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UP 185 Cities in a Global Perspective Spring 2016

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UP 185 Cities in a Global Perspective Spring 2016
UP 185
Cities in a Global Perspective
Department of Urban and Regional Planning @UIUC
Spring 2016 Tuesday and Thursday 9:30-10:50 AM,
386 Armory building
Instructor:
Professor Faranak Miraftab [email protected]
Office hours: Thursdays 2-3pm, Temple Buell Hall 218
TA:
Shruti Syal [email protected]
Wednesdays 2-3pm, Noble Hall room 310
Course Description and Overview
This course consists of the study of cities around the world to provide an understanding of the social,
political, cultural and economic forces that shape the cities in the context of globalization. Examples of
cities from a range of countries including Iran, Mexico, Chile, India, Brazil, Canada, Australia, South
Africa and the US will be included in the lectures and course readings. The course aims to provide:
1) A global perspective on the processes of urbanization.
2) An understanding of the social, historical cultural and economic forces that shape cities and
urban life in them.
3) The analytical skills that unfold the processes of globalization and how they influence and
account for urban formation.
Learning Methods and Expectations
You will learn in multiple ways, including attending lectures, engaging in discussions, watching movies,
and listening to audio materials. To improve your understanding of the course material, you are highly
encouraged to actively participate in class discussion. You are required to carefully read the assigned
materials before the class starts. In addition to attending class sessions, you will be required to complete
the individual and group assignments to enhance your learning.
Use of laptops and other electronic devices: The classroom use of laptops, tablets, cell phones and other
electronic devices are not allowed in this course. Students are encouraged to write down their lecture
notes and bring with them to class a copy of the course assigned textbook (Cities of the Global South
Reader) for discussion.
Attendance: No online means of learning can substitute a lively class discussion. That is why you have to
attend class sessions to pass the course. If you have to miss the class for medical reasons, make sure you
provide a doctor’s note in the next session that you attend. If you have to miss the class for any other
reasons, please communicate with me in advance. Avoid using email for this purpose, unless it was an
emergency situation. Missing the class for more than three times without a medically certified or other
justified reasons will make you fail the course.
Academic Integrity: Learning involves an effort to do assignments by yourself, even if the result is not
perfect. Taking some or the whole part of other people’s work, even when they are from anonymous
source like from an internet website, should be considered as an act of plagiarism. Plagiarism is like
stealing, except that what you steal is an intellectual property instead of a tangible object. If you are
unsure whether what you do can be considered plagiarism or not, consult Rule 33 (Academic Integrity) of
the University’s Code of Policies and Regulations Pertaining to All Students.
(www.uiuc.edu/admin_manual/code/rule_33.html).
Any cheating and plagiarism of any kind will be investigated and penalized. Such penalty will include
failing the course and having a permanent record of plagiarism in your university file. To avoid this risk,
make sure you familiarize yourself with Rule 33!
1
Respect in the classroom and other learning environments: You are responsible to maintain respectful
environment in all class-related activities, including all lecture sessions, discussions, and collaborative
projects. You may find the code of conducts for students in your
University Student Code. Consult Student Code Article 1—Student Rights and Responsibilities, Part 1.
Student Rights: §1-102: http://www.admin.uiuc.edu/policy/code/article_1/a1_1-102.html
Course Evaluation
The final grade has the following components:
1. Assignment One: Trip around the world (three google maps)
up to 24 points
exploration of three cities via audio visual material — one city in each of the following continents:
Latin America, Asia, and Africa. (see Assignment One guideline)
Assignment Two: Understanding cities
up to 25 points.
Review of two books or articles. (see Assignment Two guideline)
2. Quizzes
20 points
There are 5 quizzes during the semester. Each quiz has 5 points. We will choose the four quizzes for
which you received the best scores. Students are required to respond to quiz questions on assigned
readings and course lectures.
3. Final assignment 25 points
Final assignment is reflective and involves writing during the last session of the course. It includes
essay questions to assess students’ comprehension of overall concepts, relationships and ideas
discussed in lectures and assigned readings throughout the semester.
4. Active participation
Up to 6 points
o
Attendance (this is a pre-requisite for passing the class. Please pay attention if you do not attend
class regularly you will not risk losing 6% of the grade you will risk failing the course. The
instructor has discretion to fail students who have more than three absences during the semester.
o
Participation in class discussions
o
Participation in “sharing” space within Compass.
Active participation of students in discussion of readings is expected. Although attendance is
necessary for participation; it is not a sufficient indicator of students’ participation. Students are
expected to actively take part in opportunities for class discussion by sharing their reflections on the
relationship between the lecture material, the assigned readings, the students own material collected
in their Trip Around the World exercises and their group project. Moreover, there will be a
designated space on Compass called “Students Sharing.” In this space students could ask each other
for help and also offer each other information that they think can be of use and interest to others. The
extent to which students help others out by offering tips and sharing important sites or information
they have found useful or by answering questions their classmates post in that space, is an important
component of students participation grade.
Total = 100 points
Total Points to Letter grades
Conversions from Numeric to Letter Grades
2
Numerical
Grade
≥ 97.5
> 92.5
> 90.0
> 87.5
> 82.5
> 80.0
> 77.5
> 72.5
> 70.0
> 67.5
> 62.5
> 60.0
< 60.0
Letter
Grade
A+
A
AB+
B
BC+
C
CD+
D
DF
Equivalent
on 4.0 scale
4.0
> 3.7
> 3.3
> 3.0
> 2.7
> 2.3
> 2.0
> 1.7
> 1.3
> 1.0
> 0.7
> 0.0
NA
Required Reading:
All readings for this course are from the book titled: Cities of the Global South Reader (CGSR) edited by
Miraftab & Kudva (2014) and available for purchase (used and new) at the Illini bookstore. One copy of
the CGSR is on reserve at the library for this course. The volume cannot be checked out but can be read in
the library reading room. Any additional reading not included in the CGSR as well as links to audiovisual materials for this course can be downloaded from the course Compass site. You are required to
read/watch/listen to the assigned materials before each class session begins.
At the beginning of the course you may feel overwhelmed with the amount of reading required to prepare
prior to class sessions. However there are ways to improve your reading skills so that you can get the
most from the limited time you have. Consult the handout on Compass titled Ten Steps to Critical
Reading.
Additionally, you may be overwhelmed with the amount of writing you have to do to complete the course
assignments. To improve your academic writing skills consult another handout posted on compass titled:
Guide to Writing Effective Essays. You are highly encouraged to take the benefit of consultations with the
Writers Workshop (http://www.cws.illinois.edu/workshop/). You can make appointment through their
website. You can also consult the Purdue University’s Online Writing Lab (http://owl.english.purdue.edu)
which is one of the most comprehensive collection of writing information available online.
If English is not your first language, the OWL also provide useful resources for English as a second
language (ESL) writers at http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/esl/.
3
Course Schedule
Date
Topic / Theme
Requirement / Activity
Deadlines
INTRODUCTION TO CITIES IN A GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE
January
19
January
21
Course orientation
Read course syllabus
Visit from CITES, How to
create Google maps
Due Sunday 24th 11:59PM
Trial Google Map of Own
Town
In class work: Bring your
laptops for use in class
during the training
session.
Upload on the Compass
before midnight on
Sunday Note: Not Graded
January
26
Why do we have to study
cities? What lenses can be
used to study cities?
Read editor’s introduction to
the CGSR (Cities of the Global
South Reader)
January
28
How do we learn about
cities from the collective
experience of its residents?
Read Urban Lives: Stories
from Tehran (Madanipour in
CGSR)
GLOBALIZATION AND CITIES: COLONIAL CITIES
February How can we view cities as a
2
both a cultural product and
process?
Intro to historical
underpinnings (Miraftab and
Kudva in CGSR)
February Continued …
4
Post your google map I by
Sunday midnight Feb 7.
Colonialism
February
9
Movie bible and gun
Read Colonialism and Urban
Development (King in CGSR)
February What does a colonial city
11
look like?
Read Cities Interlinked
(Massey in CGSR)
Quiz I on February 16, 9.30 AM
GLOBALIZATION AND CITIES: DIVERCITY
February What is the relationship
16
between city and
modernization?
Watch Tehran does not have
pomegranate
http://www.idfa.nl/industry/tag
s/project.aspx?ID=3c6d5537d10c-41c0-848400d359ca1993
4
By Feb 12 you will have
received feedback from
TA on first Google map
Read World Cities, or a World
of Ordinary Cities? (Robinson
in CGSR)
Read Intro to Development
(Miraftab and Kudva in
CGSR)
February What is development?
18
February What is the relationship
23
between development and
urbanization?
Read Development and the
City (Goldman in CGSR)
What triggers migration:
February
urban-rural; local-global?
25
Watch Continent on The Move
Read The Urbanity of
Movement (Simone in CGSR)
March 1
Read Migration and
Privatization of Space and
Power in Late Socialist China
(Zhang in CGSR)
How does migration shape
our cities?
Post your google map II
by Sunday midnight Feb
21.
By Feb 26 you will have
received feedback from
TA on google map II
Quiz II on March 3, 9.30 AM
INFORMALITY AND THE CITY
March 3
What is informal
urbanization? What do we
mean by informal city?
Read Intro to Housing
(Miraftab and Kudva in
CGSR)
In-class work session:
introduce and discuss
assignment 2
Post your google map III
by Sunday midnight
March 6.
.
March 8
What is informal housing?
Why does informal housing
exist and persist?
Read International Policy for
Urban Housing (Harris in
CGSR)
March
10
What is the role of women
in informal city?
Read Women and Self-Help
Housing Projects (Moser in
CGSR)
By 3/11 receive grade for
google map III
March
15
What is the informal
economy? Where can we
trace informal economy in
the city?
Read Working in the Streets of
Cali, Colombia (Bromley in
CGSR)
Submit your proposed
selected texts for
Assignment Two by
March 15.
March
17
continued
Instructor approves your
selected text for
assignment two by March
18.
Quiz III on March 17, 9.30 AM
Spring Break
5
THE CITY AS EXPRESSION OF INEQUITY
Read “Formalizing the
Informal? The Transformation
of Cairo's Refuse Collection
System.”. (Assaad in CGSR)
March
29
Multiplicity: multiple Cities
within a city.
March
31
TBD
April 5
TBD
TBD
April 7
Who builds the city? For
whom are the cities built?
Read “Going South” with the
Starchitects” (Kanna in CGSR)
April 12
Does the interest of policy
making serve all people
equally?
Read Between Violence and
Desire (Baviskar in CGSR)
Quiz IV on April 14, 9:30 AM
CITIES AS LOCI OF GOVERNANCE AND CITIZENSHIP
April 14
What do people of less
power do when their interest
is not served by policy?
Read Victims, Villains, and
Fixers (Beall, Crankshaw &
Parnell in CGSR)
April 19
How do we read local
activism as a part of a global
movement?
Read Deep Democracy
(Appadurai in CGSR)
April 21
Why is it so difficult to get
rid of squatter settlements
anywhere?
Read Why India Cannot Plan
its Cities (Roy in CGSR)
Quiz V on April 26, 9.30 AM
REFLECTIONS ON GLOBAL CITIES
April 26
What do these insights help
us see about the American
cities?
April 28
Continued
May 3
General Review
Final Assignment, May 5 during the class time
6
Submit Assignment Two
on Compass by Sunday
midnight April 17
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