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Hostos Community College Division of Student Development and Enrollment Management (SDEM)

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Hostos Community College Division of Student Development and Enrollment Management (SDEM)
Hostos Community College
Division of Student Development and Enrollment Management (SDEM)
2014-2016 Student Handbook
Message from the Vice President for Student Development and
Enrollment Management
Greetings,
Congratulations on taking one more step on your educational journey. Your decision to enroll
at Hostos Community College represents a commitment to the future that will ultimately
benefit not just yourself but your family and our community as well. In order to assist you with
your transition to college life, I recommend the 2014-2016 edition of The Eugenio María de
Hostos Community College Student Handbook made available by the Division for Student
Development and Enrollment Management.
In this handbook, we attempt to answer most of the questions you may have about being at
Hostos. This book will provide you with step-by-step information on how to apply for
admission, sign up for placement exams, inquire about financial aid, and register for classes.
Furthermore, if there is anything you don't quite understand, it will tell you where to go or
whom to call to have your questions answered. The Hostos Student Handbook also provides
information on the roles of college personnel who are here to assist you as well as college life. It
also addresses your rights as a student. Please become familiar with the information in this
booklet, for as in so many things in life, a little time invested early in the process can save you a
lot of time and stress in the future.
You can also benefit from our student leadership programs and tutorial services. Furthermore,
members of the counseling staff are available to discuss any academic and personal issues that
may arise. The Hostos family is also proud of our great facilities, which include a state-of-theart library, two theaters, a swimming pool, an art gallery, science laboratories, and a student
computer lab. The college also offers student clubs that appeal to a wide variety of interests, as
well as numerous extracurricular activities.
On behalf of the college community, I extend my best wishes and I look forward to helping you
attain your educational goals at Hostos Community College.
Sincerely,
Mr. Nathaniel Cruz
Vice President for Student Development and Enrollment Management
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
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Disclaimer…………………………………………………………………………………………5
Supplement……………………………………………………………………………………….5
Accreditation and Affiliations…………………………………………………………………..5
Non-Discrimination Policy……………………………………………………………………...5
Introduction to Hostos…………………………………………………………………….…….6
Mission Statement………………………………………………………………………….…….6
About Eugenio María de Hostos………………………………………………………….……6
History of Hostos Community College……………………………………………………......7
Campus Buildings………………………………………………………………………………..7
Programs of Study……………………………………………………………………………….8
The Hostos Campus………………………………………………………………………….......9
Hostos Center for the Arts & Culture………………………………………………………...10
The Library at Hostos…………………………………………………………………………..10
Hostos Academic Learning Center…………………………………………………………....11
Honors Programs……………………………………………………………………………….11
Disabilities……………………………………………………………………………………….14
Pregnancy and Related Conditions…………………………………………………………...18
CUNY Medical Withdrawal and Re-Entry Policy and Procedures Governing Student
Behavior that Presents a Direct Threat of Harm to Self or Others or Substantially
Disrupts the Learning or Working Environment of Others………………………………..18
Policy on Computer E-Mail Use/CUNY Computer User Responsibilities……………….25
Environmental Health Safety Policy………………………………………………………….27
Freedom of Information Law (FOIL) ………………………………………………………...27
Policy on Drugs, Tobacco, & Alcohol…………………………………………………………27
Workplace Violence Policy…………………………………………………………………….28
Domestic Violence and the Workplace Policy……………………………………………….29
Public Safety Policies & Procedures…………………………………………………………..29
Emergency Response Plan (ERP)……………………………………………………………...31
Rules and Regulations for the Maintenance of Public Order Pursuant to Article 129-A of
the Educational Law……………………………………………………………………………32
Notice of Access to Campus Crime Statistics, The Campus Security Report, and
Information on Registered Sex Offenders……………………………………………………34
Student Records…………………………………………………………………………………35
Notification under FERPA of Student Rights Concerning Education Records and
Directory Information………………………………………………………………………….34
The City University of New York Policies and Procedures Concerning Sexual
Harassment, Assault, Stalking, and Domestic and Intimate Partner Violence Against
Students………………………………………………………………………………………….37
Student Grievance with
Faculty…………………………………………………………………………………………...38
Student Grievance with Student/Staff Member…………………………………………….40
Open Meetings Law…………………………………………………………………………….41
Right to Peacefully Assemble – Designated Space Public Safety Advisory………………44
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CUNY Policy on Academic Integrity…………………………………………………………45
Student Support Services………………………………………………………………………50
Special Program…………………………………………………………………………………64
Programs for High School Students…………………………………………………………..70
Admission Information………………………………………………………………………...72
CUNY Affirmative Action Policy……………………………………………………………..78
Student Assessment & Testing………………………………………………………………...78
Tuition & Financial Aid………………………………………………………………………...80
Tuition Fees……………………………………………………………………………………...80
Financial Aid…………………………………………………………………………………….83
Registrar’s Office………………………………………………………………………………..93
Grading Policy…………………………………………………………………………………..99
Degree Programs………………………………………………………………………………104
Graduation Requirements……………………………………………………………………105
Appendix A: Grievance Forms………………....…………………………………………....106
Appendix B: Grade Appeal Process and Form……………………………………………..108
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Disclaimer
The policies and procedures set forth in this handbook are subject to change without notice at
any time, and at the discretion of the administration.
Supplement
This handbook is a supplement to the College Catalog which has more detailed information.
Accreditation and Affiliations
Eugenio María de Hostos Community College is accredited by the Middle States Association of
Colleges and Schools and the Board of Regents of the University of the State of New York. The
college offers career programs accredited by professional organizations such as the American
Medical Association, Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiological Technology, and
the American Dental Association. In addition, Hostos Community College is a member of the
American Association of Community and Junior Colleges, the American Association of Higher
Education, the American Council on Education, the Hispanic Association of Colleges and
Universities, the American Education Research Association, the National Association for
Bilingual Education, and other professional and learned organizations devoted to the
advancement of education.
Non-Discrimination Policy
The City University of New York (“University” or “CUNY”) – and its Hostos Community
College campus – are committed to a policy of equal employment and equal access in its
educational programs and activities. Diversity, inclusion, and an environment free from
discrimination are central to CUNY’s mission. It is CUNY’s policy to recruit, employ, retain,
promote, and provide benefits to employees (including paid and unpaid interns) and to admit
and provide services for students without regard to race, color, creed, national origin, ethnicity,
ancestry, religion, age, sex (including pregnancy, childbirth and related conditions), sexual
orientation, gender, gender identity, marital status, partnership status, disability, genetic
information, alienage, citizenship, military or veteran status, status as a victim of domestic
violence/stalking/sex offenses, unemployment status, or any other legally prohibited basis in
accordance with federal, state and city laws. Harassment based on a protected category is a
form of discrimination and is prohibited.
CUNY is also committed to providing reasonable accommodations when appropriate to
individuals with disabilities, individuals observing religious practices, employees who have
pregnancy or childbirth-related medical conditions, or employees who are victims of domestic
violence/stalking/sex offenses.
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Retaliation for reporting or opposing discrimination, cooperating with an investigation of a
discrimination complaint, and/or requesting a reasonable accommodation is prohibited under
CUNY’s policy.
To access the CUNY policy on Equal Opportunity and Non-Discrimination, please go to the
following link:
http://www.cuny.edu/about/administration/offices/la/PolicyonEqualOpportunityandNonD
iscriminationandProceduresDecember42014.pdf
Inquiries and complaints about discrimination can be directed to the Chief Diversity Officer,
Office of Compliance and Diversity, Room A-336, 718-518-4284, [email protected]
Introduction to Hostos
Mission Statement:
Consistent with the mission of The City University of New York to provide access to higher
education for all who seek it, Eugenio María de Hostos Community College was established in
the South Bronx to meet the higher educational needs of people from this and similar
communities who historically have been excluded from higher education.
The mission of Eugenio María de Hostos Community College is to offer access to higher
education leading to intellectual growth and socio-economic mobility through the development
of linguistic, mathematical, technological, and critical thinking proficiencies needed for lifelong
learning and for success in a variety of programs including careers, liberal arts, transfer, and
those professional programs leading to licensure.
The College takes pride in its historical role in educating students from diverse ethnic, racial,
cultural and linguistic backgrounds, particularly Hispanics and African Americans. An integral
part of fulfilling its mission is to provide transitional language instruction for all English-as-aSecond Language learners along with Spanish/English bilingual education offerings to foster a
multicultural environment for all students. Hostos Community College, in addition to offering
degree programs, is determined to be a resource to the South Bronx and other communities
served by the College by providing continuing education, cultural events, and expertise for the
further development of the communities it serves.
About Eugenio María de Hostos, 1839-1903:
Puerto Rican educator, writer, and patriot Eugenio María de Hostos was born on January 11,
1839, in the island village of Rio Catias, Mayaguez, Puerto Rico. He attended elementary school
in San Juan, and studied education and law in Spain at the Institute of Higher Education in
Bilbao and the University of Madrid. He joined fellow students in efforts to liberalize Spain's
colonial rule of Cuba and Puerto Rico and to abolish African slavery. In 1869, he left Madrid for
New York City, where he joined other exiles in the Cuban Revolutionary Junta, working for the
liberation of Cuba and Puerto Rico. Three years later, Hostos traveled to Latin America to
recruit support for the liberation movement. In Peru, he protested the exploitation of Chinese
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immigrants. In Chile, he championed the opening of educational opportunities for women,
particularly in law and medicine. In Argentina, he campaigned widely for the construction of
the first trans-Andean railroad.
The government of Chile established a school for Hostos to implement his advanced concepts of
education. Under his leadership, Liceo Miguel Luis Amunategui became one of the foremost
educational centers in Latin America. During eight years in Chile, he wrote award-winning
curricula in Spanish and History and published literary, artistic, and philosophical works.
After Spanish rule ended in Puerto Rico, Hostos returned to work once again for the island's
independence. In 1898, he left for the Dominican Republic, where he was appointed Director of
the Central College and Inspector General of Public Education. He died there in August of 1903.
Eugenio María de Hostos is the author of such distinguished works as La peregrination de Bayodn
(1863), Lecciones de derecho constitutional (1887), Moral social (1888) and Tratado de sociologia (1904).
His life's work and ideals are a legacy and an inspiration for all students at Hostos Community
College.
History of Hostos Community College:
Hostos Community College was created by an act of the Board of Higher Education on April 22,
1968, in response to the demands of Puerto Rican and other Hispanic leaders who urged the
establishment of a college to meet the needs of the South Bronx and neighboring communities.
In September 1970, Hostos admitted a charter class of 628 students at the site of a former tire
factory at 475 Grand Concourse. Enrollment grew rapidly to more than 2,000 students by June
of 1974. In addition, the State Legislature acted to ease an increasing space shortage by passing a
special bill to acquire the "500 Building" across the Grand Concourse from the original site. In
the same year, Hostos was granted full and unconditional accreditation following a highly
favorable evaluation by the Middle States Association.
In 1976, the Landes Higher Education Act guaranteed Hostos' existence as a community college
of excellence in New York City. Hostos takes pride in its well-equipped science, math, writing,
and computer labs, its excellent physical education facilities, and its state-of-the-art theatres.
Campus Buildings:
 A Building / Allied Health & Sciences Building – 475 Grand Concourse
 B Building / 500 Grand Concourse
 C Building / East Academic Complex – 450 Grand Concourse
 D Building / Savoy Manor Building – 120 East 149th Street
 G Building / Administration Building – 135 East 146th Street
 T5 (Trailer Site 5) – 427 Walton Avenue
 T6 (Trailer Site 6) – 121 East 146th Street
 Prow Building – 560 Exterior Street
 Gateway Building – 560 Exterior Street
Programs of Study:
Hostos Community College offers a wide array of Associate degree and certificate programs for
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its students.
Associate In Arts (A.A.) Degree Options:
 Liberal Arts
 Criminal Justice*
Associate In Science (A.S.) Degree Options:
 Accounting
 Accounting for Forensic Accounting
 Business Management
 Chemical Engineering*
 Civil Engineering*
 Community Health
 Electrical Engineering Science*
 Science for Forensic Science*
 Liberal Arts & Sciences
 Mathematics
 Mechanical Engineering
Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) Degree Options:
 Accounting
 Dental Hygiene
 Digital Design and Animation
 Digital Music
 Game Design
 Early Childhood Education
 Aging and Health Studies
 Nursing
 Office Technology (includes Administrative Assistant, Legal Administrative Assistant,
and Medical Office Manager)
 Police Science
 Public Administration
 Public Interest Paralegal Studies
 Radiologic Technology
*Joint Program – Dual Admission
Certificate Programs:
 Practical Nursing (LPN)
 Administrative Assistant, Medical Office Manager, Legal Administrative Assistant
In addition, requirements for certification and licensure in these programs impose additional
restrictions on the time required to complete them.
The Hostos Campus
Hostos Community College has evolved since the development of its Master Plan in 1986. This
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plan entailed major construction to expand and improve the educational programs and services
the college provides to its students and the community. Some of this expansion was
accomplished with the completion of the Allied Health building in 1990, the East Academic
Complex in 1994 and Savoy Manor in 1997. To accommodate the increasing number of students,
in 2012 in River Avenue and Exterior Street, which Hostos is currently involved in a Master
Plan revision process to guide the college's growth and expansion over the next ten years.
Hostos currently occupies several facilities at 149th Street and the Grand Concourse in the
Bronx. One of these buildings, at 475 Grand Concourse, houses the New Student Health Center
and several chemistry and biology laboratories, as well as administrative offices and
classrooms.
Adjoining and integrated with the 475 Grand Concourse facility is the Shirley J. Hinds Allied
Health and Science Complex. Dedicated in December 1990, this addition received several
architectural awards. The structure contains a modern library with an online bibliographic
system, and state-of-the-art laboratories for the college's programs in Radiologic Technology,
Chemistry, Biology and Physics. Students in the Allied Health programs also avail themselves
of clinical space at hospitals and clinics that are affiliated with these programs. The Hostos
Children's Center, licensed by the State of New York, is also located in this building and has
recently undergone a renovation that doubled its capacity to serve 120 children.
The building at 500 Grand Concourse contains classrooms, academic and administrative
offices, and the administrative computing center.
Phase I of the 500 Grand Concourse building is completed and included in the construction of a
new lobby, Admissions Satellite Center, and a 24-chair Dental Hygiene Patient Care facility on
the first floor along with other upgrades to the building's infrastructure. The Plaza, located
between the 500 building and the East Academic Complex has been converted into a Memorial
Garden. The East Academic Complex building, which opened in the Fall of 1994, comprises
over 279,000 square feet and adjoins the 500 Grand Concourse facility. This building houses the
Business and Accounting Data Processing and Office Administration and Technology
programs; the Humanities Department's programs in Africana Studies, Latin American and
Caribbean Studies, Modem Languages, and Visual and Performing Arts programs; Physical
Education, and numerous student organizations and club offices. In addition, the facility
contains ten state-of-the-art micro computing labs, art and dance studios, a gymnasium,
exercise and fitness centers, and a collegiate-size swimming pool. There are also two theaters—
the Main Theater and the Hostos Repertory Theater with 892 and 367 seats respectively—as
well as a museum-grade art gallery, and a modern college bookstore. A pedestrian bridge
spanning the Grand Concourse connects the East Academic Complex to the Allied Health
building. The most recent addition to the campus is the Savoy Manor building, which has been
in use since 1997. Located at 120 East 149th Street, this building is over 43,000 square feet in
size and houses the offices of the Registrar, Bursar, Financial Aid, Business, Admissions and
Recruitment, and Counseling and the Division of Institutional Advancement.
Hostos Center for the Arts & Culture
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The Hostos Center for the Arts & Culture is located in the East Academic Complex and
consists of a museum-grade art gallery, a 367-seat Repertory Theater, and a 900-seat Main
Theater, presenting artists of national and international renown. It is easily accessible from
Manhattan, Queens and New Jersey and is a mere 15 minutes by subway from midtown
Manhattan.
http://www.hostoscenter.org/
The Library at Hostos
As an academic department, the Hostos Community College Library functions as a dynamic
center of teaching and learning. The Library provides information literacy tools that enhance
the pursuit of knowledge by teaching our college community to retrieve, critically evaluate
and synthesize information for academic, professional and personal pursuits.
In this thriving urban environment, we partner with each academic department to broaden
and contextualize all areas of study, selecting and using the necessary instructional materials,
related equipment and services that will assist the college in meeting its educational, cultural
and social obligations.
As vanguards of information, the library faculty supports an environment of free and critical
thought to realize the goals of a bilingual, metropolitan and multicultural community college.
Location:
The library entrance is located on the third floor of the Shirley J. Hinds Building, 475 Grand
Concourse, Room A-308. For more information call the Circulation Desk, (718) 518-4222 or
Reference Desk, (718) 518-4215. Faculty and staff may use materials in participating libraries in
the metropolitan area. For more information, call (718) 518-4215.
Fall and Spring Semesters Schedule:
Monday – Thursday
9am-9pm
Friday
9am-5pm
Saturday
l0am-5pm
Sunday
Announced each semester
The library offers extended hours during final examination periods. Summer hours are posted
at the start of each summer session. Check library website for holidays and exceptions.
http://commons.hostos.cuny.edu/library/about-us/
Academic Support
Hostos Academic Learning Center (HALC):
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The Hostos Academic Learning Center (HALC), located in C-596, is a complete learning
environment that allows students to receive the academic help they need in a setting that is rich
in resources and supports academic success. Throughout the academic year, the HALC
programs activities that focus on the skills development of students, including tutorial support
and self-guided tutorials
Tutorial services are available at the HALC in most introductory courses offered at Hostos.
Tutors work with students either one-on-one or in small groups to provide general course
review and pre-exam preparation.
For more information, please visit us in C-596 or call (718) 518-6624.
http://www.hostos.cuny.edu/halc/
Honors Program:
The Hostos Community College Honors Program provides an enriched academic, cultural and
social experience to intellectually inquisitive and motivated students. The program offers
students an academic environment that values and promotes critical thinking, analytical
writing, and research and information competency skills through an innovative and challenging
curriculum. Attendance at cultural events, conferences, honors seminars and an Honors
Institute provide an intellectual community that encourages and supports students in pursuing
their goals.
The program will offer greater academic opportunities to a previously underserved population,
to prepare talented and ambitious students for the challenges of higher education, and to
support a successful transition to senior colleges and expanded career options. A fundamental
program goal is to promote self-confidence and increase self-esteem in students who need the
encouragement to excel and the courage to continue their education and fulfill their life goals
and dreams.
Honors Program Description:
In order to graduate with honors, students will be required to complete an honors option,
consisting of a minimum of three Honors Courses or Honors Contracts. Students may work on
only one Honors Course or Contract per semester.
Successful completion of the Honors Program has a strong emphasis on participation. Honors
students will participate in four Honors Colloquia every semester and other official Honors
events, outlined at the beginning of each semester. Students will also perform fifteen (15) hours
of voluntary community service per semester as a means of underscoring the importance of
civic responsibility.
Attendance at cultural events, academic seminars, and conferences will foster a multicultural
academic environment in which all students will learn to appreciate the many cultures which
they represent as well as prepare students to participate fully in a diverse global environment.
The Honors Student, therefore, will participate in at least two (2) such extracurricular activities
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per semester. While in the program, students will receive incentives and privileges associated
with the Honors Program. All successfully completed honors contracts and honors courses will
be indicated on the student’s transcript by an “H” designation. Students who complete all
Honors Program requirements will receive a transcript stating that they graduated with
Honors.
The number of students accepted into the Honors Program is predicated on financial ability and
will be determined each academic year.
Eligibility:
Full-time and part-time students may be considered for the Honors Program upon entering
Hostos, as continuing Hostos students with no more than 30 hours of completed coursework, or
as transfer students at the beginning of the second year. Successful completion of the CUNY
basic skills assessment tests are required for application to the program.
First year admission
 A minimum of an 85 or better high school average;
 Combined SAT score of 1100 (pre-2004) or 1700 (post-2004);
 Attend a meeting with the Program Coordinator and/or Co-Directors;
 An essay describing educational goals and the importance of the Honors Program in
achieving those goals; and two letters of reference.
Second year admission
 3.2 cumulative G.P.A.;
 Attend a meeting with the Program Coordinator and/or Co-Directors;
 An essay describing educational goals and the importance of the Honors Program in
achieving those goals; and
 Two letters of reference from Hostos Community College faculty.
Retention in the Program
 3.2 cumulative G.P.A.;
 Demonstrate full participation in Honors Program official and unofficial events; and
 Completion of at least six credits per semester without any grades below “B-”.
 HONORS BENEFITS
Advantages of being an honors student include:
 Academic and leadership development
 Use of the study room
 Small honors classes
 Help with registration
 Tutoring
 Personal advisors
 Participation in Summer Institute
 H on the transcript, recognition at graduation
 Laptop & iPad loan program
 Eligibility to apply for Honors Award Scholarship upon graduation
Program Funding
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No financial assistance is available through the program, though an Honors Program
Scholarship Award is available for outstanding students who have completed the Program.
Students in the Honors Program are responsible for all other costs normally associated with
college matriculation.
http://www.hostos.cuny.edu/Administrative-Offices/Office-of-Academic-Affairs/HonorsProgram
Dean's List:
The Dean’s List is a recognition from the Provost and Senior Vice President of Academic
Affairs. A student does not apply for the Dean’s List. Students are recognized by the Provost
and Senior Vice President if they have the following qualifications:
1. GPA of 3.5 and above for fall AND spring academic year
2. 12 credits and above for fall AND spring academic year
3. No Ds, Rs, Fs, INC, FIN, WU, WN, or WA
The Dean’s List ceremony is held once a year usually at the end of November. If the student
qualifies for the Dean’s List, the Provost and Senior Vice President invites the student to the
Dean's List ceremony, and the student receives the Dean’s List pin and the Dean’s List
certificate
http://www.hostos.cuny.edu/Administrative-Offices/Office-of-Academic-Affairs/Dean’s-List
Phi Theta Kappa:
Phi Theta Kappa, the national honor society for community and junior college students, was
first established in 1908. Induction into Phi Theta Kappa acknowledges outstanding scholastic
achievement and is available to students who have attained a record of academic excellence,
as defined by the national organization and the College.
The Alpha Kappa Tau Chapter of Phi Theta Kappa was initiated at Hostos Community College
in 1985. In order to be eligible for induction, which takes place annually, students must meet
the following criteria:
1. Enrollment at Hostos Community College at the time of induction.
2. Completion of a minimum of 12 academic credits by the end of the semester prior to
induction.
3. Cumulative grade point average of at least 3.5.
4. Attainment of academic excellence and good moral character, as judged by the faculty.
Students are required to pay a one-time initiation fee to The National Honor Society and to
submit a letter of recommendation from a faculty member.
http://www.hostos.cuny.edu/Administrative-Offices/SDEM/Student-Leadership-Academy
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Disabilities
Americans with Disabilities Act:
The ADAAA defines disability as: (A) a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits
one or more of the major life activities of such individual; (B) a record of such an impairment; or
(C) being regarded as having such an impairment. Some physical impairments are visible, but
many other physical as well as mental impairments are invisible to the typical observer. In
either case, an individual may meet the ADAAA’s definition of disability and qualify for
services and accommodations provided by the college.
For additional information regarding the Americans with Disabilities Act Amendments
http://www.eeoc.gov/laws/statutes/adaaa_info.cfm
Disability Documentation Guidelines:
Students diagnosed with a disability who request services or accommodations are required to
provide appropriate and current documentation. In the case of multiple disabilities, students
must provide documentation for each disability for which accommodations are requested.
Prior documentation such as an Individualized Education Program (IEP) or a history of
receiving accommodations from a former school does not necessarily validate the need for
services or continuation of accommodations at the university level. This history can, however,
be attached to the current documentation as part of a comprehensive assessment battery. The
determination of reasonable accommodations on campus is based on satisfying the
documentation guidelines outlined below and a clear demonstration of the functional
limitations on the student’s performance in an academic setting. These guidelines apply for all
disability types recognized by the ADA.
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A qualified professional should conduct the evaluation and provide name, title,
professional credentials, including information about state licensure or certification
number.
The evaluation should include the diagnosis (ICD-10 or DSM-IV) and be dated. The
document will include the original signature of the professional responsible for the
assessment of functioning.
It is recommended that each student submit the most recent documentation of his or her
disability. Disabilities may change in severity over time and documentation should
support current accommodation needs.
Students may be asked to obtain updated documentation if no recent documentation
exists. Also, in some cases, students may be asked to go for further disability testing to
gain more information on accommodation needs.
Recommendations and rationale for accommodations and/or assistive technology must
be based on the analysis of the functional impact of the diagnosis.
Services, accommodations, and/or assistive technology will be determined on an
individual basis upon documentation review and consultation with the disability service
professional at each campus.
Insufficient documentation may result in the delay of services and accommodations.
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For more detailed information on documentation requirements for specific disabilities, please
consult with the staff in the Accessibility Resource Center.
Accommodations a Student May Receive:
An accommodation is a modification that is intended to make a physical location, an academic
program or a course, service or activity effectively accessible to a student with a disability.
Accommodations are provided to students who complete an intake with the ARC Office and
provide relevant documentation of disability limitations that warrant specific accommodations.
The ARC staff works closely with faculty and external resources identified by the student and
ARC to provide the most appropriate and effective accommodations based on documented
need. Students who complete the intake process and provide documentation may receive the
following accommodations based on individual need:
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Modified testing (for CUNY Placement, retest and regular course exams). This may
include extra time; quiet/solitary setting; use of a reader and/or scribe; large print or
brailed exams; Assistive Technology
Access to one-to-one and/or small group tutoring and or tutoring in a distraction-free
environment
Lab Assistant
Note-taker
Sign Language Interpreter
Reader
Books in Electronic Format
Large Print and Brailed Materials
Assistive technology in instructional and support settings
Classes moved to accessible locations
Other academic accommodations based on student-specific disability and documented
limitations
Requesting Accommodations:
Each semester students who are receiving services from the Center need to follow the
procedures below in order to ensure accommodations are arranged for in a timely manner. This
will prevent any problems with providing the full range of services a student is entitled to:





Meet with the ARC staff before registering each semester to establish continuing
eligibility for accommodations.
Once you register, complete the Accommodation Request Form for ARC who will then
prepare accommodation letters for your instructors.
You will then be required to pick up these letters and present them to your professors.
It is essential that students speak with professors about accommodations as early as
possible in the semester so it is recommended that the Accommodation Request form be
completed in the first two weeks of classes.
One-on-one tutoring can be arranged through the center in partnership with the Hostos
Academic Learning Center (HALC) and the Writing Center and should be requested as
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soon as the HALC tutoring schedule is available. Availability of tutoring services on all
courses is based on HALC and Writing Center resources.
In addition, the following chart provides a list of the notice time needed in order to provide
specific types of services and accommodations. These timelines enable the Center to provide
quality services in a fair and appropriate manner. If you do not meet the request deadline the
office cannot guarantee that requested services or accommodations will be provided at the start
of the semester.
Accommodation
Timeline for Request
1.
Sign language interpreter for courses
6-8 weeks before courses start
2.
Sign language interpreter for out-of-class
events and activities
7-10 days before the event/activity
3.
Textbooks in digital format
6-8 weeks before courses start
4.
Course materials scanning
7-10 days
5.
Textbooks in Braille
1 semester
6.
Course Materials in Braille
2-4 weeks depending on nature of the
material
7.
Classroom relocation
4-6 weeks before courses start
8.
Note-takers for courses
4-6 weeks before courses start
9.
Testing with accommodations
Approximately 1 week in advance of each
test
10.
One-on-one tutoring
Within first four weeks of classes
11.
Other services and accommodations
Determined on a case-by-case basis based
on earliest possible notice to the office.
Exam Accommodation:
One of the most common accommodations utilized by students with disabilities is exam
accommodation. This accommodation allows students with eligible disabilities to take their
exams in a less distracting environment away from the classroom and provides extended time
on the exam. The letters of accommodation you obtained in the start of the semester and
presented to your professors initiates this accommodation. This is why it is so important to
complete the accommodation letters procedure within the first two weeks of the semester. The
following guidelines are important to follow in order for the exam accommodation to be most
successful:


All students are required to fill out an Exam Request Form which can be picked up from
the Accessibility Resource Center or obtained through the “forms” link on the website.
The first portion of the form will be filled out by the student and the student needs to
take the form to the professor to complete. The student is then responsible for bringing
the Exam Request Form back to the Center once it has been completed by the professor.
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
The student must take the exam at the same time the professor gives the exam in the
class. If the student cannot take the exam at that time, then the student must reschedule
another exam date or time with the professor. The professor must indicate the agreed
upon alternate date for the exam on the Exam Request Form.

In order to minimize problems understanding exam instructions or questions students
should review the exam before entering the testing room. A reader for a student with a
visual disability may be involved in this review but will not explain or interpret exam
questions. Exam reviews will take place under the supervision of ARC staff. If a student
with a hand function disability is using a scribe to write answers, the scribe will only
write what the student dictates and not edit, interpret or enhance student answers.
The Center closely monitors all students taking exams. If a student is caught cheating,
the exam will be taken away, and the professor will be notified.
Students are not allowed to have books, study notes, calculators, etc. with them while
they are taking their exam, unless such materials are authorized in writing by the
professor.


In addition, exam time will be reduced if the student:






Is late for the scheduled exam start time.
Receives any tutoring during the hours the exam is to be taken.
Does any type of studying during the time the exam is to be taken.
Meets with peers or ARC staff during the exam time. It is recommended these be done
after the exam is completed.
Takes more than two breaks of any kind during the exam.
Exams will be returned to the professor if the student does not show up at all during the
exam scheduled time.
Evening students can contact the Center so that exams can be scheduled at an alternate time.
We recommend that evening students inform the Center as soon as the professor confirms the
date and time of the exam.
Information and Questions:
For additional information, please access the ARC webpage at:
http://www.hostos.cuny.edu/Administrative-Offices/SDEM/Accessibility-Resource-Center(ARC)/General-Information
Please direct questions about the Accessibility Resource Center (ARC) to Interim Director
Raymond Perez (Room D-101P) at 718-518-4459 or [email protected]
Complaints:
If you have a complaint regarding disability discrimination or the reasonable accommodation
process, please contact the Chief Diversity Officer, Office of Compliance and Diversity, Room
A 336, 718-518-4459.
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Pregnancy and Related Conditions
Students’ absences due to medical conditions relating to pregnancy will be excused for as long
as deemed medically necessary by a student’s doctor, and students will be given the
opportunity to make up missed work. Students needing assistance can seek accommodations
from the Accessibility Resource Center, located in the Savoy Building, Room D-101P
(telephone: 718-518-4454).
Complaints:
If you have a complaint regarding pregnancy discrimination or the accommodation process,
please contact the Chief Diversity Officer, Office of Compliance and Diversity, Room
A 336, 718-518-4284.
CUNY Medical Withdrawal and Re-entry Policy and Procedures
Governing Student Behavior that Presents a Direct Threat of Harm to
Self or Others or Substantially Disrupts the Learning or Working
Environment of Others
I. Introduction
The City University of New York ("CUNY") is committed to the academic success and personal
growth of its students. As part of that commitment, CUNY and its constituent campuses are
responsible for providing a safe learning and working environment for students, faculty, staff
and other members of the University community. Some students may, because of a medical
condition, engage in behavior that presents a direct threat of harm to themselves or to others,
or substantially disrupts the learning or working environment of others. In such situations, the
safety and security of the campus community, including the individual student, is paramount.
This policy does not replace or supersede reasonable and appropriate security and health and
safety measures, such as calling 911 or taking other immediate action in case of imminent
threat to life or limb. In addition to taking action to protect the security and safety of the
campus community, a college may address the student's conduct to determine if action under
this policy or under the student disciplinary process is appropriate. When a student's conduct
that directly Threatens or substantially disrupts the learning or working environment of others
appears to relate to a medical condition, the campus may, at its option, address the student's
conduct either in accordance with this policy, or through the student disciplinary process. If
the student's conduct constitutes a threat solely to him or herself, it should be addressed under
this policy rather than the disciplinary process.
II. Policy
A. As an alternative to disciplinary action that may be taken under Article XV of CUNY's
Bylaws, a college of CUNY may bring a proceeding to require a student to withdraw from
the University, or, under some circumstances, the student's home college and/or from
residence in a college residence hall under this withdrawal policy and procedures when the
student's behavior evidences a direct threat of harm to others, or when the student's
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behavior substantially disrupts the learning or working environment of others. A direct
threat means a significant risk of harm to health or safety.
B. A student who threatens to commit or attempts to commit suicide, and who does not
otherwise threaten direct harm to others or substantially disrupt the learning or working
environment of others, shall not be subject to disciplinary action for that threat or attempt
under Article XV of the CUNY's Bylaws. If a college determines that withdrawal of the
student or retention of the student subject to specified conditions is appropriate because the
student's behavior threatens direct harm to him or her Self, the procedures outlined below
shall apply instead of disciplinary procedures.
C. A student who withdraws or is withdrawn from the University, a college or college
residence hall pursuant to this policy may apply for re-entry to the University, a college
and/or to a college residence hall. The application for re-entry shall be made to the student's
home college's Chief Student Affairs Officer, who shall determine whether the student still
presents a direct threat of harm to him or herself or others or still presents a significant risk
to substantially disrupt the learning or working environment of others. If the Chief Student
Affairs Officer or designee determines, based on the assessment of a qualified, licensed
mental health professional, that there is not a significant risk that the behavior that required
withdrawal will be repeated, he or she shall approve the student's application for re-entry.
III. Procedures
A. Emergency Interim Removal
1. If a student's behavior presents an immediate, severe and direct threat to him or herself
or others (by evidencing a likelihood of harm to him or herself or others), or is
substantially disrupting the learning or working environment of others, the Chief
Student Affairs Officer or designee (if such Officer is not immediately available) may
direct an emergency interim removal of the student that restricts the student's access to
the College's campus or residence hall, as appropriate, for an interim period before a
final determination of the matter. The Chief Student Affairs Officer or designee shall
consult with the University's Office of the General Counsel prior to making any such
direction.
2. The fact that a student has threatened to commit suicide or attempted suicide, by itself,
does not allow the Chief Student Affairs Officer or designee to direct an emergency
interim removal. In all cases involving such students, the Chief Student Affairs Officer
or designee must attempt to have the student individually assessed by a mental health
professional as outlined below in A.3 before deciding whether to direct an emergency
interim removal.
3. Except as permitted in III A. 1 above, before determining whether to require an
emergency interim removal, the Chief Student Affairs Officer or designee shall take the
following steps:
a. Exercise all reasonable efforts to meet with the student; and
b. In that meeting, offer the student the opportunity to be evaluated at the college's
19 | P a g e
expense by a qualified, licensed mental health professional, who may be an
employee of a college of CUNY or CUNY or on retainer to a college of CUNY or
CUNY. Whenever possible, that professional shall have had no prior contact with
the student. The professional shall assess whether the student's behavior presents an
immediate, severe and direct threat to him or herself or others or presents a
significant risk to repeat behavior that substantially disrupts the learning or working
environment of others, and, if so, whether the student's behavior may be the result
of a medical issue. That professional shall present his or her findings to the Chief.
Student Affairs Officer or designee, who shall determine based on those findings
and other evidence available whether emergency interim removal under these
procedures is appropriate.
c. If the student refuses to meet, and/or refuses to undergo such assessment or to keep
a scheduled appointment, the Chief Student Affairs Officer or designee may require
emergency interim removal without a meeting and/or mental health assessment if
he or she reasonably concludes on the basis of the available evidence that the
student's behavior evidences an immediate, severe and direct threat of harm to the
student or others or is substantially disrupting the working or learning environment
of others and presents a significant risk to continue that substantial disruption. The
Chief Student Affairs Officer or designee shall consult with the University's Office of
the General Counsel before making such a determination.
4. The emergency interim removal from the College and/or residence hall shall remain in
effect until a final decision has been made pursuant to the procedures below, unless,
before a final decision is made, the Chief Student Affairs Officer or designee
determines that the reasons for imposing the interim removal no longer exist.
B. Withdrawal after Emergency Interim Removal
1. If a student has been subjected to an emergency interim removal from the college
and/or residence hall, the college shall request retention with conditions or voluntary
withdrawal within 7 calendar days of such removal. Should the request for retention
with conditions or voluntary withdrawal request be refused, the College shall determine
within 7 calendar days of such refusal whether to take further action against the student,
including whether to initiate involuntary withdrawal proceedings or, disciplinary
proceedings under Article XV of the CUNY Bylaws, as applicable under II A. above, and
shall send notice of either such proceeding in accordance with the notice requirements of
the applicable procedure within that 7-day period. For students who have been
subjected to an emergency interim removal without having undergone the assessment
procedures outlined in III A. 3 above, the College shall follow the assessment procedures
outlined below in B.2. a. prior to determining its course of action.
2. In cases where the student has been subjected to an emergency interim removal without
assessment, the procedure for determining whether withdrawal is appropriate is as
follows:
a.
The Chief Student Affairs Officer or designee
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shall exercise best efforts to meet with the student to discuss the student's behavior
and to hear the student's explanation of the alleged behavior. If, after hearing the
explanation, the Officer or designee still wishes to consider the possibility of the
student's withdrawal, he or she shall offer the student an opportunity to be
evaluated, at the college's expense, by a qualified, licensed mental health
professional, who may be an employee of a college of CUNY or CUNY, or on
retainer to a college of CUNY or CUNY. Whenever possible, that professional shall
have had no prior contact with the student. The professional shall make findings
concerning whether the student's behavior presents a direct threat of harm to him or
herself or others or presents a significant risk to repeat behavior that substantially
disrupts the learning or working environment of others and if so, whether the
student's behavior may be the result of a medical issue. The professional shall report
such findings to the Chief Student Affairs Officer, who shall, based on those
findings, and after consultation with the University's Office of the General Counsel,
determine the appropriate action, including whether to request that the student
withdraw from the University, the college and/or the college residence hall or
whether to request that the student agree to specified conditions in lieu of
withdrawal.
b. If the student refuses to undergo the requested assessment, or fails to keep the
scheduled appointment, and the Chief Student Affairs Officer reasonably concludes
on the basis of the available evidence that the student's behavior presents a direct
threat of harm to him or herself or others or substantially disrupts the learning or
working environment of others and presents a significant risk to repeat behavior
that substantially disrupts the learning or working environment of others, the Chief
Student Affairs Officer may request that the student voluntarily withdraw from the
University, the college and/or the college residence hall. The Chief Student Affairs
Officer shall consult with the University's Office of the General Counsel before
making any such request.
c. If the student agrees to the request for voluntary withdrawal or to the specified
conditions, the Chief Student Affairs officer or designee shall (i) discuss with the
student the procedures for and consequences of voluntary withdrawal or the
specified conditions, as applicable; (ii) discuss the circumstances with the student's
parents or legal guardians as permissible by law and as appropriate; (iii) consult
with the student's academic advisor or department, as appropriate; (iv) consult with
the residence hall director, as appropriate; (v) refer the student to appropriate
resources for treatment; and (vi) advise the student concerning the process for
applying for re-entry, as well as on conditions for re-entry, if applicable and
appropriate.
d. If the student does not agree to the request for voluntary withdrawal or to the
specified conditions, the Chief Student Affairs Officer shall determine, in
consultation with the University's Office of the General Counsel, whether to take
further action against the student, including whether to initiate involuntary
withdrawal proceedings, or, in the case of students referenced in II A. above,
whether to initiate disciplinary proceedings under Article XV of the CUNY Bylaws.
21 | P a g e
C. Withdrawal of Students Without Emergency Interim Removal
I.
Students Who Present a Direct Threat of Harm to Others or Substantially Disrupt the
Learning or Working Environment of Others
a. Voluntary Withdrawal or Retention with Conditions
(1) In situations where a student's behavior evidences a direct threat of harm to
himself or others or substantially disrupts the learning or working environment
of others and presents a significant risk to repeat behavior that substantially
disrupts the learning or working environment of others and the Chief Student
Affairs Officer reasonably believes that the student's behavior may be connected
to a medical issue, the Chief Student Affairs Officer or designee may request that
the student voluntarily withdraw or agree to retention under conditions.
(2) If the student agrees to the request for voluntary withdrawal or to the specified
conditions, the Chief Student Affairs officer or designee shall (i) discuss with
the student the procedures for and consequences of voluntary withdrawal or
the specified conditions, as applicable; (ii) discuss the circumstances with the
student's parents or legal guardians as permissible by law and as appropriate;
(iii) consult with the student's academic advisor or department, as appropriate;
(iv) consult with the residence hall director, as appropriate; (v) refer the
student to appropriate resources for treatment; and (vi) advise the student
concerning the process for applying for re-entry, as well as on conditions for
re-entry, if applicable and appropriate.
b. Involuntary Withdrawal
1.
If the student does not agree to the request for voluntary withdrawal or to the
specified conditions, the Chief Student Affairs Officer shall determine, in
consultation with the University's Office of the General Counsel, whether to
take further action against the student, including whether to initiate
involuntary withdrawal proceedings or disciplinary proceedings under Article
XV of the LUNY Bylaws.
2.
Before initiating involuntary withdrawal proceedings under this procedure, the
Chief Student Affairs Officer shall follow the assessment procedures outlined
above in B.2.
II.
Students Who Present a Direct Threat of Harm Solely To Themselves
a. The College shall follow the assessment and other procedures outlined above in
B.2 a.-d. In order to determine the appropriate course of action.
D. Involuntary Withdrawal Procedures
1. The following shall be the procedures for involuntary withdrawal:
a. Notice of the involuntary withdrawal hearing and the time and place of the hearing
shall be personally delivered or sent by the Chief Student Affairs Officer or designee
of the student's home college to the student at the address appearing on the records
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of the College, by overnight or certified mail, by regular mail, and, for students who
have a college e-mail address, to that e-mail address. Notice of at least five business
days shall be given to the student in advance of the hearing unless the student
consents to an earlier hearing.
b. The notice shall contain (i) a statement of the reasons involuntary withdrawal is
sought (ii) the type of withdrawal sought (from the University, the college and/or
from the college residence hall); and (iii) a statement that the student has a right to
present his or her side of the story, to present witnesses and evidence on his or her
behalf, to cross-examine witnesses presenting evidence against the student, to
remain silent without assumption of guilt, and to be represented by legal counsel or
an advisor at the student's expense.
c. CUNY shall constitute a Health Review Panel, comprised of qualified, licensed
mental health professionals employed by a college of CUNY or by CUNY, or on
retainer to a college of CUNY or CUNY. CUNY's Vice Chancellor for Student
Development shall appoint the members of the Health Review Panel. Members of
the Health Review Panel, in committees constituted separately for each hearing
("Health Review Committee"), shall be responsible for adjudicating all involuntary
withdrawal hearings held according to these procedures. For each involuntary
withdrawal hearing, the Vice Chancellor for Student Development or his designee
shall constitute a three-person Health Review Committee from the Health Review
Panel to adjudicate at that hearing. No member of the Health Review Committee
shall have had prior contact with the student. All decisions of the Health Review
Committee shall be made by majority vote.
d. The hearing shall be closed, unless the student requests an open hearing. However,
the Health Review Committee may overrule a request for an open hearing if it
determines that an open hearing would be inappropriate or disruptive in light of the
nature of the evidence to be presented.
e. After the evidence is presented at the hearing, the Health Review Committee shall
determine whether the College has proved, by a preponderance of the evidence, that
the student's behavior presents a direct threat of harm to him or herself or others, or
has substantially disrupted the learning or working environment of others and
presents a significant risk of threatening further substantial disruption of the
learning or working environment of others, and if so, what the appropriate remedy
should be. The Health Review Committee may also set reasonable and appropriate
conditions on re-entry. The decision of the Health Review Committee shall be made
within five business days from the close of the hearing.
E. Appeals
An appeal from the decision of the Health Review Committee may be made to the President of
the student's home college or the President's designee within thirty calendar days after the
delivery of the decision appealed from. The President or designee shall make his or her
determination on the appeal within fifteen business days from receipt of the appeal. The
President's decision may be appealed to the Chancellor of the University or his or her designee
23 | P a g e
within thirty calendar days after the delivery of the President's decision on appeal. The
Chancellor or designee's decision shall be made within fifteen business days from receipt of the
appeal. The Chancellor (or designee's) decision shall be final. The bases overturning a decision
of the Health Review Committee at both levels of review are limited to the following: (i) clearly
erroneous factual findings; (ii) procedural irregularities; (iii) newly available evidence that
would have affected the outcome; (iv) the remedy and/or conditions on re-entry were
unreasonable or inappropriate.
F. Re-entry
1. A student who is withdrawn from the University, a student's home college
and/or a college residence hall under this policy may be considered for re-entry.
2. A student wishing to be considered for re-entry should contact his or her home college's
Chief Student Affairs Officer and provides appropriate documentation of behavioral
change and resolution of the initial behavioral problem, including compliance with any
conditions that may have been set for re-entry.
3. A student may apply for re-entry to the University, a college and/or a college
residence hall no more than one time per term.
4. In assessing an application for re-entry, the Chief Student Affairs Officer or
designee shall: (i) in cases in which he or she determines that an additional
mental health assessment is necessary, refer the student for assessment to a
qualified, licensed mental health professional, at the College's expense; (ii)
receive, investigate, and examine appropriate relevant documentation, including
assessments made by college-referred mental health professionals, and, if
applicable, licensed treating mental health professionals; (iii) consult with the
Health Review Committee, in cases in which the student's withdrawal was
adjudicated by such a Committee; (iv) contact the student's parents or legal
guardians as permissible by law, if appropriate; (v) provide an opportunity for
the student to meet with the Chief Student Affairs Officer or designee to discuss
re-entry.
5.
If the Chief Student Affairs Officer or designee determines, based on
the evidence presented, that there is not a significant risk that the behavior that
required withdrawal will be repeated, he or she shall approve the student's application
for re-entry. In such cases, the Chief Student Affairs Officer or designee shall initiate the
re-entry process, provide the student with written conditions for continued attendance,
and inform any relevant administrators of the student's re-entry.
6.
If the Chief Student Affairs Officer or designee determines that the
application for re-entry should be denied, he or she shall provide the student with a
written explanation of the reasons for the denial and specify when the next request for
re-entry may be considered.
7. A student may appeal the Chief Student Affairs Officer or designee's denial of re-entry
to the college President or designee within thirty calendar days after the delivery of the
decision denying re-entry. The President or designee shall make his or her
determination on the appeal within thirty calendar days from receipt of the appeal.
The President's decision may be appealed to the Chancellor of the University or his or
her designee within thirty calendar days after the delivery of the President's decision
on appeal. The Chancellor or designee's decision shall be made within thirty calendar
days from receipt of the appeal. The Chancellor (or designee's) decision shall be final.
24 | P a g e
The basis for overturning a decision on appeal at either level shall be limited to a
determination that the decision on reentry was clearly erroneous.
G. Effect on Academic Status
In the event of a withdrawal pursuant to this policy, a notation of withdrawal shall appear on
the student's transcript for all classes taken during that semester. The Chief Student Affairs
Officer at a student's home college may grant a student request that, in lieu of withdrawal, a
notation of incomplete shall appear on his or her transcript for classes taken during that
semester if and only if there is a reasonable prospect that the student will eventually complete
such classes, subject to faculty approval for each such class. Regardless of the notation that
appears on a student's transcript, the Chief Student Affairs Officer of the student's home college
shall inform the Vice Chancellor for Student development of the student's withdrawal in order
to effectuate a hold by the University Application Processing Center on the student's ability to
transfer or otherwise seek admission to another college of CUNY.
H. Effect on Housing Status
If the student has been living in a college residence hall and will not be permitted to continue
to do so, the student's contract will be canceled and fees refunded on a prorated basis.
I. Confidentiality
The results of examinations by mental health profession also to whom students are referred for
assessment at any stage in the withdrawal or readmission process shall be confidential student
records, except that if the results indicate that the student presents an imminent, severe, and
direct threat of harm to him or herself or others, those results may be shared with the
appropriate individuals in order to attempt to prevent the occurrence of such harm. The results
of these examinations shall be admissible in involuntary withdrawal hearings but shall not be
admissible in disciplinary hearings, unless the student places his or her health, including mental
health, at issue in a disciplinary hearing.
J. Board Review
During the fall 2009 semester, the Chancellery shall conduct a review of the experience of the
colleges with these procedures and shall report the results of that review to the Board of
Trustees, along with any recommended changes.
http://www.cuny.edu/about/administration/offices/sa/advocacyreferral/MedicalWithdra
walPolFINAL7-07.pdf
Policy on Computer E-Mail Use
CUNY Computer User Responsibilities
The computer resources** of The City University of New York must be used in a manner that
is consistent with the University's educational purposes and environment. All users of
computer resources are expected to act in a spirit of mutual respect and cooperation, and to
adhere to the regulations for their use set forth in this document. As a user of CUNY computer
resources: You must have a valid authorized account to use computer resources that require
25 | P a g e
2
5
4
one and may use only those computer resources that are specifically authorized. You may use
your account only in accordance with its authorized purposes and may not use an
unauthorized account for any purpose
 You are responsible for the safeguarding of your computer account. For a mainframe
computer account, you should change your password frequently and should not
disclose it to anyone. You should take all necessary precautions in protecting the
account, no matter what type of computer resources you are using.
 You may not circumvent system protection facilities.
 You may not knowingly use any system to produce system failure or degraded
performance.
 You may not engage in unauthorized duplication, alteration or destruction of data,
programs or software. You may not transmit or disclose data, programs or software
belonging to others and may not duplicate copyrighted material.
 You may not engage in abusive or improper use of computer hardware. This includes,
but is not limited to, tampering with equipment, unauthorized attempts at repairing
equipment and unauthorized removal of equipment components.
 You may not use computer resources for private purposes, including, but not limited
to, the use of computer resources for profit-making or illegal purposes.
 You may not use computer resources to engage in abuse of computer personnel or other
users. Such abuse includes the sending of abusive, anonymous, or unsolicited messages
within CUNY or beyond via network facilities.
 The use of college computer resources may be subject to college regulations, and you
are expected to be familiar with those regulations.
 These regulations and college regulations are subject to revision. You are expected to
be familiar with any revisions in regulations.
The University reserves the right to monitor, under appropriate conditions, all data contained
in the system to protect the integrity of the system and to insure compliance with regulations.
Any user who is found to be in violation of these rules shall be subject to the following:
 Suspension and/or termination of computer privileges;
 Disciplinary action by appropriate college and/or University officials;
 Referral to law enforcement authorities for criminal prosecution;
 Other legal action, including action to recover civil damages and penalties.
** "Computer Resources" is an inclusive term referring to any and all computing/information
technology; hardware, software and access. Hardware includes, but is not limited to, terminals,
personal computers, workstations, printers, mice, monitors, cabling, and peripheral devices.
Software includes, but is not limited to, mainframe shared software, networked software, and
stand-alone software residing on personal computers. Access includes, but is not limited to,
accounts on timesharing systems as well as access to stand-alone personal computing systems
and other relevant technology.
Revised 1/95. This statement is also available on CUNYVM as a file: ETHICS POLICY. If you
have any questions about the statement please contact the CUNY Help Desk at (212) 541/0981
or via e-mail: [email protected]
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Hostos Policy on Computer and Email Use:
The full text of the Hostos Community College Student Guidelines for Computer & Email Use
can be obtained at the Office of the Dean of Students.
Environmental Health Safety Policy
General Policy
It is the policy of Hostos Community College of The City University of New York to maintain
a safe environment for its faculty, staff, students, and visitors that will not subject them to an
avoidable risk of injury or illness. It is further the policy of Hostos Community College to
respect and protect the environment.
The applicable health, safety and environmental standards are contained in rules and
regulations promulgated by Federal, State, and City agencies, which must be followed in
establishing campus safety policies. In addition, the published standards of nationally
recognized professional health and safety organizations serve as guidelines in areas not
covered by government standards, rules, and expectations. For further information, contact
Diahann McFarlane, Health & Safety Officer, 471 Walton Ave, Bronx NY 10451, Telephone
718-518-4349.
Freedom of Information Law (FOIL)
Procedures for Public Access of Public Records:
Requests to inspect public records at the college should be made to the Records Access Officer,
Eugene Sohn, Esq., who is located at 475 Grand Concourse, Room A-322, telephone number
(718) 518-4300. Public records are available for inspection and copying by appointment only at
a location to be designated. You have a right to appeal a denial of a request for access to
records to the CUNY General Counsel and Vice Chancellor for Legal Affairs. Copies of the
CUNY Procedures for Public Access to Public Records Pursuant to Article 6 of the Public
Officers Law and the appeal form are available at the reference desk of the library and the
college website.
Policy on Drugs, Tobacco & Alcohol
Alcoholic Beverages Policy
No alcoholic beverage may be sold or given to anyone who appears to be impaired, nor sold to
anyone one hour before the agreed termination time of an activity held within the College
campus. An Alcoholic Beverage Commission (ABC) form may be obtained from the Student
Activities Office.
Smoking Policy
The Board of Trustees of The City University of New York voted to ban smoking after January
1, 1995, inside all buildings owned, leased, or operated by the University. During the fall
semester of 1994, the Hostos College Senate voted overwhelmingly in support of the Board's
action. The resolution states that, "As the largest urban university in the country, the City
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University is committed to promoting the health and well-being of its faculty, students, and
staff. The health hazards of tobacco use are well-documented and directly linked to the death
of an estimated 390,000 Americans a year". An explanation accompanying the resolution noted
that "the significant health hazards associated with tobacco smoke for both smokers and nonsmokers clearly indicate the necessity of creating a University smoke-free environment."
Hostos Community College supports the smoking ban and vigorously enforces the policy.
Sanctions
The unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession, or use of illegal drugs or
other controlled substances and the unauthorized use of alcohol by University
students/employees on the campus is prohibited. (TITLE 21 U.S. Code 801, ET. SEQ. and NYS
PUBLIC HEALTH LAW, 3306). It is a violation of NYS Penal Law 240.40 for a person to appear
in public under the influence of narcotics or a drug other than alcohol to the degree that he/she
may endanger himself/herself or other persons or property, or annoy persons in his/her
vicinity. It is also a violation of NYS Law 260.20(d) (4) for a person to give or sell an alcoholic
beverage to a person less than 21 years old. Students are expected to comply with the above
Federal and State regulations and Rules of Conduct printed in this Hostos catalog. Any student
or employee found in violation of the rules and regulations set forth in this policy may be
subject to disciplinary action. Sanctions may include admonition, warning, censure, disciplinary
probation, restitution, suspension, expulsion, and/or complaint to civil authorities. These are
clearly defined in this Hostos catalog.
A student who is experiencing difficulty with alcohol or chemical dependency may be referred
to the Assistant Dean for Student Development and Enrollment Management or the
Counseling Office by members of the instructional staff or may seek assistance directly. The
Vice President for Student Development and Enrollment Management may take disciplinary
action or recommend that the student meet with a counselor for appropriate referral or
assistance through self-help organizations or other outside intervention agencies.
Workplace Violence Policy
The City University of New York has a long-standing commitment to promoting a safe and
secure academic and work environment that promotes the achievement of its mission of
teaching/learning, research, scholarship and service. Members of the University community –
students, faculty and staff – are expected to conduct themselves in a way that fosters a safe
and secure environment. Violence, threats of violence, intimidation, harassment, coercion, or
other threatening behavior towards people or property will not be tolerated. Complaints
involving workplace violence will not be ignored and will be given the serious attention they
deserve. Individuals who violate this policy may be removed from University property and
are subject to disciplinary action up to and including termination of employment – consistent
with University policies, rules and collective bargaining agreements – and/or referral to law
enforcement authorities for criminal prosecution.
The University, at the request of an employee or student, or at its own discretion, may prohibit
members of the public, including family members, from seeing an employee or student on
University property unless necessary to transact University-related business. This policy
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particularly applies in cases where the employee or student suspects that an act of violence
will result from an encounter with said individual(s).
The Hostos Community College community is required to read and comply with the Workplace
Violence Policy which may be accessed at:
http://policy.cuny.edu/manual_of_general_policy/article_vi/policy_6.09/text/#Navigation
_Location
Domestic Violence and the Workplace Policy
The City University of New York ("CUNY") disapproves of violence against women, men, or
children in any form, whether as an act of workplace violence or in any employee's personal
life. Domestic violence can spill over into the workplace, compromising the safety of both
victims and co-workers and resulting in lost productivity, increased health care costs, increased
absenteeism, and increased employee turnover. CUNY is committed to full compliance of all
applicable laws governing domestic violence in the workplace, to promoting the health and
safety of its employees, and to making a significant and continual difference in the fight to end
domestic violence. CUNY will review this policy annually and will notify all employees and the
New York State Office for the Prevention of Domestic Violence ("OPDV") of any revisions.
The Hostos Community College community is required to read and comply with the Domestic
Violence and the Workplace Policy which may be accessed at:
http://policy.cuny.edu/manual_of_general_policy/article_v/policy_5.061/pdf/#Navigation_
Location
Public Safety Policies & Procedures
Mission Statement:
The City University of New York Public Safety Service is dedicated to providing excellence in
protection and service to the University community. As law enforcement officers, we shall
continuously endeavor to ensure a safe and secure environment conducive to a positive social
and educational process. This mission is exemplified by our departmental motto.
Service, Integrity and Pride:
At Hostos Community College, the safety and well-being of our students, faculty, and staff is
always at the top of our agenda. However, a truly safe campus can only be achieved through
the cooperation of all students, faculty, and staff. This information is a part of our effort to
ensure that our collaborative endeavor is effective. We hope that you will read it carefully and
use the information to help foster a safe environment for yourself and others on campus.
Current Campus Policies Regarding Procedures for Students and Others Reporting Criminal
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Actions or Other Emergencies on Campus:
The Public Safety Department encourages the reporting of all criminal activity or medical
emergencies occurring on campus. Reporting of criminal actions and other emergencies can be
done by contacting the Department of Public Safety in person, by calling (718) 518-6888, or by
dialing 6911 from any campus extension. While it is highly recommended that all criminal
activity be reported to the Public Safety Department on campus first, reports can also be made
to the New York City Police Department by dialing 911. Please bear in mind that you must first
dial (9) to get an outside line from college phones, before dialing 911 for the New York City
Police Department. Acts, that do not constitute a crime-e.g., smoking on the premises or failing
to display an I.D. card when asked by a college official-will be handled administratively. An
incident report will be written and will be sent to the appropriate Vice President.
Hostos Community College Public Safety Department is located in the 450 Grand Concourse
building, also known as the East Academic Complex, Room C-030, on the Anthony Griffith (B)
level. The department is responsible for 24-hour protection of all persons and property on the
college grounds.
All campus public safety officers are service-oriented, law enforcement security professionals
trained to handle security and safety matters on campus. Several members of the public safety
department are trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and defibrillator operations.
All public safety personnel carry two-way radios and flashlight and wear distinctive uniforms.
Campus Peace Officers are sworn Peace Officers and have arrest powers granted to them by
the Police Commissioner of the City of New York. Campus Peace Officers are designated as
New York City Special Patrolmen/Peace Officers in accordance with Section 2.10 subsection
27 of the New York State Criminal Procedure Law.
College Security Assistants are defined as security guards in accordance with Article 7A of
the Central Business Law. These officers do not have arrest powers above that of a private
citizen.
Weapons:
No one within the University community except Peace Officers, pursuant to authorization of
the College presidents, shall have in his or her possession a rifle, shotgun, firearm or any other
dangerous instrument or material that can be used to inflict bodily harm on an individual or
damage to a building or the grounds of a campus.
Public Safety Protection Services Escort Service:
Escorts to subway stations, bus stops, or vehicles within the vicinity of the campus perimeter
are provided by the Department of Public Safety to anyone leaving the campus, especially
during the late evening and hours of darkness.
Filing of Orders of Protection:
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The Department of Public Safety receives and files Orders of Protection brought in by any
member of the College community. The information in the Orders of Protection, along with
any other additional information, is provided to all Public Safety personnel in order to prevent
and reduce the possibilities of a violation of such orders. Anyone in violation of an Order of
Protection on campus will be arrested.
Lost and Found:
The Department of Public Safety secures items found or turned over to the office or our
personnel. Anyone who loses anything on campus may stop by Room C030 and check with
the office staff. Identification is required when recovering a lost item. All lost or recovered
items will be kept for one semester. Weapons and illegal contraband are immediately
vouchered with the New York City Police Department.
Lost ID's:
Students who lose or misplace their Hostos I.D. card must go to the Bursar's Office, present
their current Bursar enrollment receipt and pay a $10.00 replacement fee. Students should
then proceed to the Department of Public Safety with the receipt for a new I. D. Faculty and
staff members who lose their ID's must go to the Department of Personnel and obtain an
employee verification form as well as a $10.00 receipt from Bursar before proceeding to the
Department of Public Safety.
Emergency Responde Plan (ERP):
Hostos’ Emergency Response Plan (ERP) attempts to place Hostos in a proactive position to
protect students, staff, faculty and visitors in case of an emergency or disaster, and provides
important information about specific emergency situations that could arise on or near
campus. Students are urged to review the ERP at
http://www.hostos.cuny.edu/Administrative-Offices/Public-Safety
Department/Emergency-Response-Plan.
Timely Warnings to The College Community:
In the event that it becomes necessary to alert students and staff of an emergency situation or
occurrence of crimes listed in the Cleary Act on campus, correspondence from the Director of
Public Safety will be distributed to the College community within 24/48 hours. The College
community will be provided with specific information on such incidents, and the Director will
attempt to answer any questions raised by faculty, staff, and students. The information will be
disseminated in the form of flyers, telephone broadcasting, posters, electronic mail, etc. The
identity of all victims will be kept confidential within the scope of the law or investigation.
A Word to the Wise:
The Department of Public Safety maintains a "Public Safety Incident Log Book." No
community can be totally risk free. Crime takes place in our society and does not abate when
one enters the confines of a college. The Department of Public Safety strongly recommends
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that you stay alert and aware of what is going on around you, and remain security conscious
and involved. If you see or hear something suspicious, please report the situation
immediately. Thefts and other violations do occur at times. However, all of us can reduce the
risks by thinking about our personal safety and taking practical precautions.
"Student Right to Know"
Students are urged to obtain a copy of the Jeanne Cleary Disclosure of Campus Security
Policy and Campus Security Act from the Department of Public Safety, Room C-030.
Public Safety Web Site
For more information on the Public Safety Department at Hostos, please visit
http://www.hostos.cuny.edu/publicsafety.
For the Rules and Regulations for the Maintenance of Public Order Pursuant to Article 129A of
the Education Law, please contact the Public Safety Department at Hostos.
Rules and Regulations for the Maintenance of Public Order Pursuant to
Article 129-A of the Educational Law
In compliance with Chapter 191 of the laws of 1969, the Board of Trustees has adopted rules
and regulations for the maintenance of public order on college campuses and other college
property used for education purposes:
For a list of the Rules and Regulations for the Maintenance of Public Order Pursuant to Article
129A of the Education Law, please contact the Department of Public Safety at Hostos, Room
C-030.
Statement on Public Order In compliance with Chapter 191 of the laws of 1969, the Board of
Trustees has adopted rules and regulations for the maintenance of public order on college
campuses and other college property used for education purposes: Rules and Regulations for
the Maintenance of Public Order Pursuant to Article 129A of the Education Law.
I. Rules
1. A member of the academic community shall not intentionally obstruct and/or forcibly
prevent others from the exercise of their rights. Nor shall he interfere with the
institution's educational process or facilities, or the rights of those who wish to avail
themselves of any of the institution's instructional, personal, administrative,
recreational, and community services.
2. Individuals are liable for failure to comply with lawful directions issued by
representatives of the University/college when they are acting in their official
capacities. Members of the academic community are required to show their
identification cards when requested to do so by an official of the college.
3. Unauthorized occupancy of University/college facilities or blocking access to or from
such areas is prohibited. Permission from appropriate college authorities must be
obtained for removal, relocation and use of University/college equipment and/or
supplies.
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4. Theft from or damage to University/college premises or property, or theft of or
damage to property of any person on University/college premises is prohibited.
5. Each member of the academic community, or an invited guest, has the right to
advocate his position without having to fear abuse, physical, verbal, or otherwise, from
others supporting conflicting points of view. Members of the academic community,
and other persons on the college grounds, shall not use language or take actions
reasonably likely to provoke or encourage physical violence by demonstrators, those
demonstrated against, or spectators.
6. Action may be taken against any and all persons who have no legitimate reason for
their presence on any campus within the university/college or whose presence on any
such campus obstructs and/or forcibly prevents others from the exercise of their rights
or interferes with the institution's educational processes or facilities, or the rights of
those who wish to avail themselves of any of the institution's instructional, personal,
administrative, recreational, and community services.
7. Disorderly or indecent conduct on University/college-owned or controlled property is
prohibited.
8. No individual shall have in his possession a rifle, shotgun, or firearm or knowingly
have in his possession any other dangerous instrument or material that can be used to
inflict bodily harm on an individual or damage upon a building or the grounds of the
University/college without the written authorization of such educational institution.
Nor shall any individual have in his possession any other instrument or material which
can be used and is intended to inflict bodily harm on an individual or damage upon a
building or the grounds of the University/college.
9. Any action or situation which recklessly or intentionally endangers mental or physical
health, or involves the forced consumption of liquor or drugs for the purpose of
initiation into or affiliation with any organization, is prohibited.
10. The unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession, or use of illegal
drugs or other controlled substances by University students or employees on
University/College premises, or as part of any University/College activities is
prohibited. Employees of the University/college must also notify the College
Personnel Director of any criminal drug statute conviction for a violation occurring in
the workplace not later than five (5) days after such conviction.
11. The unlawful possession, use, or distribution of alcohol by students or employees on
University/College premises or as part of any University/College activities is
prohibited.
II. Penalties
1. Any student engaging in any manner in conduct prohibited under substantive Rules 111 shall be subject to the following range of sanctions as hereafter defined in the
attached Appendix: admonition, warning, censure, disciplinary probation, restitution,
suspension, expulsions, ejection, and/or arrest by the civil authorities.
2. Any tenured or non-tenured faculty member, or tenured or non-tenured member of the
administrative or custodial staff engaging in any manner in conduct prohibited under
substantive Rules 1-11 shall be subject to the following range of penalties: warning,
censure, restitution, fine not exceeding those permitted by the law or by the Bylaws of
The City University of New York, or suspension with/without pay pending a hearing
before an appropriate college authority, dismissal after a hearing, ejection, and/or
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arrest by the civil authorities, and for engaging in any matter in conduct prohibited
under substantive Rule 10 may, in the alternative, be required to participate
satisfactorily in an appropriately licensed drug treatment or rehabilitation program. In
addition, in the case of a tenured faculty member, or tenured member of the
administrative or custodial staff engaging in any manner in conduct prohibited under
substantive Rules 1-11 shall be entitled to be treated in accordance with the applicable
provisions of the Education Law, or Civil Service Law, or the applicable collective
bargaining agreement, or the Bylaws or written policies of The City University of New
York.
3. Any visitor, licensee, or invitee, engaging in any matter in conduct prohibited under
substantive Rules 1-11 shall be subject to ejection, and/or arrest by the civil authorities.
4. Any organization which authorized the conduct prohibited under substantive rules 111 shall have its permission to operate on campus rescinded. Penalties 1-4 shall be in
addition to any other penalty provided by law or The City University Trustees.
III. Appendix: Sanctions Defined
A. Admonition- An oral statement to the offender that he has violated university rules.
B. Warning- Notice to the offender, orally or in writing, that continuation or repetition
of the wrongful conduct, within a period of time stated in the warning, may be cause
for more disciplinary action.
C. Censure- Written reprimand for violation of specified regulation, including the
possibility of more severe disciplinary sanction in the event of conviction for the
violation of any University regulation within a period stated in the letter of reprimand.
D. Disciplinary Probation- Exclusion from participation in privileges or extracurricular
University activities as set forth in the notice of disciplinary probation for a specified
period of time.
E. Restitution- Reimbursement for damage to or misappropriation of property.
Reimbursement may take the form of appropriate service to repair or otherwise
compensate for damages.
F. Suspension- Exclusion from classes and other privileges or activities as set forth in
the notice of suspension for a definite period of time.
G. Expulsion- Termination of student status for an indefinite period. The conditions of
readmission, if any is permitted, shall be stated in the order of expulsion.
H. Complaint to Civil Authorities.
I. Ejection.
(Board of Trustees Minutes,1969,06-23,3,B. Amended: Board of Trustees Minutes,1980,1027,7,A; Board of Trustees Minutes,1989,05-22,8,D; Board of Trustees Minutes,1990,06-25,6,C)
(Quoted Section of Bylaws Amended: Board of Trustees Minutes,1971,03-21,1,a; Board of
Trustees Minutes,1999,10-24,9,A)
http://www.hostos.cuny.edu/Administrative-Offices/SDEM/Student-Life
Notice of Access to Campus Crime Statistics, The Campus Security Report, and
Information On Registered Sex Offenders:
The College Advisory Committee on Campus Safety will provide upon request all campus
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crime statistics as reported to the U.S. Department of Education, as well as the annual campus
security report. The campus security report includes: (1) the campus crime statistics for the most
recent calendar year and the two preceding calendar years; (2) campus policies regarding
procedures and facilities to report criminal actions or other emergencies on campus; (3) policies
concerning the security of and access to campus facilities; (4) policies on campus law
enforcement; (5) a description of campus programs to inform students and employees about
campus security procedures and practices and to encourage students and employees to be
responsible for their own security and the security of others; (6) campus crime prevention
programs; (7) policy concerning the monitoring through the police of criminal activity at offcampus locations of students organizations officially recognized by the college; (8) policies on
illegal drugs, alcohol, and underage drinking; (9) where information provided by the State on
registered sex offenders may be obtained (also see below); and (10) policies on campus sexual
assault programs aimed at the prevention of sex offenses and procedures to be followed when a
sex offense occurs. This information is maintained pursuant to the federal Jeanne Clery
Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act.
The campus crime statistics and the annual campus security report are available at the reference
desk of the library and the college website at http://www.hostos.cuny.edu/publicsafety/. If
you wish to be mailed copies of the campus crime statistics and the annual campus security
report, you should contact Chief Arnaldo Bernabe Director of Public Safety at 718-515-6888 and
copies will be mailed to you within 10 days. The U.S. Department of Education's website
address for campus crime statistics is www.ed.gov/security/InstDetail.asp (then input the
name of the school).
In accordance with the federal Campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act, registered sex offenders
now are required to register the name and address of any college at which he or she is a student
or employee. The New York State Division of Criminal Justice maintains a registry of convicted
sex offenders and informs the college's chief security (public safety) officer of the presence on
campus of a registered sex offender as a student or employee. You may contact the college's
Chief / Director of Public Safety, Arnaldo Bernabe, 450 Grand Concourse Bronx N.Y. 10451
room C-030, (718) 518-6888 to obtain information about Level 2 or Level 3 registered sex
offenders on campus. To obtain information about Level 3 offenders, you may contact the
Division's registry website at www.criminaljustice.state.ny.us/nsor/sor_about.htm and then
click on "Search for Level 3 Sex Offenders" or access the directory at the college's public safety
department or police precinct. To obtain information about Level 2 offenders, you need to
contact the public safety department, local police precinct in which the offender resides or
attends college, or the Division's sex offender registry at 800-262-3257
Student Records
Notification Under FERPA of Student Rights Concerning Education Records And
Directory Information
The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) afford students certain rights with
respect to their education records. See Section "6" below on your right to prevent the
disclosure of directory information. The FERPA rights of students are:
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





The right to inspect and review your education records. Students should submit to the
registrar, dean, head of the academic department, or other appropriate official, written
requests that identify the record(s) they wish to inspect. If the records are not
maintained by the college official to whom the request was submitted, that official
shall advise the student of the correct official to whom the request should be
addressed.
All requests shall be granted or denied in writing within 45 days of receipt. If the
request is granted, you will be notified of the time and place where the records may be
inspected. If the request is denied or not responded to within 45 days, you may appeal
to the college's FERPA appeals officer. Additional information regarding the appeal
procedures will be provided to you if a request is denied.
The rights to request the amendment of the student’s education records that the student
believes are inaccurate or misleading. You may ask the college to amend a record that
you believe is inaccurate or misleading. You should write to the college official
responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record you want changed, and
specify why it is inaccurate or misleading. If the college decides not to amend the
record as requested by you, the college will notify you of the decision and advise you of
your right to a hearing before the college's FERPA appeals officer regarding the request
for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be
provided to you when notified of your right to a hearing.
The right to consent to disclosure of personally identifiable information contained in
your education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without
consent.
One exception which permits disclosure without consent is disclosure to college
officials with legitimate educational interests. A college official is a person employed by
the university in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support staff
position; a person or company with whom the University has contracted; a person
serving on the Board of Trustees; or a student serving on an official committee, such as
a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another college official in performing
his or her tasks. A college official has a legitimate educational interest if access is
reasonably necessary in order to perform his/her instructional, research, administrative
or other duties and responsibilities.
Upon request, the college discloses education records without consent to officials of
another college or school in which a student seeks or intends to enroll.
You may appeal the alleged denial of FERPA rights to the:
General Counsel and Vice Chancellor for Legal Affairs
The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures
by the college to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the Office
that administers FERPA are:
Family Policy Compliance Office
U.S. Department of Education
600 Independence Avenue, SW
Washington, D.C. 20202-4605.
The college will make the following "directory information" concerning current and former
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students available to those parties having a legitimate interest in the information: name,
attendance dates (periods of enrollment), address, telephone number, date and place of birth,
photograph, e-mail address, full or part-time status, enrollment status (undergraduate,
graduate, etc.), level of education (credits) completed, major field of study, degree enrolled for,
participation in officially recognized activities and sports, height and weight of athletic team
members, previous school attended, and degrees, honors and awards received. By filing a
form with the Registrar's Office, you may request that any or all of this directory information
not be released without your prior written consent. This form is available in the Registrar's
Office and may be filed, withdrawn, or modified at any time.
Directory Information Non-Disclosure Form Directory information may be made available to
any parties deemed to have a legitimate interest in the information unless the student files a
"Directory Information Non-Disclosure Form" in the Office of the Registrar. Non-disclosure
forms may be obtained in the Office of the Registrar, Savoy, Room D-207.
Withholding Student Records
CUNY Policy On Withholding Student Records: Students who are delinquent and/or in
default in any of their financial accounts with the college, the university or an appropriate
state or federal agency for which the university acts as either a disturbing or certifying agent,
and students who have not completed exit interviews as required by the federal Perkins Loan
Program, the federal Family Education Loan Programs, the William D. Ford Federal Direct
Loan Program, and the Nursing Student Loan Program, are not to be permitted to complete
registration, or issued a copy of their grades, a transcript of academic record, certificate, or
degree, nor are they to receive funds under the federal campus-based student assistance
programs or the federal Pell Grant Program unless the designated officer, in exceptional
hardship cases and consistent with federal and state regulations, waives in writing the
application of this regulation.
The City University of New York Policies and Procedures Concerning
Sexual Harassment, Assault, Stalking and Domestic, and Intimate
Partner Violence Against Students
The City University of New York seeks to create and maintain a safe environment in which all
members of the University community—students, faculty and staff—can learn and work free
from the fear of sexual harassment, sexual assault and other forms of violence. The University’s
policies on Sexual Misconduct; Workplace Violence; and Domestic Violence in the Workplace
apply to all acts of harassment and violence that occur on – or spill over to – the campus.
All Hostos Community College students, faculty, staff, and visitors are required to read and
comply with these policies. You may access these policies as follows:
Policy on Sexual Misconduct (which includes sexual harassment, gender-based harassment and
sexual violence):
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http://www.cuny.edu/about/administration/offices/la/Policy-on-Sexual-Misconduct-12-114-with-links.pdf
Workplace Violence Policy:
http://policy.cuny.edu/manual_of_general_policy/article_vi/policy_6.09/text/#Navigation_
Location
Domestic Violence and the Workplace Policy:
http://policy.cuny.edu/manual_of_general_policy/article_v/policy_5.061/pdf/#Navigation_
Location
Inquiries and complaints about sexual misconduct and workplace violence can be directed to
the Chief Diversity Officer, Office of Compliance and Diversity, Room A-336, 718-518-4284.
Procedure for Handling Student Complaints about Faculty Conduct in
Academic Settings
Student Grievance with Faculty (See Appendix for Forms)
Adapted from the CUNY Board of Trustees resolution on student complaints procedures,
effective February 1, 2007.
Hostos Community College and The City University of New York respects the academic
freedom of the faculty and will not interfere with it as it relates to the content or style of
teaching activities. At the same time the University recognizes its responsibility to provide
students with a procedure for addressing complaints about faculty treatment of students that
are not protected by academic freedom and are not covered by other procedures. Examples
might include incompetent or inefficient service, neglect of duty, physical or mental incapacity
and conduct unbecoming a member of the staff.
If students have any question about the applicable procedure to follow for a particular
complaint, they should consult with the chief student affairs officer. In particular, the chief
student affairs officer should advise a student if some other procedure is applicable to the type
of complaint the student has (e.g. Academic Standards, Sexual Harassment, etc.).
1. Informal Resolution.
Students are encouraged to attempt to resolve complaints informally with the faculty
member or to seek the assistance of the department chairperson or campus ombudsman
to facilitate informal resolution.
2. Formal Complaint.
If the student does not pursue informal resolution, or if informal resolution is
unsuccessful, the student may file a written complaint with the department chairperson
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(“Fact Finder”). If the chairperson is the subject of the complaint, the complaint may be
filed with the academic dean.
a. The written complaint shall be filed within 30 calendar days of the alleged
conduct unless there is good cause shown for delay, including but not limited to
delay caused by an attempt at informal resolution. The complaint shall be as
specific as possible in describing the conduct complained of.
b. The Fact Finder shall promptly send a copy to the faculty member about whom
the complaint is made, along with a letter stating that the filing of the complaint
does not imply that any wrongdoing has occurred and that a faculty member
must not retaliate in any way against a student for having made a complaint. If
either the student or the faculty member has reason to believe that the
department chairperson may be biased or otherwise unable to deal with the
complaint in a fair and objective manner, he or she may submit to the academic
dean a written request stating the reasons for that belief; if the request appears to
have merit, the academic dean may, in his or her sole discretion, replace the
department chairperson as the Fact Finder.
c. The Fact Finder shall meet with the complaining student and faculty member,
either separately or together, to discuss the complaint and to try to resolve it. The
Fact Finder may seek the assistance of appropriate campus persons to facilitate
informal resolution.
d. If resolution is not possible, and the Fact Finder concludes that the facts alleged
by the student, taken as true and viewed in the light most favorable to the
student, establish that the conduct complained of is clearly protected by
academic freedom, he or she shall issue a written report dismissing the
complaint and setting forth the reasons for dismissal and send a copy to the
complaining student, the faculty member, the chief academic officer and the chief
student affairs officer.
e. Otherwise, the Fact Finder shall conduct an investigation. The Fact Finder shall
separately interview the complaining student, the faculty member and other
persons with relevant knowledge and information and shall also consult with the
chief student affairs officer. The Fact Finder shall not reveal the identity of the
complaining student and the faculty member to others except to the extent
necessary to conduct the investigation. If the Fact Finder believes it would be
helpful, he or she may meet again with the student and faculty member after
completing the investigation in an effort to resolve the matter. The complaining
student and the faculty member shall have the right to have a representative
(including a union representative, student government representative or
attorney) present during the initial meeting, the interview and any postinvestigation meeting.
f. At the end of the investigation, the Fact Finder shall issue a written report setting
forth his or her findings and recommendations, with particular focus on whether
the conduct in question is protected by academic freedom, and send a copy to the
complaining student, the faculty member, the chief academic officer and the chief
student affairs officer. In ordinary cases, it is expected that the investigation and
written report should be completed within 30 calendar days of the date the
complaint was filed.
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3. Appeals Procedure.
If either the student or the faculty member is not satisfied with the report of the Fact
Finder, the student or faculty member may file a written appeal to the chief academic
officer within 10 calendar days of receiving the report. The chief academic officer shall
convene and serve as the chairperson of an Appeals Committee, which shall also include
the chief student affairs officer, two faculty members elected annually by the senate and
one student elected annually by the student senate. The Appeals Committee shall review
the findings and recommendations of the report, with particular focus on whether the
conduct in question is protected by academic freedom. The Appeals Committee shall not
conduct a new factual investigation or overturn any factual findings contained in the
report unless they are clearly erroneous. If the Appeals Committee decides to reverse the
Fact Finder in a case where there has not been an investigation because the Fact Finder
erroneously found that the alleged conduct was protected by academic freedom, it may
remand to the Fact Finder for further proceedings. The committee shall issue a written
decision within 20 calendar days of receiving the appeal. A copy of the decision shall be
sent to the student, the faculty member, the department chairperson and the president.
4. Subsequent Action.
Following the completion of these procedures, the appropriate college official shall
decide the appropriate action, if any, to take. For example, the department chairperson
may decide to place a report in the faculty member’s personnel file or the president may
bring disciplinary charges against the faculty member. Disciplinary charges may also be
brought in extremely serious cases even though the college has not completed the entire
investigative process described above; in that case, the bringing of disciplinary charges
shall automatically suspend that process. Any action taken by a college must comply
with the bylaws of the University and the collective bargaining agreement between the
University and the Professional Staff Congress.
Procedure for Handling Student Complaints about a Student/Staff
Member
Student Grievance with a Student/Staff Member (See Appendix for Forms)
All students are expected to act professionally at all times, respecting each other, staff, faculty
and the campus. Students are given the responsibility to make sure that they comply with all
rules and regulations set forth by the school in order to maintain a safe, clean, and respectful
academic community here at Hostos Community College. Should a student feel that his/her
learning environment has been compromised by another student, he/she has the right to file a
Student Complaint with the Office of Student Life, located in D-101. The grievance process
against a student/staff member is as follows:
1. Fill out a Student Complaint Form
a. This form will detail the grievance as well as all parties involved, including the
student(s) the grievance is against as well as any witness to the grievance, if any.
b. This form gives the student the chance to write out his/her account of the
grievance. We ask that students be as detailed as possible in their description of
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the grievance. However, a staff member from the Office of Student Life will
interview the student to make sure all details are accounted for.
2. Once the student has filed the complaint and have spoken to the appropriate staff
member (Student Life Specialist or designee) in the Office of Student Life, the Student
Life Specialist will initiate the fact-finding process, contacting the other student(s)
involved in the grievance including any witnesses, if any.
a. These students will be asked to meet with the Student Life Specialist to be
interviewed in the Office of Student Life regarding the grievance.
b. These students will fill out a Statement Form detailing his/her account of the
grievance.
3. When all fact-finding has concluded, the Student Life Specialist will evaluate the
grievance, and make the decision on whether the grievance can be closed or further
investigation is needed.
a. When a grievance is closed, the Student Life Specialist will notify all students
involved by mail.
b. If a grievance needs further investigation, the grievance may be referred to the
Dean of Student Life for further assessment.
Open Meetings Law
Public Officers Law, Article 7
Section
100. Legislative declaration
101. Short title
102. Definitions
103. Open meetings and executive sessions
104. Public notice
105. Conduct of executive sessions
106. Minutes
107. Enforcement
108. Exemptions
109. Committee on open government
110. Construction with other laws
111. Severability
§100. Legislative declaration. It is essential to the maintenance of a democratic society that the
public business be performed in an open and public manner and that the citizens of this state be
fully aware of and able to observe the performance of public officials and attend and listen to
the deliberations and decisions that go into the making of public policy. The people must be
able to remain informed if they are to retain control over those who are their public servants. It
is the only climate under which the commonweal will prosper and enable the governmental
process to operate for the benefit of those who created it.
§101. Short title. This article shall be known and may be cited as "Open Meetings Law".
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§102. Definitions. As used in this article: 1. "Meeting" means the official convening of a public
body for the purpose of conducting public business, including the use of videoconferencing for
attendance and participation by the members of the public body. 2. "Public body" means any
entity, for which a quorum is required in order to conduct public business and which consists of
two or more members, performing a governmental function for the state or for an agency or
department thereof, or for a public corporation as defined in section sixty-six of the general
construction law, or committee or subcommittee or other similar body of such public body. 3.
"Executive session" means that portion of a meeting not open to the general public.
§103. Open meetings and executive sessions. (a) Every meeting of a public body shall be open
to the general public, except that an executive session of such body may be called and business
transacted thereat in accordance with section one hundred five of this article. (b) Public bodies
shall make or cause to be made all reasonable efforts to ensure that meetings are held in
facilities that permit barrier-free physical access to the physically handicapped, as defined in
subdivision five of section fifty of the public buildings law. (c) A public body that uses
videoconferencing to conduct its meetings shall provide an opportunity to attend, listen and
observe at any site at which a member participates.
§104. Public notice. 1. Public notice of the time and place of a meeting scheduled at least one
week prior thereto shall be given to the news media and shall be conspicuously posted in one or
more designated public locations at least seventy-two hours before such meeting. 2. Public
notice of the time and place of every other meeting shall be given, to the extent practicable, to
the news media and shall be conspicuously posted in one or more designated public locations at
a reasonable time prior thereto. 3. The public notice provided for by this section shall not be
construed to require publication as a legal notice. 4. If videoconferencing is used to conduct a
meeting, the public notice for the meeting shall inform the public that videoconferencing will be
used, identify the locations for the meeting, and state that the public has the right to attend the
meeting at any of the locations.
§105. Conduct of executive sessions. 1. Upon a majority vote of its total membership, taken in
an open meeting pursuant to a motion identifying the general area or areas of the subject or
subjects to be considered, a public body may conduct an executive session for the below
enumerated purposes only, provided, however, that no action by formal vote shall be taken to
appropriate public moneys: a. matters which will imperil the public safety if disclosed; b. any
matter which may disclose the identity of a law enforcement agent or informer; c. information
relating to current or future investigation or prosecution of a criminal offense which would
imperil effective law enforcement if disclosed; d. discussions regarding proposed, pending or
current litigation; e. collective negotiations pursuant to article fourteen of the civil service law; f.
the medical, financial, credit or employment history of a particular person or corporation, or
matters leading to the appointment, employment, promotion, demotion, discipline, suspension,
dismissal or removal of a particular person or corporation; g. the preparation, grading or
administration of examinations; and h. the proposed acquisition, sale or lease of real property or
the proposed acquisition of securities, or sale or exchange of securities held by such public
body, but only when publicity would substantially affect the value thereof. 2. Attendance at an
executive session shall be permitted to any member of the public body and any other persons
authorized by the public body.
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§106. Minutes. 1. Minutes shall be taken at all open meetings of a public body which shall
consist of a record or summary of all motions, proposals, resolutions and any other matter
formally voted upon and the vote thereon. 2. Minutes shall be taken at executive sessions of any
action that is taken by formal vote which shall consist of a record or summary of the final
determination of such action, and the date and vote thereon; provided, however, that such
summary need not include any matter which is not required to be made public by the freedom
of information law as added by article six of this chapter. 3. Minutes of meetings of all public
bodies shall be available to the public in accordance with the provisions of the freedom of
information law within two weeks from the date of such meeting except that minutes taken
pursuant to subdivision two hereof shall be available to the public within one week from the
date of the executive session.
§107. Enforcement. 1. Any aggrieved person shall have standing to enforce the provisions of
this article against a public body by the commencement of a proceeding pursuant to article
seventy-eight of the civil practice law and rules, and/or an action for declaratory judgment and
injunctive relief. In any such action or proceeding, the court shall have the power, in its
discretion, upon good cause shown, to declare any action or part thereof taken in violation of
this article void in whole or in part. An unintentional failure to fully comply with the notice
provisions required by this article shall not alone be grounds for invalidating any action taken
at a meeting of a public body. The provisions of this article shall not affect the validity of the
authorization, acquisition, execution or disposition of a bond issue or notes. 2. In any
proceeding brought pursuant to this section, costs and reasonable attorney fees may be
awarded by the court, in its discretion, to the successful party. 3. The statute of limitations in an
article seventy-eight proceeding with respect to an action taken at executive session shall
commence to run from the date the minutes of such executive session have been made available
to the public.
§108. Exemptions. Nothing contained in this article shall be construed as extending the
provisions hereof to: 1. judicial or quasi-judicial proceedings, except proceedings of the public
service commission and zoning boards of appeals; 2. a. deliberations of political committees,
conferences and caucuses. b. for purposes of this section, the deliberations of political
committees, conferences and caucuses means a private meeting of members of the senate or
assembly of the state of New York, or of the legislative body of a county, city, town or village,
who are members or adherents of the same political party, without regard to (i) the subject
matter under discussion, including discussions of public business, (ii) the majority or minority
status of such political committees, conferences and caucuses or (iii) whether such political
committees, conferences and caucuses invite staff or guests to participate in their deliberations;
and 3. any matter made confidential by federal or state law.
§109. Committee on open government. The committee on open government, created by
paragraph (a) of subdivision one of section eighty-nine of this chapter, shall issue advisory
opinions from time to time as, in its discretion, may be required to inform public bodies and
persons of the interpretations of the provisions of the open meetings law.
§110. Construction with other laws. 1. Any provision of a charter, administrative code, local
law, ordinance, or rule or regulation affecting a public body which is more restrictive with
respect to public access than this article shall be deemed superseded hereby to the extent that
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such provision is more restrictive than this article. 2. Any provision of general, special or local
law or charter, administrative code, ordinance, or rule or regulation less restrictive with respect
to public access than this article shall not be deemed superseded hereby. 3. Notwithstanding
any provision of this article to the contrary, a public body may adopt provisions less restrictive
with respect to public access than this article.
§111. Severability. If any provision of this article or the application thereof to any person or
circumstances is adjudged invalid by a court of competent jurisdiction such judgment shall not
affect or impair the validity of the other provisions of the article or the application thereof to
other persons and circumstances. For further information, contact: Committee on Open
Government, NYS Department of State, 41 State Street, Albany, NY 12231.
Right to Peacefully Assemble – Designated Space
Public Safety Advisory
The college administration recognizes the rights afforded to all persons under the First
Amendment. However, it also recognizes the rights of those who wish to avail themselves of
the institution’s instructional, personal, administrative, recreational and community services.
Members of the college community who wish to exercise their right to assemble peacefully may
do so by using the area between the 500 Grand Concourse building and the 450 Grand
Concourse Building, known also as the plaza. This area is available from 7:30 a.m. until dusk
and can be made available until 10 p.m. Faculty, Staff and Students do not require a New York
City Street Activity Permit for the use of this area.
A college space reservation form must be completed and submitted to the College Space
Reservation Committee. Request for the use of college space by any member of the college
community is approved on a first come first serve basis.
Additional, information regarding the college space reservation process can be obtained from
the college’s Theater Manager, Director of Student Activities and / or the Director of Public
Safety.
The “Plaza area” offers the greatest amount of visibility to members of the college community
wishing to exercise their right of peaceful assembly, without obstructing and/or interfering
with the institution’s educational processes.
External Organizations and/or groups wishing to demonstrate near the college must obtain a
New York City Street Activity Permit.
Article 129A of the Education Law and the New York State Penal prohibit the blocking of
University / College entrances and/or exits as well the unauthorized occupancy of any
University and/or College facility.
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A person who violates these laws and/or statutes maybe subject to administrative sanctions
and/or arrest.
Rules of Public Order on Campus Policy August 2001
CUNY Policy on Academic Integrity
Academic dishonesty is prohibited in The City University of New York. Penalties for academic
dishonesty include academic sanctions, such as failing or otherwise reduced grades, and/or
disciplinary sanctions, including suspension or expulsion.
I.
Definitions and Examples of Academic Dishonesty
1.1 Cheating is the unauthorized use or attempted use of material, information, notes, study
aids, devices or communication during an academic exercise. Examples of cheating
include:
 Copying from another student during an examination or allowing another to copy
your work.
 Unauthorized collaboration on a take home assignment or examination.
 Using notes during a closed book examination.
 Taking an examination for another student, or asking or allowing another student to
take an examination for you.
 Changing a graded exam and returning it for more credit.
 Submitting substantial portions of the same paper to more than one course without
consulting with each instructor.
 Preparing answers or writing notes in a blue book (exam booklet) before an
examination.
 Allowing others to research and write assigned papers or do assigned projects,
including using commercial term paper services.
 Giving assistance to acts of academic misconduct/ dishonesty.
 Fabricating data (in whole or in part).
 Falsifying data (in whole or in part).
 Submitting someone else’s work as your own.
 Unauthorized use during an examination of any electronic devices such as cell
phones, computers or other technologies to retrieve or send information.
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1.2. Plagiarism is the act of presenting another person’s ideas, research or writings as your
own. Examples of plagiarism include:
 Copying another person’s actual words or images without the use of quotation
marks and footnotes attributing the words to their source.
 Presenting another person’s ideas or theories in your own words without
acknowledging the source.
 Failing to acknowledge collaborators on homework and laboratory assignments.
 Internet plagiarism, including submitting downloaded term papers or parts of term
papers, paraphrasing or copying information from the internet without citing the
source, or “cutting & pasting” from various sources without proper attribution.
1.3. Obtaining Unfair Advantage is any action taken by a student that gives that student an
unfair advantage in his/her academic work over another student, or an action taken by
a student through which a student attempts to gain an unfair advantage in his or her
academic work over another student. Examples of obtaining unfair advantage include:
 Stealing, reproducing, circulating or otherwise gaining advance access to
examination materials.
 Depriving other students of access to library materials by stealing, destroying,
defacing, or concealing them.
 Retaining, using or circulating examination materials which clearly indicate that they
should be returned at the end of the exam.
 Intentionally obstructing or interfering with another student’s work.
1.4. Falsification of Records and Official Documents
Examples of falsification include:
 Forging signatures of authorization.
 Falsifying information on an official academic record.
 Falsifying information on an official document such as a grade report, letter of
permission, drop/add form, ID card or other college document.
II.
Methods for Promoting Academic Integrity
2.1. Packets containing a copy of the CUNY Policy on Academic Integrity and, if applicable,
the college’s procedures implementing the Policy, and information explaining the
Policy and procedures shall be distributed to all current faculty and, on an annual
basis to all new faculty (full and part-time) These packets also shall be posted on
each college’s website. Orientation sessions for all new faculty (full and part-time)
and students shall incorporate a discussion of academic integrity.
2.2. All college catalogs, student handbooks, faculty handbooks, and college websites shall
include the CUNY Policy on Academic Integrity and, if applicable, college
procedures implementing the policy and the consequences of not adhering to the
Policy.
2.3. Each college shall subscribe to an electronic plagiarism detection service and shall notify
students of the fact that such a service is available for use by the faculty. Colleges
shall encourage faculty members to use such services and to inform students of their
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use of such services.
III.
Reporting
1.1. Each college’s president shall appoint an Academic Integrity Officer in consultation with
the elected faculty governance leader. The Academic Integrity Officer shall serve as
the initial contact person with faculty members when they report incidents of
suspected academic dishonesty. The Academic Integrity Officer may be the college’s
Student Conduct Officer, another student affairs official, an academic affairs official,
or a tenured faculty member. Additional duties of the Academic Integrity Officer are
described in Sections 4.1, 4.2.1, 4.2.2, 4.3 and 4.4.
1.2. A faculty member who suspects that a student has committed a violation of the CUNY
Academic Integrity Policy shall review with the student the facts and circumstances
of the suspected violation whenever feasible. Thereafter, a faculty member who
concludes that there has been an incident of academic dishonesty sufficient to affect
the student’s final course grade shall report such incident on a Faculty Report Form
in substantially the same format as the sample annexed to this Policy and shall
submit the Form to the college’s Academic Integrity Officer. . Each college shall use a
uniform form throughout the college, which shall contain, at a minimum, the name
of the instructor, the name of the student, the course name and number and section
number, the date of the incident, a description of the incident and the instructor’s
contact information.
1.3. The Academic Integrity Officer shall update the Faculty Report Form after a suspected
incident has been resolved to reflect that resolution. Unless the resolution exonerates
the student, as described in Section 4.4, the Academic Integrity Officer of each
college shall place the Form in a confidential academic integrity file created for each
student alleged to have violated the Academic Integrity Policy and shall retain each
Form for the purposes of identifying repeat offenders, gathering data, and assessing
and reviewing policies. Unless the student is exonerated, written decisions on
academic integrity matters after adjudication also shall be placed in the student’s
academic integrity file. The Academic Integrity Officer shall be responsible for
maintaining students’ academic integrity files.
II.
Procedures for Imposition of Sanctions
2.1. Determination on academic vs. disciplinary sanction
The Academic Integrity Officer shall determine whether to seek a disciplinary
sanction in addition to an academic sanction. In making this determination, the
Academic Integrity Officer shall consult with the faculty member who initiated the
case and may consult with student affairs and/or academic affairs administrators as
needed. Before determining which sanction(s) to seek, the Academic Integrity
Officer also shall consult the student’s confidential academic integrity file, if any, to
determine whether the student has been found to have previously committed a
violation of the Academic Integrity Policy, the nature of the infraction, and the
sanction imposed or action taken. Prior violations include both violations at the
student’s current college and violations that occurred at any other CUNY college. In
making the determination on prior violations, the Academic Integrity Officer shall
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determine whether the student previously attended any other CUNY colleges and, if
so, shall request and be given access to the academic integrity files, if any, at such
other CUNY colleges. The Academic Integrity Officer should seek disciplinary
sanctions only if (i) there is a substantial violation; or (ii) the student has previously
violated the Policy; or (iii) academic sanctions are unable to be imposed because the
student has timely withdrawn from the applicable course. Examples of substantial
violations include but are not limited to forging a grade form or a transcript; stealing
an examination from a professor or a university office; having a substitute take an
examination or taking an examination for someone else; having someone else write a
paper for the student or writing a paper for another student; sabotaging another
student’s work through actions that prevent or impede the other student from
successfully completing an assignment; and violations committed by a graduate or
professional student or a student who will seek professional licensure. The college
also should consider any mitigating circumstances in making this determination.
4.2 Procedures in Cases Involving Only Academic Sanctions
Student Admits to the Academic Dishonesty and Does Not Contest the Academic
Sanction. If a faculty member wishes to seek only an academic sanction (i.e., a
reduced grade) and the student does not contest either his/her guilt or the particular
reduced grade the faculty member has chosen, then the student shall be given the
reduced grade, unless the Academic Integrity Officer decides to seek a disciplinary
sanction. The reduced grade may apply to the particular assignment as to which the
violation occurred or to the course grade, at the faculty member’s discretion. A
reduced grade may be an “F” or another grade that is lower than the grade that the
student would have earned but for the violation.
The faculty member shall inform the Academic Integrity Officer of the resolution via
email and the Officer shall update the applicable Faculty Report Form to reflect that
resolution.
Student Admits to the Academic Dishonesty but Contests the Academic Sanction
In a case where a student admits to the alleged academic dishonesty but contests the
particular academic sanction imposed, the student may appeal the academic
sanction through the college’s grade appeal process. The student shall be allowed, at
a minimum, an opportunity to present a written position with supporting evidence.
The committee reviewing the appeal shall issue a written decision explaining the
justification for the academic sanction imposed.
Student Denies the Academic Dishonesty
In a case where a student denies the academic dishonesty, a fact-finding
determination shall be made, at each college’s option, by an Academic Integrity
Committee established by the college’s governance body or by the Student-Faculty
Disciplinary Committee established under Article XV of the CUNY Bylaws. Each
college’s Academic Integrity Committee shall adopt procedures for hearing cases. (If
a college opts to use its Student-Faculty Disciplinary Committee for this purpose,
that Committee shall use Article XV procedures.) Those procedures, at a minimum,
shall provide a student with (i) written notice of the charges against him or her; (ii)
the right to appear before the Committee; and (iii) the right to present witness
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statements and/or to call witnesses. Those procedures also shall provide the faculty
member with the right to make an appearance before the Committee. The Committee
may request the testimony of any witness and may permit any such witness to be
questioned by the student and by the administrator presenting the case. Academic
Integrity Committees and Student-Faculty Disciplinary Committees, as applicable,
shall issue written decisions and send copies of their decisions to the college’s
Academic Integrity Officer. The Academic Integrity Officer may not serve on a
college’s Academic Integrity Committee.
4.3 Procedures in Cases Involving Disciplinary Sanctions
If the college decides to seek a disciplinary sanction, the case shall be processed
under Article XV of the CUNY Bylaws. If the case is not resolved through mediation
under Article XV, it shall be heard by the college’s Faculty-Student Disciplinary
Committee.
If the college seeks to have both a disciplinary and an academic sanction imposed,
the college shall proceed first with the disciplinary proceeding and await its outcome
before addressing the academic sanction. The student’s grade shall be held in
abeyance by using the PEN grade established for this purpose, pending the
Committee’s action. If the Faculty-Student Disciplinary Committee finds that the
alleged violation occurred, then the faculty member may reflect that finding in the
student’s grade. The student may appeal the finding in accordance with Article XV
procedures and/or may appeal the grade imposed by the faculty member in
accordance with section
If the Faculty-Student Disciplinary Committee finds that the alleged violation did
not occur, then no sanction of any kind may be imposed.
Where a matter proceeds to the Faculty-Student Disciplinary Committee, the
Academic Integrity Officer shall promptly report its resolution to the faculty member
and file a record of the resolution in the student’s confidential academic integrity
file, unless, as explained below, the suspected violation was held to be unfounded.
Required Action in Cases of No Violation
If either the Academic Integrity Committee or the Faculty-Student Disciplinary
Committee finds that no violation occurred, the Academic Integrity Officer shall
remove all material relating to that incident from the student’s confidential academic
integrity file and destroy the material.
Implementation
Each college, in accordance with its governance plan, shall implement this Policy
and may adopt its own more specific procedures to implement the Policy. Colleges’
procedures must be consistent with the policy and procedures described in the
Policy.
Faculty Report Form
It is necessary to complete this form to report an incident of suspected and/or resolved
academic dishonesty. Make a copy for your records and forward the original, along with copies
of all available supporting documentation, to the:
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Office of the Academic Integrity Officer
[Fill in name of college]
Instructor Name: _________________________
Dept:_________________________ Tel. No:________________
e-mail:___________________
Course: ________________
Section:_________________ Semester: _______________
Student Name: _______________________________
Student ID#:________________
Date of Incident: ___________________________________________________________________
Type of Incident: ________Cheating ________Plagiarism _________Other
Description of Incident: ______________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
Did the student admit to the charge of cheating, plagiarism or other act of academic dishonesty?
Yes_____ No_____ Student could not be contacted_____
Explanation________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
Explanation of recommended sanction ________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
Signature of Faculty Member________________________________
Date_____________
Resolution of the Case after Adjudication
Academic sanction ___________________________________________________________________
Disciplinary sanction _________________________________________________________________
Signature of Academic Integrity Officer _______________________
Date_____________
Student Support Services (SDEM)
Transfer Center
The mission of the Transfer Center is to assist students in making successful transitions to fouryear institutions by promoting early awareness of transfer opportunities, collaborating with
other campus entities, and by motivating and empowering students to become actively engaged
in their future., Our objective is to provide support services that will assist students with
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adjusting to their new college environment, determining their educational goals, and
encouraging individual development and growth.
The office has a resource center that offers an array of materials to assist with the transfer
process including:
 Four-year college course catalogs and applications.
 Guides and reference materials to four-year colleges and universities.
 Information about majors.
 Information about transfer scholarships and financial aid.
 Updated information about Open Houses and Campus Visits.
 Profiles of competitive and honors programs.
 Access to on-line applications, career exploration websites and Transfer Information &
Program Planning System (TIPPS).
 Unofficial graduation audit and transfer advisement
Throughout the semester, the office organizes activities such as senior college fairs where
students can obtain information about admissions requirements, scholarships and financial aid
opportunities. Transfer workshops and campus tours to local four-year colleges and
universities are also offered. Students who have decided to apply for transfer to another college
should arrange for an official Hostos transcript to be sent to the college.
For more information:
The Transfer Services Office
Savoy Building, Room D-101
Telephone (718) 518-4319
Career Services Office
The Career Services Office provides individualized career preparation assistance that includes;
career counseling, cooperative education placement and employment preparation services.
Career counseling and planning is available with use of the Career Cruising program and other
assessments to assist students with developing a career plan and clarifying major choice.
Employment readiness services consist of student preparation which includes; assistance with
resumes, cover letters, applications and videotaped mock interviews. The Employment
Counselor develops jobs and coordinates on and off-campus interviews for part-time and fulltime employment. He also offers post placement support to current students and recent
graduates. The Co-op program staff work collaboratively with faculty to prepare and place
students in paid field experiences and internships related to their major. All students who
register in the office may use the Career Resource Lab that provides access to a fax machine, a
phone for job networking, several local journals with current job search-related information,
career videos and DVDs. In addition, career programs and online assessment inventories may
be completed in the lab.
Monthly workshops are offered for "Rewards Points" in all focus areas which include: career
planning, interviewing skills; resume and cover letter preparation and the web-based job
search. On-campus recruitment takes place approximately three times a month and a job fair is
hosted on-campus annually.
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The Suited for Success Resource Room houses business suits and accessories for students in
need of interview attire. Metro cards are available to provide students with carfare for
interviews.
Students are encouraged to visit the Career Services Office to learn more about opportunities
available to them. Career development, as well as employment opportunities related to the
chosen curriculum, is essential to the education provided at Hostos. The services of the
program are available to all enrolled students and recent graduates.
For more information:
The Career Services Office
Savoy Building, Room D102
Telephone: (718) 518-4471; (718) 518-4468
College Discovery Office
College Discovery (CD) is a university wide special program. The program offers academic
support and counseling services to students who have a high potential to succeed but were
never provided the academic preparation to pursue college level work. CD Program students
are supported from admissions to graduation by staffs that are committed to helping students
achieve their full potential as individuals and to discover, develop and apply their talents to
pursue a career.
To be considered for CD a student must fill out the on-line CUNY admissions application and
answer the questions in the SEEK/CD section.
CD students are entitled to the CD Book stipend for up to six (6) academic semesters when
registered full time and three (3) summer semesters when registered for at least (6) credits. In
addition, CD pays a portion of the Student Activity Fee. Upon completion of the Associates
Degree, a student can transfer to the SEEK program at a CUNY Senior College. As a SEEK
student, the student will continue to receive funding and support services for an additional four
semesters, for a total of 10 semesters.
CD students must participate in and complete a five (5) week special summer program prior to
fall admissions. The only exceptions are attendance to complete high school requirements
and/or the CUNY Language Immersion Program; no other exceptions can be made. Students
who attend the summer program also receive a stipend. During the freshman year students are
required to attend tutoring and supplemental instruction and/or attend workshops to complete
and pass remedial courses. If a student's GPA is above 3.0 he/she will be invited to become part
of the CD Academic Excellence Cohort. These students are mentored to pursue leadership and
scholarship opportunities offered by the college and the university. The program offers a host of
support services that include academic advisement, registration and personal counseling
services from an assigned CD Counselor. The assigned CD counselor also teaches CD freshman
orientation course (SSD 100) which students are required to take regardless of their curriculum
choice.
To be eligible for the College Discovery Program a student must be a first time freshman, have a
high school average below 80, a NYC resident and have a household income that falls within
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the income guidelines established by the State of New York. Acceptance into the CD program is
once a year and must be prior to fall matriculation only.
For more information:
College Discovery Program
Savoy Building, Room 101.
Telephone: (718) 518-4486 or 4265
Health and Wellness Office
The mission of the Health and Wellness Office is to provide comprehensive health programs
that emphasize wellness and cost-effective, readily accessible services tailored to the needs of
the college community. Understanding and meeting the physical, spiritual, and emotional
health related needs of students is a major focus of the office. The following services are
available to students:
 First Aid Emergency Treatment.
 State Mandated Vaccinations on Measles, Mumps, and Rubella (MMR).
 Hepatitis B vaccinations for students matriculated in the Allied Health Sciences.
 Blood Pressure Screening.
 Blood Sugar Screening.
 Over-the-counter Medications.
 Condoms.
 Counseling on Sexually Transmitted Diseases/Infections.
 Counseling on general health Issues.
 Referrals to general health centers/providers or the Department of Health.
 Programming health activities with community health organization (Wellness Festival,
World AIDS Awareness, Blood Drive, Workshop related to Health Promotion and
Disease Prevention).
Immunizations
Compliance with Public Health Law 2165 and Public Health Law 2167 are required of all
potential college students in the state of New York. Students must provide the following before
registering for classes at the College:
 Measles, two doses (administered after 12 months of age).
 Mumps, one dose (administered after 12 months of age).
 Rubella, one dose (administered after 12 months of age).
 OR Lab print-out of Measles, Mumps, and Rubella titers proving immunity.
 Completion of the Meningococcal Meningitis Response Form.
The Health Services Office is staffed by a Registered Nurse
For more information:
Health Services Office, Room A-334C
Telephone: (718) 518-6542
Hostos Children's Center, Inc.
The Hostos Community College Children's Center, Inc. is a privately incorporated, campusbased childcare center licensed by the New York City Department of Health and regulated by
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New State. The Center undergoes a periodic comprehensive inspection and all Center
employees must fulfill the clearance requirements mandated by the city and state of New York.
These requirements include fingerprinting, screening for child abuse by the New York State
Clearance Register and an annual physical examination.
The Center services children of matriculated Hostos students and legal guardians attending
Hostos Community College. Children ages two (2)--to four—(4) are eligible for day services.
Universal Pre-K is available. Childcare tuition fees are subsidized for all students.
The Hostos Children's Center provides a safe, caring, bilingual education and supportive
environment for the children. Cultural diversity, first and second language acquisition, and age
appropriate practices are viewed as the foundation blueprint in meeting the educational, social,
emotional, and physical needs of children and their communities. Due to New York State
regulatory requirements, the Center cannot offer short term drop-off services.
Enrollment is contingent on the order of the initial requests and available slots. However, the
admission policy reserves the right to balance the groups based on age and facility assignment
for licensing compliance. All children are eligible for enrollment regardless of ethnicity, color,
religion, gender or national origin.
Hostos students interested in placing children at the Center are expected to complete and
submit an initial application, which is entered into the Center's database. As space becomes
available, applicants are then contacted and advised to follow through with the enrollment
process in a timely manner.
Registration Process
Once space has become available, applicants are notified by phone, via E-mail, and regular mail
with information regarding registration dates. At this time, applicants are advised that the
registration process occurs on a "first-come first-serve" basis, as admission is limited to space
availability. Prospective enrollees should prepare to begin the registration process several
months prior to each semester.
The Registration Process is conducted in several phases. If a parent or guardian is unable to
participate in the initial enrollment process, they are cautioned that there may not be available
vacancies during the final period.
Currently, the Center does not offer a Flex Hour Day Program. Children enrolled in the day
program must attend a minimum of 7.50 hours per week.
For those interested in attending summer classes, the Children's Center provides a summer
program if a sufficient numbers of children are available for service. The hours of operation
during the summer months are: Mon - Thurs. 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
For more information:
Children's Center, Room A-109
Telephone: (718) 518-4176
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Hostos Athletics, Recreation and Intramural
Athletics, Recreation and Intramural programs are viewed as essential components of higher
education, supplementing the educational process through enhancements of physical mental
and emotional development. Students who participate in recreational sports tend to develop
positive self-images, awareness of strengths, increased tolerance and self-control, stronger social
interaction skills and maturity.
Athletics, Recreation and Intramural programs are a vital part of the Hostos College experience.
Our Athletics Center exists to serve the entire College community by providing the
environment and means for a person to enhance his or her quality of life through physical
activity. Emphasis is on participation, with a steadfast commitment to the fundamental values
of fair play and sportsmanship.
Hostos adheres strictly to the National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA) code, as
well as City University of New York Athletic Conference (CUNYAC), whereby student
participation in intercollegiate athletics is an avocation. Athletics programs foster the physical
and educational wellbeing of student-athletes at all times, reflecting the highest standards of
dignity and honor that characterize participation in competitive sports in a collegiate setting.
Our recreational and intramural programs offer a range of options for members of the Hostos
community, individually or as part of a team, so participants may achieve the physical, mental,
and social benefits of participation. The Aquatic and Fitness Centers as well as the Dance
Studio and Gymnasium are quality facilities that have an outstanding staff and an environment
conducive to the enrichment of community life on campus, and an allegiance to the highest
moral principles in every aspect of sportsmanship and wellness.
In alignment with Hostos mission, we believe that participation in athletics and recreational
programs provide excellent preparation for achievement in our society. Participants learn how
to compete effectively and with integrity in any environment, appreciate the value and benefits
of teamwork, and how to be motivational leaders. These lessons instill and strengthen qualities
that add to success in our students' personal development as well as their future endeavors.
Athletic Teams
Men's Basketball
Men's Soccer
Women's Basketball
Women's Volleyball
Intramurals
Co-ed Basketball
Co-ed Indoor Soccer
Co-ed Volleyball
Recreation
Open Gym
Open Swim
Open Fitness
For more information:
The Athletics Department, Room C-380
(718) 518-6551
Personal & Academic Counseling
The Carlos Gonzales Counseling Center provides personal counseling for students on an
individual and group basis. Counseling is provided in a private and supportive environment in
which students may focus family problems, personal development concerns and other matters
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of importance to them. Counseling services are available in English, Spanish, French, and
German. The Counseling Center maintains a close collaborative relationship with the
instructional faculty, who are a source of many student referrals. Counselors are available to
consult with faculty on issues affecting student academic performance and retention.
The process begins in a number of ways after a student is admitted to the college. For some, it is
initiated through the College Orientation course (see SSD 100, Freshman Orientation) where
students are informed about essential academic policy and procedures, and learn academic and
personal success skills. Through this course students may develop a relationship with a
counselor. Freshmen or continuing students may make appointments by calling or coming to
the Center.
Counseling is a process in which professional skills, knowledge and experience are applied in a
collaborative effort that actively involves students in helping themselves. Students can expect
counselors to promote a mutually trusting and respectful relationship in which they can discuss
their concerns in a frank and open manner. They can also expect to learn new skills and ways of
understanding and managing their lives. All sessions are confidential.
Issues students typically may want to address with a counselor:
 Academic and social pressures of college.
 Personal trauma, loss or unresolved personal problems.
 Academic difficulties.
 Domestic violence.
 Feelings of anxiety or depression.
 Improving self-confidence.
 Managing stress.
 Problems in relationships.
 Problems with substance abuse.
 Thoughts about suicide.
 Parenting issues.
Referrals
Counselors may refer students to one of the many resources available outside the College.
For more information:
Counseling Office, Room C-330
Telephone (718) 518-4351
Email: [email protected]
Emergencies
In circumstances when a student needs to see a counselor because of serious emotional or
personal problems, no appointment is necessary. Intake staff will perform a brief screening and
facilitate an immediate meeting with a counselor if appropriate. In some cases a counselor may
contact Campus Safety to arrange for the City's Emergency Services to come to the College to
assist.
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Accessibility Resource Center (ARC):
The Role of the Office
The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) prohibits discrimination based on disability and
requires the College to be physically and programmatically accessible. Beyond the basic
requirements of the ADA, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and New York State and New
York City statutes, the college's Accessibility Resource Center (ARC) provides services to assist
students with a disability maximize their potential for success. Based on an intake interview
and documentation provided by a student, a variety of accommodations may be provided to
assist qualified students to attain their academic objectives. Intake and counseling are provided
in English and Spanish.
What is a Disability?
As the ADA defines it, a disability means, with respect to an individual, (A) a physical or
mental impairment that substantially limits one or more of the major life activities of such
individual; (B) a record of such an impairment; or (C) being regarded as having such an
impairment. Some physical impairments are visible, but many other physical as well as mental
impairments are invisible to the typical observer. In either case, an individual may meet the
ADA's definition of disability and qualify for services and accommodations provided by the
college. Some examples of invisible impairments are: arthritis, epilepsy, traumatic brain injury,
cancer, Multiple Sclerosis, asthma, AIDS, and heart disease, hearing loss and deafness,
blindness, low vision, respiratory disorders, learning disabilities, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome,
Fibromyalgia, Attention Deficit Disorder, and a wide range of psychiatric or mental health
impairments including depression, Post-Traumatic Stress and other Anxiety Disorders,
schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. There are other invisible impairments as well that may
qualify a student for services.
How to Apply for Student Services and Student Accommodations
In order to receive services and accommodations students must identify themselves to the
college and document their disability according to CUNY guidelines. The most effective way to
initiate the process of assessing eligibility for accommodations is to do so prior to or during the
admission process. Some students wait until registration or after classes begin to self-identify,
which can delay the provision of services and accommodations. Under the ADA, both the
student and the college must carry out their responsibilities in a timely manner, so the sooner a
student self-identifies, the sooner the college can provide needed accommodations.
In summary the steps a student needs to take to receive services and accommodations are:
 Identify him/herself to the Office during the Admission process or as soon as possible
 Participate in the intake process
 Provide the necessary disability documentation
 Provide additional, specific documentation of need for accommodations
 Participate in and complete the Accommodations Plan
Services a Student May Receive
Any student with a disability may receive services from ARC upon providing the appropriate
documentation. In addition to planning and coordinating accommodations, the office provides
counseling to assist students to deal with the full range of academic, career and personal issues
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that confront individuals in college. The Academic Achievement Center, Career Services and
Counseling Services are routinely utilized as part of a comprehensive response to student needs
and interests. Consultation with faculty is an essential component of academic support services
for students. The office also maintains a close working relationship with external State and notfor-profit vocational rehabilitation and disability services agencies and organizations in order to
facilitate student referral and use of their services. These agencies include the Office of
Vocational and Educational Services for Individuals with Disabilities (VESID) and the
Commission for the Blind and Visually Handicapped (CBVH). In summary, SSWD services
include:
 Pre-admission Counseling
 General Academic and Personal Counseling
 Academic Advisement and Planning
 Coordinated Consultation with Faculty
 Needs Assessment for Disability-related Referral
 Coordinated Referral to and Follow-up with College and External Resources
 Other Support Services.
Accommodations a Student May Receive
An accommodation is a modification that is intended to make a physical location, an academic
program or a course, service or activity effectively accessible to a student with a disability.
Accommodations are provided to students who provide additional, relevant documentation of
disability limitations that warrant specific accommodations. The ARC staff works closely with
faculty and external resources identified by the student and the office to provide the most
appropriate and effective accommodations based on documented need. Students who provide
the appropriate documentation may receive the following accommodations based on individual
need:
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Modified testing (for CUNY Placement, Retest and regular course exams). This includes
extra time; quiet/solitary setting; use of a reader and/or scribe; taped, large print or
brailed exams; Assistive Technology
One-to-one and/or small group tutoring and/or tutoring in a distraction-free
environment
Lab Assistant
Note-taker
Sign Language Interpreter
Electronic versions of text and other books
Scanned reading materials
Large print and brailed Materials
Assistive technology in instructional and support settings
Classes moved to accessible locations
Other academic accommodations based on student-specific disability and documented
limitations
Technology Resources
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A major strength of the office is the extensive selection of personal computers and assistive
technology available to students. This includes accessible personal computers, assistive
software such as JAWS, Zoom Text, text HELP, Kurzweil 1000 and 3000, voice recognition
software, scanners, laptop computers to borrow, CCTV's and other equipment. Assistive
technology is also available in the College Library and the Open Computer Lab. Students with
vision impairments, learning disabilities and other reading-related limitations as well as
students with hand function impairments, seizure disorders and other limitations may find
adaptive solutions to their limitations through the use of assistive technology. The office also
provides Computer Literacy and Internet use training as well as Assistive Technology training
in the office's Technology Resource Center for Students with Disabilities. The office works
closely with the College Library to assist students with disabilities develop or enhance
information technology skills so crucial to success in college and employment and for life-long
learning.
Office Location
The ARC office is located in the Counseling Center in the Savoy Building, Room D101P. Both
the building and the service and accommodation provision areas are accessible to individuals
who use wheelchairs.
Office Hours
The office is open Monday through Thursday from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.; Friday from 9:00 a.m.,
to 2:00 p.m. Evening Appointments are arranged on an as needed basis.
Compliance
The College's ADA/504 Compliance Officer works with ARC to ensure that compliance issues
are addressed in a timely manner. The officer is located in Room A-336 and may be reached at
718-518-4284.
The external resource for filing disability discrimination complaints is the U.S. Department of
Education's Office for Civil Rights.
Voter Registration Site
The Accessibility Resource Center provides voter registration application forms. The ARC office
provides assistance with completion of forms on a walk-in basis to students who come to
request services for the first time and re-admit students. Posters announcing these services are
placed in the ARC area. Assistance with completion of forms will be offered to students who
are physically unable to fill out the forms themselves.
For more information
Telephone: (718) 518-4454
Staff may be reached via this number or by email at the following address:
Mr. Raymond Perez, Services Manager; [email protected]
Ms. Simone Sylvester, LEADS Counselor, [email protected]
Ms. Maria Pantoja, Disability Accommodation Specialist, [email protected]
For additional useful information, please visit the SSWD website at
http://www.hostos.cuny.edu/Administrative-Offices/SDEM/Accessibility-Resource-Center(ARC)/General-Information
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Student Activities
Purpose
The role of the Office of Student Activities (OSA) is to create and promote out-of-classroom
experiences for students. Student Activities interacts closely with the members of over forty (40)
student organizations, assisting their leaders in the areas of leadership skills training and event
programming. Our collaborative efforts also include working with the elected leaders of the
Student Government Association (SGA) to register clubs and manage the student electoral
process. The Office of Student Activities (OSA) provides a wide-array of services to the college
community. Some of the most common services are (1) to develop extra-curricular activities for
the college community; (2) to serve as a general advisor to the SGA; (3) to certify student
organizations on campus; (4) to assist student organizations in the planning and development
of activities; (5) to alert the college community of activities organized by student organizations
and SGA; and (6) to manage the funds for student organizations and other entities that received
awards from the Hostos Association. In essence, the office seeks to promote the creation of
cultural, educational and social events that captivate, educate, entertain and effectively serve
the college community. During the academic year, the office coordinates and implements
conferences, visits to legislative offices, and offers workshops on various student development
topics. During the summer, the office works closely with the newly-elected student government
members to help them become acquainted with the responsibilities that they are about to
undertake.
Location
The Office of Student Activities is located in the C-Building (450 Grand Concourse), Room 371
For more information:
Phone: (718) 518-6561
Fax: (718) 518-6560
E-mail: [email protected]
Office Hours
The Office of Student Activities is available to provide services to students as follows:
Monday, Tuesday and Friday 9:00 am - 5:00 pm
Wednesday and Thursday 9:00 am - 6:30 pm
The Hostos Student Leadership Academy
The Student Leadership Academy works to promote the promising talents of individual student
leaders through civic minded activities, community service, cultural influx and developmental
leadership training.
The goal of the Academy is to promote leadership as a skill necessary to every person, and to be
utilized in every aspect of one’s life.
Student Learning and Development Outcomes
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Leadership Development
Meaningful Interpersonal Relationships
Collaboration
Social Responsibility
Effective Communication
Enhanced Self-Esteem
Self-Appraisal
Clarified Values
Satisfying and Productive Lifestyles
Appreciating Diversity
Independence
Intellectual Growth
Personal and Educational Goals
Healthy Behavior
Spiritual Awareness
The tools utilized to achieve the goals and objectives of the Academy
 Self-Assessment and Reflection
 Skill Building
 Problem Solving
 Mentoring
 Community Involvement/Service
 Public Policy
 Intercultural Issues
 Service Learning and Servant Leadership
 Cultural Activities
 Student Leadership of Programs
 Targeted Training and Development
 Student Recognition
 Scholarship Development
 Transcript and Portfolio Development
 Capstone Experiences
The Student Leadership Academy has several programs:
Hostos Student Ambassador Program
 Ambassadors are required to maintain a GPA of 3.25 or higher and take six or more
credits each semester.
 Each Ambassador commits to one year of service and agrees to serve 40 hours of
community service each semester that they are in the academy.
 Ambassadors are the first line of students utilized as a resource of Hostos, CUNY and
the Bronx. They attend conferences, give testimony at hearings, and support the
administration and CUNY central at a variety of events and locales.
 Student Ambassadors also provide mentorship, support, do community outreach and
plan and implement Community service activities for the larger group.
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In order to become a student ambassador you must go through a rigorous interview
process and provide letters of recommendation, a resume and documentation of unique
and service oriented activities that you have been a part of in your life.
The Student Leadership Advisory Council provides guidance and support to the
members of the academy and takes on a mentorship role with individual students
throughout their stay at Hostos Community College. (Members of the Student
Leadership Advisory Council is made up of faculty, staff, alumni and the Student
Leadership Coordinator.
The Hostos Student Ambassadors receive specialized training in workshops specifically
designed for their needs on Fridays from 3:30 to 5:30 PM. Workshops are provided in
debate, public speaking, voice and diction, mask making, ethics and etiquette,
leadership skills, parliamentary procedure, effective mentorship, writing skills and job
skills preparation. In addition, winter and summer workshops are offered to help
enhance the skills of the members of the academy.
* Workshops are mandatory for Hostos Student Ambassadors and are open to participation by
SOS Team Members.
** The Academy also offers a weekly Leadership Film Series for all students at the college.
(Hostos Student Ambassadors host the weekly Wednesday night event from 6-9 PM.)
Student Orientation Services Team (SOS)
 SOS Team Members have a GPA of 2.8 or higher and are required to be registered for at
least six credits per semester.
 A SOS Team Member commits to one year of service and makes a generous commitment
of 40 hours to provide support to students during registration, orientations, college tours
and job fairs, (amongst other things.)
 The SOS Team is currently a feeder group for the Hostos Student Ambassadors and if
after a semester of service an SOS Team Members shows a great commitment to service
and maintains or improves their GPA they can be promoted, through a tier system into
the Ambassador Program.
 The SOS Team receives specialized team training in workshops specially designed for
them. They also receive a toolkit that will help them to produce results as a team player.
 Team Training Workshops are mandatory for SOS Team Members and are open to
participation by any other member of the Academy that would like to participate.
Emerging Leaders Program
 There is no GPA requirement for recruits who participate in the Emerging Leaders
Program.
 The initiative is to provide students, who may want to participate in doing community
service activities or may benefit from receiving special training, with the opportunity to
do so, without overwhelming them in their efforts to work to improve themselves
academically.
 The hope is that by giving student who have struggled the opportunity to participate in
specialized programming, they may be more inclined to be active on campus, may
receive unique mentoring from Ambassadors or SOS Team Members and can grow and
develop into valuable assets to the college community as well as improving themselves
academically.
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The Emerging Leaders Program will represent a third tier in Hostos Leadership
Academy's Membership and members of this group will be eligible for promotion into
the SOS Team, based upon meeting certain criteria.
Hostos Community College Volunteer Corps
 Make a difference by being the difference
 Have you ever felt that there was more to do than just go about your daily routine? Ever
wondered how it might feel to help a stranger in need? Have you ever volunteered
before with your religious organization, school or neighborhood organization? Want to
make a difference today?
 Are you interested in serving the community or volunteering on the Hostos campus?
Whether you have a specific idea in mind or you are simply searching for a way to be
active in the community and get involved, we would love to have you participate! Stop
in at the Hostos Student Leadership Office in room C-392 to pick up, fill out and hand in
a completed Volunteer Interest Form.
Office of the Hostos Student Leadership Academy
East Academic Complex, Room C-392
(718) 518-6541
E-mail: [email protected]
Student Life Office/Dean of Students’ Office
The Office of Student Life (OSL) is grounded in the development and maintenance of student
programs that provide opportunities for academic, personal and professional growth through
leadership activities, internships, orientation, counseling, wellness programs, career exploration
and athletics. At the same time, OSL strives to increase awareness about institutional policies
and procedures. Participating students acquire the skills they need to work independently and
in groups, where they benefit from an exchange of ideas in a richly diverse environment.
Students are encouraged to interact with each other, faculty, staff and members of the local
community.
In addition, OSL is responsible for generating a comprehensive calendar of events; processing
student inquiries, complaints, judicial proceedings and notifications; and serving as an
administrative agent for the Academic Standards Committee in the Academic Appeal review
process. This unit also ensures that at-risk students are advised, receive an academic plan of
assistance and are registered.
Location
Dean of Students/Student Life
120 East 149th Street, Rm. D-101
Bronx, New York 10451
(718) 518-6557
Veterans Affairs
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Veterans and dependents of veterans are entitled to a variety of benefits. To apply under the
provisions of the G.I. Bill V an Educational Benefits you. Must complete a form that is available
and may be submitted electronically on the internet www.gibill.va.gov or mailed to the
Department of Veterans Affairs, V A Regional Office, P.O. Box 4616, Buffalo, NY 14240-4616.
To apply for Vocational Rehabilitation Benefits the veteran must obtain approval from a VA
counselor at the Veterans Administration,
245 West Houston Street, New York, NY 10014.
It is necessary for every veteran and dependent attending Hostos to report to the Veterans'
Liaison, Office of the Registrar, each successive session (that is, in September, January, and
June) with the Certificate of Release or Discharge from Active Duty Form (DD214) or
Certification of Eligibility Form (DD2384/2384-1) to initiate the veteran's and dependent's
enrollment status to the V.A. The receipt of benefits takes approximately twelve weeks.
Veterans applying for benefits must be able to document their service in the military, marital
status, and number of dependents they support.
To obtain information regarding the certification process, you may contact:
Veterans Coordinator
Office of the Registrar Savoy Bldg., Room D-207
(718) 518-4417
The Department of Veterans Affairs has a national Home Page on the World Wide Web
(internet) where you can get information about V.A. educational benefit programs. The
National Home Page address is www.gibill.va.gov or call toll-free at 1-888-GI-Bill1/1-800-8271000. If you are hearing impaired, call toll-free at 1-800-829-4833. You may also log on to
www.cuny.edu/veterans for education support services. We give our full support to all
veterans.
Office of Student Programming for Veteran and Reservists
The Office of Student Programming for Veteran and Reservists has been established to provide
an array of specialized educational support and student development related services for
veterans and reservists. Services include organizing and developing student leadership training
and mentorship training; collaborating with faculty to provide guidance and support on
programming initiatives, conducting orientations on academic policies and procedures;
providing guidance and support on programming initiatives that increase awareness of
veterans and reservists students at the college; assisting academic support; developing and
conducting extra-curricular activities for veterans and reservists affairs at the college; and
serving as liaison for community service referrals. Personal and academic counseling are
available in the Office of Counseling Services.
The Office of Student Programming for Veteran and Reservists:
120 East 149th Street, Room D-101
Phone Number: (718) 319-7955
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Special Programs
Continuing Education and Professional Studies
The Continuing Education and Professional Studies Department at Hostos Community College
offers academic, workforce, and personal development course designed to address the
educational, cultural and economic needs of the South Bronx, and Upper Manhattan
communities. Our quality courses, taught by knowledgeable and caring professors, can lead to
new employment opportunities, new careers, and new interests. We offer courses and certificate
programs for adults and children on weekdays, evenings, Saturdays and Sundays. Our courses
are available at a reasonable cost. You may be eligible for tuition assistance through various
voucher programs. We invite you to join the thousands of others who have enjoyed the caring,
family-like atmosphere and academic excellence that have made Hostos unique among
community colleges.
For more information:
(718) 518-6656
Email: [email protected]
CUNY in the Heights, located at 108 Cooper Street in the Inwood/Washington Heights
community of upper Manhattan offers both credit and non-credit classes including certificate
programs in a host of professions.
For more information:
(212) 567-7132
Email: [email protected]
The Adult Learning Center:
The Adult Basic Education Program provides adults with the opportunity to build their basic
skills and connect with future educational opportunities and employment. The program is for
individuals who are 19 yrs. of age or older and who have not completed high school and/or are
in need of building their English language skills. The ABE Program offers a free pre-GED/ GED
in English and Spanish as well as English for Speakers of Other Languages.
For more information:
(718) 518-6746
Email: [email protected]
Alumni Relations
The Alumni Relations Office at Hostos Community College offers an array of services designed
especially for our graduates and provides a variety of ways for the alumni to stay connected to
their alma mater. The main objectives of the office are: to promote interest of the alumni in the
general welfare of the College, its students, faculty and staff; to keep the alumni current on
matters concerning the college, and to assist the College in efforts to obtain funding from public
and private sources.
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To support the mission of keeping an open and active relationship with graduates, the Alumni
Relations Office, in conjunction with the Public Safety Department, has developed the Alumni
ID Card. The ID card is a passport to many benefits after graduation and gives the alumni
access to selected areas in the College, including:






Library Services - Browsing and in-house use of the library for personal and business
needs; reference assistance with research and search strategies; instructional support for
use of print and non-print sources; and full access to the Hostos Library's online
electronic collection.
Career Development Services - Important resources for employment and advancement
tools.
Athletic and Recreational Facilities -Access to the newly renovated and fully-equipped
Fitness Center, Olympic-sized pool, plus free attendance to all athletic events: men's
basketball, women's basketball, volleyball and soccer games.
Cultural Events - Twenty percent discount tickets to most cultural events sponsored by
the Hostos Center for the Arts and Culture. Come and visit the Alumni Relations Office
located at 120 East, 149th St. Room 214, Telephone: 718-518-4180.
Continuing Education Department – Fifteen percent discount for you and your family to
most courses offered by the Hostos Continuing Education Department.
Computer Center – Access to use the Hostos Computer Center. To purchase a printing
card, please visit the Hostos Library.
Public Relations
The Eugenio María de Hostos Community College Office of Public Relations, in the Division of
Institutional Development, is responsible for designing, developing and implementing strategic
communications and media relations programs that support the mission and core values of the
College.
Among its responsibilities, the Office of Public Relations manages the College's web news
pages; advises faculty and staff on responding to media interview requests; serves as liaison to
local, national and international media outlets; publicizes and promotes campus events; helps,
organizes and promotes activities that support recruitment, institutional branding, fundraising
and marketing; conceptualizes, and produces publications, including the Hostos Connection
(the College's official newsletter), press releases, statements, talking points and opinion pieces;
works and collaborates closely with the President and his/her Executive Cabinet to maintain
good communication and working relationships with community leaders, organizations and
political leadership at the local, state and federal levels; and among other responsibilities,
maintains regular contact with key academic and administrative areas of CUNY, in order to
stay current on strategic priorities, issues and policies.
Contact: Soldanela Rivera Lopez
Communications Consultant
Office of Institutional Development
Eugenio María de Hostos Community College
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of The City University of New York
120 East 149th Street, Rm. 214 E
Bronx, NY 10451.
Tel. (718) 518-4355.
Fax #: (718) 518-4240.
COPE - College Opportunity to Prepare for Employment
The COPE program is funded by and operated in collaboration with the Family Independence
Administration of the City of New York Human Resources Administration. Services are
available to anyone who is a current or former CUNY student or applicant and who is either
receiving public assistance, Safety Net Assistance or who meets federal income guidelines for
families with income under 200% of the federal poverty level. The program provides: Enhanced
academic and comprehensive support services; individual and group advisement on a variety
of issues; Metro cards for students employed at least 20 hours (if they qualify); Fair Hearing
requests and assistance; the policies and procedures, preparing school letters and ACD 548
forms; Attendance verification letters, monitor attendance and compliance of students assigned
to work/ study or internship, WEP Assistance, Legal Aid Assistance for HRA related issues,
Employment counseling, coaching and placement.
The mission of COPE is:
To facilitate program completion and to provide our students with the opportunity of obtaining
a challenging job, which in turn will foster financial independence, self-confidence and personal
growth.
For more information:
María Cano, Director
(718) 518-4362
Lourdes Gomera, Coordinator
(718) 518-4339
CLIP – CUNY Language Immersion Program
The CUNY Language Immersion Program (CLIP) offers students the opportunity to study
English intensively for a period of time before they enroll in formal college courses. This
program includes ESL instruction, computer-assisted learning, tutoring, books and other
materials, field trips, college orientation, and advisement. Because of the intensity of the
language instruction (25 hours a week), students do not take additional college coursework
while they are attending the Language Immersion Program.
CLIP Highlights:
 The Hostos CLIP program is recommended for entering freshmen who have already
been admitted to a CUNY college and who need additional English as a Second
Language classes prior to entering college. CLIP is also for students who have not been
successful in their college ESL courses (did not pass one semester of ESL at the
community college level or failed the same ESL course two times at a senior college).
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


Students may choose a day or evening schedule. Classes meet Monday through Friday.
Day classes meet from 9:00 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Evening classes meet from 5:00 p.m. to 10:00
p.m.
Students can enroll in the program for up to one year or for one semester only. There are
three cycles of classes: two sessions of 15 weeks in Fall and Spring, and a six-week cycle
in the Summer. Students are given the Freshman Skills Assessments Tests before leaving
CLIP so that they can be placed in the appropriate classes when they return to their
college.
Students do not use their financial aid in CLIP. The cost of the program including books
and materials is $180.00 in Fall or Spring, and $75.00 in the Summer. Students on public
assistance pay $45.00 for Fall or Spring, and $18.00 for the Summer. SEEK and College
Discovery students pay $45.00 for fall or spring semester and $18.00 for summer. (Fees
are subject to change)
For more information contact:
Fatiha Makloufi, Director
[email protected]
Parys Lebron, CLIP's Office Manager
[email protected]
Room C-553
Hours: 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. daily
Telephone: (718) 518-6645 or -6657
Fax: (718) 518-5745
CUNY Baccalaureate Program
Established in 1971, the CUNY Baccalaureate Program (CUNY BA/BS) is a small, Universitywide individualized degree program intended for self-directed, academically strong students
who have well-formulated academic and career goals. Students who are admitted to the
program work out an individualized area of specialization with guidance from a CUNY faculty
member who agrees to serve as a mentor. Students also complete the Program's liberal arts core
distribution and other degree requirements. They are also able to incorporate independent
studies and internship into their degrees, and may be able to earn up to 15 credits for
documenting learning experiences that occurred prior to entering college. Although students in
the Program are matriculated at one CUNY College, they are free to pursue their studies and
take courses at any other CUNY college including, in some cases, the CUNY Graduate Center.
To be eligible to apply, students must seeking to design a unique or interdisciplinary area of
concentration (that is, wanting to do something different from one of the majors offered by one
of the CUNY colleges) and must have completed at least 15 college credits with a grade point
average of 2.5 or higher. Students can apply to one of the CUNY colleges at the same time as
applying to the CUNY BA Program. Students can stay matriculated at Hostos Community
College until they reach 60 credits (many students will be able to complete their Associate's
degree on the way to completing the Bachelor's degree). The CUNY BA and BS degrees are fully
accredited and are awarded by the City University rather than by one of the individual CUNY
colleges.
For more information contact:
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CUNY Baccalaureate Program
(212) 817-8220
www.cunyba.cuny.edu
365 Fifth Avenue
New York, New York 10016
Latin American Writers Institute
LAWI Founded in 1987 by Professor Isaac Goldenberg while teaching at City College, the Latin
American Writers Institute (LAWI) has become, over its first twenty years of existence, a strong
supporter of Latino writers whose work appears in Spanish, English, or both languages. In 1991,
LAWI received the Manhattan Borough President's "Excellence in Arts Award."
Hostos Community College became the Institute's new home in 1992. LAWI is the central
advocacy and service organization for the dissemination of the work of Latino writers in the
United States. LAWI offers established and emerging Latino writers many services related to
their professional careers. It also develops new talent and encourages understanding of and
public interest in new writers by hosting and sponsoring writing workshops, readings, and
conferences. LAWI publishes books under its imprint, The Latino Press, and it also publishes
Hostos Review / Revista Hostosiana, a journal devoted mainly to Latino culture and to building
links between Latino writers, artists and intellectuals living in the United States and their
counterparts in Latin America and other parts of the world. LAWI also publishes LAWI Noticias,
a weekly multilingual electronic newsletter devoted to disseminating news regarding Latino
and Latin America literary, artistic, and cultural activities in the United States and abroad.
It features reviews of publications by Latino writers; sections on literary contests, grants and
residencies; calls for manuscripts and new magazine listings, news regarding other literary
organization, writing workshops, and publishing opportunities. LAWI Noticias is sent to writers
and followers of Latino literature in the United States and abroad, including universities,
libraries and cultural and literary centers. Also, LAWI's information services and
collaborations in organizing readings, conferences, and workshops are made available to
professors, journalists, reviewers, translators, editors, and publishers. In keeping with LAWI's
goal of increasing intercultural understanding, its activities are designed for a multiethnic
audience. The institute seeks to recognize and encourage cultural diversity in its membership
and all of its programs.
Study Abroad Programs
Study Abroad Programs provide opportunities for CUNY students, faculty, and staff to increase
their understanding of the history, culture, educational system, and language of other
communities and countries throughout the world. In addition to creating an institutional
environment that promotes respect for cultural and linguistic differences, these programs
cultivate skills that prepare participants to compete in the global economy.
For more than a decade Hostos has collaborated in a series of very successful study
abroad/academic exchange programs with institutions of higher education in the Hispanic
Caribbean and various European countries.
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A study abroad program is three to four weeks in duration. From Monday through Friday,
there are four hours of classroom lectures in the morning, and supplementary educational and
cultural experiences are provided in the afternoon. The classes feature lectures by distinguished
scholars from the host university. The supplementary experiences include visits to artists'
studios, museums, historical sites, and other places of interest. These field trips enable students
to adapt quickly to the language and culture of the host country and support their research and
classroom learning.
Cultural enrichment activities also contribute significantly to the academic experience. Predeparture field trips/visits to the Dominican and Puerto Rican communities of New York City
are included as part of the course. The curricula focus on the most relevant aspects of the
history, art, culture and education of these communities, and their place in the Hispanic
Caribbean. In the Dominican Republic, students visit the National Palace and meet some of the
most notable intellectuals, scholars, and artist of the country. The course is also designed to
provide insight into the American educational system through comparative analysis of a foreign
educational system from the perspective of social, cultural, political, economic, and religious
contexts.
Each course is part of the college's curriculum and has been ratified by the college's governance
structures. Participants register for credit-bearing courses and attend classes at the host
institution. The following are examples of typical courses offered in study abroad programs:
History, Culture, Art and Education of the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico and
Beginning/ Intermediate Spanish for Non-native Speakers.
Highlights of the programs include lectures by renowned scholars and original study abroad
documentaries about Dominican identity, culture, and history. Students who express interest
in conducting research receive instruction and participate in projects under the supervision of
faculty members and experts in the field. Their findings are published and disseminated at
conferences, seminars, and cultural enrichment activities.
Throughout the years, study abroad programs have flourished as these have established a
remarkable record of success at Hostos, as indicated by the 100% retention and passing rates
among program participants. Students have always rated the study abroad program as
excellent.
Programs for High School Students
College Now
College Now is a collaborative program of the City University of New York (CUNY) and the
New York City Department of Education (DOE) which aims to give students a jumpstart on
their college education while helping them succeed in high school courses. At Hostos
Community College, College Now motivates and prepares South Bronx high school students
for the reality of higher education and the college experience by offering them an opportunity to
take college-level courses and earn college credits.
Each semester, over 500 high school students from over 35 South Bronx high schools register for
College Now classes. In addition to offering college credit courses after-school (including
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Intermediate Algebra, Introduction to Criminal Justice Administration, Introduction to
Business, General Psychology and Expository Writing), College Now has also piloted a college
awareness workshop entitled Think College Now, created a Young Men's Leadership Institute
for 9th and 10th grade students, and co-sponsored (P) SAT Prep courses with the Peter Jay
Sharp Foundation.
College Now at Hostos Community College partners with the following high schools: Academy
for Scholarship and Entrepreneurship; Alfred E. Smith; Banana Kelly High School; Bronx
Academy of Letters; Bronx Expeditionary Learning High School; Bronx Guild; Bronx
International; Bronx Leadership Academy; Bronx Leadership Academy II; Bronx School for
Law, Government, and Justice; Community School for Social Justice CUNY Prep; Fannie Lou
Hammer; FLAGS; Frederick Douglas Academy III; Harlem Renaissance High School; Health
Opportunities High School High; School for Medical Science; High School for Violin and Dance;
Hostos Lincoln Academy; International Community High School; Millennium Art Academy;
Morris Academy for Collaborative Studies; Mott Haven Village Preparatory High School; New
School for Arts and Sciences; New World High School; Pablo Neruda Academy; Schomburg
Satellite Academy; School for Excellence Urban; Assembly School for Careers in Sports; and
Validus Preparatory Academy.
For more information:
Elizabeth Wilson
Coordinator, College Now
[email protected]
(718) 518-683
Liberty Partnership Program
The Liberty Partnership Program is an after-school, weekend and summer program for high
and middle school students here at Hostos Community College the Liberty Partnership
Program objective is not only to assist students in developing their academic skills but also to
introduce them to a college environment.
We offer enrichment courses geared to arouse attention in the pursuit of careers in Computers,
Introduction to Medical Careers, Math, Science, Martial Arts, Film Making, Mouse Certification,
Knitting, Calligraphy / Script Writing, Swimming [life guard certification training], Music [all
instruments] and Capoeira. In addition, we encourage students to explore the Arts through
various hands on activities and trips. Liberty Partnership Program is designed to improve a
student's academic capability. Our classes range from the basics as Math and Science to the
more non-traditional courses of Digital Photography. & Career Workshops which are all
accredited courses. Additionally, the program offers Summer Youth Employment opportunities
on the Hostos Community College campus.
The program is a partnership between Community Based Organizations, high school students,
parents, faculty, businesses, the Department of Education and institutions of higher education.
The program is staffed by college faculty, high school teachers, Liberty alumnus and
undergraduate students that serve as tutors and mentors. The partner schools are: Hostos
Lincoln Academy of Science High Middle school, Health Opportunities High School
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Liberty Partnerships Program has a partnership with the American Red Cross. This affiliation
between us has allowed our students to take part in an American Red Cross Lifeguard Training,
CPR, and Babysitting Certifications. Also, a working relationship with the Bronx district
attorney office on our yearly crime victims summit, and we are members of Health Occupation
Students of America [HOSA].
For more information:
Room C-491
Telephone: (718) 518-4188
Admissions Information
The Office of Admissions at Hostos Community College encourages prospective students to
meet with an admissions counselor regarding their higher education goals. The counselor will
help students examine their objectives, review admissions requirements, policies, and
procedures.
How to Apply
The Application Process
All applicants must complete the appropriate City University of New York online Application
and provide the required documents, as specified below. Failure to file the correct application
will result in a delay in processing for admission and may possibly incur additional fees and
subject students to disciplinary action. Be sure to read the instructions carefully and submit all
necessary documentation.
International Transfer Students can meet with an Admissions Counselor and file their online
application. However, they must mail their application fee (if they did not pay by credit card),
official transcripts and translations (when applicable) directly to the University Application
Processing Center (UAPC).
For information:
Hostos Community College
Office of Admissions
500 Grand Concourse
Bronx, NY 10451
or email: [email protected]
Office of Admission Services
1114 Avenue of the Americas (15th floor)
New York, NY 10036
(212) 997-2869
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or email a request to: [email protected]
Note: You should apply as early as possible. However, your application will be considered
whenever you apply provided the College is still open for the semester of interest. Freshmen
applications allow students to apply to six college programs. Transfer applications allow
students to apply to four college programs. Transfer students will be admitted to one college
ONLY, the first choice for which they are eligible. Freshmen will be admitted to all eligible
CUNY Colleges.
Freshman Online Application Process
Students who have never attended a college, university, or post-secondary institution since
graduating from high school/secondary school or receiving an equivalent (GED) in the U.S. or
abroad should complete the CUNY online Freshmen Application and indicate Hostos as the
first choice by logging onto www.cuny.edu/undergraduate. Students can also visit the
Admissions Office for assistance with filing online.
The freshman application requires the following:
1.
An official high school transcript or the general equivalency diploma (GED) and scores
with a minimum score of 2250 (formerly 225). The following are not acceptable:

A high school certificate

An IEP diploma

At - home - study diploma

Correspondence High School diploma
2.
A $65 money order application fee payable to UAPC (University Application Processing
Center). Students can also pay the application fee online with a credit card.
3.
Students educated outside the United States should refer to the "Students Educated
Abroad" section for additional information and requirements.
Transfer Student Online Application Process
Students who have attended a college, university, or other post-secondary institution in the
U.S. or abroad since graduating from high school/ secondary school or receiving the
equivalent (a GED) should file a CUNY Online Transfer Application and indicate Hostos as
the first choice by logging onto www.cuny.edu/undergraduate. Students can also visit the
Admissions Office for assistance with filing online. A transfer online application requires the
following:
1.
An official high school transcript or the general equivalency diploma (GED) and scores
with a minimum score of 2250 (formerly 225). The following are not acceptable:

A high school certificate

An IEP diploma

At - home - study diploma

Correspondence High School diploma
2.
An official transcript from all post-secondary institutions, colleges or universities
attended since graduating from high school/secondary school or earning a GED.
3.
A $70 money order application fee payable to the UAPC (University Application
Processing Center). Students can also pay the application fee online with a credit card.
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4.
Students currently attending another CUNY college do not have to pay the $70 fee. The
transfer application must include the courses in progress. Once grades are posted, an
official transcript from that college must be mailed to the Admissions Office.
Transfer Credits
Students may transfer credits earned at other accredited colleges in the U.S. or outside the
U.S., provided that (1) the courses were taken at institutions that are accredited by one of
the regional accrediting commissions recognized by CUNY and (2) the courses are
comparable to those offered at Hostos Community College. The Credit Evaluator evaluates
transfer credits at the Office of Admissions and Recruitment prior to the first semester of
attendance. The maximum number of credits that may be transferred is thirty (30). Credits
may be accepted if a grade of at least "C" was obtained. Students seeking entry into any
program offered at Hostos must adhere to any additional departmental requirements. Also,
prior college work cannot exceed timelines established by the Department Chairs and/or
their designees.
Students Educated Abroad
A student educated abroad must submit one of the following:


Secondary school transcripts, notas del Bachillerato, baccalaureate, mark sheets or secondary
external examination certificates (i.e. CXC, GCE, WASC, EAS, etc.) and/or other CUNY
recognized secondary school equivalent, when appropriate,
Official transcripts from any college, university, or other post-secondary school attended since
graduation from high school/secondary school.
Guidelines for Official Translation of Documents
Documents written in languages other than English must be accompanied by an official
translation, on letterhead, prepared using the same format as the original document. All
translations must be in compliance with the translation guidelines of the International
Admissions Unit of UAPC (University Application Processing Center). Contact the Admissions
Office to obtain a copy of "Guidelines for Official Translation of Documents".
International Student Admissions Process
International students should review and follow the above submission of documents
requirements for "Freshman", "Transfer" and "Students Educated Abroad" sections in order to
apply for a 1-20 Certificate. Prospective students should be aware that a 1-20 Certificate can
only be issued to a student after he/she has been completely processed and accepted into the
college through the University Application Processing Center (UAPC).
International Student Initial Attendance to Hostos:
If you have never been to the United States, you or your sponsor must demonstrate the
financial capability to fund living and attending school in the US. The total amount necessary
for issuance of a 1-20 is $22,442 per academic year. The following documents are suggested for
establishing proof of financial capability: Bank statements / letters (with the balance and/or
account activity), letter from employer (stating annual salary), tax returns.

Affidavit of support (Form 1-134) - this form is to be filled out by the student's sponsor.
You can download this form through the Citizenship and Immigration website at:
www.cis.gov.

Once we have received this information, we then issue the 1-20 Certificate.
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International Transfer Student:
If you are under an F-1 Visa already and are just transferring schools, you will need to follow
the admissions process first. Once you have received a letter of acceptance to Hostos you need
to come to the International Student Office and request our Transfer Release Form. You should
bring with you:

Passport & 1-94 cards.

All previous 1-20 Certificates issued to you.

Either you or your sponsor must demonstrate the financial capability to fund living
and attending school in the US. The total amount necessary for issuance of an I20 is
$22,442 per academic year.

Affidavit of Support (Form 1-134) from your sponsor. You can download this form from the
CIS website at: www.cis.gov. Be advised that your 1-20 Certificate cannot be issued to you until
your previous school transfers it through the SEVIS program. Students doing a Transfer of the
1-20 Certificate have until 15 days from the start of the semester to complete this process.
The International Student Services Office is located in the Admissions and Recruitment Office
in the Savoy Building, Room D-210. You can direct any questions or concerns you have to the
International Student Advisor by calling (718) 518-4439.
Second Degree
Students with an Associate degree from Hostos may apply to Hostos Community College for
a second undergraduate degree, provided it is different from the first degree. Applicants
should complete an undergraduate online transfer application for admission and submit to the
Admissions and Recruitment Office (1) official transcript(s) of all previous college work and
(2) a $70.00 money order payable to UAPC. Students can also pay the application fee online
with a credit card.
Non-Degree
Students who are not pursuing a degree but wish to enroll in courses at Hostos may be
admitted as non-degree students. Students must apply directly to the Hostos Admissions and
Recruitment Office. Non-degree students do not work toward a degree and are limited to
courses on a space-available basis. Non-degree students are not entitled to financial aid.
Non-degree students must submit the following
1.
An official high school transcript or the general equivalency diploma (GED) with a
minimum score of 2250 (formerly 225). The following are not acceptable:

A high school certificate

An IEP diploma

At-home-study diploma

Correspondence High School diploma
2.
A transcript from all post-secondary institutions, colleges or universities attended since
graduating from high school/secondary school or earning a GED.
3.
A $65 money order application fee payable to Hostos Community College.
Senior Citizens
Bona fide residents of New York City who are 60 years of age or older may be admitted by
following the regular degree-seeking student application process. Senior citizens may study
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tuition-free at the college upon the payment of a $65 fee on a space-available basis.
Additional Admission Requirements
Testing
The CUNY Skills Assessment Tests assess reading comprehension, mathematics, and writing to
determine students' readiness in these basic academic areas. Based on their performance,
students may be required to take remedial courses to strengthen their academic skills, or ESL
courses to develop their English language proficiency. After successful completion of
coursework in any of these areas, students are retested. For specific information regarding the
CUNY Skills Assessment Test and other testing issues, please see the section on Student
Assessment and Testing in this catalog.
Immunization
Measles, Mumps, Rubella
The City University of New York policy, in accordance with Public Health Law (PHL 2165),
requires that all students who register for six (6) or more billable credits and who were born
after December 31, 1956, submit proof of two measles vaccines and one mumps and rubella
vaccination in order to attend the University. To ensure full compliance, colleges must
adequately notify students of these requirements upon entering the University. The following
is the minimal requirement for students to complete the registration process and continue in
attendance:

Partial Compliance: One proof of measles, mumps, and rubella vaccinations and a
doctor's appointment for the second measles vaccination. The second proof of measles
vaccination must be submitted by the 30th or 45th day of the semester.

The Registrar's office will alert students in partial compliance that their attendance,
academic record, and financial aid eligibility can be affected if they do not complete the
immunization process.

A second letter is mailed to students in partial compliance before the 15th day of class,
informing them that (1) they will be excluded from class beginning on the 31st or 46th
day of the semester and that (2) free, on-campus immunization is available.

Students who do not comply with the minimal requirements must be excluded from
class and will not be allowed to return until they are in full compliance. An
administrative withdrawal grade ("WA") will be placed on the student's academic
record in lieu of a regular grade. Three (3) steps are needed to reverse the "WA" grade
before the end of the semester, thereby allowing the student to return to class and
receive a letter grade from the instructor:
1.
Present proof of immunization to the Nurse Practitioner before the end of
the semester (last day of classes);
2.
Obtain approval (signed reversal form) from the instructor to return to class;
3.Submit reversal form to Registrar's Office before the end of the semester. It
is essential that all steps be completed to reverse "WA" grades. The "WA"
grade is not reversible beyond the semester in question. Even if students
satisfy the immunization requirement during the following semester, "WA"
grades will remain on their transcripts as permanent grades.
Meningitis
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In accordance with PHL 2167, students must be provided written information about
meningococcal meningitis and students must complete, sign, and return a meningococcal
meningitis response form. PHL 2167 does not require that students be immunized against
meningitis. Note: For more information, refer to "CUNY Immunization Requirements" in the
Policy and Procedures section of this catalog.
Residency in New York City and New York State
The residency process qualifies students for the lower tuition rate. Residency is determined by
combining the length of time a student has resided in New York State and/or New York City
and the immigration status of non- U.S. citizens. In the residency verification process, the
Office of Admissions and Recruitment determine the tuition to be charged to students. The
University has approved two forms to document the student residency determination:
1.
Residency Form
2.
Alternate Lease Statement (a Hostos form adopted by CUNY)
Residency Verification Process
A community college student may qualify for the resident tuition rate if s/he is a U.S.
Citizen; permanent resident or in another recognized immigration status and meets both of
the following conditions on or prior to the first day of class:
a.
b.
Continuously maintained his/her principal place of abode in the State of New York
for a period of twelve (12) consecutive months immediately proceeding the first day of
classes. (A student who has attended a high school in New York City or State for the
two semesters immediately prior to the first day of classes satisfies this condition).
Continuously maintained his/her principal place of abode in New York City for at
least the last six (6) months immediately proceeding the first day of classes. (A student
who has attended a high school in New York City in the semester immediately prior
to the first day of closes satisfies this condition).
Residency Flags- Students may not qualify for the NYC/NYS resident tuition rate if:
1.
Student is not a U.S. citizen or a permanent resident.
2.
Student's parents reside outside the city or state.
3.
Student previously attended college as a nonresident.
4.
Student resides outside the state.
5.
Students who have immigrant or non-immigrant status (F-1 status, pending refugee,
paroled pending, working visa, etc.).
6.
Students who are undocumented (except for students with a New York State High
School Diploma or GED and students that were enrolled in CUNY for the Fall 2001
semester and qualified for resident tuition at that time).
7.
Student has resided in New York State for less than one (1) year. Students verifying
residency must complete the City University Residency Form. The form can be picked
up at the Admissions and recruitment Office, Savoy room D-210 or the Admissions
Satellite Center at 500 Grand Concourse.
Special Situation – County charge backs at Community Colleges
Community colleges require, as a condition for registration, that every New York state
resident who resides outside of New York City present a certificate of residence issued no
77 | P a g e
earlier than two months prior to the first day of classes. The certificate is valid for a period of
one year. In the event the county of residence declines to issue the certificate on the basis that
the student is not a county resident, the student may appeal to the New York Secretary of
State.
Students verifying residency must complete the City University Residency Form. The form
can be picked up at the Admissions and Recruitment Office, Savoy room D-210 or the
Admissions Satellite Center at 500 Grand Concourse. Any student who receives a negative
residency determination must receive, along with this determination, a copy of the College's
appeal procedures. They can be obtained in the Admissions and Recruitment Office, Savoy
room D210. Students wishing to appeal a negative residency determination must notify the
Admissions and Recruitment Office within ten days of notification that he or she has been
determined to be a non-resident. A student appeal form will be submitted to the University's
Office of the Vice Chancellor for Legal Affairs and General Counsel.
CUNY Affirmative Action Policy
Hostos does not discriminate on the basis of age, sex, race, color, creed, national origin, physical
or mental disability, sexual orientation, marital status, alienage or citizenship status, or veteran's
status.
Student Assessment & Testing
General Information
As a part of The City University of New York (CUNY), Hostos requires that all entering
students take the CUNY Assessment tests in reading and writing, and mathematics to
demonstrate their proficiency and readiness to do college level work. A test of Spanish
proficiency is given to students for appropriate placement in Spanish-language courses.
No student is permitted to register without taking the required placement tests or showing
acceptable proof of exemption accepted by the University.
Entering Freshmen
Results of the CUNY and Hostos tests are used to determine placement into the appropriate
level of classes in reading, writing, English as a Second Language (ESL), mathematics,
Spanish, or foreign language.
Students who do not pass their placement exam(s) are placed in appropriate remedial or
developmental courses and will have an opportunity to retake the tests after completing those
courses. Students should consult with an advisor/counselor to ensure that they meet the
course requirements of specific majors.
Transfer Students
Students who are transferring from a college outside of CUNY must take the reading, writing,
and mathematics skills assessment tests, unless otherwise exempted. Students transferring
from another CUNY college must have their placement test results transmitted to the Office of
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Student Assessment through UAPC. Students are responsible for ensuring that the sending
college enters the test results into the UAPC system. Students transferring from another
CUNY college may not retake placement tests not passed previously as part of the admissions
process.
Exemptions from Testing
Entering students are exempt from the reading and writing tests if they achieve a score of 480
or above on the verbal part of the SAT, 20 or above on the ACT, or 75 or above on the English
Language Arts Regents. Likewise, students are exempt from the mathematics skills test if they
achieve a score of 480 or above on the mathematics part of the SAT; 20 or above on the ACT, or
75 or above on the Sequential II or Sequential HI or Math A or Math B Mathematics Regents
Examination.
Students who have already earned a Bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university
may be exempt from testing. Determination of this exemption is made by the University at the
time the student applies for admission. Students with a Bachelor's degree from a college in
which the language of instruction was other than English will be given the CUNY Skills test for
placement purposes only.
Students transferring from a non-CUNY college without a Bachelor's degree may also be
exempted from the CUNY Assessment Tests in reading and writing if they have passed a
college-level English course with a grade of C or better. (Courses in which English was taught
as a foreign language are not eligible for this exemption.) Similarly, students may be exempted
from the CUNY Assessment Test in Mathematics if they have passed a college-level
mathematics course with a grade of C or better. Determination of these exemptions is made by
the University at the time the student applies for admission.
All students who are exempt from the mathematics assessment test, regardless of the nature
of the exemption, are required to take that test for placement into the appropriate
mathematics courses.
CUNY Testing Requirements for Graduation
In order to graduate from Hostos Community College or any other community college in
CUNY, students must pass the reading, writing and mathematics tests. Students should seek
detailed information from their academic advisor(s) about specific graduation requirements in
their major.
CUNY Proficiency Examination (CPE)
As of November 22, 2010, the CPE is no longer a requirement for graduation for all past,
current and future CUNY students. Therefore, students no longer will take the CPE for any
reason. Students who previously failed the CPE can graduate. Also, the CPE is no longer a
requirement for transferring to a senior college within CUNY.
Testing Requirements for Transfer to a CUNY Senior College
Students planning to transfer to a CUNY senior college, directly or at a later time, must pass
all three basic skills tests. Therefore, students are strongly advised to take and pass the
writing, reading, and mathematics skills tests prior to applying for transfer. CUNY senior
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colleges will not admit students who have not passed all of the basic skills tests.
Students are urged to seek more detailed information about graduation and transfer
requirements from their academic advisors.
Computerized Testing
Skills tests in reading and mathematics and Spanish placement are administered by computer.
No special computer skills are required in order to take these tests. At the time of testing,
students will receive complete instructions in the use of the facility.
For more information contact:
Office of Student Assessment
500 Grand Concourse Room B-207
Telephone: (718) 319-7921
Additional Information about Testing
The Office of Student Assessment website on the Hostos website contains current information
about the CUNY skills tests and the CPE. The URL is: www.hostos.cuny.edu/oaa/assessment.
The site contains information about the specific tests, as well as the most current requirements.
Students are also advised to consult the CUNY testing website:
www.cuny.edu/academics/testing. The CUNY website contains the most current and up-todate information about the CUNY tests and current policy.
Tuition and Financial Aid
Tuition Fees
New York State Residents
New York State Residents, Undergraduate
Matriculated:
Full-time (per semester) …..…..……....…..…. $2,400.00
Part-time (per billable equivalent credit) ….. $210.00
Undergraduate (all others):
Non-degree: (per billable equivalent credit).....$265.00
Senior citizen fee (per semester or session) $65.00
All Students: (including non-degree and senior citizens)
Consolidated Services Fee: (per semester or session) $15.00
Non- State Residents & Foreign Students
Undergraduate (includes students enrolled prior to 6/1/92, or enrolled as first time
freshmen, or non CUNY transfer students for semesters or sessions beginning on or after
6/1/92)
Matriculated:
Full-time (per billable equivalent credit)
Part-time (per billable equivalent credit)
Undergraduate (all others):
$320.00
$320.00
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Non-degree: (per billable equivalent credit) $420.00
All Students: (including non-degree and senior citizens)
Consolidated Services Fee: (per semester or session) $15.00
Qualifying for the Community College Resident Tuition Rate
This section describes the requirements necessary for consideration as a resident student and
the documentation necessary to prove residency. Residency Verification Process-A community
college student may qualify for the resident tuition rate if he or she meets all of the following
considerations:
a. Continuously maintained his or her principal place of abode in the State of New
York for a period of twelve consecutive months immediately preceding the first day
of classes. (A student who has attended a high school in New York City or State for
the two semesters immediately prior to the first day of classes satisfies this
condition.)
b. Students who are disabled as defined by the American with Disabilities Act (ADA) and
are attending part-time (at least 3 academic credits per semester or the equivalent) can
be certified for part-time TAP award for any approved term.
c.
Continuously maintained his or her principal place of abode in the City of New York
for at least the last six months immediately preceding the first day of classes. (A
student who has attended a high school in New York City in the semester
immediately prior to the first day of classes satisfies this condition.)
Special Situation
County charge backs at community colleges:
Community colleges require, as a condition for registration, that every New York State resident
who resides outside of New York City present a certificate of residence issued no earlier than
two months prior to the first day of classes. The certificate is valid for a period of one year. In
the event the ' county of residence declines to issue the certificate on the basis that the student is
not a county resident, the student may appeal to the New York Secretary of State. Students
verifying residency must complete the City University Residency Form. The form is distributed
at the Admissions & Recruitment Office, B Building, room 103. No Residency Form will be
accepted after the end of the semester for which the student is applying for a determination.
A full-time undergraduate student is one who is enrolled for 12 credits, or billable equivalent,
or more.
A part-time student is one who is enrolled for fewer than 12 credits or billable equivalent.
The tuition fee rate to be charged shall be determined by a student's status as a full-time or parttime student and his or her residency and degree status.
The schedule of tuition fees shall apply to all scheduled sessions, regardless of duration, subject
to such special tuition fee rates as may be established by the Board.
A child of a member of the permanent staff of the Board, or a child of a deceased or retired
member of such staff, who has served for more than five years on an annual salary, or a child
of an employee of the City of New York or of a city agency who is required to live outside the
City of New York in the performance of official duties, shall be charged resident rates.
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The resident rate shall be applicable to a student of another college or university that grants
exchange resident rates to a student of a college within The City University of New York.
Evidence of satisfactory educational qualifications must be presented and the approval of the
President of such college within the City University is required.
Special Fees for all Students, Matriculated & Non-Matriculated
Application for Admission (non-refundable)
Freshman ............................................. $65.00
Transfer Students ............................... $70.00
Student Activities Fee
Per Semester/Session:
Full-time .............................................. $61.75
Part-time .............................................. $28.25
Technology Fee
Per Semester/Session:
Full-time ............................................ $125.00
Part-time. ............................................. $62.50
University Student Senate (Per Semester/Session) … $1.45
Consolidated Service Fee (Per Semester/Session........$15.00
Transcripts
(No charge for transcripts sent to another CUNY College)
Late Registration
Change of Program
Duplicate of ID Card or other college record
Readmission (Effective January 1, 2014)
Nonpayment service fee
Returned check processing fee
Special examinations
First
Each additional
Senior Citizens Fee
Cooperating Teachers
Duplicate Diploma
$7.00
$25.00
$18.00
$10.00
$20.00
$15.00
$20.00
$15.00
$5.00
$65.00
$25.00
$30.00
Student Notification Regarding Payment of Collection Costs
If you do not make full payment on your tuition and fees and other college bills and your
account is sent to a collection agency, you will be responsible for all collection costs, including
agency fees, attorney fees and court costs, in addition to whatever amounts you owe the college.
In addition, non-payment or a default judgment against your account may be reported to a
credit bureau and reflected in your credit report.
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Refunds for Tuition
All refunds of the tuition charges appearing in the College's catalog, as well as registration
material, regardless of whether paid by cash or money order, are subject to the Refund
Entitlement Schedules established by The City University of New York Board of Trustees. Any
refunds due are also subject to the review by the College of all student accounts. Authorized
refunds will be returned to students in the form of a check at the completion of such review.
Other Refunds:
Official withdrawal from other than summer session courses before the scheduled opening
date of the session: 100%
Official withdrawal within one week after scheduled opening date of the session: 75%
Official withdrawal during second week after scheduled opening date of the session: 50%
Official withdrawal during third week after scheduled opening date of the session: 25%
Official withdrawal after completion of third week after scheduled opening date of the session:
None
Please note:
a. These percentages apply to the Fall & Spring semesters only. For summer sessions,
please refer to the registration calendar contained in the schedule of classes, and/or the
College website for refund information.
b. As per CUNY policy students withdrawing during the first three weeks (before the
census date) are not entitled to financial aid.
c.
All tuition and fee schedules are necessarily subject to change without notice, at any
time, upon action by the Board of Trustees of The City University of New York,
regardless of its tuition and fees schedules in effect at the time of registration.
Information on any such changes can be obtained in the Office of the Registrar, the
Bursar, the Dean of Students, and Hostos web site.
Financial Aid
The following represents the most recent and/or revised information regarding available
financial aid programs for Hostos Community College students. It replaces all information
contained in prior Hostos College Catalogs.
Hostos Community College participates in the following financial aid programs:











Federal Pell Grant (FPG)
Academic Competitive Grants (A.C.G.)
Federal Direct Loan
Federal Direct Plus
Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG)
Federal Work Study (FWS)
Federal Perkins Loan (FPL) State
Tuition Assistance Program (TAP)
Aid for Part-time Study (APTS)
Part-Time TAP (PTAP)
College Discovery (CD)
General Information
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The Financial Aid Office provides a myriad of student aid related services, ranging from
assistance with financial aid forms to job referrals. It serves an average of 5000 to 8000
students annually, awarding Hostos' students well over $30,000,000 per year. Financial
aid counseling is provided through group workshops conducted throughout the
academic year. Individual counseling is also available by appointment. Student aid
related literature is available at the Financial Aid Office. Students are encouraged to take
advantage of these services, and to call the Financial Aid Office at (718) 518-6555 or visit
our Web site www.hostos.cuny.edu/ofa.
Types of Financial Aid at Hostos Community College:

Grants: Funds that do not have to be repaid.

Work Study: Provides employment opportunities to assist students in paying their
educational expenses.

Loans: Borrowed money that must be repaid.
Eligibility Criteria
In general, the student must be currently enrolled in their chosen major, making satisfactory
progress, and meeting academic standards. The student must not owe a refund on a Federal
Pell Grant (FPG) or a Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG), or be in
default on any loans: Federal Family Education Loan (FFEL), Federal Direct Lending Program,
Perkins Loan, as well as any other types of emergency loan.
In general, student aid is awarded on the basis of need. Need is the difference between the
student's estimated cost of attendance - including but not limited to tuition, fees, books,
transportation, housing and the amount the student and/or his family can afford to pay. For
federal student aid programs, a federally approved formula called the Expected Family
Contribution (EFC) is used to calculate the amount that a family is expected to pay toward
educational expenses. This ensures equity in the awarding process throughout the City
University system.
Students with Disabilities
Since July 1, 1998 students with disabilities have been eligible for partial state aid (TAP).
Students with disabilities that necessitate additional educational costs should call the Office of
Services for Students with Disabilities at (718) 518-4454 or the Financial Aid Office at (71 8) 5186555.
Citizenship
To be eligible for student aid, a student must be a U.S. citizen, U.S. national or a U.S.
permanent resident who possesses 1-151, 1-551, or I-551C or other eligible non-citizen with an
arrival/departure record (I-94) within the following designations: Asylum Granted Refugee,
Parolee, Cuban-Haitian Entrant. Individuals in the U.S. with an Fl, F2, J1, or J2 Student Visa
are not eligible for federal aid.
Student Eligibility
Students can be enrolled in any enrollment status to receive funding from the first Pell Grant
Award. However, in order to receive funding from the second scheduled Pell Grant Award,
students must have earned at least 24 credit hours AND be enrolled at least half-time (6 credits).
84 | P a g e
This means that you must be taking your 25th credit in the semester in which you receive any
part of your 2nd scheduled Pell Grant Award.
Transfer Students
For students who transfer from one college to another, the new college will have to take into
consideration the Pell Grant award received at the prior college and credits attempted.
Have now met the 1" year Award Year requirement (for the first 3 credits that will be paid out
of the 1" scheduled award) and you are now eligible to be paid under the 2nd Scheduled
Award (for the remaining 6 credits).
An eligible student may receive an Academic Competitiveness Grant (ACG) of up to $750 for
the first academic year of study and up to $1,300 for the second academic year of study. To be
eligible for each academic year, you must:

be a U.S. citizen

be a Federal Pell Grant recipient

be enrolled full-time in a degree program

be enrolled in the first or second year of your program of study at a two-year or fouryear degree- granting institution (such as CUNY);

have completed a rigorous secondary school program of study (after January 1, 2006 if a
first-year student, and after January 1, 2005, if a second-year student)

If a first-year student, not have been previously enrolled in an undergraduate program;
and

If a second-year student, have at least a cumulative 3.0 grade point average on a 4.0 scale
for the first academic year
In New York State, a Regents Diploma with Honors or Advance Designation will serve as
evidence of a rigorous secondary school program. A student may also qualify through
completion of a prescribed set of courses taken, or two Advance Placement (AP) courses with a
minimum score of three (3) on the AP exams or two International Baccalaureate (IB) courses
with a score of four (4) on the IB exams.
Transfer Students
If you transfer from another college to Hostos, your financial aid does not automatically
transfer with you. Procedures vary depending on the particular student aid program and the
time the transfer occurs. Please inquire at the Financial Aid Office.
Method for Selection
Two basic application forms are currently used to process student aid requests. The Renewal
FAFSA for retiming students and Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) on the
WEB are to determine an applicant's eligibility for Title IV Aid (Federal Pell Grant, ACG,
Federal SEOG, and Federal Perkins).
The TAP/APTS Application, TAP on the WEB application and CUNY Supplement form is
used to process both New York State and campus based aid. A student can also apply for state
aid and CUNY supplement on the Internet by using FAFSA on the Web.
A minimum of four weeks is required to process these applications. It is the student's
85 | P a g e
responsibility to review the information contained in the application for completeness and
accuracy prior to mailing or submitting it online to the processing agent. Deadlines and specific
program procedures are posted on the Financial Aid Office bulletin board or on the Web page.
Please refer to them for updates and/or legislative changes.
Federal Programs
Federal Academic Standards: Students are required to maintain satisfactory academic progress
in their chosen major toward the completion of a degree to receive Federal Student Aid (Title
IV). In addition, the student must achieve the minimum GPA required for probationary status
at the institution. After two years of enrollment at the College, students must have earned at
least a "C" average, its equivalent or academic standing consistent with the requirements for
graduation. Students must also accumulate credits toward the degree according to the
following standards:
Title IV Satisfactory Progress Quantitative Measure: Students will be measured against the abovementioned standard at the end of each term as well as the quantitative measure listed below.
A.
150% CAP: Students are required to complete their course-work in no more than 150 percent of
an academic program's published length. The following formula may be used: See example
below for an associate degree program of 64 credits. [(Academic Program's published length in
credits) x1.5 =96] total credits.
A.A. Degree [64-credit degree x (1.5)]
Attempted Credits Accumulated Conditional
12
8
0.0
24
6
0.0
36
24
10.5
48
32
21.0
60
40
31.5
72
48
42.0
84
55
52.5
96
64
64.0
Remedial courses
Recipients are permitted a maximum of thirty (30) credits in remedial courses. ESL courses are
excluded from this rule.
General Documents Required
When you apply for student aid, you should have certain records on hand. The U.S. income tax
form(s) is the most important record. Other documents include social security forms, public
assistance records, alien card, and proof of independence. Financial aid applications are subject
to a Federal Edit System whereby applicants are selected to document the accuracy of their
information. In some cases, financial aid applicants may be required to undergo a verification
process in which data on major portions
B.
Regular Standard: If a student has attempted fewer than 150% of the total program
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credits, his or her accumulated (or earned) credits must be equal to or greater than
two-thirds of the cumulative credits attempted at the College.
Attempted Credits
All attempted credits are reflected on the student's file. Accumulated credits are credits that
the student has earned toward the completion of the degree program. "W's, (WA, WF, AND
WU), "F"s, "R"s, "INC"s, and "FIN"s transfer credits, and repeated courses reported on a
student's grade transcript are counted as attempted credits. Second degree students shall have
their status initialized for Federal Student Aid (Title IV) by using the number of credits
accepted towards the second degree as cumulative attempted credits and cumulative earned
credits. WN's grades are not counted for Title IV eligibility.
Financial aid forms must be documented for accuracy and reasonableness. Failure to comply
with the verification process will render the applicant ineligible for Federal Student Aid (Title
IV).
Federal Student Aid Programs
Federal PELL: Students registered for one or more credits will be considered for an award.
Awards are prorated according to the following: a student's enrollment status, based on federal
appropriations, the College's cost of attendance, and the applicant's EFC. Awards for eligible
applicants range from approximately $555 to $5,550 annual.
Two Pell Grants in an Award Year
Students can now receive two Pell Grant Awards within one Award Year, if certain criteria are
met. The first scheduled Pell Grant Award is the yearly amount initially provided and the
second scheduled Pell Grant Award is the additional amount you could receive based on
successfully completing over 24 credits in an award year. An example of an award year is July,
2014 to June 30, 2015.
The purpose of implementing the Two Pell Grant Option is to give students the opportunity
to accelerate their progress towards their degrees by giving them access to Pell Grant
funding each semester they attend college including summer terms. Students who received
their first Pell payment in the 2008-2009 award year or after will be limited to 18 terms of
full-time payments or its equivalent for part-time study. Students can track their remaining
Pell Grant eligibility on www.NSLDS.ed.gov (National Student Loan Data Base) or through
their Student Aid Report.
Pell Grant Awards
During the 2015-16 Award years, the maximum Pell Grant award is $5,775. Students that
meet the standards below can get up to $11,550 maximum. Students can also review their
estimated annual award amount, based on their EFC and enrollment status using the
Federal Pell Grant Chart. Your EFC can be found on your Student Aid Report (SAR) at
www.fafsa.gov. (Pell Charts are available at the Financial Aid Office).
Here’s an example of how this works:
Let's say you are enrolled in 9 credits for Fall and 12credits for Spring. You still have 3
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credits left to meet the Award Year requirement of 24 credits. So, you take 9 credit hours
in the summer term.
Credits
Registered &
successfully
completed
% of Pell award
payment
Fall
9 credits
Spring
12 credits
Summer
9 credits
Total
30 credits
37.5% from 1st
award
50% from
1st award
12.5%
from 1st
award &
25% from
2nd award
100% from
1st award
25% from
2nd award
All previously mentioned requirements apply. For further information, call PELL directly
at 1-800-433-3243, or visit their website at: www.pellgrantsonline.ed.gov
or contact the Financial Aid Office at (718) 518-6555
or visit us online at www.hostos.cuny.edu/ofa
Academic Competitiveness Grants (ACG) (Academic Year 2010-2011 will be the last year
federal government will program.)
The prescribed set of courses must include four years of English, three years of Math
(including Algebra I and higher level courses such as Algebra II,
Geometry, or Data Analysis and Statistics), three years of science (including at least two
courses in Biology, Physics, or Chemistry) three years of Social Studies, and one year of a
Foreign Language. Most potential recipients will be notified by the U.S. Department of
Education and will be given a web site link that will help them determine whether they have
completed a "qualifying rigorous secondary school program". A student's college will then be
notified and will verify eligibility. If you are not notified by the Department of Education and
you think you may be eligible, contact your college financial aid office to determine your
eligibility.
For the ACG program, the amount of your grant, in combination with your Federal Pell Grant,
other resources and estimated financial assistance, may not exceed your financial need (cost of
attendance minus EFC equals financial need). A student may not receive more than one ACG or
National SMART Grant award in each academic year for which the student is eligible.
All annual award amounts for an academic year may be reduced if sufficient funds are not
available for all eligible students nationally in an award year.
Campus Based Aid Programs
The three programs discussed in this section are called Campus Based Aid Programs because
they are administered directly by The City University of New York and the Hostos Financial
Aid Office. Previously mentioned requirements apply. Although each program is different,
they have these characteristics in common:
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



The amount of aid you receive depends on your financial need, the amount of other aid
you will be receiving, and the availability of funds at the College. Once all program
funds have been depleted, no more awards can be made from that program.
Each college determines its own deadlines to apply for Campus Based Aid.
There are no guarantees that an applicant will be granted an award, even if s/he can
demonstrate need or if the applicant received an award previously.
Generally, applicants must be enrolled for at least six credits per semester.
Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) is intended for undergraduates
with exceptional need. Priority is given to students with low Expected Family Contributions
(EFCs) and to students who are receiving Federal Pell Grants. An FSEOG does not have to be
repaid. Award amounts are based on the availability of funds, based on federal allocations,
costs of attending and the applicant's EFC. Awards for eligible applicants range from
approximately $100 to $4,000.
The Federal Work Study (FWS) Program provides employment opportunities for qualified job
candidates. The program encourages community service and provides funds to help pay
educational expenses. A great variety of work experience is available for students who are
interested in working off campus. Jobs on campus are limited and subject to federal allocations,
cost of attendance, and the applicant's EFC. Awards for eligible applicants range from
approximately $800 to $4,000.
Federal Perkins Loan is a low interest (5%) loan for undergraduate students with exceptional
financial need. Federal Perkins Loans are made through The City University of New York and
the Hostos Financial Aid Office. Based on federal allocations, cost of attendance and the
applicant's EFC. Awards for eligible applicants range from approximately $800 to $4,000.
The City University is the lender and the loan is made with government funds. If the student
borrower drops to less than six credits in a semester or leaves school, s/he is entitled to a sixmonth grace period before beginning repayment. The repayment period may extend over a
period of ten years. An additional ten years may be granted at the discretion of the institution if
the borrower submits an application. This extension applies to loans made after October 1, 1980
in accordance with the regulations of the Department of Education. Payments are not required
for up to the first three years of active U.S. military service, or service in the Peace Corps, Vista,
or a similar national program. This also applies for borrowers with disabled dependents.
First time borrowers after July 1, 1987 have nine months in which to begin repayment. Loan
deferments are available for individuals that work in certain public service employment. For
further details, please contact the Financial Aid Office at (718) 518-6555 or the Student
Receivables Office at (718) 518-4359
How does withdrawing of all my classes affect my financial aid?
Effective Fall 2000, students earn their Financial Aid based on the period of time they remain
enrolled.
During the first 60% of the term, students earn Title IV funds in proportion to the time they are
enrolled, except students who withdraw prior to completion of the third week of the semester
are not eligible for Title TV funds as per CUNY policy. If a student received more aid than s/he
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earned, the unearned portion must be returned to the Department of Education. If a student
received less aid than the amount earned, s/he may be eligible for a late disbursement.
The portion of aid the student is entitled to receive is based on a percentage by comparing the
total number of days in the semester to the number of days completed before the withdrawal.
For example, if you completed 20% of the semester, you would have earned 20% of your Title
IV aid. If you received 100% of your title IV aid you would have to return the unearned portion.
Students who remain enrolled beyond the 60% point of the term are considered to have earned
all their aid and do not have to return any of the Title IV funds upon withdrawal.
New York State Student Aid
Eligibility Criteria: In addition to the previously mentioned citizenship requirements, student
aid applicants must be New York State residents for twelve months preceding the award year,
have taxable incomes below a certain specified amount, and meet satisfactory academic
standards. Only courses in declared major are eligible for state aid. Courses not required for
major will not qualify for state aid.
High School Graduation Requirement: First-time recipients in the 1996-97 academic year or
thereafter must have graduated from high school, have a GED or other equivalent of high
school certificate, or have received a passing score on a federally approved ability-to-benefit
(ATB) test.
Students first receiving state aid (TAP) in the 2006-07 academic year who do not have a
certificate of graduation from a recognized school Within the United States' providing
secondary education (a high school diploma or recognized equivalent) must attain a passing
score on a federally approved ability-to benefit (ATB) test. Note: this provision was contained
in the TAP appropriations bill and is to be interpreted as only pertaining to TAP eligibility, not
for other state programs.
Academic Standards: For the purpose of receiving state aid, students must adhere to the
College's previously mentioned academic standards and to the following state standards as
well. Students will be permitted a maximum number of six full time semesters (three years) of
TAP to earn an associate degree. Students enrolled in the College Discovery Program may be
eligible for an additional semester of TAP eligibility. Please contact the College Discovery
Office at (718)-518-4475.
*New York State Financial Aid Academic Requirements states that: To qualify for a TAP or APTS
award, you must be enrolled for a minimum of 12 billable credits (of which 6 must be academic
credits). For part-time TAP and APTS eligibility you must be enrolled for a minimum of 6 to 11
billable credits (of which 3 must be academic credits). All courses must meet graduation
requirements for your major/curriculum.
Pursuit of Program: Students are required to complete the specified minimum number of
credits/billable equivalent credits each semester:
Academic Progress Chart for Undergraduate Students receiving their first
TAP award PRIOR to Fall 2006 (to be used in conjunction with the program
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pursuit chart of New York State financial assistance regulations effective
September 1981, Amended in July 1996):
Before Being Certified for This TAP Payment
1st
2nd
3rd
4th
5th
6th
a student must have a prior semester course
00
50
50
75
75
100
% completion of
must have accrued at least this many credits
00
00
06
18
31
45
with at least this Grade Point Average
0.00 0.00 1.00 1.20 2.00 2.00
7th
100
60
2.00
Change to Satisfactory Academic Progress Chart
A change in legislation has created a uniform chart used to determine a student's satisfactory
academic progress. The following chart must be used by all institutions for first- time
undergraduate students beginning with the 2006-07 academic year.
Academic Progress Chart for Undergraduate Students
receiving their first TAP award in the 2006-07 academic year:
Before Being Certified for This TAP Payment
1st
2nd
3rd
4th
5th
a student must have a prior semester course
00
50
50
75
75
% completion of
must have accrued at least this many credits
00
03
09
18
30
with at least this Grade Point Average
0.00 0.50 0.75 1.30 2.00
6th
100
7th
100
45
2.00
60
2.00
Below is the NEW Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP chart guideline for Fall 2014 –Spring
2015).
For non-remedial students receiving first NYS
award payment in 2007-08 and thereafter
Before Being Certified for This TAP Payment
1st
2nd
3rd
A Student Must Have Accrued at Least This
03
06
15
Many Credits
With at Least This Grade Point Average
0.00
1.5
1.8
4th
30
5th
45
6th
60
2.0
2.0
2.0
Please bear in mind that additional changes will be forthcoming. We will publish them when
they become available. For any questions please contact the Financial Aid Office.
Satisfactory Academic Progress: Students are required to accumulate the following specified
minimum number of credits and achieve the following specified cumulative grade point
average to be eligible for the TAP award number indicated below.
Satisfactory Academic Progress Update: N.Y.S. student aid recipients must have achieved at
least a C average accumulated or its equivalent after completing the second academic year.
Additional information may be obtained from the Financial Aid Office or online at:
www.hostos.cuny.edu/ofa.
Other Academic Related Issues: Students who withdraw from all courses during a semester
will lose eligibility for state aid in the next semester. Students who fail to meet the above
standard and can demonstrate that exceptional circumstances beyond their control impacted
negatively on their academic achievement, may be eligible for a onetime waiver. A waiver will
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be considered if there is a reasonable probability that the student will regain good academic
standing and the student is able to present full documentation to substantiate an appeal.
Students who wish to apply for a TAP Waiver must first receive counseling and obtain
assistance from the Financial Aid Office.
Billable/Equivalent Credits: All developmental courses are charged as billable equivalent
credits. Only the credit-bearing portion of the course counts toward the degree, and may be
paid for with financial aid funds. The difference between the academic and billable credits does
not count toward a degree and may impact on financial aid.
Note: Students who receive a retroactive withdrawal may have to pay back financial aid funds
received for the period when they withdraw.
Types of New York State Aid
Tuition Assistance Program (TAP): provides tuition assistance to full-time matriculated
students. Students must be registered for twelve (12) billable equivalent credits in their chosen
major and with six (b) or more academic credits for the semester. Awards are based on the New
York State net taxable income. The New York State Higher Education Services Corporation
(NYSHESC) directly notifies the applicant of his/her award status. Based on state allocations,
awards for eligible applicants range from approximately $100 to $1,575 per academic year.
Students who apply early and present their TAP notification before their appointed registration
date will receive a credit towards their tuition liability. Students who receive their TAP
notification later will be responsible for paying their tuition at registration. The Student
Receivables Office will notify the student by mail of their TAP reimbursement. For questions
concerning TAP refund contact the Student Receivables Office at (718) 518-4359.
The Supplemental Tuition Assistance Program (STAP) was created to provide additional
support for students who require remediation. Since the 1995¬1996 school year, STAP has been
available for first-time recipients enrolled in an approved remediation program conducted in
the summer.
Aid for Part-Time Study Program (APTS): Students who intend to register for 6 to 11.5 billable
equivalent credits and have not utilized their six semesters of TAP are eligible to apply for an
APTS award. Unlike the STAP and TAP programs which are entitlements, the APTS Program
has limited funds and is directly administered by The City University of New York and the
Hostos Financial Aid Office. When these funds are exhausted, additional awards cannot be
made for the academic year. Based on state allocations, awards for eligible applicants may range
from $45.00 to $505.00 per semester.
Part Time TAP (PTAP): State Education Law was amended to create a Part-Time Tuition
Assistance Program (PTAP) for students attending SUNY, CUNY and not-for- profit
independent degree granting colleges in New York State. This program is similar to the CUNY
PTAP Pilot which ended at the close of the 2005-06 academic years.
Eligibility Criteria:
A student may receive PTAP if he or she has:
 enrolled as a first-time Freshman in the 2006-07 academic year or thereafter;
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



earned 12 or more credits toward graduation in each of two consecutive semesters by
the time the first PTAP award is sought;
at least a 2.00 cumulative grade point average;
satisfied all program requirements for NYS TAP awards except for full-time attendance
(refer to the previous section on TAP eligibility criteria);
Enrolled for at least 6 but fewer than 12 semester hours with at least 3 of these being
degree credits.
Note: No students will be eligible to receive a PTAP award until the 2007-08 academic years.
There was no legislation to continue PTAP benefits for CUNY students who were receiving
PTAP awards under the CUNY PTAP Pilot.
Award Amounts: A PTAP award is calculated as a proportional fraction of a normal fulltime TAP award based on the number of part-time credits a student is registered for.
Partial TAP for Disabled Students
Students who are disabled, as defined by the 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), do
not have to attend school full-time to be eligible for TAP awards. These students are eligible for
partial TAP award if they are attending part-time (at least three credits per semester or the
equivalent). Students with disabilities that necessitate additional educational costs should call
the Accessibility Resource Center (ARC) at (718) 518-4454 or the Financial Aid Office at (718)
518-6555.
Other New York State Aid Programs
 Contact the NYSHESC at (518) 473-7087 for information and/or an application for the
following scholarships: Scholarships for Academic Excellence
 Regents Professional Opportunity Scholarships
 Math & Science Teaching Incentive Scholarships
 Regent's Awards for Children of Deceased or Disabled Veterans (CV).
 Robert C. Byrd Honors Scholarship
 Memorial Scholarships
 Persian Gulf/Vietnam Veterans Tuition Awards
 World Trade Center Memorial Scholarship
 New York State Volunteer Recruitment Service Scholarship
Special Programs
College Discovery (CD): This is a special program that provides assistance in the form of
counseling, tutoring, and financial aid to eligible students. It is limited to those who are
admitted to the College as a College Discovery student. Based on state funding and allocations,
awards for eligible applicants range from approximately $340 to $1,000. For additional
information, you may contact the College Discovery Office at (718) 518-4475.
Note: Due to the terrorist attacks that occurred on September 11, 2001, new relief programs have been
established. For a complete listing, please check the Financial Aid Web site at www.hostos.cuny.edu/ofa
Special Provisions for Students in the Military: As of this printing, students called for military
service before the end of the semester qualify for 100% refund of tuition and all other fees,
93 | P a g e
except application fees. For more detailed information, see: Registrar Policies & Procedures",
section on Total Withdrawal for Military Reasons. Students may qualify for late
disbursements of their Title IV award. Please contact the Financial Aid Office or call (718) 5186555 for further information.
Institutional scholarship and grants vary in amounts. For information contact the Financial
Aid Office at (718) 518-6555.
Registrar’s Office
The Office of the Registrar, Savoy Building, Room D207, Telephone 718-518-6771
http://www.hostos.cuny.edu/oor/ the repository of all official student academic records. The
Registrar also manages registration and certifies degree candidates. The following are
explanations of the various items pertaining to a student's college records and descriptions of
services that are available to all students, faculty, and staff of the College.
Student Records
The Office of the Registrar is the repository of the students' academic college record. The staff
of the Registrar's Office will provide students with information related to their college records
and refer those students requiring additional assistance to the proper College official.
Official transcripts of work taken at other institutions (including high schools) that were
presented for admission or for evaluation of credit, become the property of the College and
cannot be copied or reissued. If a transcript of this work is needed, it should be obtained
directly from the other institution.
Student Identification Number
When students file the initial application to attend Hostos, they are asked to supply the
College with their social security number, which is kept confidential. This number is used
to prevent the misfiling of student records and to enable the college to utilize its data
processing facilities for maintaining these records. Entry to the data bank is by numeric
identification of the student. In addition, a PIN number (Personal Identification Number)
is also assigned to each student. The PIN number will facilitate a student's access to his or
her academic profile.
Degree Status
Students admitted to CUNY and Hostos and who are enrolled and pursuing the course of study
leading to a degree or certificate in their selected field are matriculated degree students.
Non-Degree Students
Students who wish to register for classes but are not interested in earning a degree or in
pursuing a certificate program should file an "Application for Non-Degree Status." A student
from outside the College may apply as a non-degree student for courses on a space-available
basis. However, prerequisites and co-requisites, if any, must be met for each course.
Furthermore, it is the non-degree student's responsibility to check that any courses taken are
acceptable at his or her home College.
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Change of Degree Status
Non-degree students, who desire to change their status to degree at some point in the future;
will be subject to the college degree and college compliance requirements and must be in
matriculated status at least one semester prior to the semester of graduation. Furthermore, the
aforementioned students must apply for degree status by filing an Admissions application
with the Admissions and Recruitment Office.
Readmission
Degree and Non-degree students may not be readmitted until they have been separated from
the University for at least one semester or the equivalent calendar time. All readmission
applications must be on file in the Registrar's Office one month prior to the first day of classes
and validated with the appropriate fee of $10.00 (non-refundable). Students who attended
another institution after leaving Hostos must submit an official transcript from the other
institution before readmission with advance standing is considered
Changes of Information
Changes of Name and/or Address
Any change of name or address must be reported to the College on a form available online or
from the Registrar's Office. In the case of a change of name because of marriage or divorce,
the student should report the change, provide appropriate documents, and indicate the name
to be used on College records. In the case of a change of name because of a court order, it is
necessary for the student to produce the court order at the time of reporting the change. The
court order will be returned to the student.
Change of Curriculum
Students who wish to change their career and/or educational objectives are required to
obtain permission from the coordinator of the program in which they intend to study. This
should be done during the advisement period and prior to the fourth week of classes of the
current semester. Furthermore, the aforementioned students should report to the Office of the
Registrar to obtain the appropriate Change of Curriculum form.
Leave of Absence
Students, who decide, upon consultation with their advisor, to arrange for a leave of absence
from Hostos, must file a properly completed application for the leave. The major purpose for
filing an application for a leave of absence is to clear the student's record, making it possible
for him or her to return to the college with relative ease and to set down clearly the terms of
the student's future matriculation and financial aid. Applications for a leave of absence are
available at the Office of the Registrar.
Maximum Student Course Load
The maximum course load for a student is not to exceed 18 academic credits or a
combination of 18 academic and billable equivalent credits. Science laboratories, clinical and
physical education courses will be counted as credits.
The Dean of Academic Affairs must approve exceptions to this 18-credit-maximum policy.
Students requesting exceptions must present their latest transcript. There are two possible
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reasons for making exceptions:
1.
The student completed all 18 academic credits or 18 billable equivalent credits attempted
in the previous semester;
2.
A student (who is not on probation) needs additional credits in order to complete
graduation requirements.
A fee for accelerated study will be charged for students registered for credits beyond the
established College limit of 18 academic credits per semester.
Eligibility for Commencement
Hostos Community College grants degrees at the end of each fall and spring terms and
summer session. A commencement ceremony is held each year in June: for degrees awarded
during that academic year. Students planning to graduate at a particular time are responsible
for maintaining an appropriate course load and completing degree requirements.
Applying for Graduation
Prospective graduates must file a "Request for Graduation" at the Registrar's Office prior to the
sixth week of the semester in which the student intends to graduate. Filing dates are posted
each semester and are also printed in the academic calendar.
The application triggers a review of the student's academic record to determine whether it is
possible for the student to complete degree requirements by the end of that term or session.
Only after the "Request for Graduation" form has been filed can the Registrar's Office begin
processing the necessary information for final certification of graduation.
Transcripts
To secure a transcript, students must complete a transcript request form. The quickest and
most convenient way to request a transcript is to order it online. The college has authorized
Credentials Inc. to accept transcript orders over the Internet. In addition, transcripts can also
be requested in person at the Registrar's Office or by submitting a request by mail. For details,
visit the Transcripts website at www.hostos.cuny.eduloorltranscripts. A $7.00 fee is charged for
each transcript. The fee is waived for transcripts sent to units of The City University of New
York.
For students currently attending or have attended a CUNY college, UAPC will automatically
request all CUNY transcripts. Applicants will be notified by UAPC if they are unable to
obtain their transcript. Students must submit the UAPC transcript request letter to the
Registrar's Office along with their request for an official transcript.
Transcripts, whether for transfer, employment, or any other reason, are never sent
automatically. Each transcript must be specifically requested in order to safeguard the privacy
of each student's official records from unauthorized review.
Official transcripts bear the College seal and signature of the Registrar, and are not issued to
students or alumni.
Note: The College reserves the right to withhold all information on the record of any student
who has not fulfilled financial and other responsibilities to the College, including payment of
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student loans.
Certified Statements
Certified statements, required for such things as proving current or past attendance, may be
obtained without charge upon filing an application available from the Office of the Registrar.
Note: The College reserves the right to withhold all information on the record of any student
who has not fulfilled financial and other responsibilities to the College
Permits
Note: In keeping with the regulations of the Commissioner of Education of the State of New
York, a minimum of 30 academic credits of the total required in a degree program must be
completed at Hostos Community College.
E-Permits to attend another CUNY College
Students are responsible for securing a bulletin / catalogs from the prospective host college
and fulfilling whatever requirements it may establish for enrollment verification. Students
who wish to take courses at another CUNY college while matriculated at Hostos must have a
GPA of 2.0, have passed all three CUNY skills exam in order to attend a CUNY four year
college, have no stops on their record, have all required immunizations, and are limited to the
maximum number of credits allowable at the home college. In addition, all e-Permit courses
taken must meet degree requirements.
Students who register and subsequently cancel their permit without deleting their course are
subject to penalty grades from the HOST College that will appear on their Hostos transcript
and are subject to tuition liabilities. Students who do not complete their registration at the
host college (e.g. closed or cancelled course) must provide documentation from the HOST
College that they did not register. In addition, the student must cancel the course on the ePermit system, and officially drop from the course at the home college. Note: Student must
adhere to the applicable deadline for filing of an ePermit for both the HOME College, as well
as the deadline of the HOST College. Under no circumstances will the issuance of an e-Permit
be permitted upon the elapse of the stated deadlines.
Procedures for Hostos Students to file an e-Permit Request.
The City University of New York has put in place an e-Permit system designed to help
students find, get approval for, and register for courses at other CUNY colleges. Permits must
be submitted online through the CUNY portal at www.cuny.edu. Chairs or Coordinators must
approve requests to take a course on permit at another CUNY college. Students are kept
informed of the progress of their permit request throughout the approval process. If a request
is rejected, a student will be notified electronically of the reason for the disapproval.
Once on the University Home Page, students initially will have to register for a Portal ID and
Password, by clicking on "Register" and following the directions. Once registered and logged
in, students will find themselves on their own "My Page," that has a link to the e-Permit system
prominently displayed.
Grades for courses taken on permit at another CUNY college are posted to students' records
and are counted in the computation of a student's GPA (effective Fall 2004). Students receiving
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a failing grade (WU, WN, *WN, F, FIN) under no circumstances will benefit from the F-grade
policy.
Those students receiving TAP must bring a letter from the HOST College in which they have
enrolled certifying their enrollment status. This letter should be submitted to the HOME
College Registrar prior to the fourth week of the semester. Under no circumstances shall more
than 30 earned credits granted from another institution be applied toward graduation from
Hostos; this includes advanced standing credits.
Through the e-Permit website, students can find listings and descriptions of courses at all
CUNY colleges. The CUNY online schedule of classes, accessible through the e-Permit website,
enables students to easily determine whether a selected course is being offered in that
semester, whether it fits into the student's schedule, and whether seats are still available.
Students are encouraged to use the e-Permit application by login on to www.cuny.edu.
Permits to take courses at Hostos: Students from Other CUNY Colleges
Students from other CUNY colleges who wish to take courses at Hostos need to follow the ePermit procedures and may register on a space-availability basis. Students on permit from
another CUNY college will pay tuition at their home college.
Note: At the end of the semester, an official transcript will be forwarded to the home college.
Permits to take courses at Hostos: Students from Non CUNY Colleges / Institutions
Students from institutions other than CUNY must apply for Non-degree Status at the
Admissions Office prior to registration. Students may register for courses on a spaceavailability basis.
Procedures for filing a Permit Request to take a course at a Non-CUNY College
1.
Obtain a non-CUNY permit form through your Home College Registrar's Office.
2.
To be eligible for a Permit, you must:
a. Be matriculated and currently in attendance at Hostos Community College.
b.Be in good standing - not academically dismissed.
c. Have all required immunizations at the Home College completed.
3.
Take the Permit Form to the appropriate department Chairperson / Coordinator for
approval and signature.
a. Inform the department which course(s) you wish to take at the Host College.
b.The Chairperson or Coordinator will determine if the course(s) is equivalent to a
course(s) offered at the Home College. (This process may be expedited by
presenting a catalog from the Host College.)
4.
Registrar Processing
a. After academic approval, the Permit Form must be brought to the Registrar's
Office at Hostos Community College.
b.The Registrar's Office will affix its official seal or authorizing stamp. You should
take the Permit Form with you when you register at the Host College.
c. When the course(s) is completed, the student should contact the Host College
Registrar's Office to ensure that his/her grade is transferred to Hostos
Community College -Office of the Registrar. While the grade for a course taken
outside of CUNY will not be' posted to a student's record and will not count in
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5.
6.
7.
8.
the computation of a student's GPA, credit for the course cannot be given until
the grade is received in the Registrar's Office at Hostos Community College.
Financial Aid Approval: The student must obtain the approval of a financial aid
counselor who will indicate whether the non-CUNY coursework is eligible for financial
aid.
Tuition payment: If you are going to take a permit course at a Private or State College
(non - CUNY), payment must be made to the Non-CUNY HOST College. Be sure to
bring the Non-CUNY Permit Form with you.
There may be a limit to the number of permit credits allowed by your Home College.
Please check the Home College catalog.
Permits will not be issued to the following:
a.
Non-degree students
b. A readmitted matriculated student who is not currently enrolled or who does not
need the permit courses for graduation.
c.
An incoming newly matriculated student who requests a permit for the semester
or summer session preceding his/her effective date of admission.
Withdrawal from the College
Students who find it necessary to withdraw from the college must obtain and file a withdrawal
form with the Registrar's Office. Student should not drop out or withdraw from course(s)
without filing the appropriate form. An unofficial withdrawal will result in the student
receiving a grade of "F" or "WU", which will be computed in the cumulative grade point
average as a grade of "F". Students that never attended will receive a grade of "*WN". Official
withdrawals will receive grades of "W". The date the form is filed with the Registrar's Office is
the official withdrawal date, not the day you stop attending classes. Students may officially
withdraw until the end of the tenth week of classes.
Total Withdrawals after the Official Deadline for Medical Reasons
Students seeking to withdraw totally from the College for medical reasons after the official
withdrawal deadline may appeal for a special leave through the Counseling Department in
Room D-102, Savoy Building. Requests for medical leave are reviewed by a counselor and
approved by the Director of Counseling Services.
Total Withdrawal for Military Reasons
The Board of Trustees policies on the treatment of students who leave CUNY to fulfill
military obligations established the following rules:
I. Students called to the reserves or drafted before the end of the semester:
A. Grades. In order to obtain a grade, a student must attend 13 weeks (5 weeks for
summer session),
B. Refunds. A student called up to the reserves or drafted who does not attend for a
sufficient amount of time to qualify for a grade is entitled to 100% refund of tuition
and other fees except application fees.
II. Students who volunteer (enlist) for the military:
A. Grades. Same provision as for students called up to the reserves. In order to obtain
a grade a student must attend 13 weeks (5 weeks for summer session).
B. Refunds. The amount of the refund depends upon whether the withdrawal is before
the 5th week of classes.
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Withdrawal before the beginning of the 5th calendar week (3rd calendar week for
summer session): 100% refund of tuition and all other fees except application fees.
2. Withdrawal thereafter: 50% refund.
III. Other Provisions for Military Service: Please consult with the Veterans Liaison in the
Office of the Registrar.
1.
Grading Policy
Hostos Community College awards letter grades to denote the level of achievement for each
course. Effective FALL 2006, the grading system is as follows:
Letter
A
AB+
B
BC+
C
D
F
Grade Range
93-100
90-92
87-89
83-86
80-82
77-79
70-76
60-69
Failure
Point Value
4.0
3.7
3.3
3.0
2.7
2.3
2.0
1.0
0.0
Grade Point Average (CPA)
To compute the Grade Point Average, multiply the number of points shown for the letter
grade by the number of credits for that course. Divide the total number of points earned in all
courses by the total number of credits.
(Refer to above chart.) For example:
Course Points
ENG 110
FRE 101
VPA 192
TILT 103
HIS 210
Grade
BA
C+
B+
F
Total
Point Value
2.7
4.0
2.3
3.3
0.0
12.3
Credits
3
4
3
3
3
16
Grade
8.1
16.0
6.9
13.2
0.0
44.2
Grade Point Index (44.2 quality points divided by 16 credits) equals 2.76, or approximately an
"B-" average.
Other Grades
AUD - Audit Policy:
Matriculated and non-degree students may audit a course on a seat availability basis. Students
are cautioned to consider the effect of auditing a class that is required for their major or is a
pre/co-requisite of another course. Auditors will be charged full tuition and required fees.
Audited courses cannot be used to qualify for full-time part-time status, financial aid,
veteran's benefits, or foreign student status. No credit will be given and a grade of "AUD" will
be recorded. "AUD" grades cannot be changed to any other grade.
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To audit a course a student must:



Obtain written permission from the Department's Chairperson or Unit Coordinator.
Provide Registrar's Office with written approval declaring auditor status no later than the last
day of the add/drop period.
Audit status cannot be changed to credit status nor can credit status be changed to audit status
after the last day of the add/drop period.
INC - Incomplete:
This grade indicates that the objectives of a course have not been completed for good and
sufficient reasons, and that there is a reasonable expectation that the student can, in fact,
successfully complete the requirements of the course. For an instructor to grant an INC, the
student must have met the instructor's requirements for the course, completed most of the
coursework and have a passing semester average. Whether or not the student is registered at
Hostos, the INC becomes a FIN grade if the missing coursework is not completed by the last
day of classes of the semester immediately following the semester in which the INC grade was
assigned. The FIN grade is computed into the GPA as an F. The student should not re-enroll
for the same course while the INC grade is pending.
W - Withdrawal without penalty:
This grade indicates that a student has officially withdrawn from the course, until the end of
the tenth week of classes.
WU - Unofficial Withdrawal:
Unofficial Withdrawal and/or Excessive Absences, signifying that the course was not
completed. Student attends at least one class session. Replaces NC grades assigned prior to
1980. This grade is included in the computation of the GPA and counts as a failure (F).
WN – Withdrawn, never Attended:
This grade was only used during fall 2008- summer 2009; grade is included in the computation
of the GPA and counts as a failure (F).
WN -Withdrawn, never attended:
Effective fall 2009, this grade is not included in the computation of the GPA.
WA:
All students born on or after January 1, 1957, whether degree or non-degree, who register for
six or more credits/billable equivalent credits are required to demonstrate proof of
immunization for measles, mumps, and rubella. A non-punitive administrative grade will be
given to students who are excluded from classes for reasons of non-compliance with the New
York State Immunization Law (PHL 2165).
R:
Given in courses designed as developmental (remedial courses with credit and excess
hours) and remedial courses (with no credit).
An "R' grade is given when a student has not reached a minimal level of proficiency for the
course, but has fulfilled all three of the following conditions
a.
Satisfactory attendance record;
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b. Satisfactory completion of in-class and homework assignments;
c. Satisfactory progress toward the performance objectives of the course.
The "R" grade is considered a non-punitive grade, and is not included in the computation of
the GPA. It is given one time only per course, except in the case of ESL 091 or ENG 091, which
may be given twice. Students who take ENG 092 Spring 2003 and thereafter may receive an "R"
grade twice.
P - Passing:
A grade assigned to SSD 100 (Freshman Orientation), and COOP 101, 102, 103 (Cooperative
Education).
F - Grade Policy:
The grades of "#F," "#WU," "#WN", "#*WN" and "#FIN" denote grades excluded from GPA
calculation. Grades not computed in grade point averages are based on CUNY policy effective
September 1, 1990. When an undergraduate student receives the earned academic grade of "F,"
"FIN," "WU," "WN," "*WN" or an administrative failing grade, and that student subsequently
retakes that course and receives a grade of "C" or better, the initial grade of "F" will no longer
be computed info the cumulative grade point average. The "F" will remain on the transcript.
The number of failing credits that can be deleted from the grade point average calculation
shall be limited to 16 for the duration of the student's undergraduate enrollment in the
institutions of The City University of New York". If a course for which a student wants the
failing grade to be replaced by a grade of "C" or better was taken prior to September 1, 1984,
the student must receive the approval of the appropriate Committee on Academic Standing.

For a grade of "C" or better to replace a grade of F in the calculation of the cumulative
GPA, the failing grade cannot have been received at another institution.

A failing grade may not be partially replaced. If a student has replaced 14 credits of
failing grades and subsequently receives a grade of or better in another 3-credit course
that was previously failed, the failing grade cannot be replaced.

If a student has received more than one failing grade for the same course and
subsequently earns a grade of "C" or better in the course, the failing grades will be
deleted from the calculation of the cumulative GPA, subject to the 16-credit limit.

If a student fails a course that was taken on a pass/fail basis and subsequently retakes
the course, a grade of "C" or better must be earned in order for the failing grade to be
replaced.

If the course number or title of a course was changed in the period between the receipt
of the failing grade and the repetition of the course but the content remained the same,
the failing grade will be replaced if a grade of "C" or better was received in the repeated
course.

If the content of the course was changed in the period between the receipt of the failing
grade and the repetition of the course, or when a student has been allowed to substitute
one course for another, the declaration of course equivalency for the purpose of deleting
the failing grade from the calculation of the cumulative GPA will be at the discretion of
the appropriate Committee on Academic Standing.

The cumulative GPA calculated on the basis of this policy is to be used for purposes of
retention and graduation from the college and the admission to and continuance in a
major or specialization. It will not be used to calculate graduation honors, the Dean's
List, or departmental honors at graduation.
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Any student who does not want a repeated course to replace a previously recorded failing
grade should notify the Registrar so that the replacement does not take place. This request
may be made at any time after the second enrollment, provided the student is enrolled in the
College.
Note: The policy is not applicable to an e-Permit course; students receiving a failing grade
("WU", "WN," "*WN, "F", "FIN") under no circumstances will benefit from the "F" grade
policy.
FIN - Failure due to Incomplete:
A grade given when an "Incomplete" reverts to an "F" grade. Failure to complete requirements
of a course by the last day of classes of the semester immediately following the semester in
which the INC was assigned results in an "FIN" grade, effective Spring 1998.
Z - Grade:
No grade submitted by Instructor. "Z" is an administrative grade
Repeating Courses:
Repeating Courses with Passing Grades: Students should not repeat a course if a passing
grade of "C" or better has been received*, or if transfer credit has been accepted for a course
completed at another institution. However, if the student repeats a course for which they
have received a grade of "C" or better, credit will not be awarded and their financial aid
awards may be affected.
*Note: Some programs are exempted from the above statement (e.g., Allied Health). Consult
your Program Coordinator.
Absences/ Class Attendance
Students are expected to attend all class meetings in the courses for which they are registered.
Classes begin at the times indicated in the official schedule of classes. Arrival in class after the
scheduled starting time constitutes lateness. The maximum number of absences is limited to
15% of the number of scheduled class hours per semester, and a student absent more than the
indicated 15% is deemed excessively absent. In the case of excessive absences or lateness, the
instructor has the right to lower the grade, assign a failing grade, or assign additional written
work or readings. Absences due to late registration, change of program, or extenuating
circumstances, will be considered on an individual basis by the instructor. Each department
and program may specify in writing a different attendance policy.
Note:


Any work missed during any period of absence must be made up by the student.
If the student did not attend class at least once in the first three weeks of the course, the
Office of the Registrar is required to assign a grade of "*WN".
Degree Programs & Graduation Requirements
Registered Programs Approved by the New York State Education Department
(Enrollment in other than registered or otherwise approved programs may
jeopardize a student's eligibility for certain student aid awards.)
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Program Title
Accounting
Accounting
Accounting for Forensic Accounting
Business Management
Chemical Engineering Science
Civil Engineering Science
Community Health
Criminal Justice
Dental Hygiene
Digital Design & Animation
Digital Music
Early Childhood Education
Electrical Engineering Science
Game Design
Gerontology
Liberal Arts & Sciences
Liberal Arts & Sciences
Mathematics
Mechanical Engineering Science
Microcomputers for Business
Nursing
Office Technology:
(Administrative Assistant)
Office Technology:
(Medical Office Manager)
Police Science
Public Policy & Administration
Public Interest Paralegal Studies
Radiologic Technology
Science for Forensic Science
Certificate Programs
Business Information Systems
Community Health
Office Assistant
Practical Nursing (LPN)
Degree
A.A.S.
A.S.
A.S.
A.S.
A.S.
A.S.
A.S.
A.A.
A.A.S.
A.A.S.
A.A.S.
A.A.S.
A.S.
A.A.S.
A.A.S.
A.A.
A.S.
A.S.
A.S.
A.A.S.
A.A.S.
A.A.S.
HEGIS Code
5002.00
0502.00
0502.00
5004.00
5609.00
5609.00
5506.00
5505.00
5203.00
5012.00
5610.00
5503.00
5609.00
5103.00
5506.20
5649.00
5649.00
5617.00
5609.00
5101.00 (UNAVAILABLE)
5208.10
5005.00
A.A.S.
5214.00
A.S.
A.A.S.
A.A.S
A.A.S.
A.S
5505.00
5508.00
5099.00
5207.00
5619.00
(certificate)
(certificate)
(certificate)
(certificate)
5101.00 (UNAVAILABLE)
5506.00
5005.00
5209.20
Degree Programs
Hostos Community College offers Associate in Arts (A.A.) and Associate in Science (AS.),
degree programs that prepare students for transfers to four-year colleges upon graduation
from Hostos. Also offered are Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) degree programs that
prepare students for specific careers as well as one Business Information Systems certificate
program, one Community Health certificate program, one Office Assistant certificate program,
and one Practical Nursing (LPN) certificate program. In the health sciences, credits for the
A.A.S. degree vary as follows: in Dental Hygiene, 70 credits; in Nursing, 71.5 credits; in
Radiologic Technology, 64.5 credits. In addition, requirements for certification and licensure in
these programs impose additional restrictions on the time required to complete them.
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Candidates for the A.A. degree study the arts and sciences. These include the Behavioral
and Social Sciences, English, Mathematics, Africana Studies, Latin American and Caribbean
Studies, Modern Languages, Philosophy, and Visual and Performing Arts and other
courses in Humanities.
Candidates for the A.S. degree follow programs that closely parallel the A.A., degree program,
but provide greater concentration in the areas of Mathematics or Natural Science. Candidates
for the A.S. degree may also study Accounting, Business Management, Chemical Engineering
Science, Civil Engineering Science, Community Health, Electrical Engineering Science,
Mathematics, Mechanical Engineering Science and Science for Forensic Science. In addition,
there is no modern language requirement for the A.S. degree.
Candidates for the A.A.S., degree follow programs in which there is concentration in the
appliecl1field. The professional fields in which programs are offered include Accounting,
Aging and Health Studies, Dental Hygiene, Digital Design & Animation, Digital Music, Early
Childhood Education, Gerontology, Microcomputers for Business, Nursing, Office
Technology, Public Administration, Public Interest Paralegal Studies and Radiologic
Technology.
In keeping with the regulations of the Commissioner of Education of the State of New York, a
minimum of 30 academic credits of the total required in a degree program must be completed
at Hostos Community College.
Entering freshmen who are veterans of the United States military service should note that
they will be required to fulfill the Physical Education requirement for all degree programs
that include it.
Graduation Requirements for all Degree Programs (except where specified).
1.
GPA: Students must have a minimum GPA of 2.0 to be eligible for graduation.
2.
SKILLS TESTS: Effective May 1997, CUNY requires that all students pass the writing
and reading basic skills tests as a graduation requirement from all community colleges.
In addition, students who wish to transfer to senior colleges must also pass the
mathematics skills test prior to transferring (1985 policy). (See Assessment for more
details).
3.
Writing Intensive (WI): Effective Fall 2003, all entering students is required to take two
(2) Writing Intensive courses prior to graduation. These specially designated sections are
designed to help students improve their writing skills along with their understanding of
course material. Through both formal and informal writing assignments, students will
strengthen their writing proficiencies as they become familiar with the writing unique to
particular disciplines. It is expected that, through these intensive, meaningful
opportunities for writing, students will be able to become better writers and
communicators, skills highly valued both in college and in the job market.
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Appendix A: Grievance Forms
Student Grievance (with faculty)
Office use only.
Department:
STUDENT COMPLAINT FORM
Time / Date Received:
Name of Faculty:
Date of Incident:
Name of Student:
Student Contact Info: email
telephone
Total # of pages submitted:
Student’s Signature:
Details of Complaint:
Continue on back and attach additional pages as necessary.
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Student Grievance (with student/staff)
Complainant’s Name (print): _________________________________________________
Last
First
M.I.
Student ID No.:
_________________________________________________
Address:
_________________________________________________
Telephone:
_________________________________________________
City
State
Zip
(
) __________________________________________
Office/Department/Individual Involved: _________________________________________
Complaint Taken By:
_________________________________________________
Reason for Complaint:
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
NOTE: Are there other pages or documents attached? YES _____
NO _____
Complaint Resolved?
YES _____
NO _____
SUGGESTIONS: _____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
TRANSFERRED TO: _________________________________________________________________
NAME
DEPT.
____________
Date
________________________________
Signature of Staff Recording Complaint
__________________________
Complainant’s Signature
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Appendix B: Grade Appeal Process & Form
Students have the right to appeal a grade when they believe that the grade was based on
factors other than the student's academic performance in the course. The process for filing a
grade appeal is as follows:
1. The student must present written proof or justification to his/her Instructor that he/she
deserves a grade change. If the request for a change of grade is denied then the student
can submit her appeal to the academic program coordinator.
2. The second level involves a meeting with the Academic Program Coordinator. The
student must submit a written report of his/her meeting with the instructor to the
Coordinator. If the Program Coordinator feels that there is sufficient cause to appeal a
grade, then the Program Coordinator will initiate the appeal and forward the appeal to
the Chairperson. If the department denies the appeal, then the student can submit
his/her appeal to the academic department chairperson.
3. The third level involves a meeting with the Academic Department Chairperson, In this
case, the Chairperson will review the appeal and all pertinent documents available –
grade rosters, copies of papers and exams- and determine whether the appeal can be
granted or not. Once a ruling has been made, the case should be considered closed. If
the department denies the appeal, then the student can submit his/her appeal to the
Academic Standard Committee.
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STUDENT COURSE GRADE APPEAL FORM
Please read the Course Grade Appeal Procedure, which is available online, before completing this
form.
Name: ____________________________________________________________________
Student Empl ID: ___________________________________________________________
Street address: _____________________________________________________________
City/State/Zip: _____________________________________________________________
Telephone numbers: __________________________________________________________
Email address: _______________________________________ Semester: ______________
Course:
Section Number:
Instructor:
Please state the basis for your grade appeal. Be as specific as you can. Attach another sheet if
necessary. You should also attach all additional documentation as specified in the
Course Grade Appeal Procedure.
Do you wish to appear in person before the Academic Standards Committee?
_____________________________________________________________________________
Have you spoken with your instructor in hopes of resolving this dispute informally? If not,
why?
_____________________________________________________________________________
Student's signature: ________________________________________________________
Date: ____________________________________________________________________
Please submit this form to the instructional dean or department chair with supervisory responsibilities
for the course whose grade you wish to appeal.
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