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The COLLEGIATE REVOLUTION SENATE SPEAKS OUT

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The COLLEGIATE REVOLUTION SENATE SPEAKS OUT
The COLLEGIATE REVOLUTION
VOL. 2, No. 2
MANCHESTER, N. H.
NOVEMBER, 1967
SENATE SPEAKS OUT
New Hampshire
College
Campus
Dream, or Reality - Which?
Larry Lemay and Gary
We had considered many topics
which would have been appropriate
for a Thanksgiving issue. However,
we felt that no topic was nearer or
dearer the hearts of CAC students
than the subject of a new campus.
Therefore, we would like to dedicate this issue of the Collegiate Revolution to the New Hampshire College
administration, whom we have so
much to be thankful for; especially
concerning its visionary and farsighted
new campus program.
Except for a chuckle or two, you
may wonder what we meant by the
above statement. For a starter we can
of course be thankful for the new
campus which we all enjoy so much.
Just try to visualize for a moment one
of our happy students standing in the
middle of a wooded area with nothing
but fresh air to keep him company.
Here it is, fellow students of NHC,
our glorious new campus. Now all
you have to do is close your eyes and,
by using your imagination, you can
take a trip into never-never land and
envision a new school with all the
facilities that most college students
would be proud of.
Actually, the buildings you "see"
are the product of years, and years,
and years of patient research and
development; and last, but surely not
the least, repeated promises of a new
campus to incoming freshmen and
transfer students. Those poor, innocent lambs were duped into believing
that a new campus was just around
the corner.
From personal experience, we can
vouch that the typical line went some-
Levesque
thing like this: construction will begin later in the year and we expect to
have the new campus ready for occupancy at the start of the next school
year. Does this sound familiar?
But when, we ask, is "the next
school year?" Perhaps we have misunderstood and what we really heard
was "the next century.*'
Well! ! ! some of you might be saying. This is indeed a direct attack on
the administration! Yes, it is. We are
very upset and a growing number of
students are quite concerned. We will
remain so until we receive satisfactory
news from the administration that
our beliefs are otherwise unfounded.
We are getting tired of promises and
dreams! We further believe that by
using the power of the press we may
hasten the day when our new campus
will be a reality.
New Hampshire College Day
Set For Boston Garden
Courtesy: Public Relations Office
November 28 has been set as New
Hampshire College Day at Boston
Garden it was announced by Lou
D'Allesandro, director of athletics
and basketball coach at New Hampshire College of Accounting and Commerce. On that day, a Tuesday, New
Hampshire College's championship
basketball team will take on Emerson
College of Boston as a preliminary to
a Boston Celtics-Detroit Pistons game.
The New Hampshire College-Emerson
game, a pre season scrimmage for both
Continued on Page 5
In the first few hectic weeks of
school, the Student Senate set its goals
for the coming year. A major aim of
the Senate is to increase the governing
administrative role of the Student
Senate within the College.
One major advance in this direction
is the recent election of Lawrence R.
Kelley and Paul E. Dolbec to the Student Personnel Services Department.
Another step toward this aim is the
proposal of the Senate to have a nonvoting member of the Senate on the
College Council. The purpose of this
committee is to utilize and coordinate
the abilities and talents of the faculty
and administration of the College in
both long and short term planning.
As yet, it is only in the initial stages
of proposal.
The Student Personnel Services
Department is involved directly in all
non-academic phases of the College
operations. With two senators now
active voting members of this strong
and influential body, the Student
Senate can truly represent the Student
Body in the responsible manner in
which it was designed to function.
The Senate believes that this effort
on behalf of the Administration demonstrates their confidence, interest
and willingness to cooperate with the
Student Senate and the Student Body
of a College which is continually
growing in size and importance.
Along with the new role of a governing Senate, we are deeply concerned with the expanding role of the
clubs, classes, and organizations sponsoring activities within the College.
Therefore, the Senate acts as a regulatory body over these groups and has
direct authority over all College clubs
and organizations and will exercise
this authority whenever deemed necessary. This is not a threat, but a fact!
Failure to comply with Student Senate
rules and regulations will result in
suspension of an organization's constitution.
The apathy of the student body in
the past has been deplorable. This
was the result of the inefficiency of the
officers of classes, clubs, and organizaContinued on Page 5
2
From the Editor
There comes a time when most of
us have to be reminded of our duties
and responsibilities; whether they are
to our family, friends, our employers,
or our classmates. Today I am addressing myself to our class officers
and heads of organizations whose responsibility it is to effectively consult,
advise, and represent the students at
New Hampshire College.
We shall concern ourselves with
the term consultation, for without
it, the other areas of responsibility
(advising & representing) cannot be
properly set into motion. With reference to consultation, one would assume cognizance of the definition of
this term by our class officials. This
being taken for granted, we shall move
on to a more inquiring question into
the degree of consultation necessary
to insure the successful implementation of the student body's wishes.
For the sake of discussion I will
define in my own terms what consultation means relative to CAC students.
Consultation means an assembly of a
class for the express purpose of discussing various topics relating to and
directly affecting the class.
Some
officials, however, sometimes refuse
or fail to note the extent of the word
consultation and insist on gathering
about them a small group of cronies,
who together, proceed to formulate
plans and make important decisions
with the intent of notifying the remainder of the class in a future meeting. This is not consistant with my understanding of the term consultation.
It is especially worth noting that
most of the officials I am addressing
myself to had run on a platform based
upon equal representation for all the
members of the class.
At any rate, this kind of operation
has been detected and it has to stop.
It must be understood that all the
members of a class, have to be consulted so that ideas can be freely
exchanged, thereby eliminating the
biased views of some who seek greater
recognition and prominance for their
own "inside" group or organization.
?T.V.—PROPAGANDA?
The Soviet Union recognizes T.V.
as a prime media of propaganda, the
Soviet leadership encourages the purchase of T.V. sets and makes it easy
in some instances by adopting a free
enterprise tactic of installment payments. It is rumored however, that if
you fall behind on your payments,
they don't repossess the T.V. set, they
repossess you.
William
Evans
THE FUTURE OF AMERICA
Last Wednesday NHC had the
honor of having the only announced
candidate for President, William W.
Evans Jr. speak as a guest of the
Young Republicans Club.
As a private citizen Mr. Evans has
every right to voice his opinion and
to run for political office. Yet he
lacks the qualifications and experience to even consider himself as a
candidate for America's highest office.
One of his few claims, to political fame
is holding office on the local level. Is
this enough to qualify him as an
authority on foreign affairs? Contrary
to his belief America cannot be a nation of isolation. This was proven
after World War I. The affairs of
other nations all over the world are
our business, if not from the freedom
viewpoint but from the viewpoint of
the business and economic interests
Picket and Be Popular
Letter
to the
Editor
Once upon a time in the month of
November we were minding our own
business. But then turning up Hanover Street we saw all these students
strolling back and forth, back and
forth. The unintelligent college students that we are — we joined the
group. Looking around we noticed
that all students were carrying signs.
So we started reading them. In bold
print the signs all read — W E W A N T
A NEW CAMPUS. - We agreed so
we decided to stay.
While walking, we heard some
choice pieces of conversation that we
thought you might like to hear, just
in case you missed them.
—I can't carry my sign, it's too
heavy!—
—Do you think I can get into the
Candlelight? I'm hungry and nobody
will take my sign.—
by Paul
Bilicki
that America has in these countries
which are vital to the economy and
defense of our nation.
Mr. Evans also criticized the political views of Nixon, Goldwater, Johnson, Romney, and Reagan, yet his
only other political contribution was
as local chairman for the Nixon
organization in 1960 and for Goldwater in 1964. If my memory serves
me correctly both men defended our
stand in Vietnam. As a matter of
fact, Goldwater's stand was much
stronger than Mr. Johnson's. It seems
that Mr. Evans' views are as flexible as
the weather in Manchester.
In summary I feel that Mr. Evans
is in no position to even think he
could lead this nation in this crucial
period of history. He could well take
a lesson from Greyhound and leave
the running of America to Professionals.
—Did you get your poster paper at
Llewellyn's. I did.—
(This, of course, was said by a faithful
Llewellyn employee.)
—Maybe I'll get asked to the Christmas dance.—
—Gee, this is great exercise.— (And
wouldn't you know it, the skinniest
person in the crowd said this.)
—My feet hurt.— (The girl who
said this definitely wore a size twelve
.shoe.)
—I'm not very photogenic,— said a
girl to a reporter, but she took out her
compact and comb anyway.
Well, Hanover Street is now quiet.
The picketers have gone home—tired
but happy— and maybe just a little bit
successful in getting their point across.
Your reporters on the scene
Anna
Lin
Carol
Jo Anna
3
CONSUMER AND
BUSINESS TRENDS
by John
H.
Wood
Rise in the cost of living, the 1967
price index has reached 116.9 meaning
goods costing $10 in 1957-59 now cost
$11.69 and it is estimated that by the
end of the year it will rise another 3%.
An additional 4% increase is anticipated next year.
Increased costs in postal rates will
be in effect shortly, first-class mail will
go from 5¢ to 6¢ . . . air mail from 8¢
to 10¢ . . . postcards from 4¢ to 5¢.
Telephone reductions ??? beginning
this month station to station and person to person calls will be cheaper and
an extension of days and hours economy charges will also be in effect.
Car prices will be on the rise now
that labor disputes are over. It may
be cheaper to buy a new car now . . .
yet trade-ins and discounts will probably be valued higher than they are
now.
Imported
goods on the
market,
more British goods will be prevalent
in store this fall from soaps to men's
and women's wear. French and Israeli
imports will also be available.
Student loans can be obtained from
your home state without very much
trouble, the Federal Government has
allocated funds for education and the
government will pay the interest on
the loan while you are in school as
long as the family income is under
15,000 a year. Scholarships are also
available through your home state or
city, educational foundations.
Antismoking campaigns will be continued, as a matter of fact, they will
be increased, stressing the dangers of
smoking and the effect it has on the
image that the parents play upon
their children. T h e tobacco companies will be affected by these campaigns, knowing this some companies
are diversifying their outputs in order
to maintain their present levels of
profit.
New Campus for N.H.C.????
The
planning of a new campus for New
Hampshire College has been in the
embryonic state for the past several
years. Because of "tight" money in
past fiscal periods construction of the
new campus will begin within the
next several years.
STAFF
Editor-in-Chief
GARY LEVESQUE
Co-Editor
TONY LAMBERT
Reporters and Feature Writers
Joe Bukowski, Paul Bilicki, John Wood, Ed
O'Connor, Allen Cohen, Dorothy Kotarba, Belinda
Hayes, Henry Pristawa, Larry Lemay, Ken Gloade,
George Zottos
Advisor
PROF. ROBERT BUCKLEY
A Student Speaks Out
by Tony
Lambert
This year the graduating class will
number close to 250 full-time day
students. A number larger than any
previous graduating class.
Why is this so important?
Who
cares how many are going to graduate
in June? W e all should! Why? This
year, although there is a larger graduating class, little has been done to
increase the job opportunities for our
graduating seniors. Very few, if any
new companies have been added to
last year's list. In fact, a few have
been dropped.
It is amazing, indeed, that the administration has done nothing to
entice new company recruiters to the
campus. Letters were sent to potential companies this summer.
If a
negative reply came in, nothing was
done and if there was no reply at all,
there was no follow up. Is this the
treatment we, the students of New
Hampshire College, deserve.
With
all the talk about higher academic
standards, with a higher caliber of
professors on campus, with a higher
tuition being paid this year and with
talk of an increase next year, do we,
indeed, rate this treatment?
Is it possible that the trouble lies
in the position of Director of Placement? Has this title been "dumped"
on an individual just to indicate that
someone has it?
This year Dean
William Beane seems to be the recipient of the honor. Let me elaborate
on Dean Beane's other duties on
campus:
1. Chairman of the Judicial Council
2. Director of Student Activities
3. Supervisor of Orientation
4. Supervisor of Food Services
5. Director of Placement for 4-year
graduates
6. Member of Student Personnel Services
7. Assistant Professor of English
8. Coach of Baseball
9. Coach of Soccer
10. Advisor to Student Senate
This list, while very extensive, does
show the degree of responsibility that
the administration has given Mr.
Beane. He has accepted these responsibilities willingly and has been
very instrumental in upgrading the
name of N.H.C.
Facts being facts, an individual in
this situation could not possibly devote very much of his time to any one
or two of these activities. Placement,
being one of the newer of these responsibilities, has been short-changed.
I sincerely believe, as do some members of the administration, the faculty,
Executive Club News
Thomas E. Martin, Pres.
Curtis Walton, V.P.
W e are pleased to announce that
the first Executive Club Dinner meeting held on October 23 was very successful. As our guest speaker we had
Mr. Ronald Coffee of N. H. Life and
Accident Insurance Company of Concord. Mr. Coffee has been with the
personnel department of this company
for seven years and therefore was well
aware of the many implications and
problems which we as job-seeking
students may face
T h e Executive Club was also happy
to have as guests Mr. Allen Berzofski,
Public Relations Director of the College, Mr. Robert Coburn, faculty
advisor to the club, and personal
guests of the members.
T h e next meeting to be held November 27, at the Puritan Dining
room will begin at 6:30 P.M. W e will
present as our guest lecturer Mr.
Milton Machinist. T h e subject of his
lecture will be "If you're out how can
you be in". It will generally cover the
importance of participating in community activities for a successful businessman. W e have also asked Mr.
Machinist to familiarize us with the
N.H. Business Development Corporation which is similar to the Small
Business Administration in its function.
Members of the club are invited to
bring a guest so if you are not in the
club and would like to attend find a
member and be his or her guest.
Hillel Formed at N.H.C
by Allen
Cohen
An Hillel organization has been
formed on campus to promote the
interests and beliefs of the Jewish
students in the school.
Elected to office for this year are
Alan Barnett-President, Robert Zazma-Vice-President, Allen Cohen-Secretary, and Robert Aronson-Treasurer.
An advisory committee consisting of
Miss Shapiro, Mr. Shapiro, and Mr.
Rogers lends support to the organization in advising, directing, and consulting on various problems that may
arise.
Programs consisting of talks by
rabbis, movies on Judaism, and other
activities have been planned to make
Hillel a functioning and participating
organization on campus.
and the student body, that we do need
a full-time placement director for
both 2-year and 4-year graduates.
W H Y DON'T WE?
Improvement Survey
by Henry Pr is taw a
A survey was recently conducted to
determine the changes that students
desired at the college. The following
were the major avenues of concern:
IMAGE BUILDER
Changing the sign above the school
from New Hampshire School of Accounting and Commerce to New
Hampshire College of Accounting
and Commerce
EQUIPMENT
Humidity control rectifier to control humidity in rooms 1-2-3 during
class periods.
BOOKS
Reduction in price to reflect large,
quantity discounts to be passed on to
students, and in order to remain competitive with local merchants.
DRINKS in STUDENT LOUNGE
Reduction of the price of soda to
10¢ instead of 15¢ to reflect gains
through automation.
CO-ED
Improvement in the 4 to 1 ratio
that presently exists to facilitate a
more balanced student body.
PERSONNEL
Part-time systems analyst to set up
traffic flow system near rooms 23 & 24.
PARKING L O T
There should be a new parking
garage to provide parking facilities for
instructors, administrators, and students.
CAMPUS and DORMS
T o improve living conditions, coordination of activities and student
morale.
VALETE
by Kenneth
dh
Gloade
Seasons' sheltering sleeve surrounds
them. Each speaks an elderly tongue,
"Why, when-- I was your age. . ."
The park bench replies not. Little
animals scurry to relish the meager
gifts brought. Youth; how cruel can
you be to them that now rest? They
once eagerly played with life to their
best. "But, the new is fashionable
and that's the thing to do. Sit you
worthless segments and speak not like
a fool about beauty, work, righteousness and the like; for youth and all its
glories are within my sight." Warmth
comes to the old, "Why, when I was
your age . .." Youth-- run and play
your game on the modern stage. For
only the park listens to a fool like
me, For, "When I was your age, as
you see- I did more or less the same."
Dear
Zelda
Student of the Month
By George Zottos
READERS;
This column has been initiated to
help any and all in our fair university
who may seek advice or who want to
air any gripes or complaints on any
subject including those affairs of the
heart. All letters should be left at the
box in the Student Senate Office. I
will try my best to answer these in the
following addition of the Collegiate
Revolution.
Z
Dear Zelda:
I am writing this letter in search of
advice. I am a freshman girl and this
is my first time away from home.
Last week I attended my first college dance.
While there I met an
upperclassman who invited me to a
party which I promptly accepted.
To
make a long story short. I had a
couple of drinks there and all I
remember is running out after being
chased around by three guys who tried
to force their attentions on me. My
problem is what should a new freshman do?
Wondering Frosh;
Dear Wandering Frosh:
My advice to you is either transfer
or
Z
Dear Zelda:
I am a Senior with a problem.
I
have a girl up here and we see a lot of
each other during the week.
The
problem is she goes home every weekend, leaving me high and dry. Do
you have any suggestions? Signt me
E.O. so I won't get caught.
Dear E.O.
The best solution to your problem
is to get yourself a girl on the side
whose boyfriend goes home every
weekend, like me.
Affectionately,
Z
Dear Zelda:
My problem is with one of the
courses I am required to take. It
seems to me that although I listen I
can not seem to understand his lectures. All I get are his jokes.
What
should I do?
Worried
Dear Worried:
If this is the teacher I think it is my
only advice to you is his advice. Laugh
hard, study hard and pray you're not
an underclassman.
Z
By Zelda
Lany
Lee
One of the most highly motivated
individuals in the Sophomore class is
Lawrence L. Lee. This year's Sophomore president comes to us from
Durham, N.H., where he was graduated from Ovster River High School,
Class of 1966.
Besides being class president, Larry
is the parliament arian for the Student
Senate. This year Larry was in charge
of the Orientation Committee and is
presently chairman of the Senate
Constitution Committee.
Larry is presently enrolled in the
Business Management program at the
College. Keep up the good work
Larry.
IMPRESSIONS
FROM
stay at the party and enjoy it.
THE NHCAC LIBRARY
The Art Look:
The large abstract painting of the
"Roman Wall" and the untitled "OP
Art" painting, loaned by Dr. Roland
Gibson, set a stimulating backdrop
for the library. Two additional small
abstracts were added last week. These
are rewarding "fringe benefits" of
library usage. T o help the student
body assimilate the exposure to art, a
handsome Encyclopedia of World Art
is being added to the reference section.
The New Books Look:
Several thousand new books will be
added to the library this year, according to Mrs. Jordan, Librarian. The
new books list on the bulletin board
reflects the ones catalogued each week.
The Traffic Look:
In the library, the doors are constantly in use. During October, a
spot-check of student usage (a total
of a count once each period, once
during evenings, and once on Saturdays) yielded almost 8000. Actual
usage probably triples that number.
This didn't tally the chess tournament
going on in the cellar!
Mrs. Jordan says there is still room
for more students — especially during
late afternoons, evenings, and specifically, on Saturdays from 9 AM to 1
PM.
5
GARDEN
Senate in Action
SENATE
Continued from Page 1
tions within the College who profess
to be responsible, dedicated individuals who in actuality are reaping the
glory and recognition gained from
these positions but failing to fulfill
their duties. When the novelty has
passed and the time and work is of the
essence officer interest subsides.
We realize there are those officers
who are responsible and dedicated
people who perform noteworthy jobs
which are a credit to themselves and
the college. These are the kind of
people who get things done, do more
than is asked of them, take the initiative and make the College, a College
of which they can be proud.
However, these are still in "the minority. For the above reasons there
will be a meeting in the very near
future of all officers of the classes,
clubs and organizations. This will
be a mandatory meeting. The time
and place will be announced in a later
issue of the Pen.
Finally, we demand that all Student
Senate Requests previously sent to
the various college groups be complied with immediately. Failure to
do so will result in revocation of the
organization's constitution.
Continued from Page 1
teams, will begin at 6:00 p.m.
Tickets for the game, a regular
3.00 garden seat that will be good for
both games, will go on sale next week
at the New Hampshire College athletic office, on the second floor of 83
Hanover Street. Chartered bus service from the college will also be
available at $2.00 for the round trip.
New Hampshire College is undefeated against Emerson during the last
3 years with a 6-0 record and also in
the past 3 years was conference titleholder in the Greater Boston Small
College Conference. New Hampshire
College is no longer in the Boston
Conference, having moved up to the
New England Intercollegiate Basketball Association.
Coach Lou D'Allesandro, looking
forward to the toughest season in his
four years at New Hampshire College,
points to the new basketball scholarship program as indicative that basketball has become big time at New
Hampshire College, and is anxious for
Garden fans to take a look at his fine
team. He is also anxious for local
support for the team, since its recent
NAIA membership will entitle the
team to regional and national playoffs
for the first time.
NHC Gains Admission
to NAIA
By Joe Bukowski
The National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics has announced
that it has accepted New Hampshire
College into its program. This acceptance is a great step forward for our
ever expanding college.
By gaining recognition by the
NAIA, all sport teams at NHC (with
the exception of the ski team, due to
the fact that the NAIA program does
not encompass skiing) will be eligible
to win national championships. In
addition individual performers will be
able to establish personal records
which will be recognized as such by
the NAIA. Finally, all players will
be eligible to gain All - American
honors, for consistently big performances.
Hubby:
Wife:
I'll bet if you were real sweet
to the landlord, he'd stop
bugging us for the rent.
No, dear, that doesn't work.
Sign report at Berkeley:
"Please don't smoke the grass."
Coaches D'Allesandro and
BASKETBALL
By Gary Levesque
In a recent interview with coach
Lou D'Allesandro, I had the opportunity to get some candid opinions on
this year's basketball team.
As you may know, New Hampshire
College is now a member of the
National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics and will be facing
much stiffer competition this year as
a result. As a member of the NAIA
the Penmen may get a chance to play
in the District 3 playoffs in the nationals at Kansas City.
I asked Coach D'Allesandro if there
Williams
were going to be any particular problems to overcome this year. He said
that "the biggest problem will be in
putting in an offense that will take
advantage of returning players and
successfully integrating the new recruits into the system."
When asked how tough this year's
schedule will be Coach D'Allesandro
said "every game is a big one, but you
can't win them all unless you win the
first one." By the way, that first big
one is an away game against Loyola
College on December 1.
In summing up Coach D'Allesandro
asked that our students be at the
games to support the Penmen. He
also stated the possibility that away
games will be broadcast on radio.
6
F A L L
W E E K E N D
1 9 6 7
Fly UP