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Document 1851983
speciAL
coLLecooNS
OouqLas
LibRARy
queeN's uNiveusiiy
AT kiNQSXrON
Presented by
kiNQSTON
ONTARIO
CANAt)A
A N
S PF
E R
TO THE
REFLEC TIONS
RIGHT HON. EDMUND BURKE,
ANSWER
TO THE
REFLECtlO NS
OF THE
RIGHT HON. EDMUND BURKE.
By M. DEPONT.
WITH THE
OJ.IGIKAI,
NOTES.
LONDON:
PRINTED FOR
J.
DEBRETT, PICCADILLr.
M^DCCj^CI.
n^\
V'^ip-
A N
S
IF
E
R
O F
D E
M.
P
O N
T,
TO THE REFLECTIONS OT
The Right Hon.
M. Depont,
Mr. Burke
on
the
in
BURKE.
young Gentleman
to
in France, was
fome time
England, and he had the honour
joy the hofpitality of Beaconsfitld.
late great event in France,
Mr. Burke,
the
firft
he wrote a
to en-
On
ih>e
letter to
requefting that as he had learnt
rodiments of Government at his table,
he would favour him with
tranfaftions
Burke,
whom
addrefTed his celebrated Pamphlet
the Revolution
ago
EDMUND
then
pafling
his opinions
in
France.
with great complacency,
gratify the wifhes of his
and wrote
fat
on the
— Mr.
down
to
young Correfpondent,
his fentimen's freely in a letter of
a
couple of Ihcets
— but
him
from a friendly apprehenfion,
for a time,
that if
it fell
this letter
he kept by
into the hands of the violent fpi-
B
rrit»
2
[
rits
]
M. Depont might fall
of Pans,
to
M. Depont, who
delicacy,
—
there
th::t
him from
relieved
by an aHurance
inviolable
a facrifice
Tnis he intimated
to his dcfire of knowledge.
the
tliat
was no fuch danger—
and that theie was nothing he coveted
Mr. Burke, on
as the opinions of
of which
at
fo ir.uch
the
fcenc
momer.t the
that
Mr. Burke complied, and
fpeftator.
him
Europe was
all
the
I^.ter
;
fent
fame time inform-
the
at
his
was
poll
ing him, that he had turned his thoughts more
ferioufly
to
the fubjeft,
communicate
to
him.
which he fnould alfo
This intimation ended
in the celebrated pamphlet, which,
for the laft
three months, has been the fubjeft of general
difcufCon.
Mr. Burke, from the fame
his
correfpondsnt,
name.
M. Depont,
clofed the fecret,
delicate regard
fludioufly
concealed
however, has himfelfdif-
and has given leave
publication of his anfwer.
bable but from the
to
his
It is
for the
not impro-
fame valuable fcurce we
may be honoured with the firfl le;ter cf Mr.
Burke, for which we are fenfible how much
our readers would bs indebted to
uz.
M.
dupont'*
3
[
3
M. DEPONT'S ANSWER.
TO
MR. BURKE'S REFLECTIONS.
Sir,
*•
*'
When
in what
year took the liberty of aCcing
I laft
manner you confidered
of France,
I
the political events
certainly did not imagine
ti.at
letter could give occafion to the publication
work you have had
will evsn
own,
the geodnefs to f:;nd to me.
that I
xny queftion had
I
my
of the
I
would not have hazirded
been aware what
efFeft it
would
produce, and that if your opinions had been then
known
to
me,
far
from engaging you to difc'o'e
thelm, I Ihould have
them from
*'
intreated you to withheld
the public.
Iwould have reprefented
to
you that the
fingle
name would give fome degree
of hope to the vanquifhed party in France, and
that to encourage that party to make new atauthority of your
tempts, was to expofe
it
to
new dangers
(i).
I
(hould have agreed with you on fome of the errors which the National
AfTembly muft neceflarily
have committed in the midft of the agitations
£ 2
and
4
[
and
fl)ocks
but
I
uhich
body has experienced
that
have
fliould
]
laboured
and
tbat time, experience,
to
;
perfuade you
refledlion,
were the
only proper correftives for thefe errors, and that
to attempt to correft
them inftantly, would be to
my country anew
expofe
of every kind which
to the troubles
and
evils
two years con-
for almoft
tinue to afiliftit, and which (b cruelly diftrefs
the true friends of humanity.
"
I
would have endeavoured
that the anarchy,
paint fo f.>rtib!y,
the
mud
if the cn!y authority
fided were
made
perhaps, have
om
in
which you
in
which the Nation con-
the objeft of attack.
been able
to
in
mine (2). Yes,
mightj
I
prevent one of the
his
ranging himfelf with the
Defpotifm
convince you,
of
be dreadfully protrafted,
warmeft friends of liberty,
f
to
mifchiefs
Sir,
own country,
Advocates of
your fufceptible
aad worthy heart has been too ftrongly affefted
«viih the evils that
have attended our Revolution,
rot to fcarexpofing
ful,
in
a
it
manner by
to
evils
ftill
involuntarily
more
dread-,
ferving the
party which, dares towifti for a Counter- Revolution,
to
and which thinks that OHr Confiitation ought
he purified by fir t
and by
blood.
"
Thi»
[
)
5
am
confident,
would have
determined you to preferve
filence, if
ycu had not
•'
This motive.
Sir, I
been afraid of the re-aftion of the tranfaflicns in
your o-vn
country upon
O'Jr
which may be perceived
work, ought
to
:
This fentiment,
of your
cojrfe
the
in
be deeply imprefTed on
mmJ
th-^
of every good Englishman, and the apprehei»fi/>n
of feeing
abandon a
his country
real bl. fiir^g f.T
an ideal and rsnnoti advantage, appears
sac
to
Yery natural.
"
I will
even own.
the bazird of
fome of the innovators,
Sir, that at
appearing a bad patriot
to
the greater part of whofe fentimen'.s I have
change in France,
been
adpt-
would have ftrenuoully oppofed every
cd, I
if
our former
as o^ood a^ yours,
and
if
had been equally fecured.
compare the
fort
our individual liberty
But can we really. Sir,
fiiuation cf the
two countries?
Very far from thinkirg that a Revolution
is
I
not become incifpenfable in France
ment
at
which
it
hap;jened
Oftober, on which
to fuppofe,
it
?
by rot looking
earlier period,
It
at the
was not
was efredcd,
as
was
To
mo-
the 5th of
you appear
for its origin
and detaining us
am
at all
times, or in allrefpedls.ahippy event (3). Bat
it
of
Government had
to
an
long on the
detail of that dreadful day, the account of
which
ought
[
6
DDght to be torn from our
]
The Revo-
hiftory.
was already efFeded, and the events of
the 5ih and 6th of Oilober, added to every other
lution
fpecies
of atrocity, the moil abfolute
inutility.
wason the days of the 3th and 14th July 1789
i
that
the
between oppreflive
originated
conteft
authority, and rifing liberty
m-ment
that the
Jt
(4),
it
;
was at
French nation exprefled
its
this
fen-
timents with the greateft energy, and obtained
Truft me. Sir, fince
the moft complete triumph.
that
period good
citizens
mented the abufe of
their
have frequently
la-
power by fome mali-
who can by no
means be confounded with the body of the
cious or mifguided individuals,
people, except by
their enemies,
intereft in reprefenting
point of view.
You
them
in
who have an
the moft odious
are too juft, and
too
im-
partial. Sir, to attribute to the nation the crimes
committed on the 5th and 6th O£lober
you know me
fufficiently
I entertain the
gard to
this
to
;
and
be convinced, that
fame fentiments
as you, with re-
n.elancholy tranfaftion, which you
fo pathetically defcribe.
**
fafts
and
But permit me,
Sir, to
remind you of fome
which happened previous
which have been
to
thofe
mis-Hated to
you
days
by
fome
7
[
]
fome Frenchmen, whofe
fuch as
prefent France,
and not fuch
as
the
then only to
was
the
a:
France,
States General.
yoa
opening of
fay,
needed
expenditure to a
-^
But did not the people.
opprtffive,
that
already
Sir,
groan under the load of fubfidies
more
to re-
pay fome new taxes in order to
bring the public receipt and
level.
was
to have been,
ought
it
really
it
intereft it
fo
mach
the
they were exsdled by the
Had
moft arbitrary government.
not a National
Bankruptcy been already pronounced by an Jrret
of Council (5)
?
You
talk of laws,
of opinion, which tempered the
(ifm,
and made
in reality (6).
it
exift rather in
Laws,
refpeflable laws, and
been violated
cred,
dumb
?
Sir
till
?
!
!
of defpo-
appearance than
But had not the moil
that inftant the moft fa-
Was
Anarchy prevailed
realm (7). Religion
of religion,
effefts
not
in
But did
it
Juftice herfelf
every part of the
temper
in
France
the efFefls of defpotifm in the period of ignorance,
fanalicifm, and foperftiiion (8). Opinicn! But
it
was
rot in general then exprefs in oppofiticn to the
Government (9) ? Were not men
now moft divided in intereft, then united
by the common intereft of refifting oppreffion ?
Did not the officers, who comphin with fo much
cxifting form of
who
are
force and fo
much
jafticc of ths
want of fubordinatioB
:
«
[
]
nation amor.g the foldiers,
fet
the example of re-
finance to the execution of arbitrary
orders
demn
Did
?
and illegal
who moft con-
not the Magiftrates,
the reprehenfible excefles of the people, thea
regard them as indifpenfable (lo)
general
infjrrcftion
w^ich you
find
fo
againft
Was
?
that
favourable to the population,
commerce, ard profperity of the empire
it
not then to
who
reft
be graned, Sir,
has be?n able to
cf
feries
to
not the
Government,
trace
poliiical events,
in
?
Ought
by every perfon
this
country the
and who has no inte-
afcribe the Revolution to other caufes,
that the depof.:d
Government could no longer
fuLfift(ii).
" Bat
you. Sir, fay, thit inftead of
making
we fhould have endeavoured
novations,
In-
to re-
How! the firm and couwho rofe with fo much vigour againft
of his own country ; the man, who in
form, and Improve (12).
rageous man,
the abufes
the Parliament of
February
1780,
England,
pronounced
on the
thefc
nth
oi
re;iiarlcable
words
*'
There
is
a
t^ms when
**
bad things becaufe
**
vvorfe.
—There
is
men
wiil not fufFer
their anceilors have fuftered
a time
whea
the hoary
head
"
of
;
9
[
]
**
of inveterate abufe will neither draw reve-
*'
rence, nor obtain proteftion*.
**
Some
ties,
valuable perfons, refpe£ted by poth par-
were of opinion that the ancient divifion of
Chamber,
orders ought to be replaced by a fecond
nearly fimilar to that which exifls in your country.
without
But,
examining
the
quelHon,
great
whether the unity of the Legiflative Body, with
proper reftriftions and modifications,
ferable
;
is
not pre-
without referring to the particular cir-
cumllances which gave the people reafon to ap-
prehend that the Nobility, who had Ihut them
out from admiffion
to
ail
employments, might,
when
they again appeared in a different form (13),
take occafion to ufurp the fame advantages
ought
it
not to be admitted, that
the
excelTive
eulogiums, which were given t© your Conflitution,
were more calculated
to
prevent us from
cepting than to perfuade us to adopt
nations are too
it (
1
4)
?
Free
zealous eafily to yield to their
neighbours any fuperiority, efpecially in what refpedls their Conllitution.
* Speech of the Right Hon, Edmund Burke on
fenting
a Pisa
for
pre«>
the CEconomical Reformation of the
CItH and other Efiabliihments.
C
''I have
10
[
**I have hiiKerto,
you, that
Sir,
3
endeavoured to prove to
the Revolution of France did
if
not
commence with you till the moment at which the
Clubs of London and Dr. Price took it under
coniideration, with us
goes back to a period
it
much more remote, and
be
fought
the
that
its
the nation
which
fortunate,
numerous, the
the racft
muft
origin
at
crifis,
General being convoked, the
States
ed
before
the
part
moft
of
un-
and the moft oppreffed, had record-
their defire, that the votes Ihould
individually
by orders,
be coUefted
in inftruftlons very dif-
ferent from thofe in which you fee only a defire
of reforming fome abufes.
tempt
to reply to the
work,
I
articles
of your
(hould too evidently injure the caufe,
which I wi(h
you.
I will not. Sir, at-
different
to defend,
by entering
This noble and glorious
the
tafk I
lifts
with
leave to
fome man more worthy of being your antagonift,
and will content myfelf with communicating to
you fome
you
hafty refleftions, intended
my
that
to convince
love for Liberty has not been
weak-
ened by the incidental oppreiTion of fome individuals
;
that the horrors, with
troubles have infpired
increafc jny fear of
which the
me, has tended
paft
only to
feeing them renewed,
and
that
"
I
your charge againft Dr. Prke> of taking
t^iat
the deviation from principles for the principles
themfelves,
You
**
is
me (15).
lament. Sir, the weaknefs of the exe-
power, and the influence of the
cutive
the National
mittees of
which
clrcumftances
think
not applicable to
it
Aflembly
Com-
thefe are
;
lament, but I do not
I alfo
neceffary to excite a civil
war
in France,
in order to reftore an order of things, to which
reafon muft naturally lead (16).
" You
lament. Sir, the poverty of the people
for the prefent
But
I rely
moment, and
much on
gefted by that
the
Commiuec*
which you feem
to
I likewife
means which
condemn
lament it:
will be fug-
(17), the inftitutionof
and
;
I
am
of opi-
nion, that in order to reftore peace to the country,
and recal emigrants, we ought not to exci&e
frelh troubles (18).
" You
and
.
lament the fufpenfion of public credit
I, Sir, likewife
that the beft
lament
it
:
;
But I do not thii^
method of reviving
it is
to attack the
different operations of the National Aflembly,
• The Committee «f Mendicity,
and
12
[
1
to perfuade the landed and
monied
interefts that
they are neceffarily enemies, when, in
mull ftand or
fall
" You lament.
and
I alfo
lament
faft,
they
together (19).
Sir, the defefh'on
it
:
But
I
of the troops;
have recovered confi-
dence from the conduft of the National Guards,
and
the troops of the line in the affair of
Nancy,
and from
the fincere repentance of the fleet at
Breftj and
lam
convinced that a
will always unite all
You
'*
ed to
all
common danger
(20).
lament the fcandalous fpeftacle exhibit-
Europe by the
Members of
lefs
Frenchmen
lament
inteftine divifions of the
the National AfTembly; and I
it,
and frequently have
poignant regret,
in feeing forae
felt the
Frenchmen, un-
worthy of the name, calumniate, and
Iha^iefuIIy
But does not even the im-
traduce their country.
punity of fuch
no
moft
men prove
their liberty
?
And can
a man, feparated from us only by fome miles,
maintain, that an Aflembly
knows
that one of
hemence,
in
its
not free,
is
Members
that very AfTembly,
counter-revolution, and
that
when he
propofed, withve«
it
a plan
was
for
a
liltened io
with coolnefs^zi},
"
Yo«j
;
13
[
You lament
**
]
the rigour «ich whith the Ec-
clefiaftics
have been treated
ment
But
it:
I
cannot fee
and
;
how
ed, or Atheifm eftablifhed,
alfo la^
I, Sir,
religion
is ?.ttack-
becaufe the falary of
public Minifters, employed in the fervice of devotion,
is
not large (22).
You complain
*'
diciary
Power
defedls
:
But
of the organization of the Ja-
and
;
I,
Sir, find
for thefe 1
with which they
may
advantage acquired
am
it
not free from
confoled by the eafc
be redlified, and by the great
in the inllitution
of Juries, of
which you fpeak not a word (23).
You
*'
perty
;
lament the violation of ftuJal pro-
and
I likewife regret
the misfortune of
feme individuals (24) But I think that there Hill
remains another method of indemnifying thera,
:
withoutinvading the property of
RocHEFOUCAULT,
M. M.
de la
dc NoAiLLES, and de la
EORDE.
'«
and
by
You lament
the creation
I, Sir, likewife
lament
the refledlion, that
it
it is
:
of paper money
But
I
am
ccnfoled
only temporary (25).
and
;
u
[
«nd that
]
tends to facilitate an operation produc-
it
tive of thegrcatell advantages.
You
*'
great
;
number of municipalities
find the
and
I
am of
that it will be
the
more
fame opinion
that
it
is
I
too
think
when the
eafy to dirainifli,
(hall perceive
people
But
:
true in-
their
tereft(26).
Yoa
**
are afraid of the National Militia
;
and
I alfo might entertain the
fame
fears> if I
thought
they were to co.tinue on
their
prefent
fooiing,
and
did not
know
that their fpeedy
quickly difpel
will
all
organization
apprehenfions
from
that
quarter.
** I
am
not fo
much alarmed
as
you. Sir, a-
bout the progrefs of the new political machine
and
I
am
of opini-n, that
whan once
the princi-
pal wheels (hall have been put in motion, the
will eafily follow.
In
fine.
Sir,
I
am
reft
infpircd
with the higheft confidence from the progrefs of
that enlightened fpirit, which you have (o cruelly
and from the liberty of the prefs, upon
which you have not touched j and I am convinced
attacked,
that thefe economiils.- thefe philanthroplfts, thefe
philofophers, upon
whom
you fpeak with
fo
much
afperity.
15
[
]
afperity, will contribute as
much, by
ings, to the fupport of liberty,
thofe
blifhment of order, as
and whofe very
was always necefTary
excefles of a people
tion as they
«*
I
were
re-efta-
famous paladins,
whofe extinftion you de-
thofe knights errant,
plore,
their writ-
and the
inftitution
to oppofe
proves that
armed
more formidable,
lefs
It
force to the
in propor-
enlightened (27).
hope. Sir, that you find In this letter only
the fimple expreffion of the moll genuine regard
for liberty,
and that you will not difcover the
language of a
I will
man
blinded by the fpirit of Party.
never be fubfervient to the ambitious views
of Minifters or of demagogues (z8), but
I will al-
ways defend the ConlVitution, which I have fwora
to maintain.
I
wi(h not to exalt myfelf to the cha-
rader of a reformer of mankind, or a miflionary of
the new French Inditutions.
that
an
inhabitant of the Canton of Berne, or that
an
Englifhman, may be
free
I believe,
and happy, notwithftand;
ing the apparent Ariftocracy of their Conftitation_
but I think, that
a.
Frenchman, who
fpalr of the fafety of his country,
ftiould
de-
and endeavour t9
foment new difturbances, would be the moll culpable of men, whilft the fage Englilhjnan,
who
wilhed
[
,6
]
wifhed to prevent thofe diviflons ready to break
out
of
in hij
country, would difchargethe moll fac red
duties.
1 flatter
will coincide with
myfelf. Sir, that this opinion
your own, and, that
our feeing the fame objed
in oppofite
in fpite
of
points of
view, fo natural in our different fituations, you
will preferve the fame friendfhip which you teftified for
me
during
entertain the hope
fpring,
my
refidence in Ergland.
of being able to
and there renew
to
vifit it in
I
the
you the afTurance of
the feniiments," &c. &c. Sec.
FINIS,
NOTES,
(i) Experience
has proved,
]?0NT were gioundlefs.
more than that of
M. Calonne,
the period
)
is
is
to
works which preach a Counter-revolution
they dare
call
Tl
found in
to be
;
nothing but
produce convi^ion.
of fenfe in the fame light,
has not
fortunately paft,
authority was attached to great names
argument can now operate
men
M. De-
revived the hopes of the
All that they have written
mal-contents.
books publiihed every day
when
that the fears of
The work of M. Burke
as thofe
All the
are regarded
by
which preach what
Juffitment cfthi Revolution, namely, a mafiahappenened at Aix, and in
ere, or infurre£lions, fuch as
hope that we
approaching the moment,
Quercy.
I
both
be equally barmlefs.
fhall
are
(2) This want of confiftency
I
very
is
common
have frequently remarked, and, without
have occurred
to others,
that thofe people
whea
in Franca*
it
muft
who had
often
doubt,
talked in raptures of the exertions of the Englifh, and partiticularly of the
Americans,
thefe nations were fortunate
arrive at
it
to acquire liberty,
enough
having
who
faid that
been able to
through oceans of blood, lamented, or pretended
to lament, the evils
with which
tended in France.
Nothing
berty
in
among
not chufe to
is
its
fo
introdudlion had been at-
common
as friends
make
the fmalleil effort to fecurc
it
of
li-
who do
the Ancients, and in Foreign Nations,
at
home.
Liberty, however, can only be eftabliflied la oppofition to dif-
D
(icultiM
;
«8
(
)
and fturdy oak grows in
ficulties, »s » robuft
tucks, wiiich obftru(fl
its
(3) It Isbecaufe a Revolution
inftance a happy event
of attempting
Any
in
the
fliort
efforts
be bad,
tim; only,
in the
eftabiiflied
will not fubfiil
it
nectlTary to to do
are
which could be made
to deftroy it
om much
only have the effbfl to fubftitute
would be eftablilhed
not always, and in every
Government now
aflfored, that if it
time, and a very
juftice:
is
that they ought to be very cautious
j
change
a
Be
in France.
of the
fpite
roots.
it
would
worfe; for
it
midft of greater dilRcalties, and
and after longer coiivulfions.
have pointed out the commencement of 1788,
I
(4)
the true epoch of the Revolution, and
nion.
It
of their
on
part
poflible to deceive
to
commenced
they- learned that nothing
With
ftand.
j
ftill
It
I
mean
right of
was
in
;
it
was im-
nor could 'the Baftile be
1788 that the infurreAioa
was then Indifpenfibly necetrary, and be-
it
fo,
till
the
month of July 17S9. It
the artifices of feme
ncceflary to ftru?gle againft
Minifters
lated.
was wanting
fuch aconvlftion,
them longer
came every day more
was
at
in that opi-
but inclination, in order to obtain juftice
againft their oppreflbrs.
allowed
perfid
was then that the People acquired the knowledge
own power;
their
I
;
Liit
When
I
thefe obftacles
the whole body of the ffation,
making an
much exagge-
have been
Tpeak of the People,
ar.d
of their power,
who
alone have the
infuirsdVion, of deftroying one govern-
ment, of fubftitutlng another, of removing and punifliing
their oppreflbrs.
Every part of the people
'u
fubjcft
to the
whole
J
19
(
whole
;
)
the fovereignty rcfides
tome fundions
delegates
the nation
in
at large
fome rights
intrufts
it
;
moft frequent and fometimes dangerous abufe
is
the words Nation, People, Sovereignty, &c.
It
day
&c.
the
made of
every
is
the Miiniclfal Oincers, the Adminiftrators,
that
faid,
It
:
;
are the Reprefentatives of the
The Municipal
Officers, like the
People.
It
is
not true.
Judges, AdrainiAratorSf
Bifhops, Curates, &c. are perfons entrufted with the exercife of functions eflabliihed
know
if it
differ only
by the conftltution.
would be hazarding an idea,
from
tlie o.Ticeis
of
whom
delegated the nomination to the
cf being differently elefted
the
the other by the
Diftri^ft,
King
the right of
The
fentatives.
naming
Sovereign
are appointed
The
others, and
principles are too
attended to
iittie
foreign to this difcufliun.
i;89,
is
Odloher
the
is
work of
the
by
conftitutlon
officers,
and the
neither are repre-
Leg'fhture alone reprefents the People; it
name
every part of the Nation
;
in the circumftancc
King.
alone fpeaks and ftlpulates in their
is
they
the one
chudng fuch
gives the Di£tri€V the right of
do not
the conilitution has
King,
;
I
fay, that
to
work
The
;
to
;
the
is
me
Nation alone
fubjcdl.
tliey
Thefe
appear not
infurredion of 1788 and
the People; the revolt of the 5th of
of fome fuborned ruffians, and fome
mifguidcd individuals.
{5)
M. Depont
might have added, that
Ger.eral had confented to
furniiTi
means
if the States
to equal the receipt
to the expenditure, the extravagant depredations of perfons
about the Court, would foon have cccaConcd new want^,
equally reafonable with
the former, and which muft have
D
1
been
20
C
]
been provided for in the fame manner.
that
it
machine wanted reformation
the papers
j
Co frequently mentioned, and fo
befide^y
is falfe
new Im-
man, that the whole
It is evident to every fenfible
poftst
It
to furniih
at this period
was only neceffary
alone,
which are
underilood, prove that
little
the intention of the people was to reftore the Monarchical
Government
and
to its true nature,
fhaclcles of all forts,
from the
to difengage it
which had been impofed by the Clergy
and Nobles.
No
(6)
government
quickly become
which does not
called defpotic,
is
It
fo in reality.
may
down
be laid
neral rule, that there fubfifts defpotifm,
when
ge-
as a
the agents of
authority cannot be legally compelled to repair the damage
and injury, which they have occafioned
fpotifm then fubfifted in France,
De-
to a Citizen,
when no
Inten-
Minifter,
dant, or Deputy of an Intendant, could be profecuted.
ought
to add, that defpotifm
mittee of Refearches,
tional
the
would
ftill
Municipalities,
Guards could not be puniflied
and
might
of the greateft extremity fcarcely juftify
fpeedily finiflxing the plan
ing
all
their
all
the laws
faftious,
fljall
objed
;
is
it
arm
fliall
be taken
away
and inftead of afts of arbitrary authority,
be fubftituted as the protestors of alL
all
by
of the Conftitution, by organiz-
the powers, that this terrible
from the
to this
concur with
illegal.
put a ftop to an order of things, which circura-
to
ftances
and
for every arreft,
every exerclfe of their authority, noi only unjuft, but
3 invite the friends of freedom, to
I
Comthe Na-
fubfift, if the
It if
our wifbes ought to tend.
(7)
No
21
[
No
(7)
cellent laws as France
ierved
ihem, referved
but in no country were they
j
becaufe thofe,
J
1
country, without doubt, had fo numerous or ex-
who had
lefs
ob-
theexclufive right of making
the privilege of infringing
to themfeives
them.
prevented the defpotifm of
(8) Religion neither
Louii
XI. and Louis XIV. nor the dreadful tranfaftion of the
league, the dragooning, &c. Religion,
upon
reftraint
Kings
which
is
a
powerful
has never been able to check
individuals,
or Nations.
(9) It has frequently been faid, that opinion prevents def-
potifm from proceeding to the moft violent excefs.
out doubt
opinion,
a defpot
if
ought
he fhould order the one half of the nation to cut
the throats of the other
folent defpotifm of
tifm of the Regent.
tifm.
yet, it
;
is
Good
manners.
which forms the men
guard the Government.
that cuftom, religion,
every where
Burke,
known how few
darei
Louis XIV. nor the intemperate defpoinftitutions alone prevent defpo-
Good manners guard good
produces good
well
Opinion neither prevented the in-
Charles IX.
^ifobey
With-
to dread the confequence of public
It
in
is
inftitutions,
that country, and the
In
fine, it is every
men who
where affirmed
and opinion, temper defpoti/m, and
the aflertion is ill-founded.
whether law,
and education
the Englrfh Government,
religion,
I
demand of Mr.
and opinion, prevented the
the militia, vaffalage,
Lettrei de Cachet, the arbitrary imports,
real, or only
a
exemptions, &c. and whether thefc conftituted
22
[
]
Under an
an apparent defpotifm.
ahle
Prince or Miniftcr,
there exifted the defpotifm of an individual; but
wanted
when
was an ariftocracy of defpots
abilities, there
pare the Governmerst of Cardinal
Richlieu with
thefe
com-
:
the end
XV.
of that of Louis
(10) Every body muft have heard in 1788, of the Magiftates defire,
and endeavours
to excite a civil
body muft have applauded their
and the prudence of Officers,
Why
againft Citizens.
circumftarces
?
is
war; and every
refiftance to the Miniftry,
who
refafed
their language
to
employ force
now changed with
Is it becaufe
they wiflicd to proteft the Ma,-
the Court,
but not the People againll tht
giftrates againft
Great.
M. Dfpokt
(11)
ftacles,
has not mentioned the numberJcfs ob-
by which the Court, the Nobility, and Clergy, either
cpenJy or by fecret machinations, attempted to embarrafs the
Hiftory will difclofe on this fub-
progrefs of public affairs.
jeft,
fome ftrange
particulars,
of Anecdotef, but
which the
errors of the
rKmth of January
to
rT>e
to
little
and
known.
I
hope to farnifhmy quota
In general, the influence
Court had upon the events from the
to the
month of July 1789, does not feem
be fufficiently taken into confideration
perceived, that if the Minifter had poffefli;d
:
it
common
is
not
fenfe,
he might have acquired immortal glory, by founding the
liberty cf his country
;
then
all
the advantages of the
volution would have taken piace, without any of
niences;
factions would not have been able to
its
Re-
inconve-
form
;
the
fadHous would have been entirely deftitute of weight, and
even
=3
[
ejren of a pretext.
Many
they committed feveral, but
Alllmbly> ^nd withjufiice;
fewer than the Minifler, and
h^d
1
errors ars imputed to the National
rlie
greater part of the Meicber*
better Intentions.
(12) Thij idea of Mr.
nijRKE
is
every where to be met
with; inftsad of malting innovations, they ihould only have
adopted the neceflary improvemeacs.
provements can be made,
roots innumerable abufe«.
Orders, prevented
ment
all
ift.
No im-
adly.
poJfibiiity
Have not
the twoprivLledged
of adopting fach improve-
and has not their (lubborn refnlance compjUcd the
j
Commons
3dly, I:
is
to
feparete
yet thefe were not
himfelf.
themfelves
from them alto^iher,
not fufficicntly perceived that the Declarations of
the 23d of June, were
a real
change in the government
Indeed the Minliters were in
aad
that inftaace be-
homage
to
to have been fufSciently acquainted with
known
5
made by the Afiembly, but by the Kii;<i
trayed too late into an ineffedloal
ought
But
without dellroying from d>eir
reafon; they
men
that their Mtful prefent would be refufeJ.
doubt the refufoJ was proper.
If a Conftitution,
to
have
Without
if a
Go-
vernment are the (imple conceffion of the Prince, he may,
whes£yer he
fpirit
pleafes,
withdraw bis own gift.
had made too much progrefs
that the will of the Sovereign
lic liberty.
may
Without doubt,
is
at
this
An enlighteaed
period, to allow
fufficient to fecure the
pub-
individual liberty, civil liberty
be great under a defpot, but they can never bs fecured,
except by political liberty
;
this laft alone guards all the
reft-,
and preferves them from every attempt of violation of royal,
and even popular tyranny.
Thus
has
it
been Incumbent oft
the
C
H
the National Aflfembly to
make
lions
it
was impoflible to avoid,
ftould fubilitutc a
1
innovations
as
it
Innovs*
thefe
;
was necefTary that they
new government,
in the flead
of
a go-,
vernment already deflroyed.
(13)
I believe that
the qucftion
What
is
now
into
evident
is,
to form two chambers
politic
onty time and experience can refolve
M. Depont
which
ift,
That
that this
;
and dangerous: zdly, That
legiflative
declines
a part, a dlvifion
of the
body, which /hould review and examine the deli-
berations of the body itfelf, but without
all
to enter.
was impoflible in 1789
ftcp would have been imit
-veto
might have
the advantages of a fecond chamber, and none of Its
umerous
inconvcniencies.
whicb
I only fuggeft the idea,
requires lung deliberation.
(14) I have already remarked that thofe
to the Hues the Englifh
tion
among
liberty
us, at a time,
when
attended
of thofe
pralfc
introduc-
its
the mofl ardent friends of
it.
an error in reafoning very
is
to,
who
Revolution with the conftitution.
fubve.fioii of the
who now
dreaded
would have been happy to obtain
(15) There
little
government,
incefi'antly
The
former government
j
common, but
confound the
Revolution
it
is
is
the
not the vrork
cf the National AfTembly, nor of any individual
;
it is
the
aSion, by which the People cxprefled that they were weary
of the yoke, and defirous of freedom
:
can this be imputed
to thctn as a crime, and can their right to a(^ for themfelves
te conceited
?
The
conltitution
is
the work of the National
Affemblyt
r
AtTemblyy and yet
fections,
it
is
which
25
]
not to this body that
it is
are to be found in
it
a'l
the imper-
are to be
imputed
circumftances of embarraffment, the necefiity
to
j
of
framing new regulations, the weaknefs or difaf«
fpeedily
ftclion of government, and the perfidy
individuals.
I
would wifh then that
recollected that the Revolution
quence judifiable
the conftitution
that
;
is
it is
it
and guilt of fome
fhouid for once
be
was neceflary, and of confe-
the
imperfeiSt, but
work of
the People
that
;
can only be judged of by
experience, and matured by tim^.
It is by a fimilar error in reafuning that the
Revolution
confounded with events, which have no connection with
iuch
as thofe
is
it,
of the 5th of October (as has been already re-
marked), thofe of Nancy, Aix, Cahors, the Hotel de Caf-
&c. &c.
trics,
ly
Thefe
are, perhaps, calamities unfortunate-
infeparable from every great revolution
the
French Revolution
ten repeated, the
of fome rufrians
viliiiny, but
wlfh
;
thefe are not,
work of the nation
who may
who
cannot be too of-
They
are the crimes
efcape the puniihment due to their
cannot efcape
to believe), the
;
but thefe are not
j
it
(at lead
remorfe of their
the good
fo
cwn
would
confcience, the
public infamy, with which they are incelfantly puifued, and
the execration of
great change of
all
pofterity.
It
is
Government can take
no
not recoileCted that
place, of
which
all
the
mal-contents, bankrupts, ftock-jobbers, retainers
ruffians,
of the court,
all
the dregs of the nation will not always en-
deavour to profit and mingle their bafe and unruly paflions
with the noble and grand paflion of Liberty.
Burke
Court,
fays, in his page
is
Al! that
92, againit thofe people about
the moft Icrapulous truth.
£
But
thefe furcly
Mr.
tjie
are
not
;
26
[
who
not the perfons
]
wi(hcd for liberty; nor did fuch defire
which freedom was
the Revolution, by
be effedled,
to
defircd only confufion and difturbances, by
profit
:
But the confufion, the difturbances, the anarchy,
were not, and could not be the wiHi of the nation
were wearied of oppreffion
Government.
objects
;
they were
Every thing that has not
a relation
(16) Whatever Government be adopted,
is
who
where
a
it is
nccelTarily be depofited in
are entrufted with carrying
likewife evident, that there
can
thefe
to
no
is
it
evident that
the hands of
into execution.
liberty
in
from confinement.
things was permanent,
but happily
it is
we would
impoiiible that
it
be
order of
If this
from being
far
free
fhould fubfjft, the imperi-
ous law of neceflity muil quickly produce a change.
;
there
is
a
more
ftill
afFairs
b»t
I
bitterly
am
far
protefting power
Mr. Burke
reprelTing
all
I la-
this fituarion
of
evil irremediable
the public intereft, which
fupreme
private
;
appoints
but
interefts,
intereA.—
add, that the Agents of the Executive Power
the
ftill
than
from fuppoling the
a remedy in
fubjcft to
I might
I:
country,
a
Conimittce of Refearches of the National Aflcmbly
arreft or difmifs
ment
they
;
defirous of a good
not their work, and cannot be imputed to them.
is
much power muft
thofe
they
which they might
controul
of
public
have greatly contributed to take away from
its effe£l>
by
al-
ways aJdrcfring the National Affsmbly, when they were to
i&. rcfponfibly
;
by always confuking the Committees, who
have neither the right nor power to give advice
loudy
ai^'cfling
;
by ridicu-
declamations from the tribune, which could
have no influence with men of fenfe
;
in fin?,
by falling
fcort of that greatnefs ef charafter, without which,
Governir.est
;
27
[
went Cinnot be conduced
eondud of M.
Bouillki
de
]
in a feafon
cf Revolution.
in the aifair of
The
Nancy,
a
is
ftrong proof, that if Minifters had purfued a firm and decided
condu^,
they had
if
known how
to difcharge their duty,
they would have impcfed filence upon
declaimers
own
ferred their
(17)
upon
all cai-illers,
all
they wouid have bencnied the public, and pre-
j
The
reputation.
Aflembly, upon the report of the Committee
de Mendiclu, has ordered that a fupply of 15 millions be
furniflied to
accommodate the exigencies of the departments
the Report of the Committee
is full
of very enlightend views,
and which might fuggeft ample matter
may
the
laft
years of the reign
Regency, or
in
for confideration-
It
be aflced, are the people at prefent as poor, as during
at the
of
Louis XIV.
or duiing the
end of the reign of Louis
17S6, 1787, and 1788? But
XV.
at leaft they are
cr ev;n
at prefent
/upported by the hope of bettering their fituation, and by
the certainty of an ceconomical plan of Adminiftration, upoQ
which formerly they could have noreafon
(18) Experience may he produced
of
M. Depont
y
to
depend.
in favour of the opinion
the emigrations occaGoned by the outrage
of the Hotel de Castries, have given to commerce, which
had begun
feel.
May
to revive,
a blow, \Nhich
it
will
perhaps long
the friends of liberty, warned by this deplorable
event, unite
all
their efiorts to prevent the recurrence of
9
fimilar misfonune.
(19) If the work of
M. De?ont
£ X
was of
a date
more
re-
cent,
;
23
[
]
cent, he might have added that credit appacrs to
gour
that the
;
will foon be perceived to be the only real
every thing will tend
before
it
and good property
augment thek value
to
Domains proves
price of the National
whom
vi-
refuirif'
public effcfts acquire their true price, and
the high
j
this faft to thcfe,
to
could not have been demonflrated by the
moft fimple theury.
(20)
rty.
General Officers aft like
I believe that if all
RocHAMBEAU,
Happily,
wiU foon be
difcipline
however,
revolts everj'
M.
day become
dc
ar-
in the
reftored
lef»
/recjuer.r,
(21)
The
Hot occafion
which
divifions
furprife,
fubfift
when we
in the AfTembly, need
refleft, that it is
compofed o£
the moft incoherent elements, the moft heterogeneous parties; there
is
maintained a perpetual conflift, not only of
private infrsils againft the public intereft, but of
Interefts agalnft one another
for
Aflembly, vain of
its
fufficient allowance
;
the different paffions,
which
neceflarily
all
private
not made
is
agitate a
new
power, apprehenfive of the future, and
Solicitous for the prefent.
The men,
are net judged fuch as they are;
dard of an ideal perfection;
it is
overcome foms
obftacles,
fuccefsful with regard to
Befides the moft honeft
of whom
it is
compofed,
they are tried by the ftan-
not recollefted that they
are regulated by circumftances, and
able to
all
that if they have been
they
could not be equally
all,
men, who had the
heft intentions,
were atthe fame time the moft unexperienced, the
leaft
ac«
quainte4
^9
r
]
with Intrigue, they were therefore tnoft
<^ui'intfd
ceived by
the artifice
of the courtiers,
who
played
eafily
upon
d««
their
fimplicity with great fuccefs.
were in the Af-
It is not fufficiently perceived that there
fembly few ftatefmen, not merely as Mr.
Burke
account of an improper choice, but becaufe
all its
fubjeds
where men of the
at
a
from public
diftance
greateft abilities
in the
Aflembly
If feveral
a fuperiority
a depth of conception, too great a
come
affair3»
were obliged to affed ig-
rorance, in order to fliun (ufpicion.
have difplayed
members
of talents, and
number of
fpeakers have
forward, deftitute of thofe powers of political
tiation, neceffary in order
to fave
a
ftate,
with public
that
affairs,
of difcourfe.
every day
;
But the
;
it
was na-
fome time be dazzled by fluency
reputation
in proportion as Ideas
of
are
fpeakers decline!
formed, the under*
Handing demands information, and cannot be
words.
was natural
It
that they fliould miftake loquacity for talents
tural that they fhould for
comW-
and even fuch
The French were
fpeakers have not been without fuccefs.
fo little acquainted
on
Government
£ble to chufe properly in a country, where the
had kept
fays,
was impof-
it
Thefe fpeakers, when brought
fatisfied
with
in review before the
j-udgment, are found merely to poffefs a fluency of wordii
Every circumftance has concurred
to
render this feHion
diforderly, but
perhaps particularly a caufe mentioned by
DucLOS, and
ceferving the
**
Men
the
of fuperior
misfortune
to
talents,"
attention of
lays
he,
'*
men of
fenfCi
have frequently
b« afl'ociated with fools,
and perfont
jealoul
;
i
30
[
and inimical to
credit,
]
own confequence,
jealous of their
their equtlj in r«nk
thofe views, of
ail
and
which they
ue
themfeives incapable
Thefc
divifions,
CADfolation
derly
i
ia a
:
pofition will
ihort
the
and this oppo(ition, however, admit of
approaching le^iflature will be mure or-
fliort
time, without doubt, the party of op-
no longer be
hoftile to the conllitution.
time, as in England,
In a
whatever in oth«r
parties,
all
refpefts be their opinions, will
combine
the neceClty of preventing a
new Revolution
their interefts
;
from
they will
range themfeives beneath the (tandard of the laws, the protec.'ors
of
all;
in a (hort time
would be dreadful
(It
at leaft
to lofe the hope) the odious diftinftions of Arlftociates and
Demagogues
are
will vaniih
die fmall
j
k Inceflantly
fury of the
flora the
we
!
number of
call
out
if ever
May
wh«
perfons,
and blood,
fire
united by the fa-
in reality wilhed
faclious,
would be quickly faved.
eyes
Ah
dimini/hlng.
cred love of our country,
my
who
deiirous of troubles,
A\\\
who mangle
to deliver it
its
the glorious day
bofom,
it
dawn UPOQ.
'.
,
^^
(is) I think that there ought to have been placed herein
obfervation, which I have not
plained of the perfecution
pared their
own
met with.
The
Priefts
com-
which they experienced, and com-
fituation to that of the hrft Chrillians
;
and
M. MoNTLAUsiEB
Cild,
that they ought not to be torn
from
The
firA
their palaces.
Chriflians bad no palaces
they had not changed their wooden crofs intoa crofsof gold
fox they
had no gold.
Tl^
firll
j
Chriilians vrcre pcrfecuted
for
31
f
opinions
for their religious
them
]
it
;
was attempted to compel
renounce the worihip of the Eternal, and to of-
to
fer to falfe
Gods, a facrlllegeous Incenfe
were only required
to
j
ir.odern Prelates
renounce the worfhip of
Mammon,
order to adore wick humility and charity a good
whofe prefence
all
joy their opinions
men
;
fcandalous opulence; there
opinions.
religious
They
are equal.
the law deprives
The
here nothing in
is
?
In
reality,
common
with
why
;
are they not
no perfecution has been
A flembly
I believe, that the
employed.
en-
part of their
Chriftians obeyed the laws,
firft
they were not the preachers of revolt
Imitated by the Biiliops
are allowed to
them of a
in
God, la
have carried pretty
fnr their feverity againft the Titularies, but they hire neither
pra<f^ifed,
nor wiihed to pra£life perfecution againfl any indi»
dual.
(xj)
fefts
I
;
believe that the Judiciary
Order has very great dc-
but the inftitution, Des Bureaux de Paix, \Nhofc be-
nign influence has already been
fates a great
number.
And
felt
in the country,
compea-
I truft, that ethers will in time
iifappear.
(24)
Were
a calculation to be
every individual
made of
be found to exceed the fpocie circulating in Europe
no
perfon,
nineteen
who
which
the loffes,
pretends to have experienced, they would
does not lament a
twenties of the
lofs,
amount
;
there is
or boaft of a facrifice
are exaggerated.
j
They
never take into their calculation, the indemnities, which they
have obtained.
calculate
Thus,
if a
the exemption
dts
man
lofes a place,
he does not
dixmn, without doubt
many
iodividuai*
3»
[
I
Individuah hare ^reat reafon to complain
and
;
I firnnly
bc-
Keve, that the number of fufFerers might, and ought to have
been
lefs
but far from
;
ftill
augmenting
by protrafling
it
anarchy, by again difplacing thofe, who begin to afTume a
fomewhat
fituation
new
f revent
fixed,
let
(25) Since the date of
M. Depont'j
aats have been burnt; their
fale
hope that they
will foon
(26)
It Is
wrong
to
willrefort
There
t'alfe
will
our efforts to
number
Letter,
is
fome A/?ig-
indeed fmall,
but
burn many more.
not merely the ninnber of Municipalities, which
attacks,
pf opinion that
it
all
of the National Property, gives reafon to
the very rapid
Mr. BuKKi
us combine
difordcrs.
it is
it is
likewife their compcfition
compare them
more
;
I
am
in fiveral refpefts defe<SHve, but I thinle
to Republics
to the principles laid
no longer
exifl a
dcwn
;
every day
they
in the fourth note.
Municipal Power, an expreflion
and dangerous, which would induce to believe that
the Municipal Officers have fome appropriate power, whilft
they are only entrufted with the exercife of functions.
Power that has
the abufe of the word
rity of Parliaments,
power.
which pretended
Words have
created
all
It Is
the autho-
to have the judiciary
great influence over
men, an tffed
of prejudice which philofophers fhould endeavour
to reflify.
The
Municipal
nation delegates no part of
Officers or Magirtrates,
it
its
power
to
only intrufts to them the exercife
of a certain portion of that power, namely, the difcharge
•f tuadiont
£<very Conftitution
wh^re
it is defe Ai ve
ought
33
i
to be dlreftcd
irom
in
it
many
]
principle; our Conftitutjon deviates
to this
points, but
may
eafily be
brought back by
ausmenting and fortifying the aftion of the
and
Diftiitls
Departments upon the Municipalities, and that of the
King
upon the Departments, and by rendering the vigilance of the
Lfgiflature over Minifters very fevere and rigid.
only that liberty can be eflablifhed
It is thus
cannot exift while the
it
;
Municipalities claim the immediate right of watching over
the agents of authority, whilft they fhall denounce, &c.
But
thefe inconveniences, and a great
all
means
exift in the ccnftitutlon,
portion as
(27)
I
am
&c.
others, by
no
and wiil be remedied in pro-
completed,
it is
Mr. BusKE
volution
many
when he
deceived,
is
fays, that the
Re-
defiroyed the National fpirit; on '.hs contrary,
hi's
of opinion, that
it
has given
a proper direftion;
it
the
Juxur)-
and corruption of the Court, which had everywhere
fpread
their baleful
-eiery thing
fcle
was
to be purchafed
recompence of
had
infiuence,
foldiers
the nation;
degraded
by money
and priefts
j
j
money was the
they were ambitious
of honours, and of the favour of the Prince only, in order
to obtain wealth
cpflant in the
pafiion had
;
a Bifiiop, a General of an
demand of money.
This
army were in-
vile
metamorphofed the French, and
and fliameful
efpscially the
Great, into a mere herd of Stock-jobbers on their knees before a
Crown.
True honour, the manly and generous French
loyait}-, their fidelity in
^eftroyed, and if our
will not
become
obferving their engagements are nut
manners become fomewhat
ferocious,
in fpite
fevere, they
of ruflSans, and thofe
Vihu ftiboxned taem>
4i
(28^
Demagogufi
4
^
34
[
]
(23) Uem^ogucsdcftroy the defpot, only In order to inherit the defpotlfm
them
there
j
j
much meannefs
as
is
Miniilers
as in Tcrving
there
in
them.
feaiinz
I o'Jpht here to repeat, that
Mr. Burke
refu'.e
thp.t to
talk
in fervinjj
more puGllanimity
is
one,
who
;
but
he
;
appears to
not afraid to aflert,
vnOuIJ wifn to urdertakc
would not be ditncult
principles
did not intend to
I
am
I
is
he
;
is
millaken in his
fadls
the rroduflion of an
rr.e
it,
the
in
his
difFufe
;
his
hor.ell
work
man,
informed cf the misf-rtunes that have happened,
but ignorant either of the ancient Government, or
the cbjcfl of our difputes, or the principles admit-
t:d by the true friends of the Conllitution.
He is
rot acqualnte<l with cur beft authors, for he quotes
none of them
;
and he mentions as an authority
the Rcrolutions cf France and Braliant, by
Ca Mii.LB Desmculi Ns
Cor.fticution, for
tion,
;
he
is
M.
i^-ncrant of our
hefpeaks of ihree degrees of elec-
which do not
exift
;
he attacks the divifion
ofthe kingdom, which may have, and which has
imperfe6l;0PS,
former
]y
takes
but
irregularity
the
wh-ch
;
prcftnt
in a
llats
is
preferable
word, he
of
alFairs
i.
to
the
cefTintfor
the
Conllitution,
35
[
and he
Conftltution,
the
to
ces
faid,
fpirit
it
prober
is
J
deceived.
makes fuch progrtfs,
return of
that the
'
troubles appears very improbable.
extinguifhed, the
may be
and an enlightened
will be completed,
crats ar€
advan-
It
whatever
point;
The
Demagogues
garded in the proper point of view
Arifto-
are re-
nothing
;
remains but to infpire the true friends of liberty
with a fufiiclent degree of energy to fecond the
opinion, that
it
will fupport
and bear them out
upon every exigency.
Mr. Burke
Is
French nation, a
taking
continually
vile herd
guilty of outrages, and titled ruffians,
vile,
by
whom
and employed
here, he
:
would
for
the
of ruffians, who are
ftill
more
they are encouraged, fupported,
If
he were to fpend feme tima
fee, that thefe are far
from form-
ing the nation, and conftitute only a very fmall
pare
;
he would fee that
true
Frenchmen glow
with the facred love of liberty
are
far
he would
;
but that they
from wifhing or approving outrages
fee, that if
;
they fliudder with horror at
the bare idea of calling
down upon
the popular vengeance, they will not
the faflious
exempt them
from the judgment of the tribunal of public opinion, a dreadful tribunal, and which has already
done
C
36
!
Yes, rsfpeftable Citizcfti
3oae ihcm jadlce.
will form therafjlves into a body,
own
their
(Ire
ngth
;
it is
they will feel
inconceivable
;
they will
avenge the French nation
for
which the fadious
have furnifhed a pre-
t^t
;
they will
ruffians
the calumnies, of
bow under no yoke
their noble pride of fre.edom,
and
:
animated by
their high fenfe"
cf honour,
they will brave fanatical profcrip-
tian, as they
have braved Minifterial violence;
they will not defert thtir country
fend
—
they will fave it;
;
and Mr.
they will de-
Burke
will
one day be forced to acknowledge that the French
Nation was worthy cf
how
liberty
to acquire, eflabiifli,
;
that they
and preferve
it
knew
in fpite
of MiniJlers, AriRocrats, Demagogues, and Ruf£ans.
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