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MATH 1341, Calculus for Science and Engineering, Fall 2015

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MATH 1341, Calculus for Science and Engineering, Fall 2015
MATH 1341, Calculus for Science and Engineering, Fall 2015
Section 8, Syllabus
Instructor: Seckin Demirbas
Office: 550 Nightingale Hall
E-mail : [email protected]
Office hours: M 1:00-3:00, W 2:00-3:00.
Textbooks: Worldwide Differential Calculus and Worldwide Integral Calculus by David B. Massey.
We will be using both books this semester. PDF and printed versions can be purchased at
www.centerofmath.org/textbooks/calc1/index.html for the first book, and for second book at
http://www.centerofmath.org/textbooks/calc2/index.html. The second book Worldwide Integral
Calculus is also the textbook for MATH 1342 so you do not need to buy it again if you take that
course later. It is absolutely NOT required that you purchase a printed textbook. A PDF version
suffices.
The PDF version is priced at $9.95 for each book. The black and white (grayscale) soft-back printed
version is $29.95 for each book. The PDF textbook contains links, at the beginning of each section,
to one or more free video lectures by Professor Massey on the contents of that section. The PDF
file has hyperlinked Tables of Contents, Indices, and cross-references. You may need to activate
the Forward and Back buttons in your PDF viewer to take full advantage of the hyperlinks. To
use the textbook on an iPad, you need a PDF reader app.
Course content:
Differentiation: definition via limits, derivation rules, applications including optimization.
Basic functions: exp and log, trig and inverse trig, and their derivatives.
Integration: antiderivatives and integration by substitution, definite integral, and the Fundamental
Theorem of Calculus.
Learning objectives: Students completing the course should be able to recognize and use the
concepts and methods of calculus when they occur in their disciplines.
Quizzes and exams: No homework will be collected. There will be quizzes for 20 minutes each.
The problems for quizzes are similar to those from the exercise list below. The quiz dates are
Thursday. The two lowest quiz scores will be dropped. Any missed quizzes will be counted in the
dropped worst scores, and there will be no makeups. Quizzes will constitute 40% of your total
score. There will be a midterm on Wednesday, March 2, constituting 20% of your total score. The
final exam will constitute the remaining 40%.
Attendance: It is expected that you will attend every class. The course moves very fast and the
concepts we are going to cover get confusing quite easily. The best way to clarify them is to ask
about them in the class. It is possible to fall behind in a single day. You should contact me or
another student to discuss what you missed and how to catch up. It is your responsibility to be
aware of any changes to the syllabus as they are announced in class. You are responsible for all
information given when you are absent.
Final exam: All students without legitimate conflicts approved by the Registrar will take the
final exam at the scheduled time. Do not make travel plans that conflict with the final. Two finals
at the same time or three exams in one day are the only University recognized legitimate reasons
to be excused from taking the final at the scheduled time. Students with such a conflict must
complete a final exam conflict form, available on the Registrar’s website. Final exam conflicts must
be resolved in advance with the Registrar’s Office and your instructor. The last day to file a Final
MATH 1341, Section 8
Syllabus for Fall 2015
2
Exam Conflict Form with the Registrar is February 3rd. If you miss the final, it will count as a 0
and you will fail the course. The final exam date is TBD. Check for exam schedule conflicts as
soon as possible.
Letter grades: Letter grades are determined numerically by your average as follows:
A > 92, 92 = A− > 89, 89 = B+ > 86, 86 = B > 82, 82 = B− > 79,
79 = C+ > 76, 76 = C > 72, 72 = C− > 69, 69 = D+ > 66, 66 = D > 62,
62 = D− > 59, F = 59 or less.
Calculators: You may need access to a graphing calculator equivalent to TI-83 or higher.
Issues with the course/instructor: In all sections of MATH 1341, if there is an issue you
would like to discuss, it is important to start by discussing it with your instructor. If this does
not help, please contact the course coordinator, Seckin Demirbas (550 NI, [email protected])
or the Mathematics Department Teaching Director, Professor David Massey (529 NI, 373-5527,
[email protected]).
Additional resources
1) The Mathematics Department Tutoring Center is in Room 540B, Nightingale Hall. This peer
tutoring is free. Peer Tutoring appointments can be booked via MyNEU under TUTORING.
Although you can walk in, it is really best to sign up in advance. Tutoring requests are scheduled
by students in real-time and confirmed by email. You are encouraged to schedule your appointments
in advance; for example, it is recommended that next-day appointments be booked by 9:00 pm the
previous day. You can, however, always check the schedule to see if there are available times up to
two hours ahead of time. See http://www.northeastern.edu/csastutoring/setting-up-appointments/
for more information about peer tutoring.
2) The College of Engineering also provides tutoring for Calculus. For COE tutoring see
http://www.coe.neu.edu/coe/undergraduate/studentservices/tutoringinCOE.html.
If there is a discrepancy between how a tutor or a TA presents the material and how your instructor
presents the material, you should follow your instructor’s presentation, but you should also discuss
the matter with your instructor.
3) The PDF version of the textbook contains links at the beginning of each section to online, fulllength video lectures on the contents of that section. These videos can also be accessed for free
directly by going to http://www.centerofmath.org/video.html for Calculus videos.
If there is a discrepancy between how the videos present material and how your instructor presents
material, you should follow your instructor’s presentation, but you should also discuss the matter
with your instructor.
Withdrawal and Incomplete: Withdrawal is done through the Registrar. The last day to
drop a class without a W grade is February 1st; the last day to drop with a W grade is April 21st.
Instructors are only permitted to give an Incomplete under very limited circumstances. The student
must have completed at least 75% of the course material and must have a grade of C or better at
the time.
Schedule of Topics and Suggested Homework Exercises
Week 1: Jan. 11–15
§1.1 Average Rates of Change: #3, 4, 8, 9, 12, 19, 21, 25, 38, 46
§1.2 Prelude to Instantaneous Rates of Change: #1, 3, 10, 11, 14, 24, 33, 42–44
MATH 1341, Section 8
Syllabus for Fall 2015
Schedule of Topics and Suggested Homework Exercises
Week 2: Jan. 18–22 (Monday, January 18, Martin Luther King Day, no classes)
§1.3 Limits and Continuity: #1–3, 5, 12, 22, 23, 25, 35, 44–47
§1.4 IROC’s and the Derivative: #1, 3, 4, 12, 13, 17, 19, 21, 25, 26, 29, 30, 44, 52, 55, 57
Week 3: Jan. 25–29
§1.4 (continued)
§1.5 Extrema and the Mean Value Theorem: #3, 9, 10, 18, 23, 28, 29, 30
§1.6 Higher-order Derivatives: #1–3, 7, 9, 12, 16, 21–25, 32, 36, 45
Week 4: Feb. 1–5
§2.1 The Power Rule and Linearity: #1, 2, 13, 18, 20, 32, 33, 37, 39, 42, 43, 46, 47, 49
§2.2 The Product and Quotient Rules: #1, 2, 7, 10, 23, 27, 29, 43, 45
§2.3 The Chain Rule and Inverse Functions: #2, 4, 6, 8, 22, 23, 32, 33, 37, 39, 45
Week 5: Feb. 8–12
§2.3 (continued)
§2.4 The Exponential Function: #2, 5, 7, 12, 17, 25, 30, 34, 39, 40, 42, 43, 52
§2.5 The Natural Logarithm: #2–5, 13, 17, 21, 25, 26, 37, 48
Week 6: Feb. 15–19 (Monday, Feb 15, Presidents’ Day, no classes)
§2.5 (continued)
§2.6 General Exponential and Logarithmic Functions: #2–7, 16, 21, 37, 50
Week 7: Feb. 22–26
§2.7 Sine and Cosine: #1, 4, 5, 8, 13, 14, 20, 25, 33, 36–38, 52, 54
§2.8 Other Trig. Functions: #5, 7, 8, 11, 16, 18, 39, 45, 49
Appendix A: Parametrized Curves and Motion: #1, 2, 5, 6, 9–11, 14, 15, 19
Week 8: Feb. 29– Mar. 4
Review, Midterm
§2.9 Inverse Trig. Functions: #2–7, 21, 24, 27, 44, 47
Week 9: Mar. 14–18
§3.3 Optimization: #1, 2, 4, 7, 16, 17, 19, 21, 34, 42
§3.5 l’Hôpital’s Rule: #1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 12, 39, 52
Week 10: Mar. 21–25
§4.1 What is a Differential Equation?: #1, 3, 17, 19, 25, 26, 39, 43, 44
§4.2 Anti-derivatives, Integration by Substitution: #1–7, 9, 11, 15, 19, 22, 25, 28, 57, 59, 69,
70
3
MATH 1341, Section 8
Syllabus for Fall 2015
4
Schedule of Topics and Suggested Homework Exercises
Week 11: Mar. 28– Apr. 1
§1.1 (continued) Anti-derivatives, Integration by Substitution
In the second book Worldwide Integral Calculus, §1.1 is the same as §4.2 of the first book.
§2.1 Sums and Differences #1, 2, 5, 12, 16, 19, 29
Week 12: Apr. 4 – 8
§2.2 Prelude to the Definite Integral #1, 17, 19, 20, 25, 28, 31, 37
§2.3 The Definite Integral #1, 2, 3, 8, 14, 15, 22, 35, 39
Week 13: Apr. 11 – 15
§2.3 (continued)
§2.4 The Fundamental Theorem of Calculus #1, 2, 3, 10, 17, 23, 24, 41
§3.2 Area in the Plane #1, 3, 6, 8, 11, 14, 19, 36
Week 14: Apr. 20 (Monday, April 18, Patriots’ Day, no classes)
Review
FINAL EXAM PERIOD: Friday, April 22 to Friday, April 29
Academic Integrity: Collaboration or copying on quizzes, tests, and exams is not allowed. As
noted in the Northeastern University Academic Integrity Policy (see Integrity) at
http://www.northeastern.edu/osccr/academicintegrity/index.html) “A commitment to the principles of academic integrity is essential to the mission of Northeastern University. The promotion of
independent and original scholarship ensures that students derive the most from their educational
experience and their pursuit of knowledge. Academic dishonesty violates the most fundamental
values of an intellectual community and undermines the achievements of the entire University.
As members of the academic community, students must become familiar with their rights and
responsibilities. In each course, they are responsible for knowing the requirements and restrictions
regarding research and writing, examinations of whatever kind, collaborative work, the use of study
aids, the appropriateness of assistance, and other issues.”
Miscellaneous policies: Any student with a disability is encouraged to meet with the instructor
during the first week of classes to discuss accommodations. The student must bring a current
Memorandum of Accommodations from the Office of Student Disability Services.
If you are an athlete and have conflicts with a class activity (quiz, midterm, or final), you should
let your instructor know before the end of the second week of classes and bring a letter from the
Office of Athletics.
Phones and laptops should be turned off during class time.
Important Dates
February 1: Last day to drop a class without a W grade.
February 3: Last day to file a Final Exam Conflict Form.
April 21: Last day to drop a class with a W grade.
TRACE: Please complete the TRACE evaluations at the end of the course.
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