document provides further details on implementing
this policy.
4.3.3 Proposals for major residential developments or other major development
schemes may also be required to provide small shops where no alternative
facilities are within 400m walking distance. This is in view of the need for
reasonable access to local shops being essential for the day-to-day needs of
all members of the community. Each case will be judged on its individual merits.
The loss of existing small shops will be resisted by requiring adequate reprovision and removing the future ability to amalgamate small units without
planning permission.
4.3.4 Affordability is a key concern for small enterprises in Hackney including small
and independent retailers. It is considered that certain types of small and
independent shops perform an essential service and should be easily
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accessible to all residents. These services include butchers, bakers,
greengrocers, grocers, fishmongers, chemists, post offices, newsagents, dry
cleaners and laundrettes. The Council is committed to supporting its town
centres to be dynamic and competitive providing a diverse range of retail offers
in varied sizes of retail outlets. In this regard, the Council will resist the loss of
affordable shop units providing essential services which have been secured
through planning obligation. The Council wishes to maintain as wide as possible
opportunities and access to affordable small shop units for small and
independent traders. Applicants of significant retail developments will be
encouraged to seek independent retailers for small units wherever possible.
The Council may use this policy to mitigate the loss of, and/or to provide or to
support affordable shop units suitable for small and independent traders. The
policy may also be used, subject to State Aid regulations, to support
improvements and measures to help strengthen the retail offer, attractiveness
and competitiveness of its town centres. The Council’s Planning Contributions
Supplementary Planning Document provides further details on implementing
this policy. The loss of such shops through amalgamation will be resisted. The
amalgamation of individual shop units can result in material impacts, primarily
relating to character and intensification of use. Amalgamation of shop units will
be resisted where they materially and detrimentally affect the character of
Hackney’s shopping areas. Larger shop units may also result in different
patterns of servicing and deliveries: supermarkets, for example, may rely on
high delivery rates which can result in more traffic movements by large vehicles,
which in turn can impact on residential amenity and environmental quality.
Where it is considered that unacceptable adverse impacts will arise, the
amalgamation of individual shop units will be resisted.
4.3.5 The following policy sets out the Council’s requirements for development
proposals in relation to the provision and protection of small shops.
POLICY DM8 – SMALL AND INDEPENDENT SHOPS
Small shop units (generally 80sq.m gross internal floorspace or less) suitable for
small and independent retailers will be sought by the Council throughout the
Borough by:
i.
Requiring proposals of more than 1000sq.m gross internal floorspace in the
A Use Classes in its Town Centres to incorporate small shop premises,
equivalent to at least 10% of the total amount of proposed gross internal retail
floorspace through imposing conditions or seeking contributions through
planning obligations where appropriate, feasible and viable in order to
provide or to support affordable shop units and/or to support improvements
and measures to help strengthen the retail offer, attractiveness and
competitiveness of town centres, and encouraging their occupation by small
or independent retailers, particularly for essential services as set out in
paragraph 4.3.4;
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ii.
iii.
iv.
Requiring proposals for the redevelopment of small shop units to incorporate
adequate reprovision of small shop units, particularly for essential services;
Requiring proposals for major housing developments or other major
development schemes6 to incorporate small shop units where there is no
accessible provision of essential daily goods available within a short walking
distance (within 400m); and
Where appropriate, attaching conditions to prevent the future amalgamation
of units into larger premises.
The Council will prevent the amalgamation of individual shop units incorporating A
Use Classes which would:
v.
vi.
vii.
Involve the loss of existing affordable viable small independent shop units
secured through planning obligation providing essential services;
Not be appropriate to the scale, character and function of the centre, taking
into account existing shops and consents for shops; and
Cause unacceptable adverse impacts on the historic environment and/or
amenity.
Changing the Use of Shops
4.3.6 Core Strategy Policy 13 seeks to safeguard and enhance the vitality and
viability of all Hackney's shopping centres by encouraging diversity of uses,
including mixed uses with residential on upper floors, and resisting loss of
shops where this would unacceptably harm the retail function, character of the
centres or shopping provision in the centres.
4.3.7 In line with advice in the NPPF, the Council designates primary and secondary
shopping frontages in its District Town Centres (other than that part of Hackney
Central covered by the Hackney Central AAP which designates the shopping
frontages). Dalston AAP designates the frontages for that Major Centre.
4.3.8 In the primary shopping frontages of Stoke Newington the Council seeks to
maintain a higher proportion (60%) of ground floor units in Class A1 use
compared to other uses. Secondary shopping frontages are defined for
Hackney Central (outside of the AAP area), the majority of Stoke Newington
and Finsbury Park District Shopping Centres. Some parts of Blackstock Road
and Seven Sisters Road lying within Hackney in the Finsbury Park District
Shopping Centre have been designated as secondary shopping frontages and
not primary shopping frontages because the majority of the Finsbury Park
District Shopping Centre containing a higher proportion of larger retail uses lies
within the London Borough of Islington. Neither primary nor secondary
6
“major housing schemes” refers to new housing development on large housing sites of 0.4 hectares (1 acre) or
more comprising more than 10 new housing units, whilst “other major development schemes” relate to new
developments of more than 1,000 square metres in prominent and accessible locations.
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shopping frontages are defined for ‘Local Shopping Centres.’ Where the current
proportion of A1 uses in a secondary shopping frontage is below the minimum
threshold as set out (50% in these secondary frontages), the Council will only
accept Class A1 uses. The boundary of the primary and secondary shopping
frontages within town centres is shown on the Policies Map and a schedule of
affected properties listed in Appendix 3.
4.3.9 In the primary shopping frontages, retail should be the principal and dominant
land use as they contain the most important shopping facilities, those which
attract the greatest number of customers and which contribute most to the
vitality of the respective centre. It is not considered appropriate to reduce the
proportions of Class A1 use in these frontages below their existing critical
threshold, or to allow too many non-retail uses or the clustering of non-retail
uses which would diminish the attractiveness of the town centres and have a
weakening effect on their retail function, character and appearance. The
Council therefore considers that careful management of changes of uses in
these frontages is required to ensure the creation of healthy shopping centres
in the Borough.
4.3.10 The Council recognises that town centres perform other functions beyond retail,
and therefore should accommodate other non-retail uses or service
businesses. Some non-retail uses, such as cafes, building societies and banks,
provide services which are directly related to a shopping trip in that people most
frequently visit them as part of their shopping trip. Such uses contribute to the
vitality and viability of town centres. Other uses such as Police Shops/front
counter facilities are appropriate in town centres and would be allowed where
they would contribute to the safety and security of the area, an appropriate shop
front design is retained or proposed, and there is no loss of substantial retail
frontage. However, there is concern within the Borough that there is an overconcentration of some non-retail uses, such as betting shops and hot-food takeaways, and their potential effects on the environment and wider determinants
of health and well-being.
4.3.11 However, it is difficult to control these types of uses through the application of
planning policy. Hot-food take-aways (use class A5) are not always linked with
unhealthy food, and are a recognised ‘town centre use’ (as long as they don’t
detrimentally affect retail provision, and impact amenity). The number/amount
of non-A1 uses can be controlled through the application of thresholds for
maintaining certain levels of A1 retail use in both primary and secondary
frontages in Dalston and Hackney Central (designated in respective Area
Actions Plans), Stoke Newington and Finsbury Park, and in the Borough’s Local
Shopping Centres. Also, conditions can be attached to planning permissions
for changes of use, if it is considered that there is an over-proliferation of such
uses.
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4.3.12 Secondary shopping frontages provide opportunities for a higher proportion of
non-retail uses which support the retail function of the core/primary frontages
and complement shopping facilities. The Council, therefore, promotes a mix of
uses within secondary shopping frontages, especially those non-retail uses that
provide services which complement shopping facilities. Whilst seeking to
promote a mix of uses, the Council is concerned to ensure that the retail
character and function of its town centres is protected by stating the proportion
of A1 units that must be present within its town centres’ secondary shopping
frontages and within its local shopping areas as well as setting conditions to
prevent over proliferation of non-retail uses either within the town centres or
within particular frontages of the centres. In this regard, the proportion of A1
uses in the Secondary Shopping Frontages of its District Shopping Centres and
in its Local Shopping Centres must not be below 50% (as a proportion of total
units measured across the total Secondary Shopping Frontage or the total units
measured across the total Local Shopping Centre area). Equally, proposals
which may result in a concentration of non-retail units within a particular
frontage or over-proliferation of non-retail uses in the town centres will not be
permitted. In considering compliance with the threshold limits, Appendix 3 of
this plan defines the relevant frontages and lists the addresses. This is based
on street blocks and takes into account the occurrence of physical breaks in the
continuity of the shopping frontage as created by road junctions and other
obstructions to pedestrian movement. This provides the basis for calculating
the threshold limits on the proportion of non-retail uses in the relevant frontage
and the extent to which a proposal results in the creation of three or more
adjoining standard size shop units. A standard size shop frontage in Hackney
is 5.5m. This is the width of the shop unit bordering the road or pavement and
reflects the predominantly Victorian character of buildings in the Borough. The
secondary shopping frontages are identified on the Policies Map and a
schedule of affected properties listed in Appendix 3.
4.3.13 The Council considers its Local Shopping Centres as an important element of
its shopping strategy and therefore seeks to safeguard them in order to ensure
availability of essential local shopping facilities, providing for day-to-day needs
to all residents within reasonable walking distance. This is particularly important
for the less mobile members of the community and those who may not wish to
travel far. For this reason, in the following policy the Council’s approach is not
to permit proposals which would lead to the proportion of Class A1 uses within
Local Shopping Centres falling below 50%. The Council may permit other uses
that meet community, health or social needs (nurseries, doctor’s and dentist
surgeries, police shops, arts and cultural uses, etc.) as these are appropriate
to a shopping centre in terms of their mode of operation, appearance and
function.
4.3.14 It is recognised that at low points in the economic cycle and/or in some locations
(fringes of shopping centres or shops outside shopping centres) there could be
much reduced demand for shop units and that this can lead to long-term
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vacancies. Where a shop unit has been marketed for at least one year and
there is little prospect of it becoming occupied by new retail uses then its
continued vacancy represents a lost opportunity for other uses which could
provide accommodation for the needs of residents (e.g. social and community
uses) or for art and cultural uses.
POLICY DM9 - CHANGING THE USE OF SHOPS IN TOWN CENTRES
A. Primary Shopping Frontage of Stoke Newington District Centre
Proposals for a change of use involving ground floor Class A1 retail unit in the
primary shopping frontage of Stoke Newington Town Centre (as defined on the
Policies Map and listed in the schedule in Appendix 3) will not be permitted where
the proportion of Class A1 units in the primary shopping frontage would fall below
60% (as a proportion of total units measured across the total Primary Shopping
Frontage), taking into account unimplemented planning permission for changes of
use.
B. Secondary Shopping Frontages of Hackney Central, Stoke Newington and
Finsbury Park District Centres
In the secondary shopping frontages of Hackney Central (outside the AAP
boundary), Stoke Newington and Finsbury Park District Centres (as defined on the
Policies Map), proposals to change the use of ground floor Class A1 retail unit will
not be permitted where the proportion of A1 units in the secondary shopping
frontages would fall below 50% (as a proportion of total units measured across the
total Secondary Shopping Frontage), taking into account unimplemented planning
permission for changes of use.
C. Primary and Secondary Shopping Frontages of Major and District Town Centres
In all the primary and secondary shopping frontages of the Borough’s Major and
District Town Centres (including those defined in the Dalston and Hackney Central
AAPs), changes of use will not be permitted where one of the following applies:
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
The proposal will result in the equivalent of a group of three or more adjoining
standard size shop units being in non-retail uses;
Individually or cumulatively the development will have an adverse effect on
the vitality and viability of the centre as a whole and/or on the individual shop
unit;
The shop unit has not been marketed for a minimum of one year, with the
marketing information clearly demonstrating that there is no realistic prospect
of the unit being used for A1 retail in the foreseeable future (see Appendix
4); and
A shop front has not been retained or provided.
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D. Local Shopping Centres
Within these Centres (as defined on the Policies Map), the Council
will only permit changes of use at ground floor level from an existing
Class A1 retail use where:
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
ix.
x.
the proposal will not result in the number of units in retail (Class A1) use
falling below 50% (as a proportion of total units measured across the total
Local Shopping Centre area), taking into account unimplemented planning
permissions for changes of use;
the shop unit has been marketed for a minimum of one year and it has been
demonstrated that there is no realistic prospect of the unit being used for A1
retail purposes in the foreseeable future (see Appendix 4);
the proposal meets the needs of residents within the local neighbourhood
and/or the whole Borough;
other essential shops are within 400 metres walking distance from the centre
of the shopping centre;
The proposal will not have an adverse effect on the vitality and viability of the
centre as a whole and/or on the individual shop unit; and
a shop front is retained or provided.
4.3.15 Non designated local shopping parades have a key role in sustainable
development, providing access to day-to-day necessities, typically food,
newsagents and commercial uses with post office services, within walking
distance from home. Although there is considerable variation in their sizes,
vacancy rates and shopping function, they are important to be retained in order
to provide local facilities, for sustainability reasons, and to cater for future needs
created through population increases and higher density living. The following
policy sets out the Council’s approach towards safeguarding Class A1 uses in
local shopping parades or corner shops outside town centres and local
shopping centres.
POLICY DM10 – CHANGE OF USE OF SHOPS OUTSIDE TOWN CENTRES AND
LOCAL SHOPPING CENTRES
Individual shops not within designated town centres and Local Shopping Centres
will be safeguarded for A1 retail purposes, unless it has been demonstrated that the
shop unit has been marketed for a minimum of one year and it has been
demonstrated that there is no realistic prospect of the unit being used for A1 retail
purposes or other essential shops defined in CS Policy 13 in the foreseeable future
(see Appendix 4).
Where this has been demonstrated, the Council will permit changes of use from
Class A1 retail provided:
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i.
ii.
iii.
4.4
The use meets the needs of residents within the local neighbourhood;
There are alternative shopping facilities for local residents within reasonable
walking distance of 400 metres from the centre of the parade and its retail
character is not undermined; and
A shop front is retained or provided.
Evening and Night Time Economy
4.4.1 The Core Strategy sets out the Council’s overall spatial strategy for evening
and night time economy uses, seeking to encourage managed expansion of
such uses in town centres and limit their further expansion in South Shoreditch,
whilst making sure that the impact of such uses on residents and nonresidential uses as well as on local areas is minimised. Diversity of uses in town
centres is promoted and encouraged, including entertainment and leisure uses,
although the loss of shops is generally resisted. The Area Action Plans for
Dalston and Hackney Central also encourage the managed expansion of
evening and night-time economy uses, and direct such uses to certain locations
within the AAP areas.
4.4.2 Evening and night-time economy uses comprise a wide range of uses which
include A3 restaurants, A4 drinking establishments, A5 hot food takeaways, D2
cinemas, dance and concert halls, and bingo halls (especially where these
operate at night and have drinks licences) and some sui generis uses such as
casinos, theatres, night clubs and amusement arcades. They are an important
part of Hackney’s local economy in providing jobs and business opportunities
as well as opportunities for entertainment and socialising for residents, workers
and visitors. However, as recognised in the Core Strategy, night time activities
can also lead to problems such as noise and disturbance, anti-social behaviour,
fear of crime, and environmental degradation. This conflict can be made worse
where there is a concentration of these uses within a locality, and this has been
the case in South Shoreditch. Here the Hackney Night-Time Economy
Evidence Based Study (2005), and the Shoreditch Night Time Economy
(Evidence Base Review) 2007 both indicate that the growth in Shoreditch’s NTE
was having a negative impact on the overall resident and visitor experience, for
example, in terms of rising crime levels, environmental degradation and noise
pollution.
4.4.3 In order to mitigate these effects, the night-time economy must be managed.
Tools such as planning and licensing policies, enforcement activities, late night
transport provision, street cleansing, and policing can assist in balancing the
positive and negative impacts of the night time economy.
4.4.4 In the case of Shoreditch the Council designated, within its Licensing Policy, a
Special Policy Area (SPA) to manage the night-time economy in the area. The
affected area is indicated as Proposal 298 and shown on the Policies Map. The
area of Shoreditch not covered by the SPA status is small and, therefore, offers
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opportunity for the location of a limited number of night-time uses. Within this
SPA there is a presumption against granting any new licenses, additionally any
application for the intensification of use such as to increase either the capacity
of a premise or the hours of use is normally refused unless the applicant can
demonstrate that this will not add to the cumulative impact already being felt in
the area. Also, from a planning perspective, any planning application for new
night-time economy uses (restaurants and cafes (A3), drinking establishment
(A4), hot food takeaways (A5) and assembly and leisure (D2)) is similarly
refused unless the applicant can demonstrate that this will not add to the
cumulative impact already being felt in the area. The onus is on applicants to
prepare a convincing case regarding cumulative impact. Further detail
regarding the application of the SPA policy is outlined in Hackney’s Statement
of Licensing Policy 2011. It should also be noted that an SPA for the Dalston
Town Centre and its immediate surroundings has been adopted on 29th
January 2014.
4.4.5 The Council seeks to encourage well managed and operated night time
activities in its centres and to prevent any concentrations of such uses that
would harm Hackney’s shopping centres’ attractiveness or the amenity of
adjoining residential occupiers through managing their number and impact. The
Council also wishes to encourage a wide range of complementary night time
uses within its centres, not just those that primarily sell alcohol, to benefit a wide
range of the community.
4.4.6 Where night-time economy uses are permitted, they will need to be managed
to ensure they do not harm the amenity of local residents or non-residential
surrounding uses, either individually or cumulatively (with a particular focus on
Shoreditch and Dalston). Applicants will be required to submit management
plans detailing how the operation of their proposals will be managed in ways
that do not exacerbate potential adverse impacts. Management plans should
demonstrate how proposals satisfy both planning and licensing issues. The
Council will consider applying conditions and obligations that can help to ensure
uses operate appropriately, such as in relation to hours of operation, refuse,
noise/vibration, fumes and cooking smells, and potential anti-social behaviour
measures through a local management plan and other measures such as
CCTV and contributing towards street wardens. The Planning Service will work
closely with the Council’s Licensing and Regeneration Delivery services to
ensure full assessment of potential proposals, and to ensure strategic
management issues are co-ordinated where proposals are considered
acceptable.
4.4.7 Changes of use and development proposals for evening economy uses should
ensure that there is a clear distinction between such uses and any adjacent
uses (e.g. on upper floors, or next door), and that the evening economy use is
managed sufficiently and effectively to ensure surrounding occupiers’ amenity
is not adversely affected, and access to properties is not impeded.
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4.4.8 The following policy sets out the Council’s approach to the consideration of
proposals for evening and night-time economy uses.
POLICY DM11 - EVENING AND NIGHT-TIME ECONOMY
USES
Evening and night-time economy uses, including restaurants and cafes (A3),
drinking establishments (A4), take-aways (A5), assembly and leisure (D2) and
some sui-generis uses, should primarily be located in the Borough’s Major, District
and Local Shopping Centres, with a limited number within Shoreditch, and comply
with Policy DM7 (New Retail Development) and Policy DM9 (Changing the Use of
Shops in Town Centres). It must be demonstrated that proposals for such uses will
be well managed. The Council will seek planning contributions to mitigate the impact
of proposals where necessary, and through the use of local management plans
where appropriate. When considering planning applications for night time economy
uses the Council will give consideration to the following factors:
i.
ii.
4.4.9
The potential impact of the development on amenities of adjoining and or
adjacent residential accommodation and non-residential uses, such as
through noise disturbance, cooking smells and anti-social behaviour, and
highway safety; and
The cumulative impact of the use considering the number, capacity and
location of other night-time economy uses in the adjacent area, particularly
for proposals within Shoreditch which is part covered by a Special Policy
Area designation and Dalston.
The Council is committed to improving the health and well-being of its
residents, in line with Hackney’s Sustainable Community Strategy7, which
cites health and well-being as one of its key objectives. City and Hackney
Health and Wellbeing Profile Data Update 20148 states that childhood obesity
is a major problem in Hackney with its prevalence being amongst the highest
as recorded by National Child Measurement Programme (NCMP).
Government guidance aimed at promoting healthier communities encourages
planning authorities to manage the proliferation of fast food outlets. To this
end, the Council considers that in order to curtail the prevalence of childhood
obesity it is necessary to exercise planning mechanisms to limit access to fast
food establishments to secondary school pupils. This will require controlling
any clustering of these uses generally and restricting them to locations
beyond easy walking distance of schools. In this regard, Policy DM12 is
provided as part of the Council’s wider healthy living agenda and accessibility
to healthy food policies (see Policies DM3 and DM33).
7
http://www.hackney.gov.uk/Assets/Documents/scs.pdf
http://www.hackney.gov.uk/Assets/Documents/City_and_Hackney_Health_and_Wellbeing_Profile__data_update_2014.pdf
8
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4.4.10 This will require controlling any clustering of these uses generally and
restricting them to locations beyond easy walking distance of schools. This
would thereby deter school children from walking to premises and accessing
the products from these establishments. A report from the Nutrition Policy Unit
of London Metropolitan University9 in 2008 found that of the three sources of
food available to pupils during the school day (home, school, surrounding
area), shops and takeaways from the surrounding area were the most widely
used. The Council considers that the location of hot food takeaways within
400 metres of a secondary school contributes to obesity within the Borough.
Public health care guidance published by the National Institute for Health
Care Excellence in 201010 states that planning authorities should restrict
planning permissions for take-aways and other food retail outlets in specific
areas such as within walking distance of schools. The Council considers 400
metres to be adequate walking distance in this context.
POLICY DM12 – HOT-FOOD TAKE-AWAYS AND SCHOOLS
Proposals for hot food take-aways (A5 uses) may not be granted planning
permission if proposed within 400 metres of the boundary of a secondary school,
excluding locations in the Borough’s shopping centres.
4.5
Street Markets
4.5.1 The Core Strategy recognises the contribution of Hackney’s Street Markets to
the economic, social and cultural life of the Borough. Street Markets make an
important contribution to the variety and attraction of shopping in the Borough
and to the character of their local areas, particularly when the character of the
Street Markets contributes to enhancing available retail offer including those
from Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) communities. Street Markets are
important for the establishment of new business by Hackney residents,
especially by the BAME communities. The existing markets of Ridley Road,
Hoxton Street, Broadway Market, Kingsland Waste and Well Street are
protected, and their extent is shown on the Policies Map. The Council seeks to
promote and secure improvements to the markets’ environment and
management. Additional or expanded markets are supported, such as the
Chatsworth Road Street Market, if formally designated by the Council.
Additionally, Dalston AAP supports the improvement of Ridley Road Market.
4.5.2 The following policy sets out that Street Markets should be located within the
Borough’s Shopping Centres to complement the Centres, and add to their
9
The School Fringe: What pupils buy and eat from shops surrounding secondary schools.Sarah Sinclair and
Jack Winkler, Nutrition Policy Unit, London Metropolitan University, January 2008. found at
http://www.fhf.org.uk/meetings/2008-07-08_School_Fringe.pdf
10
http://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ph25/resources/guidance-prevention-of-cardiovascular-disease-pdf
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vitality and viability, ensuring a diverse offer of goods to the shopper. Markets
located outside of the Shopping Centres would detract from their role. The
Council would resist development proposals that would result in the loss of
markets and pitches, unless appropriate comparable reprovision is made.
4.5.3 Despite their benefits, if poorly designed or managed, markets can cause harm
to surrounding areas, for example in terms of congestion on footpaths and
roads, litter and poor refuse storage and noise. Proposals for markets should
therefore include provision for careful management and design features, and,
where appropriate, contribute towards environmental and street improvements
and initiatives such as improving areas for parking and servicing. The Council
will use conditions and/or obligations to ensure the operation of markets do not
have harmful impacts, and require detailed layout plans as part of an application
to allow consideration as to whether these matters have been properly
addressed. In addition to planning controls, the Council manages proposals for
new markets through its role in determining applications for street trading
licenses.
POLICY DM13 - STREET MARKETS
New or expanded markets should be located within the Borough’s Shopping
Centres. The Council will promote and protect markets in Hackney by:
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
4.6
Refusing permission for development which would result in the permanent
loss of markets or pitches supported by the Council unless appropriate
comparable replacement provision is made;
Safeguarding sites allocated for the storage of market equipment, market
facilities and parking for traders’ vehicles;
Normally permitting proposals for new markets and market stalls where they
would not cause individual or cumulative harm to the local area in terms of
residential amenity, pedestrian and highway safety, parking congestion or
the free flow of traffic, especially public transport;
Seeking improvements to the markets’ environment and management; and
Ensuring appropriate control of hours of operation and that adequate
arrangement is made for storage and disposal of litter and refuse, parking
and servicing.
Employment land and floorspace
4.6.1 As set out above, the Core Strategy’s position is to protect employment land
and floorspace last used for employment use anywhere in the Borough, and
seek to increase the employment offer and allocating land for employment
purposes. The policies below add more clarity and detail to the employment
policies within the Core Strategy. The policies relate to how applicants should
approach the redevelopment of employment land and floorspace, the
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circumstances where the loss of employment land and floorspace may be
acceptable, the proportion and mix of uses appropriate in the PEAs, the uses
appropriate to other designations and certain locations such as railway arches,
and the type of new employment floorspace the Borough requires. The
employment policies should be read together, particularly Policies DM14 and
DM15 which will apply in most instances where employment land and premises
are involved, and Policy DM17 will also apply where a site is located in a PEA.
4.6.2 Whilst the suite of employment policies contained in this chapter provide a level
of flexibility which aims to recognise individual site characteristics and to allow
supporting uses to cross subsidise the improvement of employment floorspace
where appropriate, the underlying purpose of the policies is to protect and
where possible enhance the employment potential of employment land and
buildings. Hackney has a limited reservoir of designated employment land.
Together PEAs and the CAZ represent only approximately 6% of the Borough’s
total land area. This limited supply will come under increasing pressure
following the Government’s changes to permitted development rights governing
the change of use of offices to residential. The Council has been successful in
having its area of CAZ along with a number of PEAs and town centre sites
exempt from these changes as shown in Figure 1. Whilst this is positive, a
number of designated and non-designated employment sites across the
Borough will be affected by the changes meaning it is especially important that
the employment potential of sites is protected and enhanced over the life of this
plan.
4.6.3 Once the scale of impact from the Government’s changes is more fully known,
the Council may use Article 4 Directions or impose conditions on planning
permission to restrict permitted development rights and to control the change
of use of business premises in the Borough’s non-exempt employment
designations and Shopping Centres.
4.7
Retention of Employment Land and Floorspace
4.7.1 The Council’s employment policies seek to promote and focus preferred types
of employment generating activities in the main types of employment areas
identified by Core Strategy Policy 17, and to protect employment
land/floorspace anywhere in the Borough. Nevertheless, it understands that
some commercial uses may no longer be viable, and that such land and
floorspace needs to adapt to changing economic circumstances, avoiding the
long term protection of sites where there is no reasonable prospect of a site
being used for that purpose, having regard to market signals, and allowing
improvement and the introduction of new uses on such land, to support the
creation of employment and location of businesses within the Borough. It is
important though that sufficient employment land and floorspace is available to
supply future upswings in the economic climate and demand for premises and
land. The Council supports the provision of more modern, high quality
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employment floorspace with better facilities which can lead to better quality jobs
and higher density employment.
4.7.2 Policy DM14 sets out the criteria for proposals for the redevelopment of sites
containing employment land and floorspace, and where the loss of employment
land and floorspace may be considered acceptable. The starting point for
considering the redevelopment of such land and floorspace is the commercial
opportunities and potential of sites, and applicants need to demonstrate that
they have fully considered these when submitting an application. Applicants
should demonstrate through marketing evidence that their development
proposals are providing the maximum economically feasible amount of
employment land and floorspace possible for the site. This evidence should
include marketing the site for a range of employment or employment-led
scenarios. Only after it has been satisfactorily demonstrated that a commercial
or primarily employment-led scheme is not possible for a site will a nonemployment-led or non-employment scheme be considered, taking into
account site characteristics and the need not to undermine the long term
functioning of the area as an employment location. Where a scheme is not
employment-led an uplift in employment floorspace compared to the existing
quantity should be delivered. This should be possible in many instances given
that sites are generally being redeveloped at higher densities. If not, the Council
will consider other benefits offered by the scheme, including the comparison
between the number and quality of jobs between the existing or former use and
the proposed use. Clear and robust marketing evidence must demonstrate that
there is no demand for use of land or floorspace as it exists, or alternatively for
employment purposes if reconfigured into smaller units, or for alternative
employment generating use. Alternative employment generating uses will
generally include non B class uses which have similar operational requirements
and generate comparable employment density. It must also be demonstrated
that these uses will not impact on the function of nearby B class use and that
they are appropriate in amenity terms where part of mixed use development.
D2 and certain Sui Generis uses such as Police Facilities are examples of
alternative employment generating uses. The requirements for marketing
evidence are contained within Appendix 4.
4.7.3 For incremental staged schemes proposing amendments to existing planning
permissions as change of use of commercial floorspace to non-commercial
floorspace, in particular to residential C3 use, applicants must justify to the
Council’s satisfaction why the entirety of the approved scheme was not initially
developed together with marketing information submitted to justify the loss of
commercial floorspace. The loss of some floorspace or land may be considered
acceptable if it is evident that the development will provide the maximum
economically feasible amount of employment floorspace reasonably possible
on the site with higher grade employment premises, and with a high density of
employment, and that it has been demonstrated that the commercial land and
floorspace has a very strong prospect of being occupied. These requirements
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should be demonstrated as part of a marketing strategy also outlined within
Appendix 4.
4.7.4 Additionally, the Council is committed to ensuring that residents seeking work
have the right skills to gain employment, and that employment opportunities
exist. The reduction in employment land and floorspace in the Borough, and
thus potential employment opportunities, can partially be mitigated against by
assisting residents gain apprenticeships, and attendance on training
programmes.
4.7.5 As such, Policy DM14 sets out the criteria that need to be satisfied for
redevelopment proposals on sites containing employment land and floorspace.
The policy is also applicable to proposals in PEAs and proposals in PEAs
should satisfy both Policy DM17 and Policy DM14.
POLICY DM14 – RETENTION OF EMPLOYMENT LAND AND
FLOORSPACE
When considering the redevelopment of sites, applicants must firstly consider the
commercial opportunities and potential of that land and floorspace, and
demonstrate in the first instance that the maximum economically feasible amount of
employment land and floorspace possible has been examined through the
submission of marketing evidence (see Appendix 4).
Where the above has been demonstrated, the loss of employment floorspace will
only be permitted where:
i.
ii.
iii.
Additional robust marketing evidence is submitted which demonstrates (see
sections 1.8 – 1.10 of Appendix 4) that there has been no demand for the
existing or vacant land and floorspace for its current or former use, and the
possibility of retaining, reusing or redeveloping it for similar or alternative
smaller or more flexible units for employment generating use, or other
alternative employment generating use has been fully explored;
Any new employment use provides a range of higher quality, more flexible
floorspace and preferably a higher density employment than the previous use
(in accordance with Policy CS18 and Policy DM15); and
It is demonstrated that the new commercial floorspace being provided has
a strong likelihood of being occupied through the submission of a detailed
marketing strategy (refer to Appendix 4).
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Exempt Areas
Priority Employment Areas not exempt
Figure 1: Areas Exempt from Office to Residential Permitted Development Rights
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4.8
New Business Floorspace
4.8.1 Core Strategy Policy 18 essentially sets out replacement commercial
floorspace should be of high quality and should meet the up-to-date needs of
businesses in the Borough or seeking to locate in the Borough. New business
floorspace needs to be designed to respond to changing economic conditions
and support economic growth. Unless it is demonstrated that a commercial
occupier is lined up for employment land/floorspace and has particular
requirements from the premises or land being developed, proposals should
incorporate flexible design features to provide future adaptability for a range of
uses and occupants, such as small and medium sized companies and ‘startup’ businesses. Premises should have good natural lighting (and avoid
basement and windowless offices). Flexible design features include:







Adequate floor to ceiling heights (at least 3 metres of free space, but up to a
minimum of 5 metres in industrial buildings to allow for the introduction of
mezzanines) with few supporting columns, if this can be avoided;
Strategic lay-out of entrances, entry cores, lift cores, loading facilities and fire
escapes, to allow mixing of uses within the building;
Availability of a range of unit sizes and types suitable for occupation by small,
medium and large businesses (where appropriate);
Grouping of services, plumbing, electrics, cabling, communications
infrastructure and circulation;
Flexible ground floor access systems that can easily be adapted for goods
delivery (e.g. through adaptable façade panels);
Good standards of insulation to mitigate any overspill from future alternative
uses in the building, and good natural daylight;
Other details such as super-fast broadband connections where appropriate,
meeting room facilities, flexible desk arrangements, service lifts, and flexible
space for events.
4.8.2 Proposals that provide mixed-use or differing commercial uses must be
designed to demonstrate there is adequate separation of uses, reducing the
impacts of horizontal or vertical adjoining uses to ensure high standards of
amenity. In support of paragraph 6.63 of the Core Strategy all applications
incorporating new business floorspace should be accompanied by a marketing
strategy demonstrating that the above design parameters have been
incorporated where appropriate. The following policy sets out the type of new
or replacement floorspace that is required.
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POLICY DM15 - NEW BUSINESS FLOORSPACE
Where development proposals involve or require the provision of new business (B1)
floorspace, either in commercial or mixed-use schemes, the Council will require the
provision of well designed, high quality buildings and floorspace incorporating a
range of unit sizes and types that are flexible, with good natural light, suitable for
sub-division and configuration for new uses and activities, including for occupation
by small or independent commercial enterprises11. All applications incorporating
new business floorspace should include a marketing strategy (refer to Appendix 4)
which demonstrates the design and layout of the proposed floorspace is of a high
quality, is flexible and meets the needs of likely end users.
4.9
Affordable Workspace
4.9.1 The Borough has a strong concentration of Small and Medium Sized
Enterprises (SMEs) and start-up businesses, and has strong demand for
buildings and floorspace for a range of commercial activities, particularly within
the knowledge-based and creative and cultural sectors. The provision of
affordable SME space is supported by the Hackney Employment Growth
Options Study (2006) (updated in 2010), a local employment land review report
and other on-going secondary evidence, which state that there is significant
evidence supporting the adoption of Local Plan policies which aim to increase
the availability of sites and premises for small businesses in Hackney. The
report goes to state that ‘the mismatch between the supply of and demand for
B1 premises in Hackney largely is explained by the current supply being
inappropriate in terms of location, type and/or cost. Indeed, the findings of this
study indicate that affordability of premises is a particularly important factor
which determines the ability of small firms to become established and grow.
Indeed, our business survey and that provided by other recent research
projects indicates that cost of rents and poor availability of suitable premises
are the main factors in driving companies out of the Borough. The cost of most
B1 supply in Hackney is at a price significantly higher than the rents small
businesses are seeking to pay. The Hackney Employment Growth Options
Study suggests that suitable and affordable workspaces need to be provided
and preserved given that there is market failure in this area and that they are
essential to Hackney’s economic vitality and catalyst for regeneration. The
findings also show that businesses seek affordable small offices, studios or
workspace with favourable lease or license conditions, and many SMEs and
11
Small or micro workspaces are units with a net floorspace of around 90sq.m or less in the B1(a), (b) and (c)
and B2 use classes and 70sq.m for retail uses, which provide for a range of uses, and where appropriate,
flexibility between uses (for example small offices and light industrial studios). This information is based on an
assessment of existing premises, Hackney’s Retail Health Check 2010 and the GLA's London Small Shops Study
June 2010.
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start-ups with the potential for financial self-sufficiency have particular needs
that often cannot be met by market rent levels.
4.9.2 London Plan Policy 4.1 identifies the need to ensure a good supply of
workspace in terms of type, size and cost, supporting infrastructure and suitable
environments for larger employers and small and medium enterprises,
including the voluntary and community sectors. In light of this the Council’s Core
Strategy sets out the need for smaller employment space that is affordable and
easily sub-divided for different uses to meet the needs of a rapid expansion of
micro and small businesses in certain parts of the Borough as set out in the
Delivering Sustainable Growth Chapter (Chapter 3).
4.9.3 There is a need, therefore, for the provision of affordable employment
floorspace within the Borough. This can partly be secured through development
and through planning agreements as part of mixed use development. The
following policy, therefore, sets out that the Council will seek the inclusion of a
proportion of affordable workspace, or the reprovision of such floorspace, within
major commercial development schemes (generally B1 and B2 development),
and within major mixed-use schemes in the Borough’s designated employment
areas. The Council’s first preference is for any affordable workspace to be
secured through legal agreement with a Council registered workspace provider.
The commercial terms relating to the affordable workspace are to be agreed
between the applicant and the Council registered workspace provider and
detailed within the associated legal agreement. Where this is not possible
because the applicant wishes to either manage the space themselves or in
association with a provider not registered with the Council, the Council will
consider affordable workspace to be where rent and service charges, excluding
business support services, are at least 20% less than comparable local market
rates in perpetuity (although it is noted that, for some sectors and locations,
much reduced rents may be needed to render them affordable to target
occupiers such as locations in the Shoreditch and Wenlock PEAs). Proof of
effective management arrangements will be required and secured via legal
agreement to ensure the space is suitable for immediate occupation and
remains available for business in need of below market rent floorspace.
4.9.4 A ‘significant element’ of affordable workspace will depend on the size of the
development scheme and the type of occupier (for instance, if the proposal is
for one main occupier), and the viability of providing affordable workspace. As
a guide, major developments should provide at least 10% of total gross
commercial floorspace as affordable workspace. This is in addition to ensuring
existing businesses are also reprovided for, where appropriate in any
redevelopment of sites, given it is the Council’s ambition to allow existing
business to remain and grow in size as well as attract new businesses to the
Borough.
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4.9.5 The design of workspace for small or micro enterprises will vary, depending on
the end occupier or sector. In general, however, applicants should demonstrate
that workspace is flexible in compliance with Policy DM15. Applicants will also
be required to demonstrate likely lease terms for target sectors, and where
appropriate make provision for short-term, flexible 'all-in' or 'meanwhile' leases,
and/or letting space on a per-desk rather than per-square-foot basis. Where
affordable workspace is to be provided, it is important that developers initiate
dialogue with a Council registered workspace provider early on in the preapplication stage and that at the planning application stage a workspace
provider is identified. A list of the Council’s registered workspace providers can
be found on the Council’s web site at:
http://www.hackney.gov.uk/Assets/Documents/Workspace-Providers-List.pdf
4.9.6 The following policy sets out the Council’s requirements in terms of the
provision of affordable workspace in development schemes.
POLICY DM16 - AFFORDABLE WORKSPACE
The Council will seek 10% of the new floorspace within major commercial
development schemes12 in the Borough, and within new major mixed-use schemes
in the Borough’s designated employment areas, to be affordable workspace, subject
to scheme viability.
The applicant should submit evidence of agreement to lease the workspace
preferably in association with a Council registered workspace provider. Under this
preferred option the commercial terms to be agreed between the applicant and
Council registered workspace provider are to be secured via legal agreement.
If on-site provision is not possible, financial contributions for equivalent off-site
provision will be sought.
In addition, proposals for the redevelopment of existing low value employment
floorspace reliant on less than market-level rent should reprovide such floorspace
suitable, in terms of design, rents and service charges, for these existing uses,
subject to scheme viability, current lease arrangements and the desire of existing
businesses to remain on-site.
4.10
Development within PEAs
4.10.1 Core Strategy Policy 17 sets that the “Council will encourage economic
development, growth and promotion of effective use of land through the
identification and regeneration of sites for employment generating uses, the
promotion of employment clusters and the encouragement of mixed use
12
Major schemes are development where the floor space will be more than 1,000sq.m (or the site area is more
than 0.1 hectare).
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development with a strong viable employment component that meets the
identified needs of the area…” It goes on to set out the types of uses appropriate
in the employment designations (Strategic Industrial Land (SIL), Locally
Significant Industrial Sites (LSISs), Other Industrial Areas (OIAs) and Priority
Employment Areas (PEAs). Hackney Wick AAP provides more detail on the
types of uses appropriate to the SIL, OIAs and LSISs within its boundaries.
4.10.2 Policy DM14 which applies to all employment land and floorspace and Policy
DM17 which covers sites in PEAs should be read together. In relation to PEAs,
CS Policy 17 states that “Business (B1), Hotels (C1) and Non-residential (D1)
Institutions will be the preferred uses. C1 and D1 uses will only be allowed in
PEAs with a PTAL score of 5 or above or PEAs adjacent to the identified town
centres. In PEAs outside town centres, a sequential approach should be
followed by any proposal of a use prioritised for town centres as set in the
London Plan and the NPPF. New A Class and residential (C3) uses may be
acceptable in PEAs, as long as auxiliary to business, hotel and non-residential
institutions development and where not considered to draw trade away from
existing retail centres identified in CS Policy 13 to the detriment of their vitality
and viability.”
4.10.3 The Council has received a number of pre-application schemes and planning
applications for mixed use proposals within PEAs following the adoption of this
policy, with proposals heavily in favour of residential (C3) use, and also
proposals for solely residential use. The approval of such schemes has the
potential to erode this important employment designation to protect land and
floorspace in the Borough. The below policy and supporting text is aimed at
ensuring this does not happen.
4.10.4 The key purpose of PEAs, as set out in the Hackney Employment Growth
Options Study 2006, is that they “should resemble the core portfolio of existing
employment land assets that should be safeguarded for employment use”, and
in Atkins 2010 that the promotion of other uses should, “…seek to retain the
primary function of these areas as employment (B use) locations. In considering
proposals, particular emphasis should be given to the need not to compromise
the ongoing operations of existing businesses in the area. Furthermore,
proposals should not be encouraged where they are likely to limit or prevent
investment opportunities for B use businesses in the area. If the proposal is
likely to undermine the long-term functioning of the area as an employment (B
use) location, such proposals should be discouraged.” Atkins also
recommended that B2 and B8 uses would be acceptable in PEAs.
4.10.5 The 2006 Study goes on to suggest “the introduction of a site-specific allocation
type which promotes employment-led mixed use development (i.e.
development that has a higher concentration of employment uses, yet may
require a non-B-class component in order to facilitate the development).”
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4.10.6 The principle that A and C3 uses may be acceptable if they function in a
‘supporting capacity’ for redevelopment to assist with the viability and quality of
the replacement employment floorspace generally is acceptable in certain
circumstances, but does not necessarily give the green light to A and C3 uses,
and even C1 and D1 uses, at the expense of the core employment uses in
every site in PEAs. Thus, clarity is needed on the definition of ‘auxiliary’ and the
balance of uses allowed in PEAs. This is provided below and in the following
policy. If the balance of residential or retail floorspace, or even C1 and D1 uses,
exceeds the amount of employment floorspace (generally B class floorspace)
then the PEAS may well be undermined.
4.10.7 Subject to satisfying the requirements of Policy DM14 ‘Retention of
Employment Land and Floorspace’, additional uses are acceptable if secondary
to the ‘primary’ employment use, in that the majority of floorspace should be for
the primary employment use, and that such additional uses, particularly
residential, should not compromise the on-going operations of adjacent
businesses, and the amenity of potential occupiers of the residential component
should not suffer from a poor level of amenity. In exceptional circumstances,
the amount of non-employment floorspace may exceed employment floorspace
where a location requires a range of land use types at a high density; this is
mainly relevant to Dalston PEA. In such circumstances, the economically
feasible amount of commercial floorspace should be maximised, preferably
resulting in a significant uplift in such floorspace along with the introduction of
a mix of uses as part of any larger redevelopment scheme.
4.10.8 Also, clarity is needed on the location of B2 and B8 uses in the PEAs. Although
these uses do not fit the profile of a re-structuring economy, they are important
employment-generators and businesses for local people, and assist in serving
the London economy. Given the loss of large areas of industrial land in the
Lower Lea Valley and more specifically the Olympic Park (which incorporates
the Borough’s SIL designation), appropriate sites for these uses are very
limited. Thus, the following policy clarifies that the continued location, extension
and new development of B2 and B8 uses in PEAs is acceptable if appropriate
to the location and site characteristics.
4.10.9 London Plan policy 2.11 on CAZ states that the Mayor will, and boroughs and
other relevant agencies should “ensure that development proposals to increase
office floorspace within CAZ…include a mix of uses including housing, unless
such a mix would demonstrably conflict with other policies in this Plan…” The
purpose of the CAZ policy is essentially to protect and increase office
floorspace within that zone, thus applications to redevelop office floorspace
should preferably increase the amount of office floorspace, while allowing the
inclusion of residential use as long as auxiliary to the main employment use
and appropriate to the location.
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4.10.10 Thus, the following policy also sets out the requirements for at least reprovison
but preferably uplift of office floorspace in the CAZ and Shoreditch and Wenlock
PEAs. Proposals within those PEAs but outside of the CAZ should comply with
the other main requirements of Policy DM17. Proposals in the CAZ for
redevelopment of floorspace other than office floorspace must comply with the
other requirements of Policy DM17. In PEAs located outside town centres a
sequential approach and impact assessment should be followed by any
proposer of a use prioritised for town centres as set out in the London Plan and
NPPF, including the need for an impact assessment, in compliance with Policy
DM7 and paragraph 4.2.2.
4.10.11 Policy DM17 needs to be read together with Policies DM14, DM15, and DM16.
Specifically in relation to Policy DM14, an applicant must consider the
commercial opportunities and potential use of a site in the first instance, and
seek to maximise its employment potential. The additional requirement in Policy
DM17 is that, if a mixed-use scheme is acceptable, the majority of the
floorspace must be for commercial, employment-generating use unless
satisfying the criteria in the policy. An additional policy context is that the
complete loss of commercial floorspace in a proposed scheme in PEAs will not
be granted planning permission in any circumstance. Policy DM17 supersedes
policies 11.1 and 12.1 on employment land contained in the Council’s adopted
South Shoreditch SPD. That SPD will be reviewed in due course.
POLICY DM17 - DEVELOPMENT PROPOSALS IN PRIORITY
EMPLOYMENT AREAS (PEAS)
B1, B2 and B8 uses are appropriate uses within PEAs. A Class, C1, C3 and D1
uses are considered acceptable within PEAs, subject to the following criteria:
i.
ii.


Proposals must satisfy the requirements of Policies DM7, DM14, DM15 and
DM16;
C1 and C3 uses as part of mixed use schemes are acceptable in the following
circumstances:
As part of an employment-led mixed use development including conversion
schemes where proposals for such development must ensure that the
commercial use is the primary use, in that the majority of floorspace should
be for such use; and
Appropriate to the characteristics and functioning of the site and will not
compromise the on-going operations of businesses in the PEA.
In exceptional circumstances, such as for proposals within Dalston PEA, and where
there are strong planning reasons or other material considerations, the amount of
C1 and C3 floorspace may exceed commercial floorspace if meeting the second
bulleted criteria above. The amount of commercial floorspace proposed should
match existing or preferably result in a significant uplift in floorspace.
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C1 and D1 uses are generally only appropriate in areas with a PTAL rating of 5 or
above.
Proposals solely for residential use within PEAs will be refused planning permission.
The change of use of ground floor commercial uses to residential use will generally
not be permitted, a wide range of non-residential uses should be considered.
D2 and sui generis uses may be acceptable where they are considered to be
‘alternative employment generating uses’ consistent with paragraph 4.7.2 and it is
not possible to provide the other uses identified for PEAs (as demonstrated through
marketing evidence).
Proposals for development that are within the Shoreditch and Wenlock PEAs and
the Central Activities Zone (CAZ) to redevelop office floorspace must reprovide,
and should result in an increase of office floorspace compared to the existing
amount.
4.11
Railway Arches
4.11.1 The Core Strategy and Policy DM17 set out the mix of uses appropriate within
the Council’s employment designations. Hackney contains a number of railway
arches with adjacent land. Railway arches and adjacent land, both inside and
outside of those designations, provide good sites for the location of some of the
‘heavier’ type industries, such as B2 and B8 uses, which they have traditionally
been used for. Although these uses do not fit the profile of a re-structuring
economy, they are important employment-generators and businesses for local
people, and assist in serving the London economy. Many of them provide
relatively cheap accommodation for a range of activities which play an essential
role in the functioning of the local economy. Also, space within railway arches
can be flexible and used innovatively to provide other employment-generating
uses, such as a range of B1 activities e.g. workshops. A1 and A3 uses may
also be appropriate in certain locations in order to upgrade such premises.
4.11.2 Thus, in order to protect and support the continued use of railway arches and
adjacent land for ‘heavier type’ industries, but to facilitate a wider range of uses
and activities and encourage the upgrade of railway arches, the following policy
is applied. In certain locations, railway arches can very successfully contribute
to the regeneration and visual improvement of town centre and edge-of-centre
locations, through accommodating active frontage uses and accommodating
new vibrant uses. Proposals for town centre uses (e.g. Classes A1, A3, D2
uses) must meet the requirements for sequential approach and impact
assessment for such uses proposed outside of designated Shopping Centres,
and comply with other policies in this Plan namely Policies DM7, DM11, DM1
and DM2 for example.
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POLICY DM18 - RAILWAY ARCHES
Railway arches are appropriate for B1, B2, B8, and other similar sui generis uses.
Proposals for such uses must not cause adverse environmental, highway or
amenity impacts to other uses within the surrounding area. Other commercial uses
may be appropriate, such as A and D class uses, for arches in certain locations,
provided they meet the sequential approach for such uses outside of the Borough’s
Shopping Centres and comply with other policies in this plan.
Proposals should:
i.
ii.
iii.
Incorporate active frontage uses where appropriate, and result in the
upgrade and appearance of the premises;
Not obstruct the public highway; and
Not result in the significant loss of any existing employment generating use.
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PROVIDING BETTER
HOMES
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CHAPTER 5: PROVIDING BETTER HOMES
5.1.1
As set out in the Council’s Core Strategy, Hackney needs to deliver different
housing types at varying levels of size and affordability to meet peoples’
individual needs. Hackney requires development management policies which
support the Core Strategy’s spatial approach to housing growth, which enable
the Council to meet its London Plan’s housing target of 1160 dwellings per
annum, and assist in the delivery of much needed affordable housing.
However, this approach needs to balance the needs of housing delivery with
other uses, (for example, employment land and floorspace), as well as
providing clear requirements for other sources of new housing and ensuring
that development will contribute towards any upgrades or the provision of new
supporting infrastructure where necessary.
5.1.2
Large, readily available brownfield sites in Hackney are scarce, so it is
essential that development makes best use of the limited land resources
available. However some locations (such as protected employment sites), will
be unsuitable for wholly residential developments. Core Strategy Policies 1
and 13 set out locations where the bulk of Hackney’s housing and economic
growth will take place. The Council’s emerging Site Allocations Local Plan
(SALP), and the AAPs for Dalston, Hackney Central, Hackney Wick and
Manor House, identify and allocate key strategic sites for such uses.
5.2
General approach to housing delivery and loss of housing
5.2.1
Hackney’s general approach to housing growth is set out by Core Strategy
Policy 19. Key aims of this policy are to resist the loss of family
accommodation, promote the provision of new family accommodation,
provide a mix of housing to meet identified needs of different households and
local communities, and overall, protect the current housing stock from net loss
of units unless acceptable plans are in place for replacement development.
The Council is currently completing a new Strategic Housing Market
Assessment to further inform local housing need. This will support the review
of the Core Strategy currently scheduled to commence in 2015 as well as any
update to ‘Table 1 – Preferred Dwelling Mix’ as appropriate. Furthermore, the
Council has completed an Accommodation Needs Assessment for Gypsies
and Travellers.
5.2.2
However, as part of managing the overall approach of housing growth in
Hackney, the Council recognises there are circumstances where site
redevelopment will be fundamentally necessary to improve existing
properties. For example, with the redevelopment of social housing estates,
the solution to improve and modernise such estates may necessitate the
selective demolition of some properties, resulting in a net loss of housing. Net
loss of units could also occur where a proposal is sought to create more family
housing in place of smaller homes either by the amalgamation of smaller units
into larger properties or where complete demolition and reconstruction would
take place on the same site. The Council will normally resist the
redevelopment, amalgamation, and demolition of housing where this would
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result in a net loss of dwellings or floorspace, unless the housing is replaced
with better quality accommodation and a better mix that meets Hackney’s
housing needs and in most circumstances with at least equivalent floorspace.
5.2.3
Additionally, there may be locations where a current residential use is
incompatible with the surrounding area, for example due to noise or access
issues. Some loss of residential use might also be acceptable in locations
close to industrial areas where the quality of the residential environment
would be compromised. The particular circumstances of listed buildings and
disused accommodation over shops may also merit changes of use from
housing to ensure improvement and reuse of dilapidated buildings. In other
circumstances, and subject to compliance with all applicable policies, the loss
of a residential unit to enable the provision of a community facility such as a
school or place of worship may constitute an acceptable change of use, if
suitable alternative sites are not available, the community facility can only be
provided by use of a residential building, and there is demonstrable demand
for the non-residential use. The latter will be subject to the proposal not
resulting in an over-concentration of similar uses in the immediate area as to
cause negative cumulative impacts on the character and function of the area
including local amenity and transportation. Some proposals for changes of
residential uses to supported housing may also be acceptable. Changes of
use from residential to ‘bed and breakfast’ accommodation could be
acceptable if compliant with Policy DM27 (Hotels). The need for any change
of use resulting in the loss of housing must be fully justified to the Council’s
satisfaction, through supporting information.
5.2.4
The following policies build on Core Strategy Policy 19 in relation to the
general presumption in favour of housing unless proposals significantly
conflict with other Local Plan policies, and set out criteria where the loss of
dwellings and residential floorspace may be considered acceptable.
POLICY DM19 - GENERAL APPROACH TO NEW HOUSING DEVELOPMENT
There is a general presumption in favour of housing, particularly affordable housing
(including social/affordable rented and intermediate housing) to meet identified
housing need, in the Borough. Proposals for new housing development will be
permitted provided they would not adversely conflict with other policies in this Plan
or the Council’s Local Plan, particularly in relation to design quality, amenity,
environmental sustainability, employment land and floorspace, and the Borough’s
Shopping Centres.
Major residential and mixed use proposals will be appropriate on land safeguarded
for such uses within the Site Allocations Local Plan, and sites within the Dalston,
Hackney Central, Hackney Wick and Manor House Area Action Plans, and other
sites in the Borough subject to compliance with other Local Plan policies.
The Council will resist the development of alternative uses on identified sites which
are considered particularly suitable for general housing and supported housing.
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Conversions of houses into flats, and changes of use from non-residential uses
into residential, and extensions and renovations, may be supported if considered
appropriate against other Local Plan policies including those within this Plan.
POLICY DM20 - LOSS OF HOUSING
The redevelopment, conversion or change of use of land or buildings involving loss
of residential floorspace will only be permitted where:
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
The land or buildings are no longer fit-for-purpose or it is considered
inappropriate to re-provide residential accommodation;
Replacement housing of an appropriate type is being provided at an
equivalent or higher density, or can help to address an identified housing
need;
Redevelopment is necessary to create better quality homes and dwelling
mix, and improve the living environment, as part of major regeneration
schemes;
A proposal seeks to combine small dwellings to create larger dwellings (e.g.
3 or 4 bedroom dwelling);
The proposal will enable sub-standard units to be enlarged to meet
residential space standards;
The change of use is from residential to supported housing (subject to the
requirements for supported housing as set out in Policy DM26);
The site or building is in the right location to be used for an essential
community use for which there is demonstrable need, and can only be
provided by use of a residential building, providing it would not result in an
over-concentration of similar uses in the immediate area which would have
negative cumulative impacts on the character and function of an area
including local amenity and transportation impacts (See Policies DM2 and
DM45;
The site or building is in an Employment Land Designation (i.e. PEA, LSIS,
OIA or SIL), and the change of use is to an employment use.
Proposals to sub-divide property may be acceptable (e.g. conversion from house to
flats). Conversely, the Council will support the reversion of flats back to the original
use of the property as a house, provided that the reversion would not lead to the
loss of three or more dwellings, or the net loss of a family dwelling (refer also to
Policy DM23).
5.3
Affordable Housing
5.3.1
The NPPF defines affordable housing as “social rented, affordable rented and
intermediate housing, provided to eligible households whose needs are not
met by the market. Eligibility is determined with regard to local incomes and
local house prices. Affordable housing should include provisions to remain at
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an affordable price for future eligible households or for the subsidy to be
recycled for alternative affordable housing provision”. The definition is further
expanded in Annex 2: Glossary to the NPPF.
5.3.2
The London Plan Policy 3.11 states that an average of at least 13,200 more
affordable homes per year is needed in London. However, it sets out an
annual monitoring housing provision target of 1,160 dwellings for Hackney
covering the period 2011 – 2021, which is subject to adjustment against any
future revised London housing targets. Hackney aims to deliver a minimum of
580 ‘affordable’ dwellings each year over this period in accordance with its
Core Strategy Policy 20, which seeks to meet a borough-wide affordable
housing target of 50% of all developments comprising 10 dwelling units or
more subject to site characteristics, location and overall scheme viability. Both
the 2009 Hackney Housing Needs Assessment and 2011 update identified a
future need for affordable housing that is significantly greater than recent and
projected supply, particularly for families and newly forming households.
Hackney’s 2011/12 Annual Monitoring Report (AMR) notes that there were
18,688 households on the housing waiting list in Hackney. The numbers are
expected to increase while the present high rates of affordable housing
delivery are expected to fall from the monitoring year 2011/12 onwards, along
with the number of overall social rent lettings.
5.3.3
Core Strategy Policy 20 sets a target that 50% of the dwellings on schemes
of 10 or more units should be ‘affordable’ housing. Of this 50%, the preferred
mix would be 60% social rented (including affordable rent, see below) and
40% intermediate, in line with the Mayor of London’s current target. This will
be revised if local circumstances dictate the need for an alternative
breakdown.
5.3.4
In December 2010, the Government introduced a range of changes to
housing legislation by creating a new category of ‘Affordable Rent’. The
Council recognises the implications for the delivery and affordability of
Affordable Housing (including affordable and social rented elements) resulting
from the adoption of these changes, the Revised Early Minor Alterations to
the London Plan and the subsequent limited availability of grant funding for
such elements. The Council will continue to work to seek to retain/provide as
many affordable homes as possible (which is an identified priority for the
Council), including as part of the London Borough of Hackney Framework
Agreement, part of the Mayor’s Housing Covenant (2015 – 2018 Programme).
This framework includes principles to guide the delivery of affordable housing
including setting rent levels for ‘affordable rent’ components that are more
affordable for local incomes (refer also to para 5.3.14).
5.3.5
To meet the Council's targets for affordable housing delivery, proposed
schemes will need to consider a number of criteria, such as housing mix,
viability, and maximising the delivery of affordable housing on-site. The NPPF
states that local plans should set policies to meet identified need for affordable
housing on a site, unless off-site provision or a financial contribution of broadly
equivalent value can be robustly justified. The London Plan states that
“Affordable housing provision is normally required on-site. In exceptional
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circumstances it may be provided off-site or through a cash in lieu contribution
ring fenced, and if appropriate ‘pooled’, to secure efficient delivery of new
affordable housing on identified sites elsewhere.” The Core Strategy (CS
Policy 20) sets out a sequence that affordable housing should be delivered
on-site in the first instance, off-site provision may be considered in exceptional
circumstances and in-lieu contributions as a last resort. The Mayor of
London’s Housing Supplementary Planning Guidance (adopted November
2012) sets out these exceptional circumstances.
5.3.6
An additional exceptional circumstance to those set out in the Mayor’s
Housing SPG is that, where off-site provision of affordable housing is
permitted, the alternative sites selected should preferably be in the ‘vicinity’ of
the main application site to ensure the benefits of the affordable housing
provision are realised locally. As a guide, vicinity could be considered as
within a 10 minute walking distance or 800 metres from the main application
site; the precise location(s) will be considered on a case by case basis. An
assessment area of mixed tenure should be based on the Mayor’s Housing
SPG suggestion of a Middle Super Output Area, which is a reasonable size
assessment area for the Hackney context.
5.3.7
Where the policy requirements of CS Policy 20 and DMLP Policy 21 cannot
be achieved because of viability reasons, the applicant must demonstrate
through an ‘open book’ development appraisal why on-site provision cannot
be delivered. CS Policy 20 states that the GLA’s Affordable Housing Toolkit
Assessment or a similar scheme appraisal model should be used in
presenting the viability of a scheme.
5.3.8
The fragmentation or part-development of a site could mean an application is
submitted where the development does meet the 10 unit threshold for
affordable housing provision. The Council will consider such piecemeal
development or phasing to assess the capability of each site to meet the
threshold. Similarly, if a proposal is considered to ‘under-develop’ a site, the
Council will consider negotiating an increase in the number of residential units
and thus affordable housing provision, or consider refusing the proposal.
5.3.9
In order to help guard against this, the following policy incorporates an
additional threshold to that contained in CS Policy 20, this being that
residential developments with a site area of more than 1000 sq.m or 0.1ha
will also be required to provide affordable housing in line with the other
requirements of CS Policy 20.
5.3.10 Hackney’s Housing Supply and Delivery report shows that during the years
2006 - 2009 some 2089 units were delivered on sites ranging from 0.01 –
0.124 ha in size. There is a lack of available brownfield development land in
Hackney, with completed densities varying from 126 to 365 Dwellings per
Hectare (DpH), giving a Borough average of 240 DpH.
5.3.11 Therefore, it is considered that a site of 1000 sq.m (0.1 ha) can comfortably
accommodate 10 units with a mixture of unit sizes, particularly where a
proposal is seeking to construct flats. For this reason, the Council does not
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consider it unreasonable to seek affordable housing from sites of 1000 sq.m
90.1 ha).
5.3.12 This approach conforms with policy 3.12 of the London Plan 2011, which
requires that boroughs seek the maximum reasonable amount of affordable
housing from individual residential and mixed use schemes.
5.3.13 The integrated housing management of different tenures should be
considered at the start of the detailed design and layout of the site. Private
developers are expected to engage with a Registered Provider (RP) early on
in the pre-application stage and to identify the RP who will deliver the
affordable housing prior to the determination of the planning application. All
developers are advised to liaise with the Council's Housing Directorate
Enabling Team (where there is a residential element) particularly at the preapplication stage. A list of RPs approved by the Council can be found on the
Council's website: http://www.hackney.gov.uk/affordable-housing-spd.htm
5.3.14 For ‘Affordable Rent’, the Council would encourage developers to fully
familiarise themselves with the Council’s Position Statement on the Mayor’s
Housing Covenant Programme 2015-2018 as updated from time to time:
http://www.hackney.gov.uk/Assets/Documents/Hackney-housinginvestment-guidance-2015-18.pdf This position statement provides
guidelines for the GLA's Investment Partners operating in Hackney, to help
shape the local outcomes the Council would like to see from the future
programme of new affordable homes in the Borough, having regard to local
priorities. However, it should be noted that the guidelines on affordability
levels of rents are provided for information only. The agreed mix of Social
Rent and Affordable Rent accommodation, in terms of unit size and type of
dwellings on individual schemes will be determined through negotiation,
based on existing area tenure mix and current local housing need
assessment, site characteristics and viability.
5.3.15 The Council recognises the increasing importance of the private rented sector
in meeting housing needs in the Borough, and supports the provision of ‘buildto-rent private rented homes’, where these are well-designed, where evidence
is provided that high standards of management will be put in place, and where
the benefits of such housing are balanced against the level of affordable
housing provision. The Council will work with the GLA and other delivery
partners to seek to increase and improve the private rented sector in line with
the London Plan and the Mayor’s Housing SPG.
POLICY DM21 - AFFORDABLE HOUSING DELIVERY
Proposals for residential development must comply with Core Strategy Policy 20,
‘Affordable Housing’ in relation to the provision of social/affordable rented and
intermediate housing. In addition, requirements to provide onsite provision of
affordable housing will apply to:
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i.
ii.
iii.
All developments comprising of 10 or more residential units, including partconversion/part new-build schemes;
Residential developments with a site area of more than 1000 sq.m or 0.1Ha;
Phased developments where a housing development is part of a larger
development meeting or exceeding the above thresholds.
The Council may refuse proposals where it is considered that the site has the
capacity to provide residential development to meet or exceed the above
thresholds.
Where additional homes are proposed through amended planning applications (i.e.
through re-submissions or variations of existing planning applications or submission
of a new planning application for an extension resulting in an increase in existing
homes) within four years of the commencement of the original planning permission
and the total number of homes proposed increases to 10 or more, or the site
threshold above, affordable housing for 50% of all residential units will be sought
preferably on-site, or if not possible by way of in-lieu contributions.
On-site provision of affordable housing is required, subject to the content of
paragraphs 5.3.5, 5.3.6 and 5.3.7 above.
5.4
Housing mix
5.4.1
The Council is committed to ensuring that housing in the Borough meets
residents’ needs. There is a diverse population in Hackney, with an equally
diverse range of housing needs and requirements; this means ensuring that
a good selection of housing types and tenures are built. The 2009 Housing
Needs Assessment found that there is still an acute shortage of family housing
delivered on new developments. It is essential to maintain an adequate stock
of housing suitable for occupation as family dwellings, which will help in
addressing demand for such accommodation in the Borough. Of particular
demand is family housing for the social rented sector – Hackney still has one
of the highest proportions of social housing in the country (44% social rented
in 2011 Census). Many new developments at present are not delivering
enough family housing, and also conversions have resulted in a loss of family
homes.
5.4.2
The current most pressing shortage is for 2 bedroom (3 person) homes and
for 3 bedroom (5 person) family homes. For affordable housing (Social Rent
and Affordable Rent) a third of dwellings sought should be family-sized of at
least 3 bedrooms. The Council’s preference is for there to be a higher
proportion of 2 bedrooms than 1 bedroom (2 person) units, as they offer
greater flexibility of accommodation. In light of this the following mix is sought.
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Table 1 – Preferred Dwelling Mix
1 Bed (2 person)
Social
Rent
Affordable Rent
& Lower % than 2 bed
2 Bed (3 or 4 3 or more Bed (5
person)
person plus)
Higher % than 1 Bed 36%
Intermediate
Lower % than 2 bed
Higher % than 1 Bed 16%
Market
Lower % than 2 bed
Higher % than 1 Bed 33%
5.4.3
The above preferred dwelling mix will be subject to periodic amendments
based on up-to-date Council assessments of needs across the Borough. Any
amendments to this preferred mix will be published on the Council’s website
or contained within supplementary planning guidance, as appropriate.
5.4.4
The policy below sets out the requirement for dwelling mix within residential
proposals in the Borough based on current needs set out in the above table.
Requirements may vary dependent on site location and characteristics, and
scheme viability. For example, the requirement for family housing for social
rent in areas of existing high social rent family dwellings may be reduced.
Proposals containing family housing (in this case units with 3 bedrooms or
more) in excess of the above guidelines will be supported, provided that there
are not high existing levels of family housing in an area, or there is a
demonstrable need for such family housing in an area. There will be greater
flexibility on the requirement for family units for proposals for retirement,
sheltered or extra care housing. Justification for the dwelling mix proposed in
development schemes is required, if differing from the mix set out in Table 1.
An assessment area of dwelling mix should be based on a Middle Super
Output Area, which is a reasonable size assessment area for the Hackney
context.
POLICY DM22 - HOMES OF DIFFERENT SIZES
All residential proposals should provide a mix of dwellings for each tenure in
accordance with the Council’s preferred dwelling mix in Table 1 (and any further
subsequent amendments).
Variations to this size mix will be considered, however, dependent on site and area
location and characteristics, and scheme viability, if required or agreed by the
Council.
Where proposals are seeking to provide retirement, sheltered or extra
care housing, the Council recognises there may be a need for greater flexibility with
regard the mix of units to be provided within developments, particularly in achieving
the provision of 3 bedroom units.
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One person flats may be permissible where a larger unit is not possible, provided
that the unit size meets the London Plan (July 2011) and the GLA’s Housing SPG
(November 2012) standards, and, if part of a scheme where multiple dwellings are
proposed, an appropriate dwelling mix is incorporated.
5.5
Residential Conversions
5.5.1
The increase in the number of smaller households, combined with rising
house prices, has increased the demand for smaller dwellings in the Borough,
particularly from single people and young couples on modest incomes. One
way the supply of smaller dwellings has come about has been through the
conversion of larger homes to flats. Land Registry data confirms that the bulk
of properties sold in Hackney (83.9%) are flats or maisonettes, a significantly
greater proportion than for Greater London as a whole (51.0%).13
5.5.2
Although the contribution made by conversions of larger houses to smaller
dwellings is useful in providing a lower cost accommodation, conversions to
flats can result in the loss of family housing, and inflate the price of remaining
larger homes. As set out in the above policy, there is a pressing need for
family homes (3 bedrooms or more).
5.5.3
Thus, the following policy sets out the criteria where the conversion from
houses to flats will be possible – essentially the aim of the policy is to protect
smaller family houses from conversion, and ensure that the conversion of
larger houses provide at least one 3 bedroom dwelling with access to private
amenity space. As such, setting a threshold of 120sq.m for the conversion of
houses enables the retention of homes or households with children, while
permitting houses with greater floorspace to be converted to provide a range
of dwelling sizes.
5.5.4
New development should meet London Plan Policy 3.5 and the GLA’s
Housing SPG 2012 standards in relation to unit and room sizes. For this
reason, the subdivision of houses smaller than 120 sq.m would not meet the
requirements of this policy. Conversion of a 120sq.m dwelling would allow for
the provision of 1x 3 bedroom family flat (3b4p with a minimum of 74sq.m
floorspace) and a 1 x 1 bedroom flat (with a floorspace range of 37-50sq.m).
There is an acute need to maintain accommodation for larger households (five
or more persons) wherever possible. Therefore, in more substantial
properties with 180sq.m of floorspace, provision should be made for larger
families, i.e. for family sizes of 5 or more. The larger the dwelling, the wider
the range and size of households that can be satisfactorily accommodated.
5.5.5
The Council recognises that a different dwelling mix may be required to
enable development or as part of the refurbishment of a recognised heritage
asset building in order to retain distinctive townscape character, and the
historic layout of a property. As such, flexibility will be applied in such
instances. Conversions of basements should be carried out in line with
13
Source: Hackney Housing Needs Assessment, July 2009
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guidance in the Council’s Residential Alterations and Extensions SPD and the
flooding policy contained within the Climate Change and Environmental
Sustainability chapter of this document.
POLICY DM23 – RESIDENTIAL CONVERSIONS
Conversions from houses to flats will be permitted, subject to compliance with other
Local Plan policies, and where:




The house consists of no less than 120 sq.m of original floorspace, including
internal circulation;
Adequate access would be provided to each dwelling;
Each dwelling would be self-contained; and
The distinctive character of the building/area would not be adversely affected
by development (with particular regard to heritage assets).
The Council will expect conversion schemes to provide a minimum of one family
unit of 3 or more bedrooms. Family dwellings must be suitable for a minimum of 4
people. Dwellings intended for families should preferably be on the ground floor and
should provide direct access to a garden.
The reversion of flats back to the original use of a property as a house will be
supported, subject to compliance with Policy DM20.
5.6
Student Housing
5.6.1
Hackney has approved and received a number of applications for purposebuilt student bedspaces during the last few years, despite not having a
university within its boundary. However, neighbouring Newham, Islington,
Tower Hamlets and Camden boroughs contain several well-known London
universities (in addition to those in Zone 1), which are still easily accessible
from the Borough. London Higher found that, for the academic year 2011/12,
there were 282,000 undergraduate students and 130,000 postgraduate
students in London.14 Over the last decade student numbers have increased
considerably; and much of this increase was driven by overseas students.
5.6.2
Whilst the Council acknowledges that inadequate local provision would result
in students having to travel long distances to attend university, putting
pressure on the public transport infrastructure, and that students contribute
socially and economically to an area, it nonetheless recognises that the
development of new-build student housing must not be to the detriment of
other key uses such as general housing delivery or designated employment
land or lead to an over-concentration of similar uses which may be detrimental
14
Source: London Higher Factsheet, 2013
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to residential amenities or the balance of land uses, affecting the character
and function of an area.
5.6.3
New build student housing schemes have been prevalent in Shoreditch, with
at least 7 approved schemes since 2006 providing approximately 2500
bedrooms. 5 of these are in Priority Employment Areas providing
approximately 2113 bedrooms. 989 bedrooms of those approved have been
constructed, and 1521 are under construction. Although having become more
mixed use in nature, Shoreditch is predominately a commercial area,
including and adjacent to the City Fringe and the Central Activities Zone, and
containing large areas of designated employment land (Priority Employment
Areas). As such any further consents for large student housing developments,
particularly within PEAs, are likely to affect the character and function of the
area. In addition to pressure on other important land uses, such developments
can have adverse impacts on amenity, such as through noise levels and
additional vehicular traffic particularly at the start and end of terms, and
increased pressure on local services, including demand for evening economy
uses (which the Council seeks to manage in Shoreditch for example).
5.6.4
Therefore, in considering a proposal for student accommodation the Council
will take into account the likely impact on the amenities of surrounding locality,
and the cumulative impact on the locality and community where a number of
such uses already exist, to ensure an appropriate balance of land uses in an
area, and to avoid detrimental effects on amenity. Applicants should submit
details of how student housing developments will be managed to minimise
impacts on amenity. Where sites are designated for other uses in the AAPs
or Site Allocations Local Plan, student housing developments will not be
permitted (unless the site is already allocated for that use).
5.6.5
Accommodation should serve higher education facilities within Hackney or
within London. Student housing will be secured by planning agreement or
condition relating to the use of the land or to its occupation by students of
higher educational institutions. Where there is not an undertaking with a
specified academic institution(s), providers should, subject to viability, seek to
deliver student accommodation that is affordable for students in the context
of average student incomes and rents for broadly comparable
accommodation provided by London higher educational institutions. Where
the accommodation is not secured for students, it will normally be subject to
the requirements of affordable housing Policy DM21.
5.6.6
An element of purpose-built student provision may be acceptable in a mixed
use scheme where it will be unsuitable to provide family housing, and the uses
proposed are compatible with the most appropriate use, and subject to the
content of paragraph 5.6.2 above.
5.6.7
The Council would encourage developers and site owners to ensure that all
tenancies remain affordable, in light of the likely level of financial support
available to the intended occupiers. Intended rental levels should be included
in supporting information. This information will be treated confidentially during
the planning application process.
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5.6.8
Given the need for students to access the public transport network, and to
have good access to local services, student housing development should be
located in areas of high public transport accessibility and within or close to the
Borough’s centres. Development proposals will be considered in relation to
other applicable Local Plan policies, including amenity and design.
5.6.9
The Council encourages student housing developments to be in compliance
with the ANUK/Unipol Code of Standards for Larger Residential
Developments for student accommodation managed and controlled by
educational establishments, or The National Code of Standards for Larger
Developments for student accommodation not managed and controlled by
educational establishments. The Codes enable housing suppliers and their
student tenants to agree a set of undertakings about how they wish to do
business with one another. They encourage good practice from good quality
housing suppliers in the Borough.
5.6.10 The following policy sets out the Council’s policy for the development of
student accommodation through new-build or conversion, and the criteria
required to make such development acceptable.
POLICY DM24 - STUDENT HOUSING
Proposals for new-build student accommodation:
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
Will not be granted planning permission on designated employment land (see
Policies DM14, DM15 and DM17), or sites allocated for general housing
provision, or for any other allocated use;
Must not be detrimental to the provision of general needs housing and not
result in the loss of self-contained dwellings;
Should be highly accessible by public transport and provide good access to
local shops, services and facilities;
Must not lead to an over-concentration of such uses which may be
detrimental to local amenity, or the balance of uses within the area affecting
the character and function of an area;
Should include a range of unit layouts, including units with shared facilities.
Details of the management of such developments must be submitted with an
application, setting out how the impact of development on local amenity will be
minimised.
The Council strongly encourages the provision of tenancies which are affordable, in
the context of the financial support available to the intended occupiers.
Student Housing should serve academic institutions based in Hackney, or within
London. The specific academic institution(s) that the student housing development
would serve should be specified when a planning application is submitted. Student
housing will be secured by planning agreement or condition relating to the use of
the land or to its occupation by members of specified higher educational institutions.
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Where there is not an undertaking with a specified academic institution(s), providers
should, subject to viability, seek to deliver student accommodation that is affordable
for students in the context of average student incomes and rents for broadly
comparable accommodation provided by London higher educational institutions.
Where the accommodation is not secured for students, it will normally be subject to
the requirements of affordable housing policy DM21.
5.7
Houses of Multiple Occupation (HMOs)
5.7.1
HMOs provide non-self-contained units with shared facilities. It is recognised
that they are an important part of the provision of lower-cost housing in the
private rented sector, particularly for young or single people and those with
low incomes. However, conversions to HMOs can often result in the loss of
family housing. Because of wider economic changes and lack of credit
availability, purpose-built larger HMO developments may have an increasing
role to play in terms of meeting the needs of single households in the future.
5.7.2
In accordance with the Housing Act 2004 the following property types are
defined as a House in Multiple Occupation (HMO): An entire house or flat
which is let to 3 or more tenants who form 2 or more households and who
share a kitchen, bathroom or toilet facilities; a house which has been
converted entirely into bedsits or other non-self-contained accommodation
and which is let to 3 or more tenants who form two or more households and
who share a kitchen, bathroom or toilet facilities; a converted house which
contains one or more flats which are not wholly self-contained (i.e. the flat
does not contain within it a kitchen, bathroom and toilet) and which is occupied
by 3 or more tenants who form two or more households; and a building which
is converted entirely into self-contained flats if the conversion did not meet the
standards of the 1991 Building Regulations and more than one-third of the
flats are let on short-term tenancies. In order to be a HMO the property must
be used as the tenants’ only or main residence and it should be used solely
or mainly to house tenants.
5.7.3
A Use Class for HMOs (C4) was created in 2010 to cover small shared houses
or flats occupied by between 3 and 6 unrelated individuals who share basic
amenities. The 2010 amendment to The Town and Country Planning (General
Permitted Development) Order 1995 (as amended) allows a permitted change
from a dwellinghouse (Use class C3) to a C4 use, and from C4 use to C3 use.
To note, any HMO with more than 6 occupants may be ‘sui generis’ to the
recognised use classes. HMOs that are to be used as student housing would
also be classified as sui generis. New student housing must accord with Policy
DM24 and the guidance set out in the London Plan. Details of the intended
type of occupiers for new HMOs should be included within planning
applications.
5.7.4
Given that it is recognised that HMOs are an important part of the provision
of lower-cost housing in the private rented sector, proposals for the
development of HMOs may be supported. Additionally, purpose built larger
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HMO properties may help to protect the conversion of some family housing to
smaller units. As with residential conversions, small houses of up to 120sq.m
are protected as such. When HMOs are lost as part of development they are
seldom replaced. Where any development involves the loss of good quality
HMO properties (i.e. they meet space standards as set out below, have good
facilities and a good record of management), justification for the loss must be
provided. Pressure exists to convert HMO properties into self-contained units,
which are then rented at much higher prices than pre-conversion stock, or are
simply sold for owner occupation following the conversion.
5.7.5
In accordance with the Housing Act 2004, Hackney’s Private Sector Housing
Team has introduced minimum standards for HMO properties, which apply to
specific types of housing including some housing with shared facilities and
student housing not provided by an educational institution. These standards
set out minimum sizes for bedroom, bathroom and kitchen areas, and the
minimum level of facilities that should be provided for occupiers. Hackney will
resist proposals for housing with shared facilities and student housing that fail
to comply with the relevant minimum standards. The standards are available
from the London Borough of Hackney’s website:
www.hackney.gov.uk/Assets/Documents/bedsit-hmo-conditions-sept07.doc
5.7.6
Development proposals for HMOs will be considered in relation to other
applicable policies, including amenity and design. Given that HMOs can
contain a number of occupants, they should be located in areas of good public
transport accessibility and within or close to the Borough’s centres, where
local service provision is good. The following policy sets that the Council
seeks to protect and support HMOs, subject to certain criteria.
5.7.7
The Council will resist proposals for new HMOs where it would result in an
over-concentration of similar uses in the immediate area. Over-concentration
of HMOs can lead to a negative impact on amenity, and affect the character
and function of an area. The Brownswood and Leabridge wards for example,
particularly in Brownswood the area between Manor House and Finsbury
Park, are recorded as having a high concentration of HMOs. Such areas need
to be monitored in terms of further applications for such uses to prevent an
over-concentration. Each application will be considered on a case by case
basis.
5.7.8
Supporting information such as management arrangements that include the
length of proposed tenancies, the number of existing HMOs in the immediate
area, and mitigation measures where it is likely to lead to a high concentration,
should be submitted with planning applications for new HMOs to assist in
analysing the application; for large HMOs of more than 6 occupants.
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POLICY DM25 - HOUSES OF MULTIPLE OCCUPATION (HMO)
Proposals for new HMOs may be supported if they:
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
Have an existing floorspace area of more than 120 sq.m including internal
circulation if being converted from a dwelling house; and
Are well served by local shops, facilities and accessible by public transport;
and
Will not have a detrimental impact on the amenity of neighbouring occupiers;
and
Will not result in the loss or part-loss of any site allocated for general housing
(C3) use; and
Will provide a good standard of accommodation, such as space standards,
facilities, daylight and sunlight, aspect and amenity space.
Evidence of management arrangements and details of proposed length of tenancy
agreements should be provided where the proposal would consist of non selfcontained rooms for 7 (or more) occupants.
Loss of any good quality HMO properties will be resisted unless adequate
replacement facilities are provided or it can be demonstrated that the existing facility
is no longer required.
5.8
Shared and Supported Housing Schemes
5.8.1
Housing with shared or support facilities traditionally can take many forms,
including private staff accommodation or sheltered housing for the elderly.
The Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) also play an important role in
contributing to both identifying specialist and special needs housing and its
delivery. Many people in Hackney have personal circumstances which mean
that they can experience difficulties accessing wholly independent
accommodation. Numerically, these represent relatively small groups but their
wide range of different needs must be taken into account in the provision and
redevelopment of housing with support. However, changes to the benefit
system and reduction in central Government funding may mean that higher
numbers of people may become dependent on the Council and other public
bodies for support. Homelessness levels are also predicted to rise over
forthcoming years.
5.8.2
Supported housing is a generic description of support that is combined with
the provision of accommodation for people who require support in order to
live independently. These services involve a person living in accommodation,
on a temporary or long term/permanent basis, and receiving support in order
to promote their independence. This support can be provided on-site or on a
visiting basis. Supported housing can be self-contained or shared.
5.8.3
There are different types of hostels that are categorised under shared housing
(e.g. commercial facilities which can generally resemble budget hotels mainly
catering for those on short breaks, centres for those with severe disabilities,
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or more secure residential facilities which are generally used by groups such
as the homeless or those with some dependency addictions).
5.8.4
Alongside population growth, average life expectancy levels in the Borough
are increasing. The 2011 Census shows that there were an estimated 24,600
people over 60 years of age in Hackney, around 10% of the population. By
2031, the population of Hackney is expected to rise to 37,610 comprising 14%
of the predicted higher population. Hackney’s Supporting People 5 Year
Strategy 2005-2010 (LBH, 2010) identified the pressing need to target further
resources towards older people. It will be crucial that the Borough's
conventional and non-conventional housing stock can accommodate both the
current and changing future needs of older people.
5.8.5
Overall, the approach to housing with care reflects a movement away from
institutional care and studio accommodation into the provision of selfcontained accommodation respecting individual choice and independence
and offering the chance to remain integrated in the community. However, it is
difficult to quantify the exact types of development, or numbers of bedspaces
that will be required to meet hostel and other supported housing needs which
arise as this can vary on a weekly basis. The policy framework needs to
ensure that new facilities are located near to the services that they will require.
5.8.6
Hostels fall under the term ‘shared housing’ and are classified sui generis to
the Use Classes Order, whereas housing that offers a significant element of
care or supervision in the service provision would be a C2 (Residential
Institutions) use. Hostels are used for many purposes and should be located
in areas which are mainly residential in nature, although hostel-type facilities
which have more in common with budget hotels could be acceptable within
town centres and will need to be assessed on a case-by-case basis. However
with well designed schemes and proper management arrangements, hostels
and shared accommodation should not alter the residential character of
areas. Hostel applications should have regard to any Council supplementary
planning guidance on hostels.
5.8.7
The following policy sets out that the Council supports proposals for shared
and supported housing, subject to certain criteria. Development proposals will
be considered in relation to other applicable policies, including amenity and
design. The Council encourages developers and site owners to ensure that
bedspaces will be affordable in the context of the likely financial support
available to the intended occupiers. Intended rental levels should be included
in the supporting information.
5.8.8
The Council will resist proposals for new shared and supported houses where
it would result in an over-concentration of similar uses in the immediate area,
if it is considered that the proposals will have a negative effect on the
character and function of an area, and/or local amenity.
5.8.9
Proposals for new, or expansion of, existing hostels, shared and supported
housing should provide a good standard of accommodation and meet
minimum regional room size standards.
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POLICY DM26 - SHARED AND SUPPORTED HOUSING
Proposals for new hostels, shared housing and supported housing, or for their
expansion, are supported provided that they:
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
Cater for a need which has been identified by the Council’s Housing Needs
Assessment, a Joint Strategic Needs Assessment, or any other strategy
produced by the Council or other strategy produced by a public body and
supported by the Council; and
Have good access to local shops, services, public transport and facilities
appropriate to the needs of the intended occupiers; and
Will not have a detrimental impact on the amenity of neighbouring occupiers;
and
Will provide a good standard of accommodation, meet minimum regional
room size standards; and
Provide a level of support and/or care appropriate to the needs of the
intended occupiers where it is required.
The Council will support the development of additional hostels and accommodation
for older people which combine independent living with the availability of support
and nursing care.
The Council would encourage the provision of tenancies that are affordable in the
context of financial support available to the intended occupiers.
Any loss of floorspace to other uses will be resisted unless adequate replacement
facilities are provided or it can be demonstrated that the existing facility is no longer
required.
Details of the management arrangements of such developments must be submitted
with an application.
5.9
Hotel Development
5.9.1
Hackney has demand for hotels from both ‘leisure’ travellers and ‘business’
travellers. The demand for the development of further corporate facilities in
the Borough will help to underpin regeneration, and Hackney’s potential as a
location with easy access to key transport interchanges for ‘leisure’ travellers
makes it well suited as a base to explore other parts of London, the South
East of England and beyond. Encouraging development of new hotels could
help the local economy and create jobs both in terms of construction, and
once the developments are operational. They can help to stimulate other
businesses to expand, as hotels also require numerous ancillary services.
5.9.2
Proposals for large hotels (considered to be 50+ beds) are appropriate in the
Borough’s main shopping centres, particularly in Dalston, Hackney Central
and Manor House, and within Shoreditch and Hoxton (the Central Activities
Zone). Smaller scale hotels may be appropriate in these and other areas
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provided that they have good public transport access, the land use is
appropriate to the location, and there is good access to other services. While
hotels can both support the visitor economy and aid in job creation, it is
important to ensure that other planning objectives are met: hotel development
should not compromise economic growth, particularly in relation to B class
uses, or housing delivery, and must not lead to an over-concentration of
similar uses within the locality. An over-concentration of such uses could
undermine these objectives, and lead to a detrimental impact on amenity as
set in the following paragraph. New hotel provision should include at least
10% wheelchair accessible bedrooms as improving availability of hotel
accommodation that is genuinely accessible will enhance their accessibility to
all customers. The following policy should be assessed and applied in
conjunction with Policy DM17 – Development Proposals in Priority
Employment Areas (PEAs).
5.9.3
Hotels can also lead to concerns relating to amenity, such as late-night
disturbance, the impact of vehicular movements on highway safety, and also
the balance of uses in an area, particularly if there is an over-concentration of
hotels. The following policy sets out the criteria against which proposals for
hotels will be considered. Hotels can assist in providing local facilities, such
as leisure facilities where there may be a shortage, for Borough residents and
workers, and as such the policy is seeking to require ancillary facilities to be
available for public use, unless there are valid and appropriate reasons that
such facilities should not be accessible to the public.
5.9.4
This policy would only relate to C1 use class as defined under the Use
Classes Order, which includes hotels, motels, guesthouses and bed &
breakfast establishments, all of which are open to members of the public
visiting the Borough on a short stay basis who have permanent residence
elsewhere. These are premises which provide a room as temporary
accommodation on a commercial, fee-paying basis, where meals can be
provided but where residential care is not provided. In addition, short-term
self-contained serviced apartments, sometimes called ‘Apart-Hotels’, also fall
into this use class, provided they operate in the style of a hotel, rather than a
permanent residential style use. Apart-hotels do provide a beneficial service
potentially for longer term tourists or business people. The Council particularly
supports conventional style hotels given they potentially create more
employment opportunities.
5.9.5
Hotels are a good source of entry-level employment. As such, the following
policy incorporates a clause that the Council will seek through legal
agreement the creation of employment positions for Hackney residents during
the construction phase and the operation of hotels. The number of
employment positions will be subject to consideration of the overall number
of employees that the hotel will generate, and through negotiation with
applicants. Further detail on this is contained in the Council’s Planning
Contributions SPD (July 2015).
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5.9.6
Development should comply with BREEAM standards, and any other relevant
standards which are applicable if the development is part of a mixed use
scheme.
POLICY DM27 – HOTELS
The Council will support proposals for hotels, provided that the proposal;
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
Has a good level of access by public transport;
Would not harm the balance and mix of uses in the area, and thus the
character and function of the area, and would not result in the loss of general
housing, and is fully compatible with surrounding land uses;
Would not cause an unacceptable level of disturbance to, or loss of amenity
to, occupiers of surrounding premises;
Would not lead to an over-concentration of similar uses within the locality;
Makes adequate provision for servicing, and pick up and set down points for
taxis and coaches; and
Complies with policy DM17 in relation to proposals in Priority Employment
Areas; and
Includes at least 10% wheelchair accessible bedrooms.
Ancillary facilities such as conference rooms, restaurants or gymnasiums should be
accessible to the public, unless there are valid and appropriate reasons why such
facilities should not be accessible to the public.
Key areas appropriate for large scale hotels in particular are the Borough’s Growth
Areas, in particular the City Fringe/Shoreditch area, ‘Kingsland Corridor’ between
Shoreditch and Dalston, Hackney Wick, Dalston, Hackney Central, and Manor
House centres. Small scale hotels may be appropriate in these and other areas if
satisfying the above criteria.
The Council would prefer to see visitor accommodation which is developed as
conventional hotel uses, rather than ‘apart-hotels’ and as such conventional hotel
uses are particularly supported subject to complying with other policies in the plan.
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CLEANER SAFER
GREENER
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CHAPTER 6: CLEANER SAFER GREENER
6.1.1
This chapter contains a suite of development management policies that
provide more detail to strategic policies contained within the respective Core
Strategy chapter. The policies here relate to managing the Borough’s historic
environment, advertisements and telecommunications, open space,
allotments and food growing, biodiversity and nature conservation,
landscaping and trees and residential moorings.
6.2
Managing Hackney’s Historic Environment
6.2.1
Through the NPPF and CS Policy 25 ‘Historic Environment’, the Council
requires a rigorous approach to conserve and enhance the significance of
Hackney’s historic environment and heritage assets. Hackney’s historic
environment and assets are vital to maintaining the local distinctiveness of
the Borough. The unique character of heritage assets, including conservation
areas, derives from the combination of a number of factors, including scale,
density, patterns of development, landscape, topography, open space,
materials, architectural detailing, uses and their past. Hackney’s Heritage
Assets include 30 Conservation Areas, Areas of Archaeological Importance,
Statutory (around 1300 in number) and Locally Listed Buildings, 3 Parks and
Gardens of Special Historic Interest, and 18 London Squares. The Council
has identified with the community ‘loved’ local landmarks, which include
additional heritage assets.
6.2.2
In terms of development proposals, the Council will support good contextual,
modern contemporary design, provided it is appropriate for its historic setting
and promotes the conservation and appreciation of the historic environment.
Innovative proposals will be considered, provided they are in scale with their
surroundings, they are of a ‘considered’ design, sufficiently justified, and they
comply with relevant ‘best-practice’ standards.
6.2.3
Independent, professional assessments of the significance of any heritage
assets including settings and potential impact should be provided in
supporting information for relevant development proposals, with thorough
attention paid to relevant national and local policy. Assessments of heritage
assets, especially on major sites and for those identified as ‘Heritage at Risk,’
must follow nationally-recognised CoBRA methodology (Conservation-Based
Research and Analysis). The Council recognises and utilises the national
expertise published by Historic England and various national amenity
societies. However, in cases where there is no single source of information
or expertise, the Council will encourage developers to engage and consult
relevant conservation experts, such as national and local amenity societies
including The Georgian Group, The Victorian Society, The Twentieth Century
Society, the Historic Parks and Gardens Society, London Parks & Gardens
Trust, The Hackney Society, and The Heritage of London Trust.
6.2.4
The Council recognises the potential for development to ‘enable’ the
conservation of historic assets, where appropriate. Where relevant, the
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Council will consider proposals that would not otherwise be granted planning
consent (‘enabling development’), provided it accords with Historic England’s
‘best-practice’ standards. Such developments will be subject to an objective,
independent financial appraisal and adequate justification that such a project
will contribute positively to the heritage assets. The Council will require a
S106 Legal Agreement to ensure that the historic asset must be restored (or
benefit directly), before the ‘enabling development’ can be occupied.
6.2.5
The Council’s priority is to conserve and enhance the Borough’s historic
environment and heritage assets. In exceptional circumstances, proposals
that will lead to substantial harm to or total loss of significance of a designated
heritage asset may be acceptable provided that it can be demonstrated that
the substantial harm or loss is necessary to achieve substantial public benefit.
Alternatively, harm or loss may be acceptable if the applicant can
demonstrate that it has met the criteria set out in paragraphs 133, 134 135
and 136 of the National Planning Policy Framework (March 2012). Due to the
fact that heritage assets are irreplaceable, in Hackney the medium term for
appropriate marketing would normally be at least 2 years and accord with
Appendix 4 of this Plan. Where there is deliberate neglect of or damage to a
heritage asset, the deteriorated state will not normally be taken into account,
and the Council will endeavour to work with the owner(s) to restore the
significance of the asset.
6.3
Conservation Areas
6.3.1
Hackney will seek to manage change in a way that retains the distinctive
characters of its 30 Conservation Areas and will expect new development to
contribute positively to this. Planning permission will only be granted for
development in Conservation Areas that preserves or enhances the special
character and appearance of the area. The special character or appearance
of the area should be identified and responded to in the design of new
development. Hackney’s conservation area review process emphasises the
importance of the distinctive features of a place, its spatial qualities, and the
significance of its historic buildings and assets. It is important that uses which
contribute to the character of a conservation area are not displaced by
redevelopment.
6.3.2
Historic buildings in conservation areas can be sensitively adapted to meet
the needs of climate change and energy saving – preserving both the special
interest and the long term sustainability of the building or heritage asset.
Historic England’s website provides detailed advice on energy saving in
historic buildings and conservation areas.
6.3.3
In considering applications for demolition, the Council will take account of
group value, context and setting of buildings, as well as their quality as
individual structures and any contribution to the setting of listed buildings.
Applications must clearly show which buildings or parts of buildings are to be
demolished. Applications for total or substantial demolition in conservation
areas must demonstrate to the Council’s satisfaction that effective measures
will be taken during demolition and building works to ensure structural stability
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of retained parts and adjoining structures. Before consent for demolition is
granted, the Council must be satisfied that the applicant has met the test
criteria set out in paragraphs 133, 134, 135 and 136 of the NPPF, and that
there are acceptable detailed plans for redevelopment, and demolition will be
required to comply with the Institute of Civil Engineer’s (ICE) demolition
protocol. Where possible there will be a requirement for materials to be
salvaged and/or re-cycled in the new development. Any replacement building
should enhance the Conservation Area to an appreciably greater extent than
the existing building. When a building makes little or no contribution to the
character and appearance of a Conservation Area, any replacement building
should enhance the Conservation Area to a greater extent than the existing
building.
6.4
Listed Buildings
6.4.1
Hackney has a duty to preserve and protect the historic environment for the
enjoyment of future generations. For this reason there is a general
presumption in favour of retention of all designated assets such as listed
buildings, including those identified on Historic England’s ‘Heritage at Risk’
Register. The Council will assess external and internal works that affect their
special architectural or historic interest. Consent will be required for any
alterations that could affect the special interest of a listed building. Total
demolition, substantial demolition and rebuilding behind the facade of a listed
building, including those that are derelict or neglected, will not normally be
considered acceptable.
6.5
Other Heritage Assets
6.5.1
In addition to the designated heritage assets, any building, monument, site,
place and landscape that has a positive architectural, archaeological, artistic
or historic interest and, thus, contributes to the overall historic environment,
may be a consideration in determining a planning application. In accordance
with NPPF and other advice given by the Government, Hackney Council
keeps a list of buildings of local significance. The ‘Local List’ includes
buildings, structures or features of local architectural, archaeological, artistic
or historic interest which make a positive contribution to their localities and
are part of the character of Hackney. Furthermore, the Conservation Area
Appraisals have identified Buildings of Townscape Merit and Areas of
Townscape Interest which are of local historic and architectural significance.
6.5.2
Hackney will take appropriate action to secure the retention and
enhancement of these heritage assets and their setting. Development should
preserve, enhance, and enable conservation of heritage assets. This means
designated assets and also includes: formal squares and gardens, our wider
landscape, strategic and local views, areas of archaeological importance, and
significant historic assets identified during the evolution of a development
proposal.
6.5.3
Irrespective of whether or not a heritage asset is designated, its wider setting
can greatly influence the significance and the experience of an asset beyond
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the visual context. When putting forward proposals which may affect historic
setting, applicants should, therefore, identify the contribution made to the
historic significance of a heritage asset by its setting, before determining any
impacts on that significance arising from development in the setting.
Therefore, a proposed development within the setting of a heritage asset
should assess, consider and address any impact on the asset’s significance
in accordance with Historic England’s guidance and advice.
6.6
Archaeology
6.6.1
A schedule of Hackney’s Archaeological Priority Areas (APAs) is set out on
the Policies Map. The APAs provide a general guide to areas of
archaeological remains, but do not indicate every find site. It is possible that
archaeological remains will be found elsewhere, both within and outside of
the APAs. When researching the development potential of a site, developers
should assess whether the site is known or is likely to contain archaeological
remains, and if it is believed there are remains of archaeological importance,
the Council requires the submission of an archaeological desk-based
assessment and field evaluation.
6.6.2
The Council will resist development which adversely affects remains if
important remains are found, and to minimise the impact of developments, by
requiring either in situ preservation or a programme of excavation, recording,
publication and archiving of remains. The Council’s position is a general
presumption in favour of in situ preservation of remains and measures should
be used to allow the remains to be permanently preserved in situ. If such
preservation is not possible, development should not take place until
satisfactory excavation and recording of the remains has been carried out onsite, and subsequent analysis, publication and archiving undertaken by an
archaeological organisation approved by the Council. The Council will
consult with Historic England regarding archaeological implications of
development proposals.
6.6.3
The following policy sets out how proposals for development in relation to
heritage assets will be considered.
POLICY DM28 – MANAGING THE HISTORIC ENVIRONMENT
A. Conservation Areas
Development in or adjacent to the Borough’s Conservation Areas shall preserve or
enhance the character and appearance of the respective Area.
The Council will only grant planning permission to demolish or substantially
demolish non-listed buildings in conservation areas where:
i.
the proposal would preserve or enhance the character or appearance of the
conservation area;
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ii.
there are satisfactory proposals for redevelopment or treatment of the site
which must proceed after demolition.
Harm or loss of such a building in a conservation area should comply with section
E of this policy.
Alterations and extensions in conservation areas should:
iii.
Not upset the scale or proportions of buildings or adversely affect the
character, appearance or setting of neighbouring buildings;
iv.
Preserve (or, where missing, reinstate) characteristic features such as doors,
windows, roof details (e.g. chimneys, chimney pots, roof line and pitch) and
party wall upstands even where these elements may be redundant;
v.
Not harm the architectural integrity of a building or the unity and significance
of a group of buildings or terrace.
Proposals for alterations and extensions that would be highly visible must comply
with the remainder of (iii), (iv) and (v) above.
B. Listed Buildings
Proposals for development, including change of use, that involve any alterations to
a listed building or within its curtilage shall:
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
Not lead to substantial harm to or total loss of the significance of the building
and should harmonise with the period, style, materials and detailing of the
building;
Retain and repair existing features and fabric, or, if missing, replace them in
a sympathetic manner;
Not harm the structural integrity or stability of the building or that of adjoining
buildings or structures;
Respect and preserve the integrity of the original plan form where extensions
are proposed, relate sensitively to the original building and not adversely
affect the internal or external appearance or character of the building,
curtilage or its setting; and
Retain roof structures of intrinsic architectural or historic interest.
C. Other Heritage Assets
Hackney will seek to ensure the protection and enhancement of other heritage
assets including London Squares, Registered Parks and Gardens of Special
Historic Interest, and locally listed and designated assets. Development proposals
should not be detrimental to the appearance and character of such Assets, and
where relevant the wider historic environment.
D. Archaeology
Developments must not adversely affect important archaeological remains or their
settings. Proposals within Archaeological Priority Areas likely to affect important
archaeological remains must be accompanied by an appropriate desk-based
archaeological assessment and, where necessary, a field evaluation.
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Archaeological assessments may be required for other development proposals
where it is considered important archaeological remains may be present. There is
a presumption in favour of physical preservation in situ of important archaeological
remains. Mitigating measures must be taken to ensure the preservation of all
remains of archaeological importance, either in situ preservation or a programme of
excavation, recording, publication and archiving of remains.
E. Harm To or Total Loss of a Designated Heritage Asset
Where a proposal will lead to substantial harm to or total loss of significance of a
designated heritage asset, it must be demonstrated that efforts to retain or restore
the significance of the heritage asset have been explored and that the public
benefits of redevelopment, including securing its optimum viable use, outweighs the
adverse impact on the significance of the designated heritage asset (see Appendix
4).
6.7
Advertisements
6.7.1
Advertisements can be important to commercial areas, being both informative
and sometimes adding interest and vitality to the street scene. However,
advertisements can also greatly affect the appearance of an area. The
Borough’s town centres are a focus for advertising, and the visual
appearance of key high streets such as Kingsland High Street in Dalston and
the Narrow Way in Hackney Central are important to the performance and
attraction of such centres. There is also pressure in the Borough for locating
advertisement hoardings and stand-alone advert boards.
6.7.2
Advertising hoardings and stand-alone boards can detract from the
townscape quality of the Borough, and lead to a poor visual environment
within their immediate vicinity. Poorly located advertising hoardings can be
unsightly and an incongruous feature in areas where there is a unified
architectural or landscape character. In particular, the amenity, character and
quality of heritage assets and the wider historic environment can be adversely
affected by advertisement hoardings. However, in some locations,
advertisement may add colour and interest to an area, act as a sound barrier,
and screen unpleasant views such as where a building or site is under long
term construction / refurbishment.
6.7.3
Advertisement proposals at the national level are guided by the requirements
of the NPPF, and the Town and Country Planning (Control of Advertisements)
(England) Regulations 2007 and any subsequent amendments. In light of the
foregoing the Council considers it important to control and manage
advertisements in terms of their number, size, design, siting or illumination,
so they do not lead to substantial harm to the significance and appearance of
buildings, areas, or add clutter to an already busy street scene thus adversely
affecting the local environment and possibly hindering pedestrian movement
on footpaths, and possibly affecting highway safety. If located on a public
footpath, the Council will encourage applicants to ensure the advertisement
medium forms part of the street furniture serving other functions such as
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telecommunication equipment or bus shelters, rather than a stand-alone
dedicated notice or advertising board. The Council’s Public Realm Strategy
SPD (February 2012) specifically addresses the issue of street clutter by
street furniture, lighting, signage and other forms of communication and
information. Also, the architectural integrity of individual buildings and groups
of buildings may be damaged by insensitive advertisements. A balance has
to be met between commercial requirements and the protection of the
environment, including pedestrian and vehicular safety and movement,
especially from illuminated advertisements.
6.7.4
The term 'advertisement' covers a very wide range of advertisements and
signs. Some advertisements benefit from 'deemed consent', meaning that
consent is not needed; this depends on the size, position and illumination of
the advertisement. Other advertisements will always need consent. Policy
DM29 sets the criteria for how proposals for advertisements that require
consent will be assessed.
POLICY DM29 – ADVERTISEMENTS
Advertisements must be of the highest possible standard and contribute to a safe
and attractive environment, and shall:
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
Not cause a hazard for pedestrians or people using any type of
transportation;
Not adversely affect the historic significance of buildings, and be sensitive to
the character of an area through size and siting, especially those areas of
historic significance;
Not contribute to an unsightly proliferation or clutter of signage in the vicinity
and detract from the amenity of the street scene; and
Not cause visual intrusion by virtue of light pollution into adjoining residential
properties, and avoid flashing internal or external illumination.
6.8
Telecommunications
6.8.1
The Government's policy is to facilitate the growth of new and existing
telecommunications systems whilst keeping environmental impacts to a
minimum. In Hackney there has been a proliferation of telecommunications
infrastructure and associated structures reflecting the uptake of mobile
communications and the availability of the latest broadcast and media
technologies, including broadband access and digital television.
6.8.2
Where planning permission is required the Council is keen to minimise any
adverse impact of such development on visual amenity, aural amenity, and
on public safety including movement without restricting its provision. All
applications for development are encouraged to consider, along with all
relevant telecommunications operators, how the telecommunications needs
of the occupiers will be met. Sensitive and innovative design and
integration/dual use will be required to reduce impact, to minimise
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street/skyline clutter and the proliferation of infrastructure on top of or
attached to buildings or structures.
6.8.3
The Council will expect applicants to show evidence that they have explored
these possibilities, and have considered other locations for the location of
apparatus. Such evidence must accompany any planning application made
to the Council. In general, it is not acceptable to locate satellite dishes and
other telecommunications equipment and associated structures on the front
of buildings and other locations where they are visible from the public realm.
The location of telecommunications equipment in the public realm should be
avoided where possible and designed and located to minimise street clutter,
adverse impact on the character and appearance of an area, conflict with
other street furniture, and unnecessarily add-on to existing
telecommunication equipment that primarily provides the same or similar
service. Whilst recognising that there may be potential for the siting of
telecommunication apparatus and associated structures in conservation
areas and on/around statutory and locally listed buildings, the Council is
concerned to ensure that the amenity, character and quality of its
conservation areas and listed buildings and their settings are protected. In
this regard, the Council will apply more stringent requirements on the design
and siting of telecommunications equipment on listed buildings and within
conservation areas.
6.8.4
Satellite equipment for individual buildings at a domestic or business level
which require planning permission shall be assessed against Policy DM1.
6.8.5
The following sets out the Council’s policy in regard to proposals for
telecommunications requiring consent.
POLICY DM30 – TELECOMMUNICATIONS
Telecommunication development infrastructure should be designed and, as far as
possible, sited, in such a way that does not adversely affect visual amenity, and the
character or appearance of a building or an area.
Applications may be permitted where it can be demonstrated that:
i.
ii.
iii.
If necessary, appropriate screening through landscaping, building design or
planting is provided;
The applicant has explored alternative sites and can demonstrate why such
sites are not considered suitable;
The use of existing facilities or sharing the equipment of other operators has
been explored.
If proposing development in a sensitive area, the development should not have an
unacceptable effect on areas of ecological interest, areas of landscape importance,
archaeological sites, conservation areas or buildings of architectural or historic
interest.
Telecommunications equipment on heritage assets and within
conservation areas must comply with Core Strategy Policy 25 and Policy DM28.
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Development should facilitate high speed broadband and advancement in
communication networks where possible.
6.9
Open Space
6.9.1
The Core Strategy sets out Hackney’s open spaces, which include parkland,
playgrounds, playing fields, public squares, amenity green spaces and
extensive water areas, and habitats/natural areas. It generally protects
against the loss of open space in the Borough, in particular designated open
space. These spaces may become more vulnerable to development
pressure as physical and population growth results in London becoming
more compact and more intensively used, and are increasingly important to
serve Hackney’s growing population in terms of leisure provision, nature
conservation and biodiversity.
6.9.2
Hackney’s network of open spaces should be regarded as integral
infrastructure which will contribute to the ‘London-wide Green Grid’, and the
quality of the overall environment as advocated in the All London Green Grid
(ALGG) SPG and London Foundations: Protecting the Geodiversity of the
Capital SPG (March 2012). The network forms part of Hackney’s character
and has a vital role in the well-being of communities. In order to facilitate the
linking of the Borough’s open spaces into the All London Green Grid, the
Council will require all development providing new or replacement open
space, wherever possible, to connect to the All London Green Grid.
Protection and enhancement of this network will make a positive contribution
to Hackney and its communities. In addition to providing social, recreational
and ecological benefits, and opportunities for relaxation and interaction,
open spaces could help manage flood risk, mitigate the heat island effect,
contribute to urban greening, and promote healthy living including food
growing.
6.9.3
Many Hackney residents depend on local public open space as they do not
have gardens or private open space of their own. This deficiency of private
open space will potentially be addressed to some extent through new
development by the publication of the GLA’s Housing Supplementary
Planning Guidance (November 2012) which requires private amenity space
dedicated to individual residential units.
6.9.4
However, for inner London areas such as Hackney providing significant new
areas of open space is a huge challenge. The provision of new open space
in development does and can increase both the quantitative and qualitative
offer in the Borough, and should increase the attractiveness and value of
development. As such, for new residential and mixed-use schemes, in
addition to private amenity space, the provision of usable communal open
space (either publicly accessible or non-accessible) will be required, and
where applicable should include open space suitable for child play. For nonresidential development, or that element within mixed use schemes,
communal open space will also be required. Useable space means that it
can be used for the purposes set out above in paragraph 6.9.2 (and not for
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operation purposes, see paragraph 6.9.8). In both cases this could include
the use of roofs for recreational, biodiversity or other related purposes to offset the quantitative requirement.
6.9.5
According to Hackney’s Open Space Assessment (2005), the Borough-wide
average for open space provision is 23sq.m per person. Out of the Borough’s
19 wards, 13 wards have an average of less than 23sq.m per person, and in
these wards the average provision is 10sq.m per person. Therefore, in order
to retain this quantitative provision and ensure that the average does not
decrease as population grows, the Council will seek a communal open space
provision of 10sq.m per person from major residential development i.e. those
within Use Class C3 ‘dwellinghouse’. Proposals for specialised housing
types such as supported housing schemes or student housing developments
will be expected to provide usable communal open space. However, this
type of housing is different in that those occupying it may do so quite
temporarily. Students, for example, may not occupy their student
accommodation for a full calendar year and will generally only remain in it
for the duration of their studies at most. The level of communal open space
may be less important to people occupying some kinds of specialised
housing. As such, the level of space to be provided, whether on-site or offsite / financial contribution, will be subject to negotiation, based on the
location and individual circumstances.
6.9.6 The Council also considers that workers should have access to usable open
space, especially public open space. Therefore, based upon the existing public
park provision and the number of jobs in the Shoreditch area, which is where
many of the existing and future employment opportunities in the Borough are
situated, the Council will be seeking 4sq.m per employee generated by a major
commercial development irrespective of location within the Borough. For new
social and community facilities within the context of Policy DM5 “Protection and
Delivery of Social and Community Facilities and Places of Worship”, the level
of communal space in such schemes will be subject to negotiation, based on
the location and individual circumstances.
6.9.7
All new or replacement communal open space generated by a specific
proposal should be provided on-site, and provision should seek to deliver
the levels of open space set out in paragraphs 6.9.5 and 6.9.6, and Policy
DM31.
6.9.8
However, if it is not possible to provide these levels of open space on-site,
the quality and quantity of open space proposed will be considered (i.e. is
the open space publicly accessible, is the layout and arrangement of high
quality and functionality, does it have high recreational or biodiversity value,
are high quality child play facilities proposed?). Also, non-accessible living
roofs and private amenity space attached to individual units can be
considered to off-set some or the whole of the quantitative requirement set
in the policy. The aim of the policy is to ensure, where applicants cannot
provide the quantitative requirement, that they have made a concerted effort
to provide high quality, and where possible publicly accessible, communal
open space. Other factors that will be considered in assessing the level of
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provision will be site constraints, if there is a good level of public open space
provision in the locality of a development site, prevailing density and location
of the application site, and viability. Open space which is primarily for
operational purposes i.e. car parking, vehicle turning etc. will not be
considered as communal open space for the purposes of Policy DM31.
6.9.9
If applicants cannot provide either the levels of communal open space
sought in DM31, or cannot adequately demonstrate compliance with the
exceptions in paragraph 6.9.8, financial and/or physical contributions
towards enhancing, maintaining and managing existing local open space
close by may be acceptable, (including existing unused open space that can
be made publicly accessible and enhanced to serve potential and existing
users of the space). Guidance on how on-site or off-site contributions will be
calculated and administered are set out in the Council’s Planning
Contributions Supplementary Planning Document, and in line with the
Council’s CIL Charging Schedule as appropriate.
6.9.10
Open space provision within the design of schemes should be considered
from the outset on a site specific basis. The nature and purpose of the open
space will determine the design and layout, and the space can be multifunctional e.g. could incorporate Sustainable Drainage Systems (SuDS).
Furthermore, how and if any open space provided is used should be
determined by those with a vested interest in the space. The occupants of
the dwellings or business premises may decide that the space should be
used for food growing, dedicated child play area, relaxation or a combination
of activities. Uses are not mutually exclusive, and other possible uses of
space are highlighted in paragraph 6.9.2 above, and Appendix 2
‘Explanation of the roles of open space’ of the Core Strategy. New or
replacement communal open space including those on roofs generated by a
development should be made publicly accessible wherever possible. The
Council’s Public Realm Strategy SPD should be considered in terms of
guiding development proposals where the intention is for the open space to
be publicly accessible.
6.9.11
The following policy sets out the Council’s requirements for open space
provision for development proposals.
POLICY DM31 – OPEN SPACE AND LIVING ROOFS
Development proposals proposing 10 or more residential units and / or more than
1000sq.m of commercial floorspace, will be expected to provide the following levels
of communal amenity open space:


10 sq.m per person from residential development schemes,
4 sq.m per employee from commercial development schemes.
The layout and arrangement of open space must be of high quality and functionality
and must be incorporated into the design of a scheme from the outset. Communal
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open space should be made publicly accessible where possible. Open space should
maximise bio-diversity benefits and food growing opportunities, and should include
the provision of living roofs which should be suitable for a range of activities where
feasible.
Where it is demonstrated that it is not possible to provide the levels of new
communal (whether publicly accessible or not) open space set out above on site,
and that the applicant cannot meet the exceptions set out in paragraph 6.9.8, or it
can be demonstrated open space provision in the locality of the site is good,
financial and/or physical contributions may be acceptable for the enhancement of
existing public open space in deficient areas.
Proposals for specialised housing types such as supported housing schemes or
student housing, and new social and community facilities, will be required to provide
a level of communal open space. The level of communal space in such schemes
will be subject to negotiation, based on the criterion in paragraph 6.9.8.
6.10
Enhancement of existing open space and the Lee Valley Regional Park
6.10.1
The amount and quality of open space provision varies widely across the
Borough, areas to the east of the Borough adjacent to Hackney Marshes in
particular have a generally good level of open space provision. Meanwhile,
in the wards in and around Dalston and Hackney Central, there are open
spaces but no ‘recognised’ public parks. In Hackney, public parks are where
many people encounter significant areas of open ‘natural’ space. The
Council seeks through the DM policies and CS Policy 26 to protect, enhance
and provide new open space. CS Policy 26 essentially seeks the
improvement of open space and increasing accessibility to it. The policy
protects ‘designated open space’ (including regional, metropolitan, district
and local parks, allotments, churchyards and civic spaces) as identified in
the Policies Map and Schedule against any ‘net loss’, but allows for cases
where development would involve some ‘net loss’ of Amenity Green Space
provided replacement open space is of better or equivalent quality. Amenity
Green Space is predominately but not always, located on housing estates
and provides environmental, visual and amenity value. Such space plays an
important role in areas without access to public parks or other open space,
and has the potential to be improved for a variety of purposes. In addition
verges to highways, railways and other utilities provide value open spaces.
Given the pressures on land availability, most new communal or public open
space provision will be through improving existing open space or access to
it (although redevelopment schemes do provide the opportunity for the
provision of open space in accordance with Policy DM31).
6.10.2
Where an existing open or green space is reasonably close to the community
it serves, is demonstrably special to a local community and holds a particular
local significance because of its beauty, historic significance, recreational
value (including as playing field), tranquillity or richness of its wildlife and is
local in character, then local communities can recommend them for Local
Green Space designations in either the Local Plan or Neighbourhood Plan.
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Providing that the space satisfies the criteria of the NPPF paragraphs 76-78
then any designated Local Green Space will be afforded protection from new
development other than in very special circumstances.
6.10.3
In seeking enhancement to existing open space, Policy DM32 sets out the
criteria for proposals on open space, focussing on the categories for open
space set out in the Core Strategy, namely ‘designated public open space’,
‘other designated open space’, and ‘amenity green space’.
6.10.4
Based on Hackney’s projected population growth there is a requirement for
additional public parks, children’s play spaces, playing pitches, allotments
and natural and semi-natural green spaces. The provision of ancillary
facilities (e.g. seating, play/fitness equipment, public conveniences,
refreshment facilities, outdoor playing pitches, changing facilities, habitat
management), of an appropriate size and scale within public parks and other
publicly accessible open spaces, will be supported and encouraged.
Providing easier public access to parks and other open spaces is a vital part
of any enhancement and this is particularly beneficial for certain groups who
cannot travel so far, e.g. mothers with young children and the elderly.
6.10.5
Generally, proposals should not result in the loss of open space, and should
be for small scale ancillary development of high quality design, and
appropriate to the character of the open space. Further guidance regarding
appropriate enhancement of such open space can be found in the Social
Spaces: A Strategy for Parks in Hackney, Park Management Plans,
Hackney’s Biodiversity Action Plan and Hackney Play Strategy at
http://www.hackney.gov.uk/parks.htm and the London Mayor’s “Shaping
Neighbourhoods: Children and Young People’s Play and Informal Recreation
SPG”.
6.10.6
The policy below also provides a link between the Core Strategy Proposals
Map and its replacement, the Development Management Policies Map, in
regard to the protection and retention of existing open space, given the
current status of the Core Strategy Proposals Map. The policy should be read
in conjunction with CS Policy 26.
6.10.7
The Lee Valley Regional Park is a major area of interconnected open space
within the Borough defined by its openness, heritage rich and biodiverse
landscapes and the variety of sporting and recreational activities available to
local residents and visitors http://www.leevalleypark.org.uk The Regional
Park is statutorily designated for leisure, recreation, sport and nature
conservation. Development coming forward in the Borough will provide
opportunities to improve access into the Park from surrounding communities,
enhance existing sporting and recreational opportunities, heritage assets,
and protect existing ecological sites.
6.10.8
The Council’s Park Strategy and individual management plans cover
Hackney’s section of the Regional Park. The Council will seek to work cooperatively with the Lee Valley Regional Park Authority (LVRP) and other
stakeholders to deliver the Park Plan 2000 and the Park Development
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Framework Area Proposals, to improve leisure and sporting opportunities for
local communities, enhance access to open space and nature, and help
expand educational, volunteering and health related activities.
6.10.9
The Authority adopted Area 2 Proposals “The Three Marshes: Walthamstow,
Leyton and Hackney” (October 2011) include a large section of the Park area
within Hackney. The development of Area Proposals for the remainder of
the Park within Hackney is scheduled for mid-2014, including land within the
Hackney Wick area. Full details of the Park Authority proposals can be seen
on their web site:
http://www.leevalleypark.org.uk/en/content/cms/corporate/enhancing-thevalley/park-development-framework and a summary of specific projects in
Hackney can be seen in the Glossary.
6.10.10 The policy below seeks to protect existing open space and also recognises
the LVRP’s Park Plan and Park Development Area Proposals.
POLICY DM32 – PROTECTION AND ENHANCEMENT OF EXISTING OPEN
SPACE AND THE LEE VALLEY REGIONAL PARK
The Council will protect and enhance existing Designated Open Space and Amenity
Green Space, subject to the criteria set out in Core Strategy policy 26, and as set
out in the Development Management Policies Map, and will seek to improve,
wherever possible, the quality of access to Hackney’s open spaces, and natural
environment, for example the creation of pocket parks, community gardens, food
growing facilities and allotments. Where current access is restricted, the Council will
seek through agreement with owners, developers and operators greater public
access and enjoyment of open spaces where appropriate.
The Council supports the provision and improvement of outdoor open space and
leisure facilities. Small scale ancillary developments which enhance the park and
open space offer, such as refreshment facilities, public conveniences, public art
installations or outdoor play and fitness equipment, will be permitted, provided that
they would:
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
Be of a high standard of design and quality, safe and accessible to all;
Not have a detrimental impact on nature conservation and biodiversity, and
should seek to improve such;
Not result in the loss of functional open space; and
Not adversely detract from the overall function, character and appearance of
the park or open space.
The Lee Valley Regional Park Authority
The Council supports in principle the Lee Valley Regional Park Authority’s Park Plan
and Park Development Framework (PDF) adopted Area Proposals schedule for the
area of the Park within Hackney. These will be important considerations in
determining applications.
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6.11
Allotments and Food Growing
6.11.1
The Council supports the provision, expansion and improvement of
allotments in line with the wider healthy living agenda and to provide
opportunities for recreation and exercise. Hackney is currently experiencing
high levels of demand for allotments. The Hackney Allotment Society
manages nine sites across the Borough with a total of 125 full plots, and
there is demand for more provision. The Core Strategy identifies allotments
as open space and as such seeks to protect and enhance allotments.
6.11.2
In addition, there are a number of food growing initiatives in Hackney, led
largely by independent groups and social enterprises. The ‘community’
aspect of gardening helps to bring people together and raise awareness
about produce. Across the Borough small areas of underused land owned
by local organisations are being used as vegetable patches. Some but not
all of these initiatives are linked to the London wide Capital Growth initiative
which aims to transform the city by creating 2,012 new food growing spaces
by 2012. In May 2013 there were approximately 160 food growing projects
located within Hackney registered on the Capital Growth website
(http://www.capitalgrowth.org)15. The location of food growing sites, and
guidance about starting such initiatives within Hackney, can be found on the
Capital Growth, Hackney Homes and the Council’s websites at:
http://www.hackney.gov.uk/parks-local-food-growing.htm
6.11.3
Food growing links into and is an integral part of wider initiatives such as
healthy living, mental and physical well-being and encouraging children to
eat fresh food. Local food growing initiatives do not necessarily require a
significant amount of land for cultivation. Raised beds or sleepers on nonorganic surfaces and orchards are or can be used for local food growing,
and are particularly suited for the more dense areas of the Borough. Where
new or expanded allotments and other food growing initiatives are proposed,
the impact on the surrounding area of any boundary treatment and
associated structures should also be considered. Furthermore, particular
attention should be given to equality of access for local people who want to
participate, and where appropriate the impact on any non food growing
activities that occur on the open space. The need to balance differing
demands on the use of open space is integral to any application.
6.11.4
The following sets out the Council’s policy in relation to allotments and
development proposals relating to food-growing.
POLICY DM33 – ALLOTMENTS AND FOOD GROWING
The Council supports the provision of new, improved and expanded allotments, and
local food growing initiatives and operations, especially on existing open spaces
and temporary derelict land where short or medium term development is not
15
The Capital Growth website is ongoing and continuously being updated and revised
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planned. Proposals will need to ensure that adequate provision has been made to
support these uses, such as the need to address storage of equipment, composting,
equality of access and security, and that the provision of such facilities does not
detrimentally impact on the character, appearance and amenity of the surrounding
area.
6.12
Biodiversity and Nature Conservation
6.12.1
Core Strategy Policy 27 (Biodiversity) states that the Council will protect,
conserve and enhance nature conservation areas, and that development
should include measures that contribute to the Borough’s natural
environment and biodiversity. It identifies 26 Sites of Importance for Nature
Conservation (SINCs), which range from areas within educational
establishments to Hackney Marshes and the main water bodies and
waterways.
6.12.2
The Council’s Biodiversity Action Plan (BAP) 2012-2017 (March 2012)
outlines the priorities for biodiversity in Hackney and a framework to improve
biodiversity across the Borough. It sets out international, national and
regional policy and legislation, thus, touching upon habitats and species
which have statutory protection. Furthermore, the Plan looks at best practice
around different types of habitats - Built Environment, Homes and Housing,
Parks and Green Spaces, School Grounds, Wetlands and Waterways,
Woodland. The guidance is relevant to designated and non designated sites
of nature conservation interest, irrespective of size and ownership. The BAP
should be used as the first reference point regarding ways to incorporate
nature conservation and biodiversity into schemes or the fabric of a building.
In addition, for Hackney’s waterways the Environment Agency’s Thames
River Basin Management Plan and the European Water Framework
Directive provides guidance on the protection, enhancement and sustainable
use of the water environment especially for ecology.
http://www.environment-agency.gov.uk
6.12.3
Both CS Policy 24 (Design) and CS Policy 27 (Biodiversity) advocate that
biodiversity be addressed and enhancement measures incorporated into
design where appropriate. The Council will seek, wherever possible, to
ensure that new or additional opportunities for biodiversity is provided within
new build/development. These policies apply to all planning applications,
and applications should demonstrate how the proposals incorporate
enhancement measures. The Built Environment section of the BAP
advocates living roofs and walls including retrofitting, artificial nesting and
roosting sites, ecological landscaping and green spaces. Meanwhile the
‘Homes and Housing’ section seeks to raise awareness of individual gardens
and green spaces on housing estates as a biodiversity resource, and
encourages investment and sensitive management of these areas for such
purposes.
6.12.4
It is important to ensure that any development proposals in or adjacent to
the SINCs do not have a detrimental impact on their nature conservation and
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biodiversity value. The Walthamstow Reservoir Special Protection Area
(Ramsar Site), and Walthamstow Marshes Sites of Special Scientific
Interest16, are located adjacent to Hackney’s north east boundary within the
London Borough of Waltham Forest. These designations are of international
and national importance in terms of the sites’ value for natural habitat and
species of plants and animals including migrating birds. In addition to being
a SINC, Springfield Park is also considered appropriate for designation as a
Regionally Important Geological / Geomorphological Site (RIG). It is
London’s only designated Geological Nature Reserve, and the geodiversity
value lies in its prominent spring line and Langley Silt and Hackney Gravel
composition, and would therefore be protected.
6.12.5
Policy DM34 sets out the criteria against which development proposals will
be assessed in and adjacent to SINCs, and / or an area of geodiversity value
and the Walthamstow Reservoir Special Protection Area, and Walthamstow
Marshes Sites of Special Scientific Interest. The essence of the policy is to
ensure that development proposals should retain, enhance or create
features and areas of nature conservation and /or geodiversity value and
avoid harm to nature conservation. Where it is demonstrated that it is not
possible to avoid adverse impact, mitigation measures need to be included
to minimise this impact. Where it is demonstrated that there are overriding
economic or social reasons for a development to occur within a SINC, and
the benefits of the development outweigh the adverse impact on the
biodiversity and geodiversity value of the site, in these exceptional
circumstances, the development may be approved. This is subject to
reasonable alternatives for location and design having been assessed, and
high quality re-provision either on-site or elsewhere in the Borough, which
shall at least re-provide the habitat area and value, and preferably increase
and improve the value.
POLICY DM34 – SITES OF NATURE CONSERVATION AND / OR
GEODIVERSITY
VALUE,
WALTHAMSTOW
RESERVOIRS
SPECIAL
PROTECTION AREA AND WALTHAMSTOW MARSHES SITES OF SPECIAL
SCIENTIFIC INTEREST
The Council will not permit development within Sites of Importance for Nature
Conservation (SINCs), unless in exceptional circumstances it can be demonstrated
that there are particular overriding reasons for development to proceed. High quality
re-provision will be required, ensuring a net gain of nature conservation value and
biodiversity, including on and off-site biodiversity and nature conservation
improvements, such as to wildlife habitats set out in Hackney’s Biodiversity Action
Plan. Where appropriate, sites of significant geodiversity value should be protected,
managed and / or enhanced.
Proposals for development adjacent to the SINCs including Springfield Park as an
area of geodiversity value and a potential RIG and to the Walthamstow Reservoirs
16
Further Information on all of the statutorily protected sites (SSSI, Ramsar and SPA sites) can be
found on Natural England’s website http://www.natureonthemap.org.uk
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Special Protection Area and Walthamstow Marshes Sites of Special Scientific
Interest, must not have a significant detrimental impact on the nature conservation
value, geodiversity value and biodiversity of these sites. Mitigation and/or
compensatory measures will be considered in assessing the impact on nature
conservation, biodiversity and geodiversity.
6.13
Landscaping and Tree Management
6.13.1
Trees are an attractive feature of the urban and natural landscape and
mature trees can help to reduce air and noise pollution and improve property
values. They also contribute to a sense of place, and street trees in particular
help people relate to the urban environment. The contribution of well
designed and managed landscapes, including trees, to a scheme is
recognised through the Council’s Public Realm Strategy SPD, while ecology
benefits are highlighted in the Council’s BAP. Support for the protection,
maintenance and enhancement of trees and woodlands as a valued
resource at strategic level is highlighted in the London Plan and the Mayor’s
Preparing Borough Trees and Woodlands Strategies SPG (February 2013).
6.13.2
Development proposals that pay insufficient regard to existing ecological and
natural landscape features can lead to an incoherent urban form and the
unnecessary destruction of existing nature conservation interest. The layout
of development schemes should ensure that they incorporate existing trees
where possible and should include appropriate planting, particularly of locally
sourced/provident and native species. Opportunities for food growing should
be considered as part of landscaping schemes. Schemes should
demonstrate sustainable and appropriate irrigation plans for landscaping
and should ensure that planting design does not and/or will not impact
negatively on the structure of nearby buildings or hinder accessibility in the
short, medium and long term. SuDS should also be designed within
landscaping schemes. Paragraph 7.8.5 of this document highlights some of
the benefits of SuDS, while Appendix 2 of Core Strategy addresses some
but not all of the values of open space including SuDS. The emphasis will
be to soften the impact of the development in its setting, provide visual
interest in the street scene and contribute to nature conservation and the
Borough’s green infrastructure.
6.13.3
The following policy sets out to ensure that trees and landscaping are an
integral part of the design process, and that development proposals
recognise the contribution that they make to the character and appearance
of developments, and their positive environmental and historic benefits.
6.13.4
The Council has some control over the removal of or works that would affect
trees protected under Tree Preservation Orders (TPOs). The Council will
refuse TPO consent and/or planning permission for the removal of a tree
under a TPO, and those in conservation areas, unless there are exceptional
circumstances and/or over-riding planning benefits demonstrated. Consent
and/or permission will also not be granted if works to a tree in such
circumstances would be detrimental to its health and amenity value.
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6.13.6 This policy also relates to those individual or groups of trees considered to be
of amenity value but not protected by TPOs. ‘Amenity value’ means that they
have interest biologically, aesthetically or culturally. If applicable
development proposals will be expected to conform to the British Standard
5837:2012 or any subsequent amendments regarding pre-and post-planning
consent work in relation to design, protection and planting of trees. Root
Protection Areas (RPAs) will always be respected. Planning conditions
and/or legal agreements will be used to retain and protect trees and Root
Protection Areas during construction and in completed development, and to
require the planting of new trees if not contained within proposals. However,
in some cases tree planting may not be appropriate, as they may damage
other habitats. In assessing applications, the Council will determine the
value of existing trees including their classification under BS 5837:2012 and
landscape features, and indicative planting and landscaping schemes
should accompany applications.
POLICY DM35 – LANDSCAPING AND TREE MANAGEMENT
Proposals for development will seek to retain trees considered to be of amenity
value, especially veteran trees17, hedgerows and natural features on development
sites. Existing landscaping features considered to be of value should also be
retained and protected where possible and appropriate, and should be incorporated
within detailed landscaping schemes.
Landscaping plans should include environmentally appropriate planting for the
specific location, demonstrate appropriate sustainable irrigation plans and should
ensure that planting design does not impact negatively on the structure of nearby
buildings or hinder accessibility.
The Council will refuse planning permission and/or consent for the removal of
protected trees (trees under a TPO and those within conservation areas), and for
proposals that would have a detrimental impact on the health and amenity of such
trees, except in exceptional circumstances and/or where over-riding planning
benefits are demonstrated. In such cases, compensatory measures will be required
for suitable replacements and/or additional planting, or contributions to planting offsite.
The removal of non-protected trees as part of development schemes will not be
supported unless adequate replacement planting is proposed, or the removal is in
the interests of good arboricultural practice.
17
Veteran (ancient) tree: Trees that are or look old relative to others of the same species, usually in the second
or mature stage of its life and by virtue of their age are of interest biologically, aesthetically or culturally.
Characteristics include very large girth for the species, hollow or hollowing trunk, and a large quantity of dead
wood in the canopy.
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6.14
Waterways and Moorings
6.14.1
This policy should be read in conjunction with Core Strategy Policy 28 Water
and Waterways. Water areas, such as canals and rivers are particularly
valuable. They can cater for a wider range of leisure interests, and have
nature conservation and built environment value. Much of the Regent’s
Canal lies within a conservation area, and Hackney’s main waterways are
designated as SINCs.
6.14.2
These waterways are also attractive places to live, and the Canal & River
Trust is experiencing increased demand and pressure for residential
moorings from boat users. Additional moorings and associated facilities are
required in order to accommodate this increased demand. The Council
recognises the need for additional residential moorings and supports the
provision of such moorings, which provide an additional form of housing,
provided that any new moorings do not hinder navigation along the waterway
or impede public access along and to the waterfront. In accordance with the
London Plan, residential moorings should normally be located off-line from
the main navigation routes, i.e. in basins and docks. Furthermore, because
of the associated operational development such as storage, disposal,
fencing, pontoon, amenity area etc. expected for permanent residential
moorings, schemes should normally be located on the non-towing side.
However, there are circumstances where schemes can be designed to work
satisfactorily alongside the towpath as well as offside (non-towing side) or
off-line, particularly where they are close to amenities and public transport.
For planning applications relating to permanent residential moorings
adequate supporting infrastructure including details regarding arrangements
for waste disposal and recycling must be put in place.
6.14.3
Whilst the Council recognises the need for increasing the number of
residential moorings to cater for any existing demand, it is anxious to ensure
that residential moorings do not conflict with the navigation and recreational
uses of the waterways, and/or have detrimental impact on the amenity, water
quality, character and appearance, and biodiversity and nature conservation
value, of the waterways and adjoining areas, and that they comply with the
London Plan (July 2015) Policy 7.27. In considering applications for
residential moorings (and any other types of moorings) the Council will have
regard to the Park Plan of the Lee Valley Regional Authority and the need to
safeguard and protect the openness and amenity of much of the waterways
within the Park in Hackney, i.e. the Lea Navigation/River Lea which are
designated as Metropolitan Open Land and as Sites of Importance for
Nature Conservation. Any application for residential moorings will therefore
be carefully assessed for the impact it could have on the openness and
amenity of the Lee Valley.
6.14.4 The policy below sets out the criteria for consideration of moorings. The
Council will also work with appropriate authorities to identify and secure
additional areas for the permanent mooring of boats.
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POLICY DM36 – RESIDENTIAL MOORINGS
Proposals for residential moorings will be supported by the Council, provided
supporting uses and facilities are or will be in place, and, where appropriate they
have regard to the Park Plan and Area Proposals of the Lee Valley Park Authority.
Proposals for residential moorings and associated facilities should not:
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
Hinder navigation along the waterway;
Have a detrimental impact on nature conservation and biodiversity;
Impede public access;
Detrimentally affect leisure provision, amenity and the character and
appearance of the waterway and surrounding area.
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CLIMATE CHANGE
AND
ENVIRONMENTAL
SUSTAINABILITY
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CHAPTER 7: CLIMATE CHANGE AND ENVIRONMENTAL
SUSTAINABILITY
7.1
Climate Change and Environmental Sustainability
7.1.1 This chapter provides more detailed policies to implement the Core Strategy
policies relating to flood risk, resource efficiency, reducing carbon dioxide
emissions, low carbon energy, renewable technologies and district heating in
addition to tackling pollution and water and air quality.
7.1.2 Further details and guidance on the implementation of the policies and
information contained within this chapter of the Development Management
Local Plan (DMLP) will be available within the emerging Sustainable Design
and Construction Supplementary Planning Document (SPD) and its associated
appendices. The SPD should be used in conjunction with Hackney’s DMLP and
Core Strategy and the latest iteration of the London Plan to aid in designing the
most sustainable developments.
7.1.3 The Mayor of London has set a target to cut London’s Carbon Dioxide (CO 2)
emissions by 60% by 2025. All boroughs will need to contribute towards this
objective. Hackney adopted its Climate Change Strategy in September 2009.
This sets targets to cut carbon emissions by 3% by 2013, 15.9% by 2019,
49.2% by 2035, and 80.1 % by 2050, so meeting obligations under the 2008
Climate Change Act. All development must thus take account of the need to
deliver reductions in CO2 and other greenhouse gases, in line with the Mayor
of London’s objective of delivering a 60% reduction in CO2 by 2025, and the
80% cut required under the 2008 Climate Change Act.
7.1.4 The North London Waste Plan is currently being prepared and will set out the
planning framework for waste management in Hackney and the London
boroughs of Barnet, Camden, Enfield, Haringey, Islington and Waltham Forest
for the next 15 years up to 2031. It will also identify sites and areas suitable for
waste management use and set out policies for determining waste planning
applications.
7.2
Lowering Energy Consumption
7.2.1 Reducing energy consumption from buildings is an important consideration in
helping to tackle climate change, which goes beyond a simple matter of solely
reducing energy and water use. In line with recent legislative changes, all
residential development must meet the requirements set out in the Building
Regulations. The London Plan requires reductions in regulated CO2 emissions
over the 2010 Building Regulations Part L with a graduated tightening of
standards to achieve zero carbon by 2019 for non-domestic buildings. This fits
in with the wider national targets set in the 2008 Climate Change Act.
7.2.2 The anticipated growth in Hackney creates a need to reduce CO2 emissions at
all stages of the development cycle including ensuring that all development is
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fully accessible by a choice of transport modes, running through to final
occupancy.
7.2.3 It is estimated that two thirds of the properties which will be in the UK’s housing
stock in 2050 have already been built. A further key challenge will be to reduce
the carbon footprint from the existing built stock, which will require many largescale retrofitting projects to be undertaken to help increase thermal efficiency.
The Council will strongly promote retrofitting energy and water efficiency
measures to older premises.
7.2.4 Central to these policies is the recognition that appropriate design, orientation
and layout of buildings can reduce energy loss, minimise energy demand
through natural lighting, heating and cooling and allow on-site generation of
heat or electricity from renewable sources.
7.3
Demonstrating Sustainable Performance
7.3.1 Good design must meet statutory requirements to reduce pollution, energy and
carbon emissions, and should incorporate best practice design principles and
guidance where appropriate. This requires developments to demonstrate that
they have incorporated measures to minimise overheating over the lifetime of
the scheme through passive design measures, including appropriate levels of
glazing, solar control and shading mechanisms and optimal levels of thermal
mass and orientation to reduce solar gain, through environmentally friendly
design.
7.3.2 Applicants will be required to integrate best practice sustainable design
standards at all stages of the development process. Through Design and
Access Statements (DAS), Sustainability Statements and Energy Assessments
submitted with planning applications, development should demonstrate how
these general sustainability principles are addressed.
7.3.3 Technical solutions to reduce carbon emissions include the use of materials
which have low embodied energy and high thermal performance to reduce
energy losses through building fabric as well as maximising the recycling of
construction waste. As part of this, the Council is undertaking research on the
appropriate use of sustainable construction materials generally in the Borough
to reduce carbon emissions through the building’s full life cycle. Further
information on Hackney’s approach to sustainable materials is included within
the Materials Appendix of the emerging Sustainable Design and Construction
SPD.
7.3.4 Consultation with industry and construction bodies will be undertaken as part
of the development of the Council’s emerging planning guidance. Provision for
connectivity to district heating networks should be made, alongside
maximisation of energy efficiency and the use of renewable energy equipment,
such as photovoltaic panels to produce electricity.
7.3.5 The design of developments should take account of flood risk and be adaptable
to a changing climate. The Core Strategy and policies elsewhere in this
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document promote high quality sustainable design, which includes taking
account of the need for Sustainable Drainage Systems (SuDS) and water
efficiency standards required under the Building Regulations and BREEAM
(Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method).
7.3.6 Improving water efficiency is a priority for Hackney, especially given that the
Borough sits within an area of ‘serious’ water stress, which means that with its
high population there are high water demands against a limited water
availability. Average water consumption in Hackney in 2010 -11 was 166.5 litres
per person per day which is well above the England and Wales average of
148l/h/d and the London Plan target of 105 litres or less per head per day
required from residential developments. In light of the foregoing, the Council
will require all developments to achieve water target efficiency set by the
London Plan in order both to achieve water efficiency but also to reduce carbon
emissions.
7.3.7 Moving to occupation of completed developments, conventional electrical
heating and cooling systems cause significant carbon dioxide emissions.
Through the DAS, the Council will require applicants to demonstrate that they
have fully considered all alternatives to reduce fossil fuel dependency.
7.3.8 An Energy Assessment and Sustainability Statement, including a completed
Sustainability Monitoring form (available within the Sustainable Design and
Construction SPD), must be submitted at application stage for major
developments18 setting out how the application complies with relevant local,
regional and national sustainable design and construction policies and
guidance. The statement and assessment should demonstrate how the
application will reduce carbon dioxide emissions and energy use. Major nonresidential development shall include a BREEAM pre-assessment.
7.3.9 BREEAM is an independently verified rating system. Refer to Policy DM38 for
the development requirements under these schemes and the Council’s
emerging SPD for more detailed requirements.
7.3.10 Sustainable arrangements should be made and proposed within the Energy
Assessment for the governance and maintenance of decentralised energy
systems. These should be contracted in a Section 106 agreement.
7.3.11 Planning conditions will require that post-construction BREEAM certificates are
provided to the Council within three months of on-site completion.
18
The 10 or more homes, or 1000m2 gross threshold is derived from Government guidance on the scale of
major development. In the town Centres where an AAP applies this threshold is reduced to 5 or more homes or
500sq.m.
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POLICY DM37 –
DEVELOPMENT
SUSTAINABILITY
STANDARDS
FOR
RESIDENTIAL
All proposals for residential development must meet the requirements set out in the
Building Regulations.
Householder extensions should comply with Building Regulations and will be
strongly encouraged to include efficiency measures. The Council will encourage
improvements in the efficiency standards of existing buildings through retro-fitting
where this is possible.
All development will be required to minimise the use of water by incorporating
savings measures in order to achieve set water use targets in the London Plan.
Hackney will welcome and encourage new build proposals which achieve
PassivHaus certification.
7.4
Sustainability in Other Development
7.4.1 The London Plan has introduced tougher performance standards for nonresidential developments. Planning conditions will require that postconstruction BREEAM certificates are provided to the Council within 3 months
of site completion.
7.4.2 New non-residential development including conversions, refurbishments,
changes of use, and extensions can all increase CO 2 emissions. The
cumulative demand placed on infrastructure from smaller proposals can be
considerable and these impacts must be mitigated by reducing the energy
usage through sustainable design.
7.4.3 Also as non-residential developments consume significant amounts of water,
accounting for 29 per cent of water consumption in London, they offer scope
where further water and carbon savings can be made. The Council will
therefore require that new non-household developments including
refurbishments to achieve a water efficiency standard, such as BREEAM
“Excellent”, and where possible, achieve the maximum number of water credits.
7.4.4 Policies DM38 and DM39 set out the criteria against which other non-residential
development proposals will be assessed and also the requirements for offsetting if carbon dioxide emissions cannot be reduced to the specified levels.
Measures to achieve these emissions should take into account such factors as
ease of practicality of connection to existing networks, context, size, nature,
location, accessibility and expected operation. Further details on carbon
emission off-setting calculations and its payment are set out in the Council’s
Planning Contributions Supplementary Planning Document (SPD) and the
emerging Sustainable Design and Construction SPD.
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POLICY DM38 – SUSTAINABILITY STANDARDS FOR NON-RESIDENTIAL
DEVELOPMENT
Major non-residential developments (with a site area of more than 1,000 sq.m) must
achieve the BREEM ‘Excellent’ rating (or an equivalent rating under any other
system which may replace it) and where possible achieve the maximum number of
water credits, and must be built to the following standards:
i.
ii.
iii.
2013 – 2016: minimum of 40% reduction in carbon dioxide emissions
2016 – 2019: Building Regulations standards
2019 – 2031: zero carbon
POLICY DM39 – OFFSETTING
Where it is demonstrated that it is not possible to reduce CO 2 emissions on-site by
the specified levels, carbon off-setting payments will be required. These will be
secured via legal agreement.
7.5
Decentralised Energy, Heating and Cooling
7.5.1 Decentralised Energy (DE) utilises a series of local systems/technologies to
generate heat and power very close to the point of use and can be connected
to local distribution networks. This includes a variety of power generation
systems, such as Combined Heat and Power (CHP) or Combined Cooling,
Heat and Power systems (CCHP), renewable energy, anaerobic digesters and
energy from waste. Their implementation requires long term planning of the
built environment and land use, with flexibility to exploit new energy
technologies and systems. Where possible, the opportunity to link new
development to an existing CCHP or CHP system may be the most resource
efficient option, as CCHP/CHP can be suitable for all sizes of development.
This allows for more effective loading to be made to existing systems and can
increase their efficiencies. It is expected that the possibility to connect a new
development to an existing system will be reviewed in the Energy Assessment.
7.5.2 If it is not possible to link to an existing system, the provision of CCHP/CHP
must be considered on a site-wide basis that connects different uses and/or
groups of buildings. Where a CCHP/CHP system is installed as part of new
development, applicants should examine opportunities to extend the scheme
beyond the site boundary to adjacent areas. If a site-wide approach is not
possible, the use of CCHP/CHP schemes should still be investigated. This
should include the use of renewable technologies where technically feasible.
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7.5.3 In 2010 Hackney Council commissioned AECOM to produce a report
identifying sites most suitable for development of decentralised networks in the
Borough. This report is available to view and can be downloaded from
http://www.hackney.gov.uk/Assets/Documents/hackney_heat_mapping_repor
t_july2010.pdf The Council will expect provision to be made in areas which
have been identified in the report as suitable for the development of
decentralised networks. In these areas, the Council will require that
development proposals be designed to connect to existing or proposed district
heat networks and where none exists, to commit to future proofing. Key
elements that need to be considered when planning for district heating are the
possible distance to a central heating plant; potential heat demands and
building sizes; accessibility for vehicles and underground pipe-work; and
phasing of the redevelopment.
7.5.4 There are opportunities to install small-scale improvements to individual
properties during building works. Collectively these can accumulate and bring
significant benefits to the community. The co-ordination of design, installation,
compatibility and future proofing of systems may be significant for eventually
joining up systems, as well as leading to the consistency of appearance and
maintenance.
7.5.5 Major developments such as town centre renewal projects or estate
regeneration schemes present opportunities for large-scale investments in
renewable technologies and energy efficiency. However, the maximum
savings and sustainability benefits may not be realised until developments are
completed. Systems may need to be connected together as networks for the
initial set-up and running costs to be shared across the maximum number of
users.
7.5.6 Policy DM40 sets out the criteria against which development proposals will be
assessed.
POLICY DM40 – HEATING AND COOLING
New build developments and all major development should take into account the
need to adapt to higher temperatures, avoid and mitigate overheating and meet the
need for cooling in terms of their layout, design, construction, materials and
landscaping.
Major developments must demonstrate that the heating, cooling and power systems
have been selected to minimise carbon dioxide emissions, in line with the London
Plan targets. They should be designed to connect to existing or proposed
decentralised heat and energy networks and where none exists commit to future
proofing.
Minor developments should, where technically possible, similarly be designed to
connect to existing or planned decentralised energy networks.
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Opportunities to adapt existing buildings, spaces and places to manage higher
temperatures should be maximised.
7.6
Contaminated Land
7.6.1 Industrial activity, waste disposal, accidental spillages and transportation can
cause contamination of land. Research by Hackney's Pollution Control team
identified that sources of contamination may affect around 20% of land in the
Borough. Often this contamination is associated with industrial processes or
activities that have ceased and are no longer evident. Past dispersed sources
of pollution, such as fall out from vehicle emissions and past industry, have also
resulted in much of the land in the Borough being affected by at least some
degree of contamination. Potentially contaminated sites and sites determined
as contaminated land may be found at the following link –
http://www.map.hackney.gov.uk/LBHackneymap
7.6.2 Where waste products or residues remain within soils or groundwater they may
present a hazard to people and the general environment and preclude some
classes of development from taking place. If land and water contamination is
not dealt with, this can in time present a threat to health and the environment.
7.6.3 As regulator, landowner and planning authority, Hackney Council is
responsible for ensuring that land is suitable for its current use and is made
suitable for any new use and environmental setting. Any land recognised as
being "contaminated" or with the potential to cause environmental damage, or
soils and groundwater that may be affected by contamination, needs to be
initially assessed by the applicant as part of the planning application process
to determine if contamination is present, the extent of the contamination and
whether it is significant. The Council will therefore require an initial desk study
report from applicants which must include an appropriate level of historical and
environmental information for the site and surrounding area, development of a
conceptual model, a risk assessment, proposals for site investigations, and
where necessary, details of remedial options and measures.
7.6.4 Where contamination and/or a contaminated (or potentially contaminated) area
is identified on or near to a development site and/or a proposed development,
or a nearby use may be sensitive to contamination, and the initial assessment
does not demonstrate that the risks are acceptable, the Council will require the
applicant to provide more detailed investigations to characterise contamination
and fully assess the risks. This includes whether risks can be successfully
addressed through a remediation and management strategy without causing
adverse environmental impacts during the construction and operation of the
development.
7.6.5 Sensitive development would typically include developments that potentially
put people in direct contact with the contamination such as a residential use,
open space or school uses. Applicants must also consider any circumstances
where blight may occur from sensitive development being on or near a
contaminated or potentially contaminated area, including situations where
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people are unlikely to come in to direct contact with soil or water. In practice,
some level of information will need to be provided for most developments that
require significant disturbance of the ground.
7.6.6 Where development works may result in potentially contaminated materials
being imported on to, deposited or reused on-site (such as in soil or fills or with
chemicals and fuels used or stored on-site), applicants must identify at the
planning application stage how the site works will be controlled and/or soils and
fills verified to ensure they are suitable for use.
7.6.7 Any desktop study, site investigation, remediation and verification work should
be undertaken by a competent person/company in line with the National
Planning Policy Framework (NPPF), best practice guidance and any published
supplementary planning guidance. This will include publications by bodies such
as the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA),
Environment Agency (EA), British Standards Institute, Buildings Research
Establishment, The Construction Industry Research and Information
Association (CIRIA), Hackney Council, or the GLA.
7.6.8 More information on these requirements can be found on the Pollution Planning
& Building Control webpage: http://www.hackney.gov.uk/planning-andbuilding-control.htm
7.6.9 Hackney published its first Contaminated Land Strategy in 2001 under Part 2A
of the Environmental Protection Act 1990. This states how all contamination
issues in the Borough should be dealt with. The strategy is to be updated in
2016. The Council’s Contaminated Land Strategy is available from
http://www.hackney.gov.uk/the-contaminated-land-regime.htm
7.6.10 Policy DM41 sets out how development proposals need to address areas of
land that are contaminated or potentially contaminated will be assessed.
POLICY DM41 - CONTAMINATED LAND
The Council will refuse the grant of planning permission to development proposals
on potentially contaminated land that do not demonstrate that sufficient and
economic decontamination can be achieved and where the appropriate level of
desk study information has not been submitted. Desk study information must
include an appropriate level of historical and environmental information for the site
and surrounding area, development of a conceptual model, a risk assessment,
proposals for site investigation and, where necessary, details of remedial options
and measures.
Where contamination is, or may be present and there exists the potential for
significant harm to be caused to health, ecological systems, the quality of surface
and ground water, and property, the Council will refuse the grant of planning
permission until an appropriate level of site investigation information and a
satisfactory remediation strategy have been submitted to and approved by the
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Council and other appropriate authorities. The remediation strategy should include,
where necessary, measures for future management and monitoring activities.
Where necessary, applicants will be required to enter into planning obligations to
ensure that the approved remediation strategy is fully complied with.
7.7
Pollution
7.7.1 Unacceptable levels of pollution can have a detrimental impact on the amenity
of areas as well as serious health impacts on people and the environment.
Much of the policy and legislation relating to pollution is set out by regional and
national guidance that cascades down to the Local Plan. In addition, the
London Plan Policy 7.15 requires that development must reduce noise impacts
(directly or as a result of the traffic generated by proposed developments).
Also, London Plan Policy 5.14 states that the Mayor in partnership with local
authorities and agencies will work together to protect and improve water quality
having regard to the Thames River Basin Management Plan.
Air Quality
7.7.2 Hackney has some of the poorest air quality levels in London and consequently
the whole of the Borough has been declared an Air Quality Management Area
for nitrogen dioxide and particulate matter. Hackney has produced an Air
Quality Action Plan (AQAP) that identifies actions and mitigating measures
necessary to improve air quality. The AQAP is to be updated in 2015. Regard
will be paid to the AQAP to “Cleaning London's Air: The Mayor's Air Quality
Strategy - 2010”, the National Planning Policy Framework and relevant
guidance when determining applications. See the Council Air Pollution
webpage at http://www.hackney.gov.uk/ee-pollution-air-413.htm
7.7.3 Given the poor air quality, a policy seeking to ensure that air pollution is not
increased, and is wherever possible decreased, in the Borough through
development is required. This policy is set out below. Given the existing poor
air quality in Hackney and its surrounding boroughs, the use of biomass as a
renewable energy source will be the Council’s least preferred option for the
provision of renewable energy and CCHP/CHP schemes will need to
demonstrate that they will not contribute to an increase in local air pollution
levels. The Council will expect developments to focus on minimising emissions
from the development process, reducing emissions from transport and
promoting clean transport options. Providing an efficient energy supply,
considering alternative energy supplies (such as photovoltaic panels and solar
water heating) should also be pursued.
7.7.4 Proposals should also seek to reduce emissions of nitrogen dioxide and
particulate matter and must ensure that the air quality objectives are not
exceeded, or significantly further exceeded during the development process
and lifetime of the completed development. In worst areas of air quality in the
Borough where there is a possibility of an exceedance of National Air Quality
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Objectives occurring due to a development, air quality monitoring must be
undertaken.
7.7.5 Any air quality assessments and other air quality related work should be
undertaken by a competent person/company in line with best practice guidance
and any published supplementary planning guidance. This will include
publications by bodies such as the Department for Environment, Food and
Rural Affairs (DEFRA), the Environment Agency, British Standards Institute,
Buildings Research Establishment, the Construction Industry Research and
Information Association (CIRIA), Hackney Council, Environmental Protection
UK, The Institute of Air Quality Management or the Greater London Authority.
Light and Noise Pollution and Vibration
7.7.6 Although appropriate lighting may help to enhance community safety and
reduce the fear of crime, caution must be taken to ensure that lighting only
illuminates the intended areas or structures and should not negatively impact
on surrounding areas. Light pollution causes nuisance from unnecessary
obtrusive light and this occurs either by penetrating into facing rooms or by
impeding views of the sky at night. It can also have impacts on biodiversity.
Similarly, the effects of noise on amenity can be limited by separating noise
sensitive development such as homes, schools and hospitals from major noise
sources.
7.7.7 Noise pollution and vibration can come from a range of uses. Some examples
include from industrial processes, transport, construction activities, foul and
surface water mis-connections and energy consumption. As such it can have
a detrimental impact on the amenity of areas as well as serious health impacts
of people and the environment.
7.7.8 In cases where separation is not possible, the impact of noisy development and
vibration on ambient noise levels should be assessed, for example by an
Environmental Assessment using the best available techniques and relevant
technology and design guidance.
7.7.9 Inconvenience can also be caused to local residents by late night opening,
odours from cooking bars, restaurants and similar facilities. The Council will
require kitchen extract flues in order to avoid cooking smells and fumes causing
a nuisance and polluting the air. Flue ducts have to be fixed to the rear and
should discharge fumes above roof eaves level.
7.7.10 Other additional controls relating to hours of opening, maintenance of
independent access to residential accommodation on upper floors, installation
of new shopfronts, soundproofing, litter and refuse disposal, and provision of
toilets will be applied by the Council to ensure that the adverse effects of such
proposals are minimised.
7.7.11 Where additional information is required as to the impacts of a proposal in
respect of impacts on noise, odour or air quality, the Council will consider
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refusing planning permission where inadequate mitigation is proposed or if
sufficient information is not submitted.
7.7.12 It is important to stress that in addition to development proposals potentially
having pollution impacts that require mitigation, applicants need to consider the
impact of existing sources of pollution on proposed development (for example,
proposals for residential development adjacent to railway lines, and associated
noise and vibration impacts).
As such, necessary supporting survey
information will be required as appropriate.
Supporting Information
7.7.13 An Air Quality Assessment (AQA) will be required for proposed major
development proposals and many developments situated in the worst areas of
air quality in the Borough in line with best practice. If not provided at planning
application stage, the Council may request an AQA, or may advise that an AQA
is required at validation stage, or at pre-application stage. The study will be
subject to the written approval of the Council and other appropriate authorities.
The AQA needs to:




Clearly identify potential sources of air pollution resulting from the
development and future use of the site.
Show that the potential future occupants of the land or building will not
be exposed to excessive air pollution.
Demonstrate how the proposed development will not diminish the
existing air quality.
Identify measures that will be taken to monitor the impact of the
development on air quality, during and after the development process.
7.7.14 Where it is technically feasible, proposals should demonstrate how the
development will result in a net improvement in air quality achieved through the
use of a range of measures, including renewable energy technologies. Where
a proposal faces onto the highway consideration could be given to
incorporating a green wall, tree planting or other measures that will actively
reduce air pollution levels into the design.
7.7.15 Detailed acoustic, vibration and light survey reports may be required for
development proposals in line with best practice. If not submitted with an
application, these will be required as appropriate by the Council at the
validation stage of the application process or at pre-application stage.
7.7.16 A full Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) will be required where pollution
and/or other adverse environmental effects are considered to have “significant
impact on the environment” (as defined by the The Town & Country Planning
(Environmental Impact Assessment) Regulations 2011.
7.7.17 All works and assessments should be undertaken by a competent
person/company in line with best practice guidance, Council guidance and any
published supplementary planning guidance.
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Water Quality
7.7.18 Pollution of controlled waters poses a risk to the health and well-being of
Hackney residents and wildlife and should therefore be minimised through the
planning process. The Council will therefore resist developments that pose
unacceptable risk to water quality and will require development proposals to
consider risks to water quality, and where appropriate, to reduce the risks to
the water environment and aim to protect and improve the water quality of both
surface water and ground water.
7.7.19 Improving water quality meets a number of key objectives: it increases the
potential for the recreational use of Hackney’s water resources; it provides a
better quality environment for and opportunities to enhance biodiversity; it also
helps to maintain a good quality supply of drinking water. Measures to improve
water quality such as SuDS also provide other cross benefits such as
reducing/managing flood risk. This is discussed in more detail in the section on
Flood Risk (see Policy DM43: Flooding and Flood Risk).
7.7.20 The European Water Framework Directive provides clear objectives for
protecting and enhancing water quality, both surface and ground water, and
provides the Council with the opportunities to work in partnership with other
organisations to improve the water environment for the benefit of Hackney
people and wildlife. The Environment Agency (EA) has published a Thames
River Basin Management Plan which identifies areas of poor water quality in
Hackney and a programme of measures to improve the condition of the
waterways. The Council will therefore support this initiative by the Environment
Agency and other partners in the Thames River Basin Management Plan to
prevent ground water pollution and improve surface water quality.
7.7.21 The Environment Agency has identified a number of Source Protection Zones
(SPZ) and aquifers in the Borough where the risk to ground water and public
water supply may need to be considered. In these areas the Environment
Agency seeks to restrict certain contamination activities in order to protect
groundwater quality and public water supply. The Environment Agency is the
statutory body responsible for the protection and management of groundwater
resources and have produced a ‘Groundwater Protection: Policy and Practice
(GP3) setting out their approach for a wide range of activities and
developments that may affect groundwater quality.
7.7.22 The following Policy DM42 addresses potential pollution and water/air quality
issues related to development.
POLICY DM42 - POLLUTION AND WATER AND AIR QUALITY
A. General
Detailed survey and assessment information will be required as appropriate in order
for the Council to consider any possible pollution impact linked to development
proposals. Necessary mitigation measures will be secured through negotiation on
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a scheme, or via the use of planning conditions or planning obligations where
appropriate. Permission may be refused for proposals that cannot provide adequate
mitigation.
B. Pollution
Development proposals should include measures to reduce adverse noise,
vibration, and/or odour impacts and minimise unnecessary light pollution,
particularly close to light and noise sensitive areas, the public realm and open
space.
C. Air Quality
The Council will refuse the grant of planning permission in the most polluted areas
of the Borough until the applicant has satisfactorily demonstrated how emissions
from the construction process of the proposed development will be minimised and
controlled, so that the Council’s air quality objectives are not exceeded or further
exceeded, and the ongoing use of the development will not contribute to a
worsening of air quality and be minimised as far as practicably possible. All
development should be designed to mitigate its impact on air quality both during the
construction process and lifetime of the completed development. Individually or
cumulatively, development proposals should not worsen air quality.
D. Water Quality
In consultation with the Council and where necessary the Environment Agency, the
applicant must consider the risks arising from development (including design,
construction and operation) to water quality, and where appropriate include
measures to reduce the risk to the water environment and aim to protect and
improve the water quality of surface water and groundwater. Planning permission
may be refused if adequate mitigation measures are not provided.
7.8
Flooding and Flood Risk
Surface Water Flood Risk
7.8.1 New legislation on managing flood risk in England and Wales has been
introduced - the Flood Risk Regulations (2009), and the Flood and Water
Management Act (2010). The Council is now the ‘Lead Local Flood Authority’
(LLFA) as defined by the new Flood and Water Management Act and the Flood
Risk Regulations. As the LLFA, the Council is responsible for the management
of local flood risk, which includes surface runoff, groundwater and flooding from
ordinary watercourses.
7.8.2 In recognising the importance of addressing surface water flooding in Hackney,
a Surface Water Management Plan (SWMP) has been produced (a requirement
under the Flood and Water Management Act 2010) that outlines the preferred
surface water management strategy for the Borough. The SWMP identifies
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areas at greatest risk of surface water flooding including ‘Critical Drainage
Areas’ (CDAs) and ‘Local Flood Risk Zones’ (LFRZs).
7.8.3 A CDA is defined as a discrete geographic area (usually a hydrological
catchment) where multiple and interlinked sources of flood risk (surface water,
groundwater, sewer, main river and/or tidal) cause flooding in one or more
LFRZs during severe weather, thereby affecting people, property or local
infrastructure.
7.8.4 Nine CDAs have been identified in Hackney. Within these CDAs, Local Flood
Risk Zones (LFRZs) have been identified as the actual spatial extent of
predicted flooding in a single location.
7.8.5 Sustainable Drainage Systems (SuDS) can provide a more sustainable way of
managing surface water run-off in new and existing developments.
Consequently, all developments should utilise Sustainable Drainage Systems,
unless there are practical reasons for not doing so. The aim should be to ensure
that surface water run-off is managed as close to source as possible whether
the site is Brownfield or Greenfield. Traditional drainage systems tend to move
rainwater into sewerage systems and waterways as quickly as possible which
can contribute to flash flooding, pollution of rivers and the depletion of
groundwater quality. SuDS techniques such as infiltration trenches, swales and
permeable paving can help to reduce peak flows to sewers and rivers and
improve water quality by replicating natural drainage patterns. SuDS can also
provide opportunities to create or improve habitats, biodiversity and open space
which help to alleviate issues of heat island effects and contribute to energy
efficient buildings, whilst also providing leisure and amenity opportunities as
well as flood storage opportunities (see Chapter 6 - Cleaner Safer Greener).
Implementing SuDS can help to achieve credits as part of BREEAM
assessments. As part of this, proposals need to be developed that incorporate
the opportunity to capture, store and use rainwater harvesting systems.
7.8.6 National standards for SuDS are being produced by the Department for
Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA). These national standards will
set out criteria by which the form of drainage appropriate to any particular site
or development can be determined, as well as requirements for the design,
construction, operation and maintenance of SuDS. Until they are in place, the
Council will take account of the standards set out in the Ciria Guide 'The SuDS
manual C697' which is available to download from the Ciria website at
http://www.ciria.org Further detailed guidance on SuDS which reflects the
Borough’s local circumstances will be outlined in future Council supplementary
planning guidance.
7.8.7 A site-specific Flood Risk Assessment (FRA) may be required for developments
within Local Flood Risk Zones subject to a number of considerations including
the size and type of the development, the location of the site, and the degree
of flood hazard. The Council will determine when a site-specific FRA is required
for development within the LFRZs at pre-application stage.
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Fluvial Flood Risk
7.8.8 Flood alleviation and preparing for the impacts of climate change are key issues
in Hackney. The main vulnerability to fluvial flooding comes from the River Lea
and the Lee Navigation. Core Strategy Policy 31 - Flood Risk requires all
development to take full account of the risk posed both now and in the future.
As well as locating development where possible in areas of lower flood risk,
consideration should be given to the design, layout and form of development.
7.8.9 FRAs should be submitted where required by the National Planning Policy
Framework and should show that the development will not increase flood risk
elsewhere, and where possible, reduce flood risk overall. Where necessary,
flood resistant and resilient features or measures should be incorporated
directly into a scheme and financial contributions may also be required for
strategic flood management measures.
7.8.10 The Core Strategy Sequential Test identified additional requirements for
development outside growth areas (e.g. windfall sites) and also for
development within Hackney Wick.
7.8.11 In addressing flood risk, development proposals should be assessed with due
consideration of:






The National Planning Policy Framework;
The National Planning Practice Guidance
The London Plan;
The North London Strategic Flood Risk Assessment (SFRA) Level 1;
The London Borough of Hackney Level 2 Flood Risk Assessment; and
The London Borough of Hackney Surface Water Management Plan.
7.8.12 Further guidance on the information required to demonstrate compliance with
flooding policies (including the requirements for FRAs) is proposed to be
outlined in a Supplementary Planning Document.
Sewer Flooding and Water and Waste Water Infrastructure
7.8.13 Sewer flooding poses another potential danger. Many urbanised areas, such
as Greater London, are served by ‘combined’ sewerage systems which carry
both foul sewage and surface water run-off. When storm water exceeds the
system’s capacity, sewage can overflow into rivers, out of external drains and
manholes and can even enter homes. Population growth, housing development
and impacts of climate change are placing increasing pressure on the existing
sewer network.
7.8.14 The Council will continue to work with Thames Water Utilities Ltd (statutory
water and sewerage undertakers) and the Environment Agency (EA), as
appropriate, to ensure that adequate water supply, surface water drainage, foul
drainage and sewerage treatment capacity is in place to serve new
development throughout the Borough.
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7.8.15 Applicants should liaise with Thames Water in order to demonstrate that there
is adequate water supply, surface water, foul drainage and sewerage treatment
capacity both on and off-site to serve the development and that it would not
lead to problems for existing users. In some circumstances, this may make it
necessary for applicants to carry out appropriate studies to ascertain whether
the proposed development would lead to overloading of existing infrastructure.
7.8.16 Policy DM43 - Flooding and Flood Risk - addresses sewer flooding, surface
runoff, groundwater and flooding from ordinary watercourses in the Hackney.
Fluvial flood risk is addressed through the Core Strategy Policy 31. Policy DM43
reinforces these policies as well as address other forms of flood risk in the
Borough. However, the main policy emphasis is on surface water flood risk. It
aims to reduce runoff rates from all development through the appropriate use
of SuDS to limit flood risk, with a particular focus on development that is located
within CDAs and LFRZs.
POLICY DM43 – FLOODING AND FLOOD RISK
A. General
Development may be required to provide or contribute to strategic or site-specific
infrastructure in line with the Council’s CIL and/or Planning Contributions SPD to
address and mitigate the impacts of flood risk, particularly when they are located in
areas considered at high risk of surface water and fluvial flooding.
B. Surface Water Flood Risk
Borough Wide
All development should utilise Sustainable Drainage Systems (SuDS), unless there
are practical reasons for not doing so, and manage surface water run-off as close
to source as possible. Where there will be a net increase in impermeable area,
development must include at least one 'at source' SuDS measure (e.g. waterbutt,
rainwater harvesting tank, bioretention planter box etc) resulting in a net
improvement in water quantity or quality discharging to a sewer.
All developments should reduce both the volume and rate of existing run-off from
site by at least 50% where reasonably practicable through the appropriate
incorporation of SuDS.
Amenity and biodiversity benefits should be maximised on all schemes, for example
by incorporating well-designed, safe SuDS features which make use of clean water
at the surface to enhance landscape design and create a sense of place.
C. Critical Drainage Areas (which include Local Flood Risk Zones)
All development in Critical Drainage Areas is required to incorporate measures to
reduce the overall level of surface water flood risk in the CDA through the layout
and form of the development, including the appropriate application of SuDS.
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All major developments located in CDAs should reduce runoff to that of a predevelopment Greenfield runoff rate (calculated in accordance with IoH12419). It is
recommended that a SuDS treatment train is utilised to assist in this reduction.
In Local Flood Risk Zones, development may be required (subject to the site
location and degree of flood hazard) to submit a Flood Risk Assessment (FRA) to
ensure that development will remain safe and will not increase the risk to others.
Where deemed necessary by the Council, the development must be supported by
more detailed integrated hydraulic modelling in the FRA to clearly demonstrate that
the:
i.
ii.
iii.
Development is safe and will not increase surface water flood risk by the
design and layout of the development;
Opportunities to reduce the overall level of surface water flood risk in the area
through the layout, design and form of the development have been
considered; and
Appropriate application of sustainable drainage techniques has been used.
D. Sewer Flooding and Water and Waste Infrastructure
The Council in liaison with Thames Water will take account of the capacity of
existing on and off-site water and sewerage infrastructure and the impact of
development proposals on this infrastructure. Applicants will be required to
demonstrate that capacity exists on and off-site in the sewerage network to serve
the development or that it can be provided ahead of occupation to avoid sewer
flooding.
Where necessary, and as advised by Thames Water, the Council will seek
improvements to water and/or sewerage infrastructure related and appropriate to
the development so that improvements are completed prior to occupation of
development.
19
Defra/Environment Agency, September 2005, Flood and Coastal Defence R&D Programme:
Preliminary Rainfall Runoff Management for Developments (R&D Technical Report W5-074/A/TR/1
Revision D
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TRANSPORT
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CHAPTER 8: TRANSPORT
8.1.1 The Core Strategy has reaffirmed the Council’s commitment to supporting
integration of transport and development, encouraging and enhancing
movement within the Borough and between the Borough and other parts of
London as well as prioritising sustainable transport, (public transport, walking
and cycling) over private car use, and providing safe and convenient access to
rail and bus travel. Consequently, this chapter sets out the Council’s approach
to creating a sustainable transport system for the future of Hackney that will
contribute to the Borough’s aspiration to be a safe, vibrant and healthy place to
live, work and visit. These policies will contribute towards supporting integration
of transport and development, improving connectivity and travel options across
the Borough whilst minimising the negative impacts of traffic on residents, the
local economy and the environment.
8.1.2 2011 Census data has confirmed that Hackney has one of the lowest (and
falling) car ownership levels per household in the country at 35%. Only 18% of
the main trips by Hackney’s residents are made by car compared to 34% by
bus or rail. The Borough also has a high level of walking at 40%, while its
cycling levels at 6% are the highest in London (TfL, 2012) giving further
substance to the Council’s decision to prioritise travel by means other than car
use with pedestrians needs at the top of the hierarchy.
8.1.3 The Borough is generally very accessible by public transport. However the
public transport network in Hackney primarily reflects the arterial demands for
travel to and from Central London. There are four London Underground stations
close to the Borough boundary at Manor House (Piccadilly line); Finsbury Park
(Piccadilly, Victoria lines); Old Street (Northern Line and National Rail trains)
and Bethnal Green (Central Line). Hackney is also served by a total of 49
daytime and 23 night high-frequency bus routes.
8.1.4 There are six National Rail stations at Clapton, Hackney Downs, London Fields,
Rectory Road, Stoke Newington and Stamford Hill. There are a further four
London Overground stations at Dalston Kingsland, Hackney Central, Homerton
and Hackney Wick spanning the North London line from Richmond to Stratford.
These were joined by the stations at Shoreditch High Street, Haggerston,
Hoxton and Dalston Junction London Overground stations when the East
London line opened in 2010, directly connecting Hackney to New Cross,
Croydon and Clapham Junction in South London.
8.1.5 The Council will seek to reduce the need to travel in the first instance, by
directing higher density residential and employment growth to its town centres
and other highly accessible locations outlined in its Core Strategy Policies 1-5.
The Council will also seek to improve the attractiveness and transport capacity
of these areas through measures outlined in Core Strategy Policy CS6.
Through its development management policies, Hackney needs to ensure that
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patterns and forms of development minimise the need to travel to access goods
and services, especially by car, and will ensure that the physical standard and
environmental quality of all transport routes and links are properly maintained
and improved wherever possible.
8.1.6 This is consistent with the approach outlined by the Government’s National
Planning Policy Framework (March 2012) and the London Plan (2015). These
highlight the roles of transport policies in facilitating sustainable development
and also in contributing to wider sustainability and health objectives. Smarter
use of technologies can reduce the need to travel. The transport system needs
to be balanced in favour of sustainable transport modes, giving people a real
choice about how they travel. 20
8.1.7 Hackney’s second Local Implementation Plan (LIP2) (2011) shows the
Council's proposals for implementing the Mayor of London's Transport Strategy
and gives a good indication of what the Council would like to achieve over the
next five years. This includes projects such as improvements to key town
centres and public spaces, introducing new cycling facilities, safer roads and
measures to prioritise the needs of pedestrians, cyclists and public transport
users.
8.1.8 The LIP2 explains the relationship between Hackney’s transport objectives and
practices with the other key plans and strategies affecting the Borough. These
include the Sustainable Community Strategy, the Local Plan and the East
London Sub-Regional Transport Plan. It also demonstrates the Council’s
commitment to promote sustainable modes of travel and integration of
transportation into the Council’s key services and delivery areas. The DMLP
policies and forthcoming Transport Strategy will further support this
commitment.
8.1.9 Through traffic travelling to and from the A12 towards Central London results
in significant traffic congestion with associated air quality and road safety
problems in Hackney. This impacts disproportionately on the roads to the east
of Mare Street. In the 1960’s many of the Borough’s roads were converted to
one way streets and gyratories in an attempt to improve traffic flows and
increase road capacity. These interventions merely enabled an increase in the
number of vehicles using these routes, and left Hackney with a legacy of
vehicle dominated streets that are difficult to navigate for pedestrians and
cyclists.
8.1.10 In recent years, Hackney has sought to reverse this trend through a policy of
re-prioritising the needs of road users away from through traffic and more
towards pedestrians, cyclists and public transport users in line with national
guidance such as the Manual for Streets (2007). At a local level, Hackney has
sought to improve conditions through a variety of interventions including
20
See NPPF, paragraph 29.
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managing parking demand through controlled parking zones, removing
gyratories and one way streets, and introducing of filtered permeability
schemes. The Council will seek to continue this policy when assessing planning
applications. The Council will also seek similar improvements such as the
provision of new walking/cycling paths from new housing developments,
contributions towards the provision of cycle parking and cycle hire schemes,
better station interchanges, accessible bus stops, etc. to the sustainable
transport network to further facilitate prioritisation towards the needs of
pedestrians, cyclists and public transport users.
8.1.11 The following policy sets out the movement hierarchy that development
proposals should follow.
POLICY DM44 - MOVEMENT HIERARCHY
All development proposals should prioritise transport-related users in line with the
hierarchy set out below:









Pedestrians and those with mobility difficulties;
Cyclists;
Public transport;
Coaches and taxis/private hire vehicles;
Motorcycles;
Rail freight;
Commercial and business users including road haulage;
Car borne shoppers and visitors; and
Car borne commuters.
All new development must be successfully integrated into the existing transport
networks and manage demand through traffic restraint and proven demand
management tools. Proposals for development on large sites in particular will be
required to promote walking and cycling permeability and ensure that linkages and
publicly-accessible through routes are created to successfully integrate the
development into the wider street network.
8.2
Land Use and Transport Infrastructure
8.2.1 New development, including the intensification of existing uses, can have a
detrimental effect on the transport environment by virtue of generating
additional traffic on the Borough’s highway network and placing extra stress on
public transport services. Additionally, the creation of vehicular access can
cause danger or delays to other road users, and needs to be avoided. Hackney
needs to be able to fully assess the potential effects of development, both on
the highway network and on the public transport system. Development
proposals which cannot fully mitigate any adverse impacts upon the capacity
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of the transport infrastructure, including pavements and other walking routes,
cycle routes, public transport and roads may be refused planning permission.
8.2.2 The Council recognises the integration of land use and transport as a key
element of sustainable development. The Core Strategy promotes
developments which support compact growth and regeneration via
development of mixed use schemes, and associated travel patterns. Locating
high density development and significant trip generating development, for
example, near to public transport hubs is an effective way to reduce car travel.
Where it is planned for development to take place, proposals should be
integrated with the Borough’s wider transport and movement priorities. The
majority of Hackney’s town centres and residential and employment growth
areas such as Dalston, Shoreditch and Hackney Wick are already highly
accessible by rail, Overground, Underground and by bus. However, further
improvements to the local transport infrastructure to support projected levels of
growth are needed. Wherever development is likely to impact upon the
Transport for London Road Network (TLRN) or Strategic Road Network (SRN)
or the Public Transport System, Transport for London (TfL) will also be
consulted.
8.2.3 In order to enable the Council to assess the impacts of new developments upon
its transport network, Transport Assessments will be required in accordance
with the thresholds, requirements and guidance set out in the Department for
Transport’s ‘Guidance on Transport Assessments’ (2007), the Transport for
London’s ‘Transport Assessment Best Practice Guidance Document (2010),
and Hackney’s emerging local guidance. Where the Council does not consider
the preparation of a full Transport Assessment necessary, a less detailed
assessment in the form of a Transport Statement will be asked for.
8.2.4 Where Transport Assessments/Statements are required, the Council will also
seek the submission of a Travel Plan. A Travel Plan is a package of measures
that seek to reduce reliance on single occupancy vehicle use and increase the
use of more sustainable modes. Travel Plans are the key management tool for
implementing any transport solutions highlighted by the Transport
Assessment/Statement and are one of the primary tools for mitigating negative
transport impacts of development proposals. Travel Plans should be set out in
accordance with TfL’s best practice guidance ‘Travel planning for new
development in London (2011) and any updated local guidance. For residential
land uses, the threshold for submitting a Travel Plan is set at any development
with 50 or more dwellings. However any developments considered by the local
authority to generate significant transport impacts will also be required to
submit a Travel Plan. For commercial and workplace developments, the
threshold is dependent on the type of land use and scale of the development.
For both residential and workplace travel plans, a welcome pack should be
included to raise awareness of the sustainable travel initiatives being
implemented through the Travel Plan.
8.2.5 Similarly, school travel plans will be required for proposals for new schools or
planned expansions to existing schools. The increase in school run traffic
impacts on the risk of accidents to children, contributes to traffic congestion and
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air pollution, and is also detrimental to children's health as well as to the local
environment.
8.2.6 For residential developments especially, there should be particular emphasis
on the linkages between new housing and local facilities and community
infrastructure, the public transport network, and established walking and
cycling routes.
8.2.7 Making this linkage is fundamental to creating more sustainable patterns of
movement and to reducing people’s reliance on the car. Understanding a site’s
relationship to local facilities and to the public transport, cycling and walking
networks is therefore central to the consideration of the appropriateness of
higher density development.
8.2.8 Transport objectives are to ensure improvements to prioritise pedestrians,
cyclists, public transport users and people with disabilities and make the most
of public transport infrastructure balanced with limitations of the Borough’s road
network which suffers from congestion especially at peak times of the day.
8.2.9 Hackney will continue to work with relevant partner organisations including
Transport for London (TfL) to secure improvements to public transport. Where
appropriate, developers will be required to contribute to improving walking,
cycling and public transport infrastructure. Due contributions will be secured
through use of Hackney’s Community Infrastructure Levy or S106 agreements
or alternative arrangements where applicable.
8.2.10 The Council is also required to collect contributions from developers towards
the construction of Crossrail on behalf of the Mayor which will help to support
growth by significantly improving rail capacity in London and reducing pressure
on its existing public transport network.
8.2.11 Similarly, the movement of transport and goods is essential for the economy
but is also a contributor to congestion. Hackney is a densely populated Inner
London borough, and freight movements can have significant impacts in terms
of noise, congestion and air pollution.
8.2.12 Goods vehicles, particularly heavy goods vehicles, can have impacts on local
amenity and traffic movement in certain areas. For example, in areas such as
Hackney Central many delivery points are located close together. The Council
will expect development which is considered to generate significant movement
of goods or materials, both during its construction and operation to be located
where the need to travel will be minimised and the use of sustainable transport
modes can be maximised. This is because such a development would involve
several journeys to and from the development resulting in disruption to traffic
movement and congestion. Goods vehicles manoeuvring, and loading and
unloading also add to pollution and may cause congestion, danger to
pedestrians and other road users. Unloading and loading may also damage
pavements. To mitigate against this, the Council will require development
proposals to be accompanied by a Construction and Logistics Plan (CLP) and
Delivery and Servicing Plans (DSP) in accordance with TfL guidance, ‘Making
Freight Work for You’ to minimise congestion, noise and road danger.
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8.2.13 Ensuring pedestrian and cyclist safety during the construction stage, in addition
to on-going servicing and delivery requirements of new development, is of
particular concern. The Council is committed towards reducing collisions
involving Higher Goods Vehicles (HGV) and cyclists, which account for more
than half of cyclist fatalities in London (TfL, Cycling Revolution London, 2010).
At present, all Council-operated and Council-contracted commercial vehicles
receive on-road cycle-safety training to Freight Operator Recognition Scheme
(FORS) and Safe Urban Driving standards. Similarly, the Council will look to
ensure that SUD-standard cyclist awareness training for HGV/PCV drivers is
incorporated into s106 agreements for development proposals that necessitate
the use of lorries and buses. Further guidance will be provided in the Council’s
forthcoming Transport Strategy.
8.2.14 The following policy sets out the main transport-related requirements to be
addressed by development proposals, in conjunction with Core Strategy Policy
6. More detailed policy guidance on transport policy will be provided in the
Council’s forthcoming Transport Strategy and other forms of supplementary
planning guidance.
POLICY DM45 - DEVELOPMENT AND TRANSPORT
The Council seeks through this policy to encourage the closer integration of
transport and development in order to reduce the need to travel and to achieve
sustainable development.
Proposals for development must have regard to the following:
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
The movement hierarchy set out in Policy DM44;
Maximise safe, convenient and inclusive movement and accessibility to,
from and within the site for pedestrians, cyclists and public transport users,
particularly in relation to proposals in the main ‘centres’ (such as Shoreditch,
Dalston, Stoke Newington and Hackney Central);
Impacts of development on public transport capacity, particularly within and
around the main growth points of Shoreditch, Dalston, Hackney Central,
Manor House and Hackney Wick which should be fully mitigated; and
Adequately address provision for servicing, safe pick-up, drop-off and
waiting areas for vehicles such as taxis and coaches, where the activity is
likely to be associated with the development.
Developments should make suitable provision for encouraging the use of public
transport, walking and cycling. The Council will require the provision of or financial
contributions towards the following, as appropriate:
v.
vi.
vii.
Safe, convenient and clutter-free routes anywhere on the road network;
New secure cycle parking areas and facilities;
Other features associated with pedestrian access to the development, for
example, street furniture such as seating, improved signage/wayfinding
such as Legible London;
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viii.
ix.
x.
xi.
xii.
xiii.
xiv.
Infrastructure and funding for the expansion of the Mayor of London’s Cycle
Hire Scheme in Hackney;
Crossrail and Community Infrastructure Levy;
New safe and easy to use road crossings where these are needed;
Well located and improved bus stops, passenger shelters and waiting areas;
Highway and junction improvements as necessary prioritising pedestrian and
cyclist use and safety;
Introduction of interventions to restrain and reduce traffic volumes, such as
modal filters; and
Appropriate access standards meeting mobility requirements as appropriate,
such as to buildings, public transport facilities and along the footway, and
contributing to good interchange between public transport facilities.
The Council will require Transport Assessments/Statements and Travel Plans for
developments. Provision for any necessary supporting infrastructure will be secured
through the use of planning conditions, Section 106 planning obligations and
contributions, or through the Council’s CIL Charging Schedule (see Policy DM4).
The Council will not permit development where it is considered the proposal will
have a detrimental safety or amenity impact on other highway users, including
pedestrians and cyclists; obstruction to access by emergency vehicles; or where
manoeuvring, parking and loading risks unduly obstructing the flow of traffic on
public highways.
The Council will expect development which is considered to generate significant
movement of goods or materials, both during construction and operation, to:
xv.
xvi.
xvii.
xviii.
Be located with easy access to TfL’s Road Network, the Strategic Road
Network or other Major Roads;
Accommodate goods vehicles within the curtilage of the site; and
Minimise disruption for local communities through effective management,
including through optimisation of collection and delivery timings.
Development proposals should be accompanied by a Construction and
Logistics Plan (CLP) and Delivery and Servicing Plan in accordance with TfL
guidance; and
Ensure that all HGV and PCV operators involved in the construction and
servicing of the development comply with the cyclist safety requirements set
out in the TfL’ s Freight Operator Recognition Scheme.
The Council will assess each application on its individual merits and may refuse
planning permission on transport grounds where the residual cumulative impacts of
a development is severe.
8.3
Walking and Cycling
8.3.1 The Core Strategy promotes sustainable transport choices in order to facilitate
growth while simultaneously helping to reduce congestion, improve air quality
and promote better health. Proposed developments should be planned in a
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way that encourages movement by cycling and walking contributing to the
creation of an environment which will be attractive, easy to move around, and
safer for all. This will help to ensure more journeys are undertaken by bike or
on foot, easing pressure on public transport and the road network.
8.3.2 Careful design of the pedestrian environment to enable access for people with
disabilities is also particularly important. Development proposals should take
account of but not be limited to available best practice guidance including the
Department for Transport (DfT) Manual for Streets (MfS) 1 and 2, the DfT
Inclusive Mobility guidance, and Transport for London’s (TfL) Cycling Design
Standards.
8.3.3 There has been a drive towards alternative transport methods such as walking
and cycling in recent years in Hackney and as a result towpaths in London have
become very busy. For example, at peak times, over 500 cyclists per hour use
the towpaths through Regent’s Canal. Further development of parallel routes
in particular congested stretches of towpath, especially along Regents Canal
and River Lee Navigation, are therefore encouraged.
8.3.4 The following Policy DM46 sets out the Council’s requirements for the provision
for walking and cycling in development.
POLICY DM46 - WALKING AND CYCLING
All development proposals must:
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
Comply with policy DM45
Take full account of the needs of pedestrians, cyclists and other users,
including those with disabilities, meeting mobility requirements as
appropriate;
Provide for generous levels of secure cycle parking (as per London Plan
Standards) and provide sufficient provision of changing and shower facilities
for cyclists in employment sites;
Contribute financially to publicly-accessible cycle parking located in the
public realm within the vicinity of the site, e.g. outside local shops if they are
for uses that are publicly accessible. This will be secured through s106 legal
agreement or CIL as appropriate
Promote walking and cycling safety, through providing a high quality street
environment and well lit, signed and well maintained thoroughfares and safe
facilities for crossing roads, junctions and at transport interchanges;
Ensure any new roads are designed for reduced traffic speeds;
Ensure accessibility for pedestrians and cyclists is maintained at all times
with presumption in favour of maximum permeability for cycling; and
Consider ‘desire lines’ to key local facilities including shops and schools,
including safer routes to schools and public transport hubs.
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Parking, Car Free and Car Capped Developments
8.4
Management of Parking
8.4.1 The effective management of parking spaces is a key determinant of transport
mode choice and an important tool for tackling congestion and local pollution
in the Borough. The National Planning Policy Framework advises that local
authorities should consider an area's accessibility, type, mix and use of
development, availability of public transport, local car ownership levels and the
need to reduce the use of high-emission vehicles if setting local parking
standards. Similarly, the London Plan identifies the need to manage parking as
a key tool to minimise car use and promote sustainable means of transport.
8.4.2 The Council will therefore seek to carefully manage car parking levels in future
guidance given the Borough’s historically low car ownership levels, existing
issues with congestion, pollution and parking stress and the high propensity of
our residents to walk, cycle and use public transport. This management
process will reflect local characteristics and be appropriate to public transport
accessibility and variations in controlled parking zone coverage and parking
stress across the Borough.
8.4.3 Maximum parking standards will be provided in future Council supplementary
guidance. However, as a general guide, the Council will encourage lower
parking provision than the current London Plan standards.
8.4.4 The Council will also generally welcome proposals to redevelop underutilised
off-street parking spaces or garages for other uses providing their removal does
not have a detrimental impact on people with disabilities, operational needs of
local businesses, shoppers or displace parking to controlled parking zones.
Removal of under-utilised spaces can have positive impacts in terms of
facilitating public realm and biodiversity enhancement opportunities and
encouraging more people to use sustainable forms of transport. The redevelopment of underused spaces in or around key regeneration areas for
mixed use development can also help contribute towards the Council's housing
and employment target and provide additional activity and surveillance in
previously run-down areas.
On street parking
8.4.5 On-street parking spaces tend to cater for a wide range of users including
residents, short stay visitor parking and to facilitate loading and servicing
requirements. However, on-street parking is a limited resource and demand
exceeds supply in many parts of Hackney. This is particularly true in the south
and west of the Borough and in the vicinity of town centres but also includes
many other areas where the number of spaces available is unable to meet
existing demand, creating queuing traffic and congestion, illegal parking and
compromising highway safety. Balancing these needs therefore requires
careful management and development proposals that compromise the
availability of existing spaces may be refused.
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8.4.6 When considering proposals for parking provision the Council will refer to the
parking needs hierarchy referred to in its adopted Parking and Enforcement
Plan (2011) which places the needs of people with disabilities at the top and
commuter parking at the bottom. The Council will also generally favour zero or
low emission and other environmentally friendly vehicles and will require new
development proposals to prioritise spaces for car clubs, pool cars, bike share
schemes, low emissions vehicles and electric vehicle charging equipment.
8.4.7 The Council will seek to ensure that any permitted on-street parking or servicing
arrangements do not dominate the street scene and that indiscriminate parking
does not become a hindrance to pedestrians, cyclists and traffic in busy streets
or result in safety or access problems. The Council will expect to see design
solutions that contribute to a high quality public realm, pedestrian footfall and
prevent the dominance of parked vehicles on the streetscape.
Car free and car capped developments
8.4.8 Hackney will promote car free developments in the most accessible parts of the
Borough (although in general the Borough has good accessibility by public
transport, cycling and walking routes) and car-capped developments in areas
of high on-street parking stress (car-free and car-capped developments
essentially mean restricting on and off-street car parking, including by nonissuance of parking permits). Car-free development will be required in those
areas which have a high PTAL rating (Level 4-6) including town centre locations
and developments in the proximity of any rail stations.
8.4.9 Car-free schemes for an area with a PTAL below 4 will also be welcomed
particularly if the site lies within a reasonable walking distance to local
amenities and essential services, is likely to be covered by a Controlled Parking
Zone or if proposals are in place to upgrade the sustainable transport
infrastructure locally. Applicants should discuss this with the Council at preapplication stage and information would need to be submitted alongside the
application, outlining current transport services and accessibility and explaining
the nature of any upgrade works. The PTAL rating of a specific site can be
found on TfL’s Planning Database, at: http://www.webptals.org.uk Indicative
PTAL levels in Hackney are illustrated in Map 3.2 of Appendix 3 of the Core
Strategy.
8.4.10 On-site car parking for car free schemes will be limited to spaces designed for
disabled people, and if justified, for operational and service requirements. Carcapped developments may have a limited amount of on-site general car
parking. To make sure that developments are car-free and car-capped as
intended, the Council will restrict access to on-street permits where necessary
to do so.
8.4.11 The Council will expect advertising and marketing material to be available to
the prospective occupiers of car-capped and car-free developments, informing
them of the arrangements for car parking and the restrictions. To this end, the
Council will seek legal agreements and will use planning conditions where
appropriate.
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8.4.12 In considering the ability of on-street parking to accommodate the impact of
additional development, Hackney will have regard to the cumulative effect of
proposals in the area, including unimplemented and partly implemented
schemes already granted planning approval.
8.4.13 The Council will expect measures to be included in residential Travel Plans
that give future residents strong incentives not to drive. Examples of such
measures could include the provision of free TfL travelcards, contributions to
cycle hire schemes, free or subsidised car club membership or provision of car
club bays as part of the planning application.
8.4.14 Car sharing and car clubs are gaining popularity across Britain and can provide
residents in car free and car capped developments with access to a car. The
reduction in car use associated with car club memberships result in significant
environmental and personal health benefits and a reduction in transport related
CO2 emissions and traffic congestion. Additional benefits can include a
reduction in parking pressure on the surrounding highways. Car clubs also work
particularly well in mixed-use developments where utilisation remains high
throughout the week due to different times of peak demand.
8.4.15 As part of the demand management process, Hackney has implemented
Controlled Parking Zones (CPZs) in about two-thirds of the Borough’s roads to
help with managing parking carefully and effectively. Within CPZs, specified
hours of parking control apply to the public highway. CPZ controls do not apply
to private roads. The Council may introduce a CPZ in the vicinity of a car free
or car capped development site to ensure that parking bays are allocated to
those with the greatest needs and to avoid problems associated with
uncontrolled parking and overspill parking in adjacent neighbourhoods.
8.4.16 Contributions towards the costs of implementing CPZs and the introduction of
car club schemes is likely to be a consideration in areas where car-free and car
capped development is proposed.
Off-street parking
8.4.17 Off-street parking can take a number of forms including front courts, rear courts,
undercroft and underground parking. However, creating private off-street
parking frequently involves the loss of on-street spaces and offers potential for
increased pedestrian safety concerns, for example where kerbside parking is
removed to enable vehicles to cross over the pavement to a garden or
forecourt. The Council may therefore seek to resist off-street proposals in areas
of high on-street parking stress and on pedestrian and highway safety
concerns. In most cases, a Transport Assessment/Statement will be required
to justify proposals for off-street parking.
8.4.18 The Council is particularly concerned about the cumulative effect of removal of
front gardens, trees, boundary walls and hedgerows which have traditionally
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formed property boundaries for the purpose of providing off-street parking.
Gardens are particularly important for amenity, habitats and natural drainage
that helps reduce impact of surface water flooding. Their loss for car parking is
strongly discouraged by Hackney’s adopted Residential Extensions and
Alterations SPD. Consequently, the Council will resist proposals that are
considered to have a detrimental impact on the visual and environmental
amenity of an individual property or on the character of a wider area for
example, in a conservation area.
8.4.19 Proposals for off-street parking will need to be balanced against the potential
loss of biodiversity and aesthetic amenity and wider public safety and
sustainability objectives. Where garages or ground floor structures are
proposed, development needs to ensure that place-making principles including
the promotion of active frontages and natural surveillance and minimising land
take are adhered to.
8.4.20 In order to promote more sustainable modes of travel, the Council will generally
welcome proposals to consider existing underutilised off-street parking spaces
or garages for other uses providing their removal does not have a detrimental
impact on people with disabilities, operational needs of local businesses,
shoppers or displace parking to controlled parking zones. Removal of
underused spaces can have positive impacts in terms of facilitating public realm
and biodiversity enhancement opportunities and reducing opportunities for antisocial behaviour through additional activity and surveillance.
8.4.21 In limited circumstances, the Council may accept the provision of off-street car
club bays within developments as an alternative to on-street provision, where
it has been demonstrated by the developer, to the satisfaction of the Council,
that on-street parking is not appropriate or possible. Should the Council accept
the need for off-street car-club parking bays instead of on-street bays these
must be publicly accessible at all times (with no need for a key or other security
measures to access the spaces) and located in order to allow for convenient
and accessible access.
8.4.22 The following policy sets out the Council’s requirements in relation to parking,
car-free and car-capped development.
POLICY DM47 – PARKING, CAR FREE AND CAR CAPPED DEVELOPMENT
A. Hackney will expect to see car free and car capped developments, in most
locations throughout the Borough but particularly in those that:
i.
ii.
Have a high PTAL rating (Level 4, 5 or 6), or
Are near a wide range of amenities including shops and leisure activities, or
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iii.
iv.
Are within an operational Controlled Parking Zone or area of known parking
stress.
Where the provision of off-street parking would be likely to cause conflict with
pedestrians and other road users.
The Council will expect adequate dedicated disabled parking provision in
accordance with the London Plan standards.
For development proposals outside of CPZs, developers will be required to submit
a parking stress survey for assessment by the Council. Where a high level of
parking stress is found, the Council will expect the proposed scheme to be car-free.
B. Car clubs
The Council will support the provision of car clubs, including the provision of
wheelchair accessible car club parking bays, where appropriate. Major residential
and mixed use developments will be required to contribute towards the provision of
car clubs in the vicinity of the development, through CIL and/or Section 106, as
appropriate.
C. The Council will require a Transport Assessment/Statement to justify any
proposed parking, subject to the thresholds referred to in paragraph 8.2.3 and 8.2.4.
Where car parking is proposed the following will apply:
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
All developments, including redevelopments and changes of use, should
provide well-designed, high quality parking facilities in accordance with the
London Plan (2015) maximum car parking and minimum cycle parking
standards;
Any permitted provision is designed to be safe and secure, to achieve placemaking objectives, to minimise land take and the urban heat island effect by
providing adequate soft landscaping, permeable surfaces and other
treatments to off-set adverse impacts of surface water run-off;
Parking proposals will be required to preserve a buildings setting and the
character of the surrounding area by avoiding over-dominance of parking
and hard-standing surface areas to ensure that front gardens make a
positive contribution to street appearance; and
The provision of electric charge points in accordance with the standards set
out in the London Plan.
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MONITORING AND
IMPLEMENTATION
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CHAPTER 9: MONITORING AND IMPLEMENTATION
9.1.1
Future monitoring of the policies is required to enable an understanding of the
extent to which the Development Management Policies delivers what is
intended over the lifetime of the plan.
9.1.2
The indicators for monitoring the DMLP have already been identified under
the ‘Indicators to monitor delivery’ tables attached to each policy in the Core
Strategy. The indicators were devised to assess whether or not the intended
outcomes of the policy are being achieved and to inform any future review of
policy.
9.1.3
As well as monitoring the outcome of individual policies, e.g. on employment,
the Council will assess progress against the indicators holistically to
determine whether the policies are proving effective in promoting an
integrated approach to sustainable development.
9.1.4
At present, performance will be reported in the Authority Monitoring Report
(AMR), the production of which is a key requirement for local authorities.
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GLOSSARY
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GLOSSARY
Accessibility- the ability of people to move round an area and to reach places and
facilities, including pensioners and disabled people, those with young children and
those encumbered with luggage or shopping.
Adoption - the formal decision by the Council to approve the final version of a
document, at the end of all the preparation stages, bringing it into effect.
Affordable Housing- housing provided at a cost considered affordable in relation to
incomes that are average or below average, or in relation to the price of general market
housing. Social rented housing includes housing rented from the Council and or
registered social landlords (RSL). The rents on these properties are significantly lower
than market housing rents.
Affordable Workspace - small or micro workspaces are units with a net floorspace of
around 90sq.m or less in the B1(a), (b) and (c) and B2 Use Classes and 70sq.m for
retail uses, which provide for a range of uses, and where appropriate, flexibility
between uses (for example small offices and light industrial studios).
Air Quality Management Area (AQMA) - an area declared by a local authority where
it has predicted that national air quality objectives will not be met. Most of Inner London
has AQMA status, designated by the various authorities.
Amenity - a general term used to describe the tangible and intangible benefits or
features associated with a property or location that contributes to its character,
comfort, convenience or attractiveness.
Authority Monitoring Report (AMR) - a document produced by the Local Planning
Authority to report on the progress of producing development plan documents (DPDs)
and the implementation of policies. Formally known as the Annual Monitoring Report.
Area Action Plan (AAP) - a particular type of Development Plan Document/ Local
Plan which provides a planning framework for any area where significant change
and/or conservation is needed.
Biodiversity - all species of life on earth including plants and animals and the
ecosystem of which we are all part.
Car-free development - no parking provision will be allowed on-site and the occupiers
will have no ability to obtain car parking permits, except for parking needed to meet
the needs of disabled people.
Car-capped developments - limited amount of on-site car parking, but no access to
on-street parking permits in order to avoid any impact on on-street parking.
Communal Open Space – it is open space that is for shared use by the occupants of
a number of dwellings and/or business. For the purposes of Policy DM31, the
connections between the units are geographical proximity for example within the same
development. The term is used to distinguish such space from private open space i.e.
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gardens or balconies attached to an individual dwelling or business premises, and
‘public’ open space i.e. parks, public squares where there is a degree of freedom about
who can use the space and for what purposes.
Conservation Area – a formally designated area of special historic or architectural
interest whose character must be preserved or enhanced.
Core Strategy - a Local Plan (LP) which contains the spatial vision, main objectives
and policies for managing the future development of the area.
Development Plan - this includes adopted Local Plans, Neighbourhood Plans and the
London Plan, and is defined in section 38 of the Planning and Compulsory Purchase
Act 2004.
Emergency Services – are the land holding emergency services in Hackney and they
include the Mayor’s Office for Police and Crime (MOPAC), the City and Hackney NHS
and London Fire Brigade.
Examination - a form of independent public inquiry into the soundness of a submitted
LP, which is chaired by an Inspector appointed by the Secretary of State. After the
examination has ended the Inspector produces a report with recommendations which
are binding on the Council.
Heritage Assets - a building, monument, site or landscape of historic, archaeological,
architectural or artistic interest whether designated or not designated. Heritage assets
in Hackney include statutorily listed Buildings, Conservation Areas, London Squares,
Historic Parks and Gardens, Scheduled Ancient Monuments, Archaeological
Remains, Archaeological Priority Areas, Locally Listed Buildings, Local Landmarks,
Buildings of Townscape Merit and Area of Townscape Interest.
Historic Significance - the value of a heritage asset, because of its heritage interest
which may be archaeological, architectural, artistic or historic. Significance derives not
only from a heritage asset’s physical presence, but also from its setting.
Lee Valley Regional Park Authority - The Park Authority and boundary of the
regional park were established under the Lee Valley Regional Park Act 1966. The
broad remit of the Authority is to manage, innovate, lead and enable the Park to be a
place for leisure, recreation and nature conservation. Hackney’s section of the Park
includes Hackney Marshes, the River Lea and Lee Navigation. The Park Authority has
a statutory duty to produce a plan(s) of proposals for the future and development of
the Park. Its adopted Park Development Framework sets out the vision, aims,
objectives and six thematic proposals. It also has a series of Area Proposals including
Area 2 which covers The Three Marshes: Walthamstow, Leyton and Hackney. The
plans and proposals can be viewed at: http://www.leevalleypark.org.uk In summary
these are:
a) Provision of new and enhanced visitor facilities at Springhill, Springfield
Park, and Hackney Marshes available to general Park visitors as part of the
visitor infrastructure within the wider area;
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b) Opportunities to protect and develop sporting and recreational use and
activity within the area, in particular water based activity and opportunities
for a canoe trail down the Lee Navigation;
c) Working with partners to develop and enhance route networks, including
new directional signage, within and through Hackney Marshes linking the
Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park with Lea Bridge Road, Walthamstow
Marshes, Springfield Park and Walthamstow Wetlands;
d) The conservation and enhancement of landscape quality including the
continued protection of features of historic and geological interest,
protection of the openness of the valley and of views out across the
Regional Park;
e) Improving pedestrian and cycle links through to the Regional Park from
adjoining residential areas and from Clapton Station;
f) Protection and enhancement of ecological value of the area and
improvements to access to nature particularly at Springfield Park,
Middlesex Filter Beds, Hackney Marshes and alongside the waterways; and
g) Support for events and community use of the open parkland.
The Park Authority can refer Riparian authorities to the Secretary of State if it is
considered by the Authority that the decision taken materially conflicts with the
proposals of the Authority.
Listed Building - a building or structure designated by the Secretary of State under
the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 for its special
architectural or historic interest, and therefore included in a 'list' of such buildings and
structures.
Living roofs (also known as green / brown roofs) - living roofs can create or improve
biodiversity, contribute to minimising flood risk, improve flood risks, improve thermal
efficiency and improve microclimate. The substrate depth of living roofs should vary
between 80mm and 150mm with peaks and trough, but should average at least
130mm unless it can be demonstrated that this is not reasonably possible. Extensive
living roofs should be planted with 16 plugs per m2.
Local Development Document (LDD) - a set of documents specified in United
Kingdom planning law which a Local Planning Authority creates to describe their
strategy for development and use of land in their area of authority.
Local Development Framework (LDF) - the collective term for the whole package of
planning documents which are produced by a Local Planning Authority to provide the
planning framework for its area. This term has been replaced by the Local Plan.
Local Development Scheme (LDS) - a document which sets out the Local Planning
Authority's intentions and timetable for the preparation of new LDDs (including LPs,
SPDs and the SCI).
Local Green Space – The National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) introduced a
new concept of a Local Green Space designation. This is a discretionary designation
to be made by inclusion within a local development plan or neighbourhood
development plan. The designation should only be used where the land is not
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extensive, is local in character and reasonably close to the community; and, where it
is demonstrably special, for example, because of its beauty, historic significance,
recreational value (including as a playing field), tranquillity or richness of its wildlife.
Policies within the local development plan or neighbourhood development plan for
managing development within a Local Green Space should be consistent with the
policies protecting green belts within the NPPF.
Local Plan (LP) - the plan for the future development of the local area, drawn up by
the Local Planning Authority in consultation with the community. In law this is
described as the development plan documents adopted under the Planning and
Compulsory Purchase Act 2004. Current core strategies or other planning policies,
which under the regulations would be considered to be development plan documents,
form part of the Local Plan. The term includes old policies which have been saved
under the 2004 Act.
Local Planning Authority (LPA) - the local authority which has duties and powers
under the Planning and Compulsory Purchase Act.
Main Town Centre Uses – retail development (including warehouse clubs and factory
outlet centres); leisure, entertainment facilities, the more intensive sport and recreation
uses (including cinemas, restaurant, drive-through restaurants, bars and pubs, nightclubs, casinos, health and fitness centres, indoor bowling centres, and bingo halls);
offices; and arts, culture and tourism development (including theatres, museums,
galleries and concert halls, hotels and conference facilities).
Major Development – for residential development, where the scheme provides for
more than ten dwellings or where the site area is more than 1,000 square metres. For
other developments, where the floor space will be more than 1,000 square metres or
the site areas is more than 1 hectare.
For all developments, the site area is that directly involved in some aspect of the
development. Floor space is defined as the sum of the floor area within the building
measured externally to the external wall faces at each level. Basement car parks,
rooftop plant rooms, caretakers’ flats etc. should be included in the floor space figure.
Mitigation measures - actions necessary to restrict or remedy the negative impacts
of a particular development.
Natura 2000 Site - a site of international importance for nature conservation
established under the EC Birds and Habitats Directives, comprising (in the UK)
designated Special Protection Areas and Special Areas of Conservation.
National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) – a national planning policy document
which sets out the Government’s planning policies for England and how these are
expected to be applied. It sets out the Government’s requirements for the planning
system only to the extent that it is relevant, proportionate and necessary to do so. It
provides a framework within which local people and their accountable councils can
produce their own distinctive local and neighbourhood plans, which reflect the needs
and priorities of their communities.
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Open Space and Recreational Land - areas of undeveloped or largely undeveloped
land for leisure purposes - including village greens, allotments, children’s playgrounds,
sports pitches and municipal parks.
Planning Inspectorate (PINS) - an agency of the Department for Communities and
Local Government (DCLG) which provides independent adjudication on planning
issues, typically through an Inspector with responsibility for "examination".
Planning Policy Statement (PPS) - one of a series of Statements issued by the
Government to set out national policies for different aspects of planning. Each
Statement (dealing with a particular aspect of planning) has its own PPS number.
PPSs are sometimes accompanied by Companion Guides which offer more detailed
guidance on the operation of national policy.
Policies Map - a map on an Ordnance Survey base map which shows where policies
in LPs apply. For an interim period it will also show where saved policies from Local
Plans apply. It needs to be revised as each different LP is adopted.
Ramsar Site - a wetland site of international importance especially as waterfowl
habitat, listed under the provisions of the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands of
International Importance (Ramsar Convention, 1971).
Regionally Important Geological/Geomorphological Sites (RIGS) – RIGs are
important designated places for geology and geomorphology outside statutorily
protected land such as SSSIs. In London RIGs are considered to be worthy for
protection for their geodiversity importance at the London-wide level. They are
important as an educational, historical and recreational resource. In Hackney the
GLA’s Green Infrastructure and Open Environment: London’s Foundries: Protecting
the Geodiversity of the Capital London Foundation SPG (March 2012) identifies
Springfield Park (ref GLA 43) as a site Recommended or Potential Regionally
Important Geological/Geomorphological Sites. It is described as “only London
Geological Nature Reserve, designated for spring lines associated with junctions of
Pleistocene Langley Silt (brickearth) on top of Hackney Gravel overlaying Ecoene
London Clay Formation. Villas on site built from the brickearth.
Scheduled Monument - a nationally important archaeological site that has been
designated by the Secretary of State under the Ancient Monuments and
Archaeological Areas Act 1979, and therefore included in a 'schedule' of such
monuments.
Special Policy Area – where a high concentration of licensed premises has been
identified as causing a negative impact on the licensing objectives in an area. The
Council may consider the refusal of any application and/or additional measures to
address any such concerns. There are two Special Policy Areas in Hackney;,
Shoreditch and Dalston. See Hackney’s Statement of Licensing Policy for further
information.
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Statement of Community Involvement (SCI) - one of the types of LDD; it sets out
the council's approach to how and when it will consult with the community in the
preparation of planning documents, and making decisions on planning applications.
Statutory Development Plan - the overall term for a number of documents which,
together, have a particular status under the planning legislation in decision-making.
The Development Plan includes all adopted LPs for the area. For an interim period it
may include all or part of certain structure plans and Local Plans.
Submission stage - the stage at which a LP or SCI is sent to the Secretary of State
as a prelude to its examination, having previously been published for public inspection
and formal representations.
Supplementary Planning Document (SPD) - one of the types of LDD; they expand
on policies or provide further detail to policies contained in a LP.
Sustainability Appraisal (SA) - a formal, systematic process to assess the
environmental, economic and social effects of strategies and policies from the start of
preparation onwards. The process includes the production of reports to explain the
outcomes of the appraisal.
Sustainable Community Strategy - a document which plans for the future of
Hackney across a wide range of topics, and sets out a vision and a series of
aspirations. The local strategic partnership (Team Hackney) has responsibility for
producing the document which sets out four main priorities that all partners work
towards. It is part of the evidence base for the Local Plan, but not part of the Local
Plan itself.
Sustainable Development - usually referred to as “development which meets the
needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet
their own needs” (Brundtland, 1987).
Sustainable Drainage Systems (SuDS) - an overall term for systems of surface
water drainage management that take into account the quantity and quality of runoff,
and the amenity value of surface water in the urban environment. The main focus is
on source control and the mimicking of natural processes to enable infiltration and
gradual discharge into watercourses.
The Act - the Planning and Compulsory Purchase Act 2004, which put in place the
statutory framework for preparing the LDF (now the Local Plan).
The Regulations - the Town and Country Planning (Local Development) (England)
Regulations 2004, as amended by the Town and Country Planning
(Local Development) (England) (Amendment) Regulations 2008 and the Town and
Country Planning (Local Development) (England) (Amendment) Regulations 2009;
and the Town and Country Planning (Transitional Arrangements) Regulations 2004.
Transport User Hierarchy - a hierarchy which says that in all matters of land-use and
transportation planning, consideration will be given to the needs of user groups in the
following priority order:
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• pedestrians and those with mobility difficulties;
• cyclists;
• public transport including coaches and taxis/private hire vehicles;
• motorcycles;
• rail freight;
• commercial and business users including road haulage;
• car borne shoppers and visitors;
• car borne commuters.
Use Classes Order - a piece of national secondary legislation which groups types of
use of premises into classes, so that no development is involved if a building is
changed from one use to another within the same class. The Use Classes Order can
be viewed at the Planning Portal website:
http://www.planningportal.gov.uk/permission/commonprojects/changeofuse
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APPENDICIES
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APPENDIX
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SCHEDULE OF CHANGES TO CORE STRATEGY
PROPOSALS MAP
DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
SECTION 1:
INTRODUCTION
1.1
Hackney’s Core Strategy sets out the long term spatial vision and strategic objectives
for future development in the area. It is the ‘spatial expression’ of Hackney’s
Sustainable Communities Strategy and was shown diagrammatically in the Proposals
Map accompanying the Core Strategy. Amendments to the Proposals Map (now
renamed ‘Policies Map’ in accordance with new regulations) are shown in section 2.
The amendments reflect changes between the adoption of the Core Strategy and the
production of this DMLP, and also align with the policies in this DPD. This appendix
highlights the key amendments between the Core Strategy Proposals Map (2010) and
the adopted Development Management Local Plan Policies Map.
1.2
Section 2 provides a scaled down version of the entire Policies Map. Section 3 lists all
area designations in the Policies Map. Section 4 identifies the key differences between
the Core Strategy Proposals Map and the DMLP Policies Map.
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
ii | P a g e
DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
SECTION 2:
POLICIES MAP
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
iii | P a g e
DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
SECTION 3:
POLICIES MAP SCHEDULE
Policies
Map
reference
number
Category
Site Name
1
Central Activities Zone
Central Activities Zone
2
Strategic Transport
Infrastructure
Strategic Transport Infrastructure and Channel
Tunnel Rail Link Safeguarding
3
Area Action Plan
Dalston
4
Area Action Plan
Hackney Central
5
Area Action Plan
Hackney Wick
6
Area Action Plan
Manor House
8
Major Town Centre
Dalston
9
District Town Centre
Hackney Central
10
District Town Centre
Stoke Newington High Street
11
District Town Centre
Finsbury Park
12
Local Shopping Centre
Manor House
13
Local Shopping Centre
Stamford Hill
14
Local Shopping Centre
Stoke Newington Church Street
15
Local Shopping Centre
Upper Clapton Road
16
Local Shopping Centre
Stoke Newington Road
17
Local Shopping Centre
Lower Clapton Road
18
Local Shopping Centre
Chatsworth Road
19
Local Shopping Centre
Wick Road
20
Local Shopping Centre
Wells Street
21
Local Shopping Centre
Kingsland Road
22
Local Shopping Centre
Broadway Market
23
Local Shopping Centre
Lauriston Road
24
Local Shopping Centre
Hoxton Street
25
Local Shopping Centre
Shacklewell Lane
26
Street Market
Ridley Road Market
27
Street Market
Wells Street market
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28
Street Market
Kingsland Waste market
29
Street Market
Broadway Market
30
Street Market
Hoxton Street market
31
Estate Renewal
Woodberry Down
32
Estate Renewal
Nightingale Estate
33
Estate Renewal
Tower Court
34
Estate Renewal
Kings Crescent
35
Estate Renewal
St Leonards Court
37
Estate Renewal
Marion Court
38
Estate Renewal
Bridge House
39
Estate Renewal
Holly Street
40
Estate Renewal
Haggerston West
41
Estate Renewal
Kingsland
42
Estate Renewal
Colville
43
Conservation Areas
Albion Square
44
Conservation Areas
Broadway Market
45
Conservation Areas
Clapton Common
46
Conservation Areas
Clapton Pond
47
Conservation Areas
Clapton Square
48
Conservation Areas
Clissold Park
49
Conservation Areas
Dalston Lane (West)
50
Conservation Areas
De Beauvoir
51
Conservation Areas
Fremont and Warneford
52
Conservation Areas
Graham Road and Mapledene
53
Conservation Areas
Hoxton Street
54
Conservation Areas
Kingsland
55
Conservation Areas
Lea Bridge
56
Conservation Areas
Lordship Park
57
Conservation Areas
Mare Street
58
Conservation Areas
Newington Green (North)
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
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DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
59
Conservation Areas
Queensbridge Road
60
Conservation Areas
St Mark's
61
Conservation Areas
Regent's Canal
62
Conservation Areas
South Shoreditch
63
Conservation Areas
Stoke Newington
64
Conservation Areas
Stoke Newington Reservoirs, Filter Beds and New
River
65
Conservation Areas
Sun Street
66
Conservation Areas
Town Hall Square
67
Conservation Areas
Underwood Street
68
Conservation Areas
Victoria Park
69
Conservation Areas
Hackney Road
70
Conservation Areas
Northwold and Evering
71
Sites of importance for
Nature Conservation
Abney Park
72
Sites of importance for
Nature Conservation
Allen's Gardens
73
Sites of importance for
Nature Conservation
Ancient Mother Churchyard, Stoke
Newington
74
Sites of importance for
Nature Conservation
Butterfield Green & Shakespeare Walk
Adventure Playground
75
Sites of importance for
Nature Conservation
Clapton Common Pond
76
Sites of importance for
Nature Conservation
Clissold Park
77
Sites of importance for
Nature Conservation
Daubeney Green
78
Sites of importance for
Nature Conservation
Hackney Downs
79
Sites of importance for
Nature Conservation
Haggerston Park and Hackney City Farm
80
Sites of importance for
Nature Conservation
Holmleigh Railway Cutting
81
Sites of importance for
Nature Conservation
London Fields
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
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82
Sites of importance for
Nature Conservation
Millfields Recreation Ground
83
Sites of importance for
Nature Conservation
Napoleon Road Railway Cutting
84
Sites of importance for
Nature Conservation
Red Path Wood
85
Sites of importance for
Nature Conservation
Rushmore Primary School
86
Sites of importance for
Nature Conservation
Shacklewell Primary School
87
Sites of importance for
Nature Conservation
Shoreditch Park
88
Sites of importance for
Nature Conservation
Spring Hill Playing Fields
89
Sites of importance for
Nature Conservation
Springfield Park
90
Sites of importance for
Nature Conservation
St John's Churchyard & Clapton Square
91
Sites of importance for
Nature Conservation
Stoke Newington Reservoirs
92
Sites of importance for
Nature Conservation
New River
93
Sites of importance for
Nature Conservation
Lee Navigation
94
Sites of importance for
Nature Conservation
Middlesex Filter Beds
95
Sites of importance for
Nature Conservation
River Lea
96
Sites of importance for
Nature Conservation
Wick Woodland
97
Sites of importance for
Nature Conservation
London's Canals
98
Archaeological Priority
Areas
Shoreditch
99
Archaeological Priority
Areas
Hoxton
100
Archaeological Priority
Areas
Wenlock Barn
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
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101
Archaeological Priority
Areas
Haggerston
Manor House and
Village
102
Archaeological Priority
Areas
Bammes House/Hoxton
Manor House
103
Archaeological Priority
Areas
Merestet/West
Street Triangle
104
Archaeological Priority
Areas
Hackney
105
Archaeological Priority
Areas
Dalston Lane
Manor House
and Village
106
Archaeological Priority
Areas
Homerton
107
Archaeological Priority
Areas
Lower Clapton
108
Archaeological Priority
Areas
Clapton
109
Archaeological Priority
Areas
Shacklewell
110
Archaeological Priority
Areas
Bayston Road/
Tyssen Road
111
Archaeological Priority
Areas
Stoke Newington
112
Archaeological Priority
Areas
Stamford Hill
113
Archaeological Priority
Areas
Upper Clapton/
Stoke Newington
114
Archaeological Priority
Areas
Lea Valley
115
Archaeological Priority
Areas
Kingsland Leper Hospital
116
Strategic View
View from Westminster Pier of St Pauls Cathedral
and King Henry’s Mound of St Pauls Cathedral.
117
Priority Employment
Area
Shoreditch PEA
118
Priority Employment
Area
Wenlock PEA
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119
Priority Employment
Area
Kingsland PEA
120
Priority Employment
Area
De Beauvoir PEA
121
Priority Employment
Area
Dalston PEA
122
Priority Employment
Area
Mare Street PEA
123
Priority Employment
Area
Homerton PEA
124
Priority Employment
Area
Hackney Downs PEA
125
Priority Employment
Area
Tilia Street PEA
126
Priority Employment
Area
Prout Street PEA
127
Priority Employment
Area
Shacklewell PEA
128
Priority Employment
Area
Red Square PEA
129
Priority Employment
Area
Belfast Road PEA
130
Priority Employment
Area
Theydon Road PEA
131
Priority Employment
Area
Anton Street
132
Locally Strategic
Industrial Site
Kingsland Road LSIS
133
Locally Strategic
Industrial Site
Mare Street LSIS
134
Locally Strategic
Industrial Site
Milfields LSIS
135
Locally Strategic
Industrial Site
Lee Conservancy LSIS
136
Locally Strategic
Industrial Site
Eastway Osborn Road LSIS
137
Locally Strategic
Industrial Site
Eastway Buxhall Crescent LSIS
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138
Locally Strategic
Industrial Site
Bartrip Street LSIS
139
Strategic Industrial
Location
Hackney Wick SIL
141
Other Industrial Area
Hackney Wick and Palace Close OIA
142
Green Links
Regents Canal
143
Green Links
Finsbury Park to Stoke Newington Reservoir
144
Green Links
Butterfield Park to Millfields
145
Green Links
Broadway Market to Victoria Park
146
Green Links
Hackney Central
147
Green Links
St Johns to Mabley Green
148
Green Links
Hackney Downs to Millfields
149
Green Links
Finsbury Park to Green Lanes
150
Green Corridors
Regents Canal
151
Green Corridors
Lee Navigation
152
Green Corridors
River Lea
153
Green Corridors
New River
154
Green Corridors
Hackney Downs to Amhurst Park Road Railway
cutting
155
Green Corridors
Hackney Downs to Leaside Road Railway cutting
156
Metropolitan Open
Land
Stoke Newington (East and West Resevoirs and
New River)
157
Metropolitan Open
Land
Lea Valley (River Lea, Lee Navigation, Hackney
Marshes North and East, White Hart Field, Mabley
Green, south Millfields, North and South Millfields
Recreation Ground, Springhill Sports Ground,
Springfield Park, Middlesex Filter Beds Nature
Reserve and Wicks Field)
158
Open Space
Myddleton Avenue
159
Open Space
East Reservoir
160
Open Space
West Reservoir
161
Open Space
New River Path
162
Open Space
Homleigh Railway Cutting
163
Open Space
Allens Gardens
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
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DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
164
Open Space
St Anne's Home
165
Open Space
Abney Park Cemetery
166
Open Space
Levy Memorial Grounds
167
Open Space
Clissold Park
168
Open Space
Oak Tree Community Centre
169
Open Space
Stoke Newington Seventh Day Adventist Church
170
Open Space
Old St Mary's Church
171
Open Space
St Mary's Parish Church
172
Open Space
Stoke Newington School
173
Open Space
Betty Layward Primary School
174
Open Space
Aden Terrace Allotment
175
Open Space
Methodist Church & Twinkle Tots Nursery
176
Open Space
Church Walk Allotments
177
Open Space
Springdale Road Allotments
178
Open Space
Butterfield Green
179
Open Space
Shakespeare Adventure (part of Butterfield Green)
180
Open Space
St Mattias Church
181
Open Space
Kynaston Gardens
182
Open Space
Stoke Newington Common
183
Open Space
St Pauls Church
184
Open Space
West Hackney Recreational
185
Open Space
Gillett Square
186
Open Space
Clapton Common
187
Open Space
Spring Hill Allotments
188
Open Space
Springhill Sports Ground
189
Open Space
Springfield Park
190
Open Space
Cazenove Road North
191
Open Space
Springfield field after school nursery
192
Open Space
Knightingale's School
193
Open Space
Charnouk Road railway embankment
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DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
194
Open Space
Hackney Down
195
Open Space
Clapton Ponds
196
Open Space
North Millfields Recreation Ground
197
Open Space
South Millfields Recreation Ground
198
Open Space
South Millfields
199
Open Space
Middlesex Filter Beds Nature Reserve
200
Open Space
Hackney Marsh North
201
Open Space
Hackney Marsh East
202
Open Space
Wicks Field
203
Open Space
Mabley Green
204
Open Space
White Hart Field
205
Open Space
Clapton Park ( Daubeney Green)
206
Open Space
Daubeney Green Nursery
207
Open Space
Kingsmead Primary School
208
Open Space
St Mary of Eton Church
209
Open Space
East Cross Route
210
Open Space
Overbury Street Allotments
211
Open Space
Railway buffer Crozier Terrace
212
Open Space
St Dominic's Infants & Nursery School
213
Open Space
Junction of Estuary/A12
214
Open Space
Homerton Adventure Play Grove
215
Open Space
Brooksby Way
216
Open Space
Clapton Girls Technology School
217
Open Space
The Round Chapel
218
Open Space
Clapton Square
219
Open Space
St Johns Square
220
Open Space
Homerton College
221
Open Space
St Barnabus Church
222
Open Space
Berger School
223
Open Space
Church in Morningside Estate, St Lukes
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
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DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
224
Open Space
Well Street Common
225
Open Space
St John of Jerusalem
226
Open Space
Lauriston Road Jewish Cemetery
227
Open Space
Cardinal Pole Annex School Grounds
228
Open Space
Railway Embankment
229
Open Space
Hackney Town Hall
230
Open Space
Hackney Free & Parochial C.E Secondary School
231
Open Space
Park on corner of Frampton Park Road
232
Open Space
St John the Theologian Churchyard & park opposite
churchyard
233
Open Space
St Thomas Square
234
Open Space
Grayhurst School
235
Open Space
London Fields
236
Open Space
Broadway Market Green & Alden House
237
Open Space
Dalston Eastern Curve
238
Open Space
Evergreen Adventure Play
239
Open Space
De Beauvoir Square
240
Open Space
Lockner Estate
241
Open Space
Stonebridge Common
242
Open Space
Albion Square
243
Open Space
Area behind industrial estate, Kingsland Basin
244
Open Space
Upton Gardens
245
Open Space
Sports Pitch
246
Open Space
Stonebridge Estate
247
Open Space
Evergreen Square
248
Open Space
Haggerston School
249
Open Space
Haggerston Park
250
Open Space
Dove Row
251
Open Space
St Marys Garden Project
252
Open Space
Geffrye Museum
253
Open Space
St Leonards Garden
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
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DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
254
Open Space
Mark Street Gardens
255
Open Space
Clarkes Square
256
Open Space
St Johns Church
257
Open Space
Windsor Terrace
258
Open Space
Shoreditch Park
259
Open Space
Wenlock Road
260
Open Space
Lawson Practice (Doctor's surgery) & Louis
Freedman Nursing Home
261
Open Space
Hoxton Community Garden
262
Open Space
Regents Canal
263
Open Space
Lee Navigation
264
Open Space
River Lea Space (South)
265
Open Space
River Lea Space (North)
266
Open Space
Leaside Road Allotments
267
Open Space
Quaker Burial Ground
268
Open Space
Baden Powell School
269
Open Space
Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park
270
Potential New Open
Space
Gainsborough Playing Fields
271
Flood Zone 2
Flood Zone 2
272
Flood Zone 3
Flood Zone 3a
273
Flood Zone 3
Flood Zone 3b
274
Flood Zone 3
Hackney Marsh
275
Registered Parks and
Gardens
Clissold Park
276
Registered Parks and
Gardens
Abney Park Cemetery
277
Registered Parks and
Gardens
Springfield Park
278
Lea Valley Regional
Park
Lea Valley Regional Park
279
North London Waste
Plan
Millfields Waste Transfer Station
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
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DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
280
North London Waste
Plan
Braydon Motor Company
281
Conservation Area
Hackney Wick
282
Primary shopping
frontage
Stoke Newington
283
Secondary shopping
frontage
Stoke Newington
284
Secondary shopping
frontage
Finsbury Park
285
Secondary shopping
frontage
Hackney Central (Lower Clapton Road)
286
Green Links
Clissold Park to Springfield
287
Critical Drainage Area
Group4_012
288
Critical Drainage Area
Group4_017
289
Critical Drainage Area
Group4_018
290
Critical Drainage Area
Group4_019
291
Critical Drainage Area
Group4_020
292
Critical Drainage Area
Group4_023
293
Critical Drainage Area
Group4_024
294
Critical Drainage Area
Group4_026
295
Critical Drainage Area
Group4_029
296
Metropolitan Open
Land
Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park
297
LLDC Boundary
London Legacy Development Corporation Boundary
298
Shoreditch SPA
Shoreditch Special Policy Area
299
City fringe OAPF
City Fringe OAPF
300
Regionally Important
Geological Site
Regionally Important Geological Site
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
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DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
SECTION 4:
SCHEDULE OF CHANGES
Core Strategy
Proposals Map
Changes reflected in
the new Policies Map
Reasons for the Change
DMLP Policies Map reference
number the change relates to21:
Delivering
Sustainable Growth
1.
Strategic Transport
Infrastructure
As per existing
N/A
2.
Central Activity Zone
As per existing.
N/A
3.
Area Action Plan
(AAP)
Revised - Hackney
Central AAP boundary
change.
Amend the boundary of Hackney Central AAP
to match the area of the Hackney Central
AAP LP. Boundary amended as a result of
public consultation on the AAP.
4.
LLDC Boundary
Addition - New
boundary for LLDC area
Planning powers transferred to the LLDC for
the area within the new boundary.
Revised - Removal of
Rendlesham House,
Ottaway Court and
Alexandra National
House.
Rendlesham House, Ottaway Court and
Alexandra National House have been
developed and thus no longer part of the
Estate Renewal programme.
4
297
Providing Better
Homes
5.
21
Estate Renewal
See section 3 for further details on which reference number relates to which designation on the DMLP Policies Map.
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
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31 – 42
DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
Addition of Nightingale
Estate and St Leonard’s
Court.
Nightingale and St Leonard’s Court form part
of the Estate Renewal Programme.
A Creative and
Dynamic Economy
6.
Major Town Centre
Boundary (Dalston)
As per existing.
N/A
7.
District Town Centre
Boundaries (Hackney
Central, Stoke
Newington, Finsbury
Park)
As per existing.
N/A
8.
Local Shopping
Centre
Revised – Manor House
Local Shopping Centre
boundary extension.
Extend the boundary to include 279 Seven
Sister’s Road (Ivy House) to reflect the aims
of the Manor House AAP LP.
9.
Street market
As per existing.
N/A
10. (New layer) Stoke
Newington District
Centre
Stoke Newington
primary shopping
frontage and area (see
Appendix 3).
To reflect and help implement Development
Management LP policies (see Appendix 3).
282
11.
Stoke Newington
secondary shopping
frontage (see Appendix
3).
To reflect and help implement Development
Management LP policies (see Appendix 3).
283
12. (New layer) Finsbury
Park District Centre
Finsbury Park
secondary shopping
To reflect and help implement Development
Management LP policies (see Appendix 3).
284
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
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12
DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
frontage (see Appendix
3).
13. (New layer) Hackney
Central District
Centre
Hackney Central
secondary shopping
frontage (see Appendix
3).
To reflect and help implement Development
Management LP policies (see Appendix 3).
14. Priority Employment
Area
As per existing.
N/A
15. Locally Significant
Industrial Areas
As per existing.
N/A
16. Other industrial
Areas
Revised.
To reflect proposals of the Hackney Wick AAP
and Olympic Legacy SPG.
141
17. Strategic Industrial
Land
Revised.
To reflect proposals of the Hackney Wick AAP
and Olympic Legacy SPG.
139
18. (New layer) Existing
Waste Sites
Existing Waste Sites Millfields and Braydon.
Spatial representation of the existing Waste
Sites.
19. (New layer)
Shoreditch SPA
Addition – Shoreditch
SPA
Evening and Night-time economy policy
should be viewed in conjunction with and with
consideration for the Shoreditch Special
Policy Area.
20. (New layer) City
Fringe OAPF
Addition – City Fringe
OAPF
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
285
279 – 280
298
299
xviii | P a g e
DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
Cleaner Greener
Safer Places
Revised – Regents
Canal Conservation
Area.
To reflect the changes to the Regents Canal
Conservation Area.
61
Revised – Victoria Park
Conservation Area
To reflect the changes to the Victoria Park
Conservation Area
68
Revised – Clapton
Common Conservation
Area
To reflect the changes to the Clapton
Common Conservation Area
22. Strategic View
Background Area
As per existing.
N/A
23. Sites of Importance
for nature
Conservation
As per existing.
N/A
24. Archaeological
Priority area
As per existing.
N/A
25. Green links
Revised – addition of
green link from Finsbury
Park to Stoke
Newington Reservoir.
To reflect potential opportunity for a green
link.
26. Green Corridors
As per existing.
N/A
21. Conservation Area
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143
DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
27. Metropolitan open
Land
Revised – addition of
Metropolitan Open
Land.
As part of the legal agreement between the
Council and the LLDC, the Olympic Park must
be returned as a coherent, usable green
space that meets the criteria under the
London Plan for designation as MOL. It is the
Council’s intention to designate the new
Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park as MOL.
296
Support for this designation has also been
given by stakeholders – GLA, ODA and the
LVRPA.
28. Potential New Open
Space
Revised – conversion of
Proposed Linear Park
Potential New Open
Space to Metropolitan
Open Land.
As the Proposed Linear Park Potential New
Open Space falls within the Olympic Park
boundary, it is proposed, as part of the legal
agreement stated above, be designated as
Metropolitan Open Land.
Support for this designation has also been
given by stakeholders – GLA, ODA and the
LVRPA.
29. Lee Valley regional
Park
As per existing.
N/A
30. Open Space
excluding Amenity
Green Space
Revised – removal of
Rhodes Estate
Wasteland Open
Space.
Open space had been developed on as part
of the Dalston Junction development.
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
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Reference removed
DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
Revised – Alteration to
boundary of St John’s
Square Open Space
To reflect the Hackney Central AAP.
Addition – Queen
Elizabeth Olympic Park
To reflect the legal agreement between the
Council and the LLDC. This states that the
Olympic Park must be returned as a coherent,
usable green space that meets the criteria
under the London Plan for designation as
MOL. The green space has been formally
named Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park.
219
269
To reflect the Dalston AAP.
237
Revised – extension of
Dalston Eastern Curve
31. Registered Parks and
Gardens
As per existing.
N/A
32. Olympic Park
Remove
The Olympic Park was a part of the 2012
Olympic Games and is therefore no longer
relevant.
33. (New layer)
Regionally Important
Geological Site
Addition – Regionally
Important Geological
Site
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
7
300
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DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
Climate Change and
Environmental
Sustainability
34. Flood Zone 2
As per existing.
N/A
35. Flood Zone 3a
As per existing.
N/A
36. Flood Zone 3b
As per existing.
N/A
37. (New layer) Critical
Drainage Areas.
Critical Drainage Areas
Reflect the duty of the Council under the
Flood and Water Management Act 2010
linked to the Hackney’s Surface Management
Plan 2011 (see Appendix 2).
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287 – 295
DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
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DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
APPENDIX
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
2
xxiv | P a g e
DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
CRITICAL DRAINAGE AREAS AND LOCAL
FLOOD RISK ZONES
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DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
CRITICAL DRAINAGE AREAS (CDA) AND LOCAL
FLOOD RISK ZONES (LFRZ)
Source: London Borough of Hackney Surface Water Management Plan 2011.
This Appendix links to policy DM43 ‘Flooding and Flood Risk’. It provides a summary
of the location, probability, consequences and mechanisms of flooding in each CDA
within the borough. Each accompanying figure shows the extent of the CDA
displayed with the 1 in 100 year maximum depth results.
CDA: Group4_012
Location:
Berkshire
Road/Wallis Road/White Post
Lane, Hackney Wick
Description: Surface water
is observed to pond at the low
points within this CDA
generally
concentrated
around Berkshire Road and
White Post Lane. There are a
number of Council managed
properties and the Council
are already proposing a
series of flood resilience
measures to properties to
manage risk. The southern part of this CDA extends in the London Borough of Tower
Hamlets. There are isolated areas of significant risk, mainly confined to Berkshire Road
and White Post Lane, within the roads. The hazard from surface water flooding during
the 1 in 100 year event in this area is generally moderate, meaning the water is either
deep or fast flowing.
CDA: Group4_017
Location: Wick Road,
Homerton
Description:
The
area generally slopes
from the north in a
south-easterly
direction. Wick Road
is noticeably lower
than
surrounding
ground levels. Two
LFRZs have been
identified: One along
Wick Road extending
to the intersection with
the A12, the other at
the A106 underpass beneath the railway track.
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CDA: Group4_018
Location: Dalston Lane, Hackney
Description: Surface water is observed to
pond at the low point within this CDA, at the
rear of properties along Amhurst Road. The
flooding appears to be confined to back
gardens and parking facilities however there
are a number of properties containing
basements in the area which may be at risk
of surface water flooding.
CDA: Group4_019
Location: Northwold Road, Upper Clapton
Description: Surface water flows southwards
along Fountayne Road and ponds at the low
point on Northwold Road, and between Norcott
Road and Alconbury Road. There are a number
of basement properties in the CDA which are
shown to flood posing a moderate to significant
hazard with a row of buildings between
Kyverdale Road and Fountayne Road shown to
experience a moderate hazard.
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CDA: Group4_020
Location: Railway tracks between Dalston Kingsland and Hackney Central London
Overground Station
Description: The railway line is in a cutting at this location, with water ponding at low
points on the tracks. All water is retained on the railway corridor and it appears that
there is a relatively low likelihood of runoff from the surrounding higher ground entering
the cutting in most locations. The western extent of this CDA is located within the LB
of Islington.
CDA: Group4_023
Location: Stoke Newington Station to Rectory Road
Station, Stoke Newington
Description: Surface water is observed to flow in a
southerly direction along the railway corridor. In general,
overland flow from surrounding higher ground is
prevented from entering the railway cutting due to steep
slopes on either side. Some water however, is observed
to flow in from the east.
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CDA: Group4_024
Location: Downs Estate,
Amhurst
Road,
Hackney
Downs
Description: The properties
on Amhurst Road are a
localised low point with the
CDA. The estate is bound by
higher ground to the west
along Amhurst Road, and the
railway embankment to the
east. The hazard as a result of
surface water flooding is significant in the area immediately adjacent to the railway
embankment.
CDA: Group4_026
Location: Clapton Station, Upper Clapton
Description: Surface water is observed to flow from higher
ground in the north-west into the railway cutting. Water is
observed to pond around Clapton Station, north of where the
tracks enter a tunnel beneath Brooke Road. Flood waters are
also observed to pond in the cutting between Kenninghall Road
and Downs Road.
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CDA: Group4_029
Location: Lordship Road, Stoke
Newington
Description: The topography of this
CDA
Surface water is observed to flow in a
north and southerly direction towards
the centre of this CDA with ponding
water observed in Clissold Park and
along Grazebrook Road. A number of
residential properties are at risk of
surface water flooding on Lordship
Road and Grazebrook Road, as well
as the Grazebrook Primary School.
The residential properties are at greater risk of worse surface water flooding than the
roads due to the gradient of the road camber and the properties in the area containing
basements.
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
xxx | P a g e
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LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
xxxi | P a g e
DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
APPENDIX
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
3
xxxii | P a g e
DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
SCHEDULES AND MAPS OF PRIMARY AND
SECONDARY SHOPPING FRONTAGES
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
xxxiii | P a g e
DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
1:
INTRODUCTION
1.1
This appendix links to the Policies Map in Appendix 1 and to the Policy DM9 –
Changing the Use of Shops in Town Centres. It identifies the primary and
secondary shopping frontages within Hackney’s District Town Centres, as well
as the addresses of the individual shop units located within these frontages22.
This is achieved through the use of tables and geographical maps of each
centre. The shopping frontages of the Borough’s Major Town Centre, Dalston,
and a large part of Hackney Central District Town Centre, which is identified in
Figure 1 below, are identified in their respective Area Action Plans (AAPs).
References to ‘town centres’ apply to the Hackney Central, Stoke Newington and Finsbury Park
District Centres. These designated District Centres are shown on the DMLP Policies Map and are
referred to as Town Centres.
22
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DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
2:
SHOPPING FRONTAGES
2.1
The following tables and maps identify the individual unit addresses that fall
within the Primary Shopping Frontages of Stoke Newington District Centre, the
Secondary Shopping Frontages of Stoke Newington and Finsbury Park District
Centres, and part of the Secondary Frontage of Hackney Central District
Centre.
Table 1: Stoke Newington Town Centre Primary Shopping Frontage
STOKE NEWINGTON TOWN CENTRE PRIMARY SHOPPING
FRONTAGE
Building No.
Street
135
Stoke Newington High Street
137
Stoke Newington High Street
138
Stoke Newington High Street
138
Stoke Newington High Street
139-143
Stoke Newington High Street
140
Stoke Newington High Street
142-146
Stoke Newington High Street
145
Stoke Newington High Street
147
Stoke Newington High Street
147
Stoke Newington High Street
149
Stoke Newington High Street
150-152
Stoke Newington High Street
151
Stoke Newington High Street
154-156
Stoke Newington High Street
155
Stoke Newington High Street
157
Stoke Newington High Street
158
Stoke Newington High Street
159
Stoke Newington High Street
160
Stoke Newington High Street
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DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
161
Stoke Newington High Street
162-164
Stoke Newington High Street
163
Stoke Newington High Street
164A
Stoke Newington High Street
165
Stoke Newington High Street
166-168
Stoke Newington High Street
167
Stoke Newington High Street
169
Stoke Newington High Street
70
Stoke Newington High Street
171-173
Stoke Newington High Street
172-174
Stoke Newington High Street
176
Stoke Newington High Street
178
Stoke Newington High Street
Table 2: Stoke Newington Town Centre Secondary Shopping Frontage
STOKE NEWINGTON TOWN CENTRE SECONDARY SHOPPING
FRONTAGE
Building No.
Street
66-70
Batley Place
72
Batley Place
74
Batley Place
82-86
Batley Place
1A
Belfast Road
1B
Belfast Road
2
Cazenove Road
4
Cazenove Road
6B
Cazenove Road
8
Cazenove Road
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DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
9
Cazenove Road
10
Cazenove Road
12
Cazenove Road
14
Cazenove Road
16
Cazenove Road
18
Cazenove Road
20
Cazenove Road
22
Cazenove Road
2
Glading Terrace
6
Glading Terrace
8
Glading Terrace
10
Glading Terrace
12 to 18
Glading Terrace
20
Glading Terrace
22-36
Glading Terrace
2A
Lampard Grove
2
Stamford Hill
2A
Stamford Hill
2B
Stamford Hill
2C
Stamford Hill
4 to 6
Stamford Hill
12
Stamford Hill
14
Stamford Hill
16
Stamford Hill
18
Stamford Hill
20
Stamford Hill
22
Stamford Hill
24
Stamford Hill
26
Stamford Hill
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DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
28
Stamford Hill
30
Stamford Hill
32
Stamford Hill
34
Stamford Hill
36
Stamford Hill
36A
Stamford Hill
36B
Stamford Hill
38
Stamford Hill
40
Stamford Hill
41
Stamford Hill
42A
Stamford Hill
43
Stamford Hill
44
Stamford Hill
45
Stamford Hill
46
Stamford Hill
47-49
Stamford Hill
48
Stamford Hill
49-51
Stamford Hill
50
Stamford Hill
50A
Stamford Hill
52
Stamford Hill
54
Stamford Hill
56
Stamford Hill
58
Stamford Hill
60
Stamford Hill
62
Stamford Hill
62A
Stamford Hill
62B
Stamford Hill
62C
Stamford Hill
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xxxviii | P a g e
DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
62D
Stamford Hill
64
Stamford Hill
66
Stamford Hill
68
Stamford Hill
STORE REAR OF 68
Stamford Hill
70
Stamford Hill
72
Stamford Hill
74
Stamford Hill
76
Stamford Hill
78
Stamford Hill
80
Stamford Hill
82
Stamford Hill
84
Stamford Hill
86
Stamford Hill
88
Stamford Hill
90
Stamford Hill
90B
Stamford Hill
92-94 (Unit 1)
Stamford Hill
92-94 (Unit 2)
Stamford Hill
8 to 101
Stamford Hill
STOKE NEWINGTON
STATION
Station Approach
1
Station Approach
2
Station Approach
3
Station Approach
4 to 5
Station Approach
1
Stoke Newington Church Street
3
Stoke Newington Church Street
5
Stoke Newington Church Street
7
Stoke Newington Church Street
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DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
9
Stoke Newington Church Street
10
Stoke Newington Church Street
11
Stoke Newington Church Street
12
Stoke Newington Church Street
13
Stoke Newington Church Street
14
Stoke Newington Church Street
15
Stoke Newington Church Street
16
Stoke Newington Church Street
18
Stoke Newington Church Street
20
Stoke Newington Church Street
22
Stoke Newington Church Street
24
Stoke Newington Church Street
26-30
Stoke Newington Church Street
31
Stoke Newington Church Street
33
Stoke Newington Church Street
35
Stoke Newington Church Street
35A
Stoke Newington Church Street
37
Stoke Newington Church Street
37b
Stoke Newington Church Street
39
Stoke Newington Church Street
40
Stoke Newington Church Street
41
Stoke Newington Church Street
42
Stoke Newington Church Street
43
Stoke Newington Church Street
45
Stoke Newington Church Street
46
Stoke Newington Church Street
47
Stoke Newington Church Street
48
Stoke Newington Church Street
49
Stoke Newington Church Street
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xl | P a g e
DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
50
Stoke Newington Church Street
51
Stoke Newington Church Street
52
Stoke Newington Church Street
53
Stoke Newington Church Street
54-56
Stoke Newington Church Street
55
Stoke Newington Church Street
57
Stoke Newington Church Street
58
Stoke Newington Church Street
59
Stoke Newington Church Street
61
Stoke Newington Church Street
62
Stoke Newington Church Street
63
Stoke Newington Church Street
65
Stoke Newington Church Street
67
Stoke Newington Church Street
69
Stoke Newington Church Street
2
Stoke Newington High Street
4
Stoke Newington High Street
8
Stoke Newington High Street
10
Stoke Newington High Street
12
Stoke Newington High Street
14
Stoke Newington High Street
14B
Stoke Newington High Street
16
Stoke Newington High Street
18
Stoke Newington High Street
20
Stoke Newington High Street
22
Stoke Newington High Street
24
Stoke Newington High Street
26
Stoke Newington High Street
28
Stoke Newington High Street
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xli | P a g e
DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
30
Stoke Newington High Street
32
Stoke Newington High Street
33
Stoke Newington High Street
34
Stoke Newington High Street
35
Stoke Newington High Street
36
Stoke Newington High Street
38
Stoke Newington High Street
39
Stoke Newington High Street
41
Stoke Newington High Street
47
Stoke Newington High Street
49
Stoke Newington High Street
51
Stoke Newington High Street
52
Stoke Newington High Street
53
Stoke Newington High Street
54
Stoke Newington High Street
55
Stoke Newington High Street
56
Stoke Newington High Street
57
Stoke Newington High Street
58
Stoke Newington High Street
59
Stoke Newington High Street
60
Stoke Newington High Street
61
Stoke Newington High Street
62-64
Stoke Newington High Street
63
Stoke Newington High Street
65
Stoke Newington High Street
66
Stoke Newington High Street
67
Stoke Newington High Street
68
Stoke Newington High Street
69
Stoke Newington High Street
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
xlii | P a g e
DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
70
Stoke Newington High Street
71-73
Stoke Newington High Street
72
Stoke Newington High Street
74
Stoke Newington High Street
76-80
Stoke Newington High Street
76A
Stoke Newington High Street
77
Stoke Newington High Street
79
Stoke Newington High Street
80A
Stoke Newington High Street
81-83
Stoke Newington High Street
82
Stoke Newington High Street
84
Stoke Newington High Street
85
Stoke Newington High Street
86
Stoke Newington High Street
87
Stoke Newington High Street
88
Stoke Newington High Street
89
Stoke Newington High Street
90
Stoke Newington High Street
91
Stoke Newington High Street
92
Stoke Newington High Street
93
Stoke Newington High Street
94
Stoke Newington High Street
95
Stoke Newington High Street
96
Stoke Newington High Street
96A
Stoke Newington High Street
97
Stoke Newington High Street
98
Stoke Newington High Street
98A
Stoke Newington High Street
99
Stoke Newington High Street
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DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
100-104
Stoke Newington High Street
101
Stoke Newington High Street
103
Stoke Newington High Street
105
Stoke Newington High Street
106
Stoke Newington High Street
107-109
Stoke Newington High Street
108
Stoke Newington High Street
110
Stoke Newington High Street
111
Stoke Newington High Street
112
Stoke Newington High Street
113
Stoke Newington High Street
114
Stoke Newington High Street
115
Stoke Newington High Street
116
Stoke Newington High Street
117-119
Stoke Newington High Street
118
Stoke Newington High Street
120
Stoke Newington High Street
120A
Stoke Newington High Street
121
Stoke Newington High Street
122
Stoke Newington High Street
123
Stoke Newington High Street
124
Stoke Newington High Street
125
Stoke Newington High Street
127
Stoke Newington High Street
128
Stoke Newington High Street
129
Stoke Newington High Street
130
Stoke Newington High Street
131-133
Stoke Newington High Street
175
Stoke Newington High Street
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
xliv | P a g e
DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
177
Stoke Newington High Street
179
Stoke Newington High Street
180
Stoke Newington High Street
181
Stoke Newington High Street
182
Stoke Newington High Street
183-187
Stoke Newington High Street
First Floor, 183
Stoke Newington High Street
184
Stoke Newington High Street
188a
Stoke Newington High Street
189
Stoke Newington High Street
190
Stoke Newington High Street
191
Stoke Newington High Street
192
Stoke Newington High Street
193-195
Stoke Newington High Street
194
Stoke Newington High Street
196-198
Stoke Newington High Street
197-199
Stoke Newington High Street
200
Stoke Newington High Street
201
Stoke Newington High Street
202-204
Stoke Newington High Street
203
Stoke Newington High Street
205
Stoke Newington High Street
206
Stoke Newington High Street
207
Stoke Newington High Street
208
Stoke Newington High Street
209-211
Stoke Newington High Street
210
Stoke Newington High Street
212
Stoke Newington High Street
213
Stoke Newington High Street
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xlv | P a g e
DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
214
Stoke Newington High Street
215
Stoke Newington High Street
216-220
Stoke Newington High Street
217
Stoke Newington High Street
219
Stoke Newington High Street
226
Stoke Newington High Street
228
Stoke Newington High Street
226a
Stoke Newington High Street
230-240
Stoke Newington High Street
230-240 (Unit 1-2)
Stoke Newington High Street
230-240 (Unit 3a)
Stoke Newington High Street
230-240 (Unit 4)
Stoke Newington High Street
230-240 (Unit 5)
Stoke Newington High Street
230-240 (Unit 7)
Stoke Newington High Street
2A
Victorian Grove
1
Wilmer Place
1A
Windus Road
Table 3: Hackney Central Town Centre Secondary Shopping Frontage
HACKNEY CENTRAL TOWN CENTRE SECONDARY SHOPPING
FRONTAGE
Building No.
Street
2
Lower Clapton Road
6 to 8
Lower Clapton Road
12
Lower Clapton Road
14-16
Lower Clapton Road
16A
Lower Clapton Road
18A
Lower Clapton Road
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xlvi | P a g e
DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
18B
Lower Clapton Road
19
Lower Clapton Road
20-24
Lower Clapton Road
21
Lower Clapton Road
23
Lower Clapton Road
25
Lower Clapton Road
26
Lower Clapton Road
27
Lower Clapton Road
28
Lower Clapton Road
29
Lower Clapton Road
31
Lower Clapton Road
33
Lower Clapton Road
35
Lower Clapton Road
37-41
Lower Clapton Road
43
Lower Clapton Road
44
Lower Clapton Road
45-47
Lower Clapton Road
46
Lower Clapton Road
48
Lower Clapton Road
49
Lower Clapton Road
50
Lower Clapton Road
51
Lower Clapton Road
52
Lower Clapton Road
53
Lower Clapton Road
54
Lower Clapton Road
55
Lower Clapton Road
56
Lower Clapton Road
57
Lower Clapton Road
58
Lower Clapton Road
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xlvii | P a g e
DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
59
Lower Clapton Road
60
Lower Clapton Road
61
Lower Clapton Road
63
Lower Clapton Road
65
Lower Clapton Road
67
Lower Clapton Road
69
Lower Clapton Road
71
Lower Clapton Road
73
Lower Clapton Road
75
Lower Clapton Road
77
Lower Clapton Road
79
Lower Clapton Road
81
Lower Clapton Road
83
Lower Clapton Road
85
Lower Clapton Road
87
Lower Clapton Road
89
Lower Clapton Road
91
Lower Clapton Road
93
Lower Clapton Road
95
Lower Clapton Road
97
Lower Clapton Road
99-101
Lower Clapton Road
103
Lower Clapton Road
105
Lower Clapton Road
107
Lower Clapton Road
109
Lower Clapton Road
111
Lower Clapton Road
113
Lower Clapton Road
115
Lower Clapton Road
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DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
2B
Median Road
29
Urswick Road
Table 4: Finsbury Park Town Centre Secondary Shopping Frontage
FINSBURY PARK TOWN CENTRE SECONDARY SHOPPING
FRONTAGE
Building No.
Street
3
Blackstock Road
5
Blackstock Road
7
Blackstock Road
9
Blackstock Road
11
Blackstock Road
13
Blackstock Road
15
Blackstock Road
17
Blackstock Road
19
Blackstock Road
21
Blackstock Road
23
Blackstock Road
25
Blackstock Road
29-31
Blackstock Road
35-37
Blackstock Road
39
Blackstock Road
41
Blackstock Road
43
Blackstock Road
45
Blackstock Road
47
Blackstock Road
49
Blackstock Road
51
Blackstock Road
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xlix | P a g e
DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
51B-51C
Blackstock Road
51D
Blackstock Road
284A-286A
Seven Sisters Road
286
Seven Sisters Road
288
Seven Sisters Road
290-292
Seven Sisters Road
294
Seven Sisters Road
294
Seven Sisters Road
296
Seven Sisters Road
298-300
Seven Sisters Road
302
Seven Sisters Road
304
Seven Sisters Road
306
Seven Sisters Road
308
Seven Sisters Road
310
Seven Sisters Road
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
l|Page
DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
Figure 1: Hackney Central Town Centre Secondary Shopping Frontage
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
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DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
Figure 2: Stoke Newington Town Centre Primary and Secondary Shopping
Frontages
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
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DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
Figure 3: Finsbury Park Town Centre Secondary Shopping Frontage
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
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APPENDIX
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
4
liv | P a g e
DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
MARKETING EVIDENCE AND MARKETING
STRATEGY
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
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DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
APPENDIX 4: MARKETING EVIDENCE AND MARKETING
STRATEGY
1.
MARKETING EVIDENCE
Introduction
1.1
Marketing and viability evidence is required in relation to Policies DM5 – Protection
and Delivery of Social and Community Facilities and Places of Worship, DM9 –
Changing the Use of Shops, DM10 – Change of Use of Shops Outside Town Centres
and Local Shopping Centres, DM14 – Retention of Employment Land and Floorspace,
DM15 – New Business Floorspace, DM16 – Affordable Workspace, DM17 –
Development Proposals in Priority Employment Areas, DM18 – Railway Arches; and
DM28 – Managing the Historic Environment.
1.2
Marketing evidence is required at submission of a planning application for three main
purposes. Firstly to justify the quantum of employment land provided within a scheme,
particularly where mixed use, is the maximum amount possible for a site as part of any
redevelopment. Secondly where a loss of either employment, retail or community
land/floorspace is proposed as part of a development proposal marketing evidence is
required to demonstrate there is no realistic prospect of the land/floorspace being
used/re-used for its existing purposes, or for continued operation in its current lawful
use. Thirdly to justify the loss of a designated heritage asset.
Employment land and floorspace
1.3
For employment land and floorspace located within a PEA, and where a scheme is not
proposed as being employment led in accordance with relevant policies, applicants will
need to provide marketing evidence demonstrating that an employment led scheme is
not viable for the subject site and that what is proposed is the maximum quantum the
site can accommodate. For other employment sites outside of PEAs marketing
evidence should again demonstrate that the quantum of employment floorspace
proposed is the maximum amount the site can viably deliver.
1.4
For all schemes affecting employment land and floorspace it will be expected, in
addition to the marketing evidence specified under paragraphs 1.8 to 1.10 below, that
evidence is provided which demonstrates that the site has been marketed for policy
compliant uses in the first instance and if found not to be possible then for alternative
generating employment uses (refer to DM14 and DM17). A site’s ‘existing use value’
should accurately reflect the site’s existing use so as to assist the Council in the robust
assessment of financial viability information submitted (as required by Core Strategy
Policy 17 and DMLP Policies DM14 and DM17). For instance the purchase of an
employment site based on generally higher non employment values will not be
considered adequate justification to reduce employment land and floorspace within
any proposed development. Furthermore, applicants are required to demonstrate
market testing of a number of policy compliant land use scenarios (i.e. looking at a
range of commercial uses) as part of clearly demonstrating that the proposed land use
mix incorporates the maximum amount of employment floorspace possible on a site.
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Where the above cannot be demonstrated, proposed schemes will not be considered
to have met policies DM14 and DM17.
1.5
For all employment floorspace, it must also be shown that the site/land has been both
adequately marketed through a commercial agent at a price that reflects market value
for employment use for a minimum of two years, with no realistic prospect of
employment generating use/re-use, including provision for smaller flexible units.
Retail, social and community land and floorspace
1.6
For all retail, social and community land and floorspace, it must also be shown that the
site/land has been both adequately marketed through a commercial agent at a price
that reflects market value for either the retail, social and/or community use. In these
instances, there is a reduced marketing period of one year. Marketing evidence is to
be in accordance with paragraphs 1.8 to 1.10.
Designated heritage assets
1.7
Any application involving significant alterations to, or the partial or full loss of, a
designated heritage asset must be supported by robust evidence. Firstly that the cost
of retaining or restoring the heritage asset, or reusing it for other purposes/uses, is
unviable. Where it is considered that a heritage asset is redundant and cannot be reused or restored and retained viably, this must be substantiated by a suitably qualified
person. The site should also be marketed for a minimum of two years demonstrating
that there is no realistic prospect of the asset being re-used following any necessary
remedial work. Sites should not be allowed to fall into a state of disrepair and then
marketed in this condition as they are obviously unlikely to be let. Marketing evidence
is to be in accordance with paragraphs 1.8 to 1.10, together with technical details on
the works required and the costs involved in restoring, retaining and reusing the asset.
Components of Active Marketing
1.8
The following requirements for marketing evidence are applicable to all employment
land, retail, social and community land and floorspace as well as designated heritage
assets as described above. It must be shown to the Council’s satisfaction that
marketing has been unsuccessful for all relevant floorspace proposed to be lost
through redevelopment or change of use.
1.9
Where marketing information is required, the following details will be used to assess
the acceptability, or otherwise, of the information submitted and marketing undertaken.
1.10
Active marketing should include evidence of all of the following, subject to specific
circumstances:
1.
2.
3.
Registration of the property with at least two reputable commercial property
agents.
Contact information posted in a prominent location on-site in the form of an
advertising board for the duration of the marketing period.
The property and marketing information was posted on the internet in popular
areas such as commercial property selling/ letting websites (including dates and
duration of posting).
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
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DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
The property and marketing details were posted in local newspapers (not an
obligatory requirement if evidence of marketing on wide audience property
websites has been demonstrated, but obligatory if not the case).
The property details/particulars were available to inquirers on request.
The property was registered with the Council’s ‘Invest in Hackney’ business
support team.
The property was marketed in terms of redevelopment opportunities for a range
of policy compliant uses as well as the proposed use.
The property was marketed at a reasonable price based on the agents
professional advice (details to be supplied), including in relation to use, condition,
quality and location of floorspace (see number 10). For heritage assets,
particularly those in need of remedial work, the market price may need to be low
or even zero.
Where appropriate, action was taken to refurbish or reconfigure the existing
vacant stock in order to meet the identified needs of local businesses or
community groups (where relating to social and community facilities) subject to
financial viability.
A professional valuation from at least three agents to confirm the value of the site
and/ or existing rental levels, rental levels of the last four years, and future rental
levels sought, if appropriate (including dates of valuation).
Advertisements should include basic information such as site location, size in sq.
ft or sq.m, site description, lawful land use of the property, property type,
specifications and costs (including rent per sq. ft, service charge per sq. ft, and
any other charges.
The property details/particulars available to inquirers on request and details of
any offers received, reasons for refusal and/ or reasons why offers fell through.
If it is the case that the existing tenant of the site intended to move out, evidence
that efforts were made to retain tenants/occupiers within the scheme, as well as
reasons why the existing tenant moved out.
Marketing must be for all relevant floorspace intended to be redeveloped or
subject to a change of use.
Existing rental levels, rental levels of the last four years, and future rental levels
sought, if appropriate.
2.
MARKETING STRATEGY
2.1
A marketing strategy is required in support of policies DM7 – New Retail Development,
DM14 – Retention of Employment Land and Floorspace, DM15 – New Business
Floorspace and DM17 – Development Proposals in Priority Employment Areas.
2.2
The marketing strategy must demonstrate to the Council that the applicant has
potential occupiers for the proposed floorspace, and provide details of occupiers and
letters of agreement.
2.3
If occupiers are not lined up, a marketing strategy is required and should include details
of all of the following subject to specific circumstances:
1.
Demonstrate how the new space has been or will be advertised and given full
exposure to the general market, and in particular to the types of operator that would
be interested in the type of space, style and location of the building.
2.
State whether the floor/s has been or would be marketed individually and as a
whole and the flexibility to be given to the marketing (e.g. ability to offer individual
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
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DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
space sizes from the smaller to the largest space size to accommodate different
unit size requirements).
3.
State when and for how long marketing has/will commence and end.
4.
State the channels of marketing used.
5.
State the commercial agents used.
6.
State whether the current tenant/occupiers have been considered for reoccupation of the floorspace in the development.
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
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DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
APPENDIX
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
5
lx | P a g e
DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
LIST OF SAVED UDP POLICIES TO BE REPLACED
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
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DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
1:
INTRODUCTION
1.1
The following lists the saved Unitary Development Plan (UDP) policies that will
be replaced by the DMLP policies.
Saved UDP Policies to be Replaced
Development Management Policies
Environmental Quality
EQ13: Demolition in Conservation Areas
Policy DM28: Managing the Historic
Environment
EQ14: Alterations and Extensions of
Buildings in Conservation Areas
EQ15: Designation of New Conservation
Areas
EQ17: Alterations to Listed Buildings
EQ19: Changes of Use of Listed Buildings
EQ21: Metropolitan Open Land
EQ28: London Squares
EQ30: Areas of Special Landscape
Character
EQ31: Trees
EQ32: Shopfronts and Shop Signs
Policy DM28: Managing the Historic
Environment
Policy DM31: Open Space and Living Roofs
Policy DM32: Protection and Enhancement
of Existing Open Space and The Lee Valley
Regional Park
DM34: Sites of Nature Conservation and / or
Geodiversity Value, Walthamstow Reservoirs
Special Protection Area and Walthamstow
Marshes Sites of Special Scientific Interest
DM35: Landscaping and Tree Management
DM35: Landscaping and Tree Management
DM9: Changing the Use of Shops in Town
Centres
EQ33: External Advertisements
EQ34: Projecting Advertisements
DM10: Change of Use of Shops Outside
Town Centres and Local Shopping Centres
EQ35: Illuminated Advertisements
DM29: Advertisements
EQ36: Advertisements in relation to
Conservation Areas and Listed Buildings
EQ37: Advertisement Hoardings
EQ40: Noise Control
EQ41: Development close to existing
sources of noise
DM1: High Quality Design
DM2: Development and Amenity
DM41: Contaminated Land
EQ42: Air Pollution
DM42: Pollution and Water and Air Quality
EQ43: Development of Contaminated Land
EQ44: Water Pollution
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
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DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
Housing
HO12: Conversions
HO15: Residential Hotels
DM23: Residential Conversions
DM27: Hotels
Employment
E8: Employment Uses and Nuisance
DM1: High Quality Design
E9: Special Industries
DM2: Development and Amenity
E10: Car Repairs
DM17: Development Proposals in Priority
Employment Areas (PEAs)
E11: Car Breakers and Open Site Uses
E14: Access and Facilities for People with
Disabilities
E16: Provision of Workplace Nurseries and
Creches
DM18: Railway Arches
DM1: High Quality Design
DM5: Protection and Delivery of Social and
Community Facilities and Places of Worship
DM15: New Business Floorspace
E17: Retention of Off-Street Service Facilities
E18: Planning Standards
DM45: Development and Transport
DM1: High Quality Design
DM15: New Business Floorspace
Retailing and Town Centres
R3: Development within Shopping Frontages
DM8: Small and Independent Shops
R4: Local Shops
DM9: Changing the Use of Shops in Town
Centres
R6: Core Shopping Areas
DM10: Change of Use of Shops Outside
Town Centres and Local Shopping Centres
DM1: High Quality Design
R7: Changes of Use in Shopping Centres
DM7: New Retail Development
R9: Redundant Shops Outside Shopping
Centres
DM9: Changing the Use of Shops in Town
Centres
R10: Cafes, Restaurants, Wine Bars and
Take-Away Hot Food Shops
DM10: Change of Use of Shops Outside
Town Centres and Local Shopping Centres
R11: Mini cab and Driving School Offices
DM12: Hot Food Take-Aways and Schools
R12: Amusement Arcades, Amusement
Centres, Video Game Centres and Pool Halls
R13: Shopfronts and Shop Sign
DM1: High Quality Design
R14: Access to Upper Floors
DM10: Change of Use of Shops Outside
Town Centres and Local Shopping Centres
R15: Use of Upper Floors
DM45: Development and Transport
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
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DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
Open Spaces and Nature
Conservation
OS5: Development Affecting Open Spaces
and Parks
OS15: Restriction of development affecting
the proposed Walthamstow reservoirs
Special Protection Areas, Site of Special
Scientific Interest, and Local Nature
Reserves
DM31: Open Space and Living Roofs
DM32: Protection and Enhancement of
Existing Open Space and The Lee Valley
Regional Park
DM34: Sites of Nature Conservation and / or
Geodiversity Value, Walthamstow Reservoirs
Special Protection Area and Walthamstow
Marshes Sites of Special Scientific Interest
Community Services
CS8: Places of Religious Worship
CS9: Provision of Childcare Facilities
DM5: Protection and Delivery of Social and
Community Facilities and Places of Worship
DM5: Protection and Delivery of Social and
Community Facilities and Places of Worship
Arts, Culture and Entertainment
ACE1: New Arts, Culture and Entertainment
Development
DM6: Arts, Culture and Entertainment
Facilities
ACE2: Promoting the Development of Arts,
Culture and Entertainment Facilities
ACE3: Retention of Arts, Culture and
Entertainment Buildings
ACE4: Art and Art Space
DM6: Arts, Culture and Entertainment
Facilities
ACE5: Percent for Art
ACE6: Arts and Open Space
ACE8: Planning Standards
DM1: High Quality Design
DM2: Development and Amenity
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
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DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
lxv | P a g e
DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
APPENDIX
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
6
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DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
MATRICES OF CONFORMITY OF DEVELOPMENT
MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN POLICIES WITH CORE
STRATEGY AND LONDON PLAN POLICIES
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
lxvii | P a g e
DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
1:
INTRODUCTION
1.1
The following tables in this appendix assess the conformity between the Development
Management Local Plan (DMLP) policies and both the Hackney’s Core Strategy and
London Plan’s policies, to help ensure that the DMLP is produced to accord with the
over-arching strategic policies.
1.2
Table 1 assesses conformity between the DMLP policies and the Core Strategy, while
Tables 2 and 3 assess conformity between the DMLP policies and the London Plan
policies.
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
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DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
LIST OF DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN POLICIES
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
Policy Title
High Quality Design
Development and Amenity
Promoting Health and Well-Being
Communities Infrastructure Levy and Planning Contributions
Protection and Delivery of Social and Community Facilities and Places of
Worship
Arts, Culture and Entertainment Facilities
New Retail Development
Small and Independent Shops
Changing the Use of Shops in Town Centres
Change of use of Shops Outside Town Centres and Local Shopping Centres
Evening and Night-Time Economy Uses
Hot-Food Take-Aways and Schools
Street Markets
Retention of Employment Land and Floorspace
New Business Floorspace
Affordable Workspace
Development Proposals in Priority Employment Areas (PEAs)
Railway Arches
General Approach to New Housing Development
Loss of Housing
Affordable Housing Delivery
Homes of Different Sizes
Residential Conversions
Student Housing
Houses of Multiple Occupation (HMO)
Shared and Supported Housing
Hotels
Managing the Historic Environment
Advertisements
Telecommunications
Open Space and Living Roofs
Protection and Enhancement of Existing Open Space and The Lee Valley
Regional Park
Allotments and Food Growing
Sites of Nature Conservation and / or Geodiversity Value, Walthamstow
Reservoirs Special Protection Area And Walthamstow Marshes Sites Of
Special Scientific Interest
Landscaping and Tree Management
Residential Moorings
Sustainability Standards for Residential Development
Sustainability Standards for Non-Residential Development
Off-Setting
Heating and Cooling
Contaminated Land
Pollution and Water and Air Quality
Flooding and Flood Risk
Movement Hierarchy
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
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DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
45
46
47
Development and Transport
Walking and Cycling
Car Free and Car Capped Development
LIST OF HACKNEY CORE STRATEGY POLICIES
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
Policy Title
Main Town Centres
Improved Railway Corridors
City Fringe South Shoreditch
Woodberry Down New Community
Hackney Wick New Community
Transport and Land Use
Working with Infrastructure Partners
Focusing Social Investment
Investing in Education
Lifelong Learning
Health Investment and Infrastructure
Health and Environment
Town Centres
Street Markets
Evening and Night-Time Economy
Employment Opportunities
Economic Development
Promoting Employment Land
Housing Growth
Affordable Housing
Supported Housing Requirements
Housing Density
Provision for the Gypsies and Travellers
Design
Historic Environment
Open Space Network
Biodiversity
Water and Waterways
Resource Efficiency and Reducing Carbon Dioxide Emissions
Low Carbon Energy, Renewable Technologies and District Heating
Flood Risk
Waste
Promoting Sustainable Transport
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
lxx | P a g e
DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
Hackney Development Management Policies
TABLE 1: DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN POLICIES COMPLIANCE
WITH THE HACKNEY CORE STRATEGY POLICIES
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
1


-
2
-
3
-
4
-
5
-
6

-
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
7
-
8

-
9

-
10

-
11


-
12




-
13




-
14

-
Hackney Core Strategy Policies
15 16 17 18 19 20 21







































-
lxxi | P a g e
22



-
23
-
24












25

-
26

-
27

-
28


-
29


-
30


-
31


-
32


-
33

-
Hackney Development Management Policies
DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
1
-
2
-
3
-
4
-
5
-
6




7

-
8
-
9
-
10
-
11
-
12
-
Hackney Core Strategy Policies
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20



-
21

-
22
-
23
-
24
















-
25

-
Table 1: Matrix of conformity of Development Management Local Plan policies with the Hackney Core Strategy policies.
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
lxxii | P a g e
26



-
27


-
28



-
29









30




-
31

-
32


-
33




DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
LIST OF LONDON PLAN POLICIES
3.6
No.
1.1
3.7
3.8
3.9
3.10
3.11
3.12
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.6
2.7
2.8
2.9
2.10
2.11
2.12
2.13
2.14
2.15
2.16
2.17
2.18
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
Policy Title
Delivering the strategic vision and objectives
for London
London in its global, European and UK context
London and the wider metropolitan area
Growth areas and co-ordination corridors
The 2012 Games and their legacy
Sub-regions
Outer London: vision and strategy
Outer London: economy
Outer London: transport
Inner London
Central Activities Zone – strategic priorities
Central Activities Zone – strategic functions
Central Activities Zone – predominantly local
activities
Opportunity areas and intensification areas
Areas for regeneration
Town centres
Strategic outer London development centres
Strategic Industrial location
Green Infrastructure: the network of open and
green spaces
Ensuring equal life chances for all
Improving health and addressing health
inequalities
Increasing housing supply
Optimising housing potential
Quality and design of housing developments
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
3.13
3.14
3.15
3.16
3.17
3.18
3.19
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
4.5
4.6
4.7
4.8
4.9
4.10
4.11
4.12
Children and young people’s play and informal
recreation facilities
Large residential developments
Housing choice
Mixed and balanced communities
Definition of affordable housing
Affordable housing targets
Negotiating affordable housing on individual
private residential and mixed use schemes
Affordable housing thresholds
Existing housing
Coordination of housing development and
investment
Protection and enhancement of social
infrastructure
Health and social care facilities
Education facilities
Sports facilities
Developing London’s economy
Offices
Mixed use development and offices
Managing industrial land and premises
London’s visitor infrastructure
Support for and enhancement of arts, culture,
sports and entertainment provision
Retail and town centre development
Supporting a successful and diverse retail
sector
Small shops
New and emerging economic sectors
Encouraging a connected economy
Improving opportunities for all
lxxiii | P a g e
DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
5.5
5.6
5.7
5.8
5.9
5.10
5.11
5.12
5.13
5.14
5.15
5.16
5.17
5.18
5.19
5.20
5.21
5.22
6.1
6.2
6.3
6.4
6.5
6.6
Climate change mitigation
Minimising carbon dioxide emissions
Sustainable design and construction
Retrofitting
Decentralised energy networks
Decentralised energy in development
proposals
Renewable energy
Innovative energy technologies
Overheating and cooling
Urban greening
Green roofs and development site environs
Flood risk management
Sustainable drainage
Water quality and wastewater infrastructure
Water use and supplies
Waste self-sufficiency
Waste capacity
Construction, excavation and demolition waste
Hazardous waste
Aggregates
Contaminated land
Hazardous substances and installations
Strategic approach
Providing public transport capacity and
safeguarding land for transport
Assessing effects of development on transport
capacity
Enhancing London’s transport connectivity
Funding Crossrail and other strategically
important transport infrastructure
Aviation
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
6.7
6.8
6.9
6.10
6.11
6.12
6.13
6.14
6.15
7.1
7.2
7.3
7.4
7.5
7.6
7.7
7.8
7.9
7.10
7.11
7.12
7.13
7.14
7.15
7.16
7.17
7.18
7.19
7.20
Better streets and surface transport
Coaches
Cycling
Walking
Smoothing traffic flow and tackling congestion
Road network capacity
parking
Freight
Strategic rail freight interchanges
Building London’s neighbourhoods and
communities
An inclusive environment
Designing out crime
Local character
Public realm
Architecture
Location and design of tall and large buildings
Heritage assets and archaeology
Heritage-led regeneration
World Heritage Sites
London View Management Framework
Implementing the London View Management
Framework
Safety, security and resilience to emergency
Improving air quality
Reducing noise and enhancing soundscapes
Green Belt
Metropolitan Open Land
Protecting local open spaces and
addressing local deficiency
Biodiversity and access to nature
Geological conservation
lxxiv | P a g e
DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
7.21
7.22
7.23
7.24
7.25
7.26
7.27
Trees and woodlands
Land for food
Burial spaces
Blue Ribbon Network
Increasing the use of the Blue Ribbon Network
for passengers and tourism
Increasing the use of the Blue Ribbon Network
for freight transport
Blue Ribbon Network: supporting infrastructure
and recreational use
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
7.28
7.29
7.30
8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
Restoration of the Blue Ribbon Network
The River Thames
London’s canals and other rivers and
waterspaces
Implementation
Planning obligations
Community infrastructure levy
Monitoring and review for London
lxxv | P a g e
DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
TABLE 2: DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN POLICIES (POLICIES DM
1 – DM 31) COMPLIANCE WITH THE LONDON PLAN POLICIES
London Plan Policies
Hackney Development Management Policies (1 – 31)
1.1
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.6
2.7
2.8
2.9
2.10
2.11
2.12
2.13
2.14
2.15
2.16
2.17
2.18
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
1

2

3


4
-
5

-
6

-
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
7

-
8
-
9

-
10
-
11
-
12

-
13
-
14


-
15


-
16


-
17





-
18
-
19





20
-
lxxvi | P a g e
21



-
22





23


24

-
25

-
26

-
27
-
28
-
29
-
30
-
31




-
London Plan Policies
DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
3.6
3.7
3.8
1

-
2
-
3

-
4
-
5
-
6
-
7
-
8
-
9
-
10
-
Hackney Development Management Policies (1 – 31)
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21


-
3.9
3.10
3.11
3.12
3.13
3.14
3.15
3.16
3.17
3.18
3.19
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
4.5
4.6
4.7
4.8
4.9
4.10
4.11
4.12
5.1
5.2





-




-
-




-

-


-



-


-

-

-
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY

-


-




-



-


-




-
-



-

-
lxxvii | P a g e




-
22


23
-
24

25

26

27
-
28
-
29
-
30
-
31
-
-
-
-
-
-

-
-
-
-
-
London Plan Policies
DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
5.3
5.4
5.5
5.6
5.7
1




2
-
3
-
4
-
5
-
6
-
7
-
8
-
9
-
10
-
Hackney Development Management Policies (1 – 31)
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21
-
22
-
23
-
24
-
25
-
26
-
27
-
28
-
29
-
30
-
31

-
5.8
5.9
5.10
5.11
5.12
5.13
5.14
5.15
5.16
5.17
5.18
5.19
5.20
5.21
5.22
6.1
6.2
6.3
6.4
6.5
6.6
6.7
6.8





-
-

-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-



-
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
lxxviii | P a g e
-
London Plan Policies
DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
6.9
6.10
6.11
6.12
6.13
6.14
6.15
1


-
2
-
3


-
4
-
5
-
6
-
7
-
8
-
9
-
10
-
11
-
7.1
7.2
7.3
7.4
7.5
7.6
7.7
7.8
7.9
7.10
7.11
7.12
7.13
7.14
7.15
7.16
7.17
7.18
7.19
7.20
7.21












-




-






-
-

-
-

-
-
-
-
-
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
Hackney Development Management Policies (1 – 31)
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21

-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
lxxix | P a g e
-
22
-
23
-
24
-
25
-
26
-
27
-
28
-
29
-
30
-
31
-
-
-
-
-
-
-





-
-
-


-
London Plan Policies
DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
7.22
7.23
7.24
7.25
7.26
7.27
7.28
7.29
7.30
1
-
2
-
3
-
4
-
5
-
6
-
7
-
8
-
9
-
10
-
11
-
8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
-
-
-


-


-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Hackney Development Management Policies (1 – 31)
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
22
-
23
-
24
-
25
-
26
-
27
-
28
-
29
-
30
-
31
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-


-
Table 2: Matrix of conformity of Development Management Local Plan Policies DM1 – DM31 with the London Plan policies.
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
lxxx | P a g e
DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
London Plan Policies
TABLE 3: DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN POLICIES (POLICIES
DM 32 – DM 47) COMPLIANCE WITH THE LONDON PLAN POLICIES
1.1
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.6
2.7
2.8
2.9
2.10
2.11
2.12
2.13
2.14
2.15
2.16
2.17
2.18
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.6
3.7
3.8
3.9
3.10
3.11
3.12
32





-
33
-
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
34
-
35
-
36
-
Hackney Development Management Policies (32 – 47)
37
38
39
40
41
42

-
lxxxi | P a g e
43

-
44

-
45
-
46
-
47
-
London Plan Policies
DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
3.13
3.14
3.15
3.16
3.17
3.18
3.19
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
4.5
4.6
4.7
4.8
4.9
4.10
4.11
4.12
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
5.5
5.6
5.7
5.8
5.9
5.10
5.11
5.12
5.13
5.14
5.15
5.16
5.17
32

-
33
-
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
34
-
35
-
Hackney Development Management Policies (32 – 47)
36
37
38
39
40
41
42














-
lxxxii | P a g e
43


-
44
-
45
-
46
-
47
-
London Plan Policies
DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
5.18
5.19
5.20
5.21
5.22
6.1
6.2
6.3
6.4
6.5
6.6
6.7
6.8
6.9
6.10
6.11
6.12
6.13
6.14
6.15
7.1
7.2
7.3
7.4
7.5
7.6
7.7
7.8
7.9
7.10
7.11
7.12
7.13
7.14
7.15
7.16
32
-
33
-
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
34
-
35
-
Hackney Development Management Policies (32 – 47)
36
37
38
39
40
41
42



-
lxxxiii | P a g e
43
-
44







-
45






-
46



-
47


-
London Plan Policies
DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
7.17
7.18
7.19
7.20
7.21
7.22
7.23
7.24
7.25
7.26
7.27
7.28
7.29
7.30
8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
32


-
33


-
34

-
35

-
Hackney Development Management Policies (32 – 47)
36
37
38
39
40
41
42





-
43

-
44

-
Table 3: Matrix of conformity of Development Management Local Plan Policies DM32 – DM47 with the London Plan policies.
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
lxxxiv | P a g e
45
-
46
-
47
-
DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
lxxxv | P a g e
DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
7
APPENDIX
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
lxxxvi | P a g e
DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
NATIONAL PLANNING POLICY FRAMEWORK CHECKLIST
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
lxxxvii | P a g e
DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
1:
INTRODUCTION
1.1
The following tables in this appendix assess the conformity between the Development Management Local Plan (DMLP) policies and the
National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF), to help ensure that the DMLP is produced to accord with the over-arching strategic
policies.
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
lxxxviii | P a g e
DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
National Planning Policy Framework: Delivering Sustainable Development
Hackney Development Management Policies (Policies 1-24)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
1
-
-
-
√
-
-
√
√
√
-
√
-
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
-
√
√
2
-
-
-
-
-
√
√
√
√
-
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
-
√
√
-
-
√
√
-
-
√
-
-
√
-
-
-
-
√
-
-
-
-
-
√
5
-
√
-
-
√
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
√
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
√
√
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
√
-
√
√
√
√
√
√
7
√
√
-
-
-
√
-
√
√
√
-
-
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
8
-
-
√
√
√
√
-
√
√
√
√
√
√
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
√
-
-
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
10
-
√
√
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
11
√
√
√
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
√
-
-
-
-
-
-
√
-
-
-
-
12
√
-
-
-
-
-
-
√
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
13
-
√
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
lxxxix | P a g e
DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
National Planning Policy Framework: Delivering Sustainable Development
Hackney Development Management Policies (Policies 25-47)
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
1
-
-
√
√
√
√
-
-
-
-
-
√
√
√
-
-
-
√
-
√
√
√
√
2
-
-
√
-
√
√
-
-
-
-
-
-
√
√
-
-
-
√
-
-
√
√
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
√
√
√
-
√
-
-
-
-
-
-
√
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
√
√
√
√
5
-
-
-
-
√
√
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
√
√
-
-
-
-
√
-
-
-
-
√
√
-
-
√
-
√
√
-
-
-
-
7
√
√
-
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
-
√
-
√
√
-
√
√
√
8
-
√
-
√
-
-
√
√
√
√
√
-
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
10
-
-
√
-
-
-
√
√
-
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
-
√
√
-
-
-
-
11
-
-
-
√
-
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
-
√
√
√
-
-
-
-
12
-
-
-
√
√
√
-
-
-
√
√
-
-
-
-
-
-
√
-
-
-
-
-
13
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
√
√
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
xc | P a g e
DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT LOCAL PLAN
LONDON BOROUGH OF HACKNEY
xci | P a g e
Fly UP