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Tobacco Health Effects and Best Practices in Tobacco Control

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Tobacco Health Effects and Best Practices in Tobacco Control
Tobacco Health Effects
and
Best Practices in Tobacco
Control
Tobacco Use:
Scope of the Problem


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
Tobacco use is the leading preventable
cause of disease and premature death in
the U.S. and the world
1,400 deaths in Montana each year
430,000 deaths annually in U.S.
1,200 each day
5 million world wide
Scope of the Problem Cont.

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There are approximately 1.25 billion
smokers in the world, and 800 million of
these live in the developing world.
By 2020 10 million people in the
world will die of tobacco related
illnesses
Montana Youth Tobacco Use

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Ever tried a cigarette
Ever smoked daily
*Chew/dip/snuff
*Cigars, cigarillos
*Any tobacco use
*past 30 days
1999
70.3
2005
55.4
23.2
15.2
20.4
45.0
15.2
8.2
17.6
31.4
Adults
In Montana 21.1% of all adults smoke
cigarettes and 6% use spit tobacco
The Real Marlboro Man
Everyone Has To Die Sometime
...But Not Like This
Smoking related illness and death can occur at any
age. The young
man in this
photo started
smoking at
age 13. He died
at age 34 from
lung cancer
brought on
by smoking.
Secondhand Cigarette Smoke
Each year, secondhand cigarette smoke is
responsible for:
• 37,000 deaths from heart disease in adults
• 3,000 deaths from lung cancer in adults
• 13,000 deaths from other cancers in adults
• 300,000 cases of lung infections, such as
pneumonia and bronchitis, in infants and
young children
200 death per year in Montana
Secondhand Smoke Effects
What can be done
about this?
Best Practices for Comprehensive
Tobacco Control Programs
Goal of comprehensive tobacco control
programs is to reduce disease, disability,
and death related to tobacco use by:
Preventing the initiation of tobacco use among young
people
Promoting quitting among young people and among adults
Eliminating nonsmokers’ exposure to environmental tobacco
smoke
Identifying and eliminating the disparities related to
tobacco use and its effects among different population
groups
Comprehensive,Sustainable
and Accountable

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
CDC recommends a minimum of $9.3
million for prevention programs in MT
Currently, there is about $6.3 million
each year allocated specifically for
prevention
In order for a program to be successful,
it must include essential components
Nine Components of
Comprehensive Tobacco Control
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Community
Programs
Chronic Disease
Programs
School Programs
Enforcement
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Statewide Programs
Counter-Marketing
Cessation Programs
Surveillance and
Evaluation
Administration and
Management
1. Community Programs to
Reduce Tobacco Use

To achieve individual behavior change
that supports the nonuse of tobacco,
communities must change the way
tobacco is promoted, sold and used
while changing peoples knowledge,
attitudes and practices.
Community Components
Continued
Programs involve:
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People in their homes
Work sites
Schools
Places of worship
Entertainment
Civic organizations etc.
Examples of Programs
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Engaging young people to plan and
conduct events and campaigns
Educational Programs for medical
personnel, schools, daycares, & city
officials
Secondhand smoke campaigns
Examples continued
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Smoking cessation programs by drug
and alcohol prevention agencies in
addition to medical facilities
Include Native American Community
and educate about tobacco use and
media literacy
Role of Health Communication
2. Chronic Disease Programs to
Reduce the Burden of TobaccoRelated Diseases

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Even if current tobacco use stopped,
the residual burden of disease among
past users would cause disease for
decades to come
Communities can focus attention
directly on tobacco related disease to
prevent them and detect them early
and addressing additional risk factors
Examples of Chronic Disease
programs

Community interventions that link tobacco control
interventions with cardiovascular disease prevention
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Develop counter-marketing to increase awareness of
ETS as a trigger for asthma

Train dental providers to counsel their patients on the
role of tobacco use in the development of oral cancer
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Expand cancer registries to monitor tobacco related
cancers
Role of Health Communications
3. School Programs

School program activities include
implementing CDC’s Guidelines for School
Health Programs

This includes: tobacco-free policies, evidencebased curricula, teacher training, parental
involvement, cessation services and linking
efforts with local community coalitions and
statewide media and educational campaigns
Example of School based
programs
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Best Practices curriculum such as
Implementations of Life Skills Training
or Towards No Tobacco Use
Linking school-based efforts with local
coalitions and counter advertising
programs.
Media Literacy Training
Tobacco Free Schools Policy
Role of Health Communications
4. Enforcement

There are two primary policy areas:
restrictions on minors’ access to
tobacco and on smoking in public place
Example of Enforcement Policy
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No one under 18 allowed to purchase tobacco
No one under 18 allowed in any bar or casino
where smoking is allowed
No smoking allowed in any restaurants (some
bars and casinos are exempt)
No tobacco products allowed on any public
school ground or at public school event
Role of Health Communications
5. Statewide Programs

Statewide programs increase the
capacity of local programs by providing
assistance on evaluating programs,
promoting media advocacy,
implementing smoke-free policies, and
reducing minors access to tobacco
MTUPP’s role
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Statewide meetings for Contractors
Regional quarterly meetings
Advocacy calls on a bi-monthly basis
Daily e-mails that provide up to date
information on tobacco issues from
around the world
Contracts with Strategicom, M&R
Strategic Services, Quitline,etc
6. Counter-Marketing

Marketing strategies to counter protobacco influences and increase prohealth messages and influences
throughout a state, region, or local
community. Counter marketing consists
of a wide range of efforts, including:
paid television, radio, billboard, and
print
Examples of Counter Marketing
Television spots
www.thetruth.com
 CDC clips
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Print ads
Local Examples of Counter
Marketing
More Examples
7. Cessation Programs

Strategies to help people quit smoking
can yield significant health and
economic benefits. Effective strategies
include: brief advice by medical
providers, counseling, and
pharmacotherapy.
Local Cessation Efforts
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Quitline 1-866-485-6868
Information and materials to medical
professionals
Hospital-based programs at
Deaconess Billings Clinic and the VA
8. Surveillance and Evaluation

A surveillance and evaluation system
monitors programs for accountability for
state policymakers and other
responsibilities for fiscal oversight.
State evaluation efforts should be
coordinated with federal tobacco
surveillance programs such as
SAMHSA’s National Household Survey
on Drug Abuse.
Montana Evaluation
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Statewide Monitoring and Evaluation
Group
TFY Action Plan
State Deliverables
TFY Quarterly Report
Standardized Data Sources
9. Administration and
Management
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An effective tobacco control program
requires a strong management
structure to facilitate coordination of all
of these program components.
In Montana, it is the Montana Tobacco
Use Prevention Program that provides
the fiscal and program management.
Media Literacy:
The ability to “read” or
“decode” messages in a
variety of print and
electronic media.
Why Teach Media Literacy?
Media is a force that
determines culture and
peoples’ behavior
Why Teach Media Literacy?
Media has a powerful influence on our lives, and
especially in the development of our children.
It can shape young people’s beliefs and their
sense of self and understanding of the world
around them…By empowering our young
people with a better understanding of the
media, we can help them control their
relationship with the vast array of media
messages they receive in their everyday
environment.
Hillary Clinton, 1996 Conference on Media in
Education
QuickTime™ and a
Cinepak decompressor
are needed to see this picture.
Kids watch between 3
and 4 hours of
television each day.
QuickTime™ and a
Cinepak decompressor
are needed to see this picture.
Direct instruction is the best way
to counteract the influence of
media
I want to take kids’ natural
tendency to rebel, and have
them apply it - do some
critical thinking - so they’ll
make choices to rebel
against the people that are
selling them addictive
lifestyles.
Peter DeBenedittis, Ph.D.
Research
Four studies in New Mexico indicate:
Statistical analysis of survey results
showed that media literacy presentations
helped students question the reality of
what they saw in the media.
Students were less likely to believe the
hyperbole presented in alcohol and
tobacco advertising, and they were less
likely to identify favorably with the
people they saw on TV
Deconstruction
Who paid for the
media?
Who is being
targeted?
What messages
and values are
expressed?
What kind of
lifestyle is
presented? Is
it glamorized?
How?
Image available at:
http://www.trinketsandtrash.org
Who paid for the media?
Why?
Who is being targeted?
What text, images or sounds
lead you to this conclusion?
What is the text (literal
meaning) of the message?
What is the subtext?
What kind of lifestyle is
presented? Is it glamorized?
How?
What values are expressed?
What tools or techniques of
persuasion are used?
What story is not being told?
In what ways is this a healthy
and/or unhealthy media
message?
Student Created Ads
Student Created Ads
Websites
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Coordinated School Health Program:
www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/CSHP/
Preventing Drug Abuse for Parents and
Teachers: http://www.nida.nih.gov/parentteacher.html
California Based Guide to Healthy Schools and
Children http://www.gettingresults.org/
New Mexico Media Literacy Project:
http://www.nmmlp.org/
Websites
Center for Media Literacy: http://www.medialit.org/
Teen Health and the Media:
http://depts.washington.edu/thmedia/
http://www.optimalhealthconcepts.com/FergusHS.pdf
http://www.optimalhealthconcepts.com/LewistownDrugs.
pdf
http://www.optimalhealthconcepts.com/Lewistown.htm
Jackie Lloyd and Ernie Randolfi
www.OptmalHealthConcepts.com
[email protected]
For More Information:

Jackie Lloyd, MSU-B, 657-2927

Katie Mayer, YCCHD, 651-6437
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