...

calicur ty (po), iGA.r/J2/z+ll/oz:' of

by user

on
Category: Documents
3

views

Report

Comments

Transcript

calicur ty (po), iGA.r/J2/z+ll/oz:' of
'tr!
LI}IfVER.STl1I Ol-. C;:IIJfCIIT
(Abstract)
iu
fr'
nel-ot of Phy:1cal Educ:tjon - changr: in the ?.eguI.ations
'I,'inimurn for Promotion/pass' cf Rachefor oi physicar hducation
course - Sanctioned - Orders issue.j.
B('.
r':ElrERlL \l.rD AC^DqN/]C BRII'CLI I
.:
iGA.r/J2/z+ll/oz:' Dared, calicur ;rriversj ty (po),
d:.
16-0'l-zoo2,
1) f tem rrr.1 of rni-nutes of the meeting of Boar:d of Studies in
. Physica I Educatiop ( O- C) h::lc1 on 8-1 2-2lOO
2) Irrinutes of the Faculty of Ftducatjon held on 15-1-2001 .
'3) Minutes of the meeting of l\c.rdemlc Council held on 7-6-2)02.
qEPI3
of .Studies 1n ph1'si,:a i Es;cation (iic) held on
8-12-2000 reviewed the present ,l,rininr,,r for promotion,/pass' of the
P.eguf.:tron for the Degree of Bactielor r:f physical Educatl-on (BPE)
and unanirnously reso]ved to rccomri,encl the appended "l,4inimum for
,Tne P,oard
Promoticn/pass',
.
I4rI\]rMIl,!
.
FC
R
P
ROI'O.TI?.Y/q\.2S
student failing in rnor:r t]:ait two i;aoers in part A (Theory
exc]uding Pap# I - EngJ-ish) in BPE - I cr ff wil-] not kre promoted tn
the next hioher cl-ass. Q.e-ex,rnnin.: tiorr in the failed paDelts, v,lil1 be
tal"en a.Iong-vrith the next subseguent I n-iversity Examination. CandidLtes
failed in oracticaL/skil-ls (part B,c/1..,) are allowed to take up theory
Examinations. In pr.rcticaf (qFr:t B,C :ncl D) re-examination.for
faited candidate .in the concerned lrar 1., wil-t also l:e conducted.
..r.
A candidate studying in BPE - fl.rxust have to pass in all- the
parts of BPE - f (part trrR and D) to get promotion to BPE lrII.
A student fa'l, Iinq in any paper,/suhject,/abtivity of Part .^./ B,C
and D in BPE - lfI may appear as an ei---student at the examinations in
the subseguent years. He,/She may alsc sec.k re-acimission, if, he/she
sc deslres, subject to the recommendar:ion ancr approvaL' of the iiead
of the Departments.
is prcnrot,:d tc Tr and 'TrT year of BPE
fIf year c;f'?Fli in the successive year, by
s e-: t a bovq. lt,, sancti,oned strength br:t withi
tn,ho
t't
').
An exceptj-onally talented slrcrtsmanf*omen who has repreJpnteci
.
a
year j-n
the Calicut 't-hiversity during the year of exarninati-on'of f'lrl
shall be promoted to the sec'ndlthird yeo:
arry sp.rts jiscipllle
of
classes and appear for tire examina-rj-ons thereafter, irrespective
in
the outcome of resLrlts of t-he examination they have appearr-'d
of trD!'-couirse
relaxation of the provi,"j-ons in the exj^stin€r nr:r.oulation
under the head 'rPrcfiotj-on,/pass" '
tc; pESS
A student ha'rinc{ completed the cou*be'of studY fajis
Part 1,8,C, an. l) r:f ]]P.. J,
inri ':all the paoers,/sub.i =cts/aetiv11i65 3f
the date of f ]rst
JI and TIr within a period o f si-x years from
get the de-'gr'-e af R"Eadmission to BPE f, shall forfeit the riqht to
Astudentpermittedtorakereexaminatj-oninsut-.seqrrent
securedyears, wlll carry{forward the dessional rnarkeorl!:tnally
'3'
held on 15-1-2oO1
2) tnJ r..rrrty of EH,.rcatjon ar its *""tirrg
stu<]ieb anr] the Aca,.}emjq
accepted t,he recommendaticns oi the Boar<] of
the sarne'
Couneil meeting held on 3-3-2001 approved
3)'r'herevi'sedr-'gulatic:'on'TheMini-mumforProrftoLLon/ the
by
pass,, for Degr.-je of Bachr-'Ior of irhysica.I Education approved
be laid before the next
lcademic Counci] hel-cl cn 3-3-203i cculd not
held on 7-6-2042
Senate meeting. the ^caclern:C CcunclI meeting
j
resolved to revive the desisicn taken earlier'
4)sahetionhasthef.,forebeenaccordedforimplementjng
ra}rp 'lriftimum for promoticn'/Dass' for degree
Ehe revj_sed rule on
from'zocZ onwards'
of Bachel-ar of Physical tdt'lcation
orders are lssued aCCPrdjngIY'
sd/-
(cr.a.-r)
DtrPIITT RqGTSTRiR
E}T
Tt
copy tQt
DR
RECT,STR^11
(cq.i)lsr.he/re.
6elFF.
F3RTTTARDEl-)
I
O
aq
:i"
ITFTCER
\
UNIVERSITY OF Cz[fCUt
hcf 9! r:rrlt
\.v
,
ttr,,u
v
I
Bachclor cf FhYsica-I Educc'ti
Delcticn cf pcrticns in Fa'rt
cf PhYsiceL Educaticn Ccursc
tlecha.nisrl f,cr Internal Asscs
Ortfcr-s issucd.
iil'JD z\Ciii'll}{Ic BR}NCti I
DatcC, Ca.Iicut Unirrersity F.O. t 4'6u2OO3'
GEI-{EF'z\L
Itrc.Gli. r/J2/598/03
cf the
Read: Itcm }]c.2 a.nd 6 of the },linutcs cf the nreeting
(uC)
held on
Bcard cf studics in rhlrsical Educa'tion
3.2.2003.
2.rr,gonda ii". I'tre-3 cf thc r'rinutes cf thc meeting cf
}li.eritty cf trduca-ticn hcld cn lC'?' 2003
3.I{inutes of the raacting cf ,itca.demj-c ccuneil he}d cn
21.3.2003.
o t?. D_E_ R
(UC) rced .o.s first
The Bca.rd of Studics in ehl,sica.I Education cf Bachclor
of
abevc ;;;=fi;;ed as itcm r{o.2, che.nge into sy)-Iabus
delcte thc f ol lcvrinq
f,nysio:1 Educaticn Ccurse a-ncl rcsclvcd
CQurse'
P'P'E'
thc
p"it c - Biologry cf Papcr rr cf
sPcetrum
Unit III - Biolcgical eccsYstern
of
Ccnccpt
V
Unit
PitrasitisrJ emC fluqa.n -iclfe-re
VIII
Unit
'--X
Unit
- Ca-rccr - Gcncra.l Ccncepts -
anri
reg.rrdinq the
cf
Assessrrent
.detailed
in
es
TheFeeultycfEdr-;caticnc.ndthe:\cadcnrj,cCcuneilrcad
the ninutes of thc Bca-rd
as sccond anrl third o5o.r. ioa ap,provcd(uC)
hcld cn ?.2.2003
Educa.ticiof Studies 1n
"#.ei-caf
sa.netion has thercfcrc been a.cccrdad fQr implernenting
thcabcve.chengclnthcsylla.buscfD.F.E.C;ursea.ndthc}"!::cf BPE
ducticn ef 'nodiossel l.'lccta.nism r'or Intert'a'1 Asses'sncnt
Course frcm 2001-02 oivsa'rrJs
'
Orders a.re jssr-red acccrdingly
sd/-
REGI STRT"R.
Te
?he Dj-reetcr,
PhYsical Educa-ticn D'Ft'
Ccpy tc:
i: The Principal,
' Christ Ccl1ege, Irinjalakku'ia'
2- C-E. secticn ccnccrncC
3. sF /DF /TC
Forvrarde a/AY . Order
ssc'-ttOr'l orFrcER
UNIVERSITY OF CALICUT
1tr]-.--+-...^
i.-_,t ,.. r. aC t
il'rchelor of Phr,.sical Fdrr-H..^
/prrE\ /-1
GENERA L r'rND
)
Reguration
Kegulation
ers issued.
_ ,Efigibi]ity for admission,
ACADEI'acTRffiT
f)atecl: Calicut Uni
i
.P.O,2&11-?002
z) Lr. dt. 1,0-9-0zf;:om the Chair.man,
B/s in physical Education (uG).
og rl,_EE
{,
,
1) As per U'C. reacl as llrst above a ca.criclaie
shoula b
on 1't Deceml-rer of the year fcrr
actnis.siorr to B.p.i. coruse.
:ls
Iimit shall be given to cancliclates rviro har,.
.epr.sented
u'.ii'ersitv-1".ory1"1 sports discipri.e or
i.
se^tce
cancricla
se^,ice as physical Education teach-er
or SC/ST ca:rdidat
o the Dean
tomocrig,
abov
B.
p.
,:j,,1i"],."Tij
the-upper
the number of
ProsPective quaJified aspira,ts for adnrission to
B.P.E. course a^d had requested that
viceChancellor by exercising tht po*'.rs
of Acade".i. co*o may modify the upper
age Iinrit to 23
years.
:
3) considtT"q the urgenY of the matter the vice-chancelror
by exercising the pou/s1s 51
Academic Council had accord"ecl sanction
to moctify th. opp., age limit of cancticlates
to 23 ),ears.
4)
The following modification has been
orclered
in Fara 2 of the universiq, chder read as
fust' "Candidates shouta be behveen the age
of 17 *o zs
admission to B'P'E' colu'se" The tlecisro1,1.qlai"g..ppu, as on L,t December of the year for
'
age limit for admission to B.p.E course
as per the U'o' dL 2G6-2001 stancls
moclifiel to thL &i*t. . The other rules regarding,eligibilig,
criteria'for admission to B.P.E. course.irnplemented
th;;;;-r,6lr"rr*rs as such. The
rer"ised eliglbilify criteria is ap,pJicable
"r ;; onward.s.
from 2003 aclmission
Gders are issuecl accordingly subject to ratilication
by Acadernic council.
sd,/DeputyRegistrar ( GA$
FoT REGISTRAR
To
The Director.,
Centre for physicai Education
Copl'to:
EXIII, EB)0I, Enquir.l.(Exam),GAl E & A Sn.
DR(GAr). sF / DF / tc.
.ri,
l
_
t- ir',-',:;17'51 ';
,
iJi'ii Ct-rursg \,viih,irawai of "r.lat-atlt. :ij.,;:L-a,i i;,:,:r','i,,:,.;, ri. .i; i1..::-iti;it i'un,:iiailCil i1i?Cet il-rc cli[;s.'Minirnum for PromotiodPass' ?:iienalcll i-lo;i., l:{i{}i r,.,::iis:;il',n oiii;\'a:is - {.,\riers issueri.
GENEI{,,{}, An*L-}.ACA$frlit{X{] Bilri:.ai{.'i+
-i
',J' StC-ilIOH
,1:ll i;';;., i - l':-l. :; ii. iJr-: : v i;r':r itir,y.iJ, 0ZC9.200
rJo.GAI/J2I598/03
I{ ead ; 1 . U, O.Nri. C Xlt iE g ?i ;} :atd}' :,, i .;?'r'
2. Itein No.2 of tlie ilitir:ies cii'ri:c iiiecli:-r:i i;f ii:e Iiraia ,:t' jlii,jies i,r.Physical
Eclr:cation (UG) held oa ;:C-3-2JS-i.
3. ltem No. I of the minutes cf the meetirrs of the Faculrv oiEd.ucation heiri on
r--_-
5
23-5-200.5.
4. Item i'Jo.II(B) o1'the miai.rtcs i:ithe.+rct-'iin1 r:,i-rhs Acadeinic Co,incii heid on
18..6-2005.
+i-i.}i-ii
As per University Order rcad llrsi paper sa-ncrion has 'hepn acsorded to promote the BPE
studenls to II and III BPE classes relaxing the provision in the existing regulation under the
clause 'Minimum for Promotion/Pass' for 20Ci and2}02 admission candidates.
'
'fhe Iloard of Studies in Ph1'sicai L,ducation (UG) at its rnei:ting helcl on 30-3-2005 vide
itt:m No.Ii unar.rir.nou.sly-re+oium*rde+i+:,-ri.-,-trk*',i ;h; 'v;;::i- ,.'r,ri :vs;ell trorn BPE course rvith
eifect from 2003 acimission onwards ;r'itii ;i i;+iriiiii,-:i: iiia.i ;.iie,=, sni:r-itcl pasrs';ire examinatir-ln and
ootnplete the course 'nrithin fi=ie -veer$ft'or"r! tii:si r;.ij ji;i.i'.ri1+.ri.
'Ihe traculty of Education at iis rneeting ireiri c;ri 21-5-2{-tfr5 vide
the minutcs of the Board of Studies.
iterr irio.i has approved
The Academic (iouncil a.t its meetir:g helii on l8-f:-2005 iiide iten: N,.r.II (B) has resol.red
to approve the minutes of the meetirrq +f the .l':rr-:irltv tii--ldircarioir ,:i:tcithe irdlutes of'the,rneeting
of'the various.Boarcls ci'St.idics as eror.x'scd t',, iirr' f 1;,:1lir,
Sanctiorr has thereftlre treen accoicier+ ri; ivii*cii'i:w 'viar ilut' systel'n of BPE ooursc
-.er:-'E:€*..-'-.".rdaxing the .provision,,in".the regulation of ili'Fl ,i"Eu€e.--+*d€i*the,=clause :lrlinirnurn ,fi)r,,^*..
' n1ks:Er:'-
^-"'Prcirn6tio#Passi witfre.fferct 'frt'rm 2003 admission r:nwards*xiitft=attriitrrtion*'that'ttig'candid'ates*;16"=
should pass the exarnination and complete the c"oursc-.*'ith in tive years from first registration.
Orders are issuecl a.ccolriin.l,1y.
sdi
-
iii:PU l-.r' IiEGIS'IRAR (G&z\-I)
].r
rii Ri:
Gtr
[]'I'.RI\R
To
1.
2.
The lrrincripal
Clrrisl C--ollege, I rinj a I akuc.a_
The Director
CPE, t-,i:i',,r:1s:lii, + f i-lllicr.li.
Copy to:
1. Controiler oJ: E..iaririr,.atir-ins.
2. EX IV
3. Et] XI
4. DR concemcd
5.
6.
F-orr,r.ard
cilB
), Order
Encuir.y E,r:aroiirirtior-r
Si'/iDFrFC.
Kiu(rA I /.i2i598/0 l'()r,ttcc
0:'f rcilR
t
UNIVERSITY OF CALICUT
SYLLABUS .AND REGULATIONS FOR
rHE DEGREE oF BAclf:.?ir?I^11I:ffAL EDUCATTON (B.p.E.)
l
I.
NATURE OF COURSE
It
is a residential programme
snrdy
,)
of three
1'ears duration open to both sexes. The course
of
is through English Medium.
OBJECTIVE OF TTTP COUJB
To impart professional training for teaching physicirl education, spons and health education in
high and higher secondary schools.
ir)
To deveiop expertise in superr ising teaclring of physical education by classroonr teachers in
Elementary Schools.
iii)
To develop cornetence in assisting the corrdnct of sport programnre in higher education
instinrtions.
iv)
Tc develop knowledge, physical fitness ancl sports skills incidental to the objectives
mentioned above (i, ii and iii)
v)
To develop rnanagement skill in organising and conducting sports nreets and ntass
denronstrations cf Phi,5isxl Education activities.
vi)
To develop the conrpetence o1'officiating in sports competitions.
\ti)
To promotc rrass particillatiorr in sports and inculcate interest in sports activities
3. trLIGIBILITY FOR ADMISSION
The carrdidates of both sexes are eli_eible to seek admission for B.P.E. Degree colll-ses if they
following conditions.
I.
.
a) (i)
-,
(ii)
fulfil
the
Candidates should not have completed 25 years of age as on lst July of the
, "onaa.ned
acadenric )'ear.
In service candidates having good sports record who are deputed and are below 30
yezrrs of age as on lst July of the concerned academic year can also seek admission.
(iii)
The candiciate shoulci have passed the Pre-degree exam irration of this Un iversity or
an exalrrination considered a5,:quilvalerrtthere to by the Urriversity.
OR
The candidate
SSLC orequrvalent examination and acertificate course in Physical educayears
tiorr of at least two
duration from.r recognised institution of Physical Edr:cation apploved by the
ha-s pzrssed
Calicut Universiry.
t_
The clndidate produces a nr()dicai certificate of or-9anic fitrtcss ltlr cjltilr' hr'lrvl' lrl:rd <lf
rledical histor'1'o1'a[-rsencc of clisirbiliti'arrd
lrh1,qi.r, u,o1k, abscncc ot'plrl,sical dciects, and
2
c'ngenital deseases.']'he recorrut'rendatiorr of the panel ol'rnedicltl dtlctot': ctrrllllr issiotted
the ipstitutiop condr-rcrirr-9 the course rvrttr th-: approval of the Univel-sity
will
hrc
by
iinirl
Lr)' t1.,,.: ,,t,.,.,'rsion-test
,i
Lttrrl titlctlts in sllorts i
prtlved
irlterests
rvith
given
applicants,
to
pr-escrihed b;,Lhe Urriversity. PIet'erence.,vill bC
ytrrr ol'
stilts. a., cnrdtircEilfi!ffiti-ciprtion ree olcls A ciurdiclirte who passecUapPcaled/discorrtirrr.rud l/[l/[ll
by 111i, Unirersity or equit'alent is also eli-qitrle to scck rtcltlissiott to -an),orhe_.Lq_e_grye-glLlllfe_
I{owever rnerit of the candidate u,itlr ,liverse c;ualil-i.cati.onl yil!-be detenrined
lsleco-g|fcc
-
BlEcotrrse.
!
I. DURATION OF 'I'I-IE COURSE
the BP[-, cie,eree shali exiend o\/er a pcriod o1'thrce ltcucle rllic vuars u'ith ii
of
,rininrurn 200 rvorking day:. pcr 'r:l: i;rirsistirrg o1'tlrree parts iiPE - I. BPE -ll. ancl BPE III The coLtrse
stuclies c:onsists of 4 parts:
Thc course of stud1,
1'or
A.
Theory
B.
C.
PlrYsical AcrivitY Skills
Teriching
I).
SPorts Sllcciilii:'aiioir,
Abiiitl
Eaclr u,olkingdal,sliallCr)nii:-r oi'tlrrcc !rr:rrs of thuoi'),.lttd l'otlt'ilortt's
tll
llrlre ire itl 1'J[1]11 r'r'll l.
5. A'I''|ENDANCtr
F-aclr i-rciiclcntiC
t,cltr'sltail l:c ini.r':ri .rs:rrt LIrrit l'ol thc t)ttt'i)()sc ol'cirlcttlrltirlg llLlrrlltilll)Lc llltil
nrrtlcsstharrS59?ofthenunrberol'rvorkingperiocisineaclrofthcpalrersundet
lt
thcot'f itttdclicittll'tltcheittis
attetldiltlceshrllrrottrcllerrriittedtt'
runricr.uctiVitics.Acarrcliclirte\\,hor.loesnotsutisfl,tlrereqriirenrerrtsof
tlikc tlic tjnivcrsity,cxanrir11rtir'rrr I-litrve'.,er.-sh()l-tuljc ol:attendetrcc to the extcllt o1' l-5(,'i tltlty be e tlrtclclrre d b\'
ol'l'ces. us prescribed by the Urrirersitv
Irrtrrlclitiontotltcab()\,c1trot,isii.trrs.uclndidatcirtorderttlbe cligiblctoill)llcill lot IItr:BPI--ll1
exarninutioir should ltttve -
(i)
iItl.r:ndcd it leittlcrship traitritlgcattlp ol'atlettst l0 ([ays ilnd
tiil
llrsscd ir prirctlcirl exanrirratiorr in Filst Aid to be conductccl t)tt thc sitrttc I)ilt(cr'il
;rs lbr.othcr
rrctivities unclet' pt.uctical skills.
,,\ stLl(k:t.tt r,vho is to rrriss irrr1, pclioc! ,ln bcinq assi-gned 1'or otitcr cttgirgcltrctrts hv tllc lrlstitLrtiilrl ltt
v,.rittcn aut h()r'iiv
tirc dL'I]ltfiil)crlt.
liont the concc rnccl lrc
nt bet' , r1't he S talf uncl
bc rLPl;r'ovcd bv tlrc Ilcitcl
o1' t lr
c I)c
P
ltt't rllett t
of
d
t
6. NIINI]VIU\,I FOR PROMOTION/PASS
A student tiriling ln rrtorcr than two papers rn part A (Theory cxcludrng papcr
I
(En-ulish) in BPE- I or II will not hc promoted to
the next highcr class. Rc- cxamrnarlon in
thc luled papers. will be taken at thc next subsequenr University Examinatitin
Candrdarcs
praclcal/skrlls (Part B. C, D) are allowed to take up theory Exlmirrurrtrn.s.
Ip prectrcul (Part B' C. and D)' re exantinatton fbr taile<i candidate in lhe
concerncd pan. rvrll rls()
lrLrle'd tn
bc eonducted.
Acandidate studyingrn BPE-ll musthavepassed all the parts ol'BpE -l (pa1A.
B
end D) to get promorion ro BpE 1IL
A student lailing in my paper/sub.ject/actrvity of'parr A. B, C and D in BpE -ill
rlaY appcar as ex-student at the examinations in subsequent years. He
may 1l.str scck rcatl
t'nl'ssion rf he so de.sires sub.iect to the recommendarion and
approval ol thc head rrl rhc
Departmcnt of' the department.
A
slLrden[ havrng compie'ed ihe course of study tails to pa.ss in all
rhe papcrs/
sublecls/activitres of' part A, B, C an<j D of BPE -I, II and III within a period
ef'srx years
trom the date of'l'irst admission to BPE -1, shell l'orfeit the right ro get the
tlecree
,,1 Bpb
A studcnt permitted to L&e reexamlnation in subsequent years. wrli carry firrward
the sessional marks onginally securecl.
CLASSIFICATION OF SUCCESSFUL CANDIDATES:
Total marks in all parls (A, B, C rind D) of'threc ycars will be takcn ln
[() acc()un[
lirr cla-s.siflcation of r;uccessf i:l canCiCeics.
(a)
(b)
(c)
4O% ut,J above bur less than 50oZ
-50c1 and above
6()0/, .l'nd
but
le.s.s
_
Iil
thtn 60% _ II
clas.s
class
ahovc* -- I c:.la-ss
+
A candtdatc who passotj sucuessfuily VIVIII years examinatlons in lrrsr artcmpL\
-rtrd:;cttre.s"l5% and abovc marks sha.ll be placed in llrstCluss with clstipctren.
Thc achicvelrlent /distinction of the ccirr.l,it<tto be mentioned separarcl.l, rn
thc
mark.si de grce certrf'icate
NOTE:
l.
There wili be no minimum fbr a pass rn lnrcrnal
part A - Theory.
Provision ror berterment (part A - Theory)
(sc's.sional) a.ssessmen[ rn
2.
A candidate shoulti be permitted to rcappear for betterment ol'mlrks (retaining
his/her onginal marks) sub.jecr ro the fbllowing condirion.s.
a)
for betterment. of marks obtained in part A theory papor-\
of first year will be allowed only once along with thc suh.sequent scc.,,nti
Re-appearance
y,.rar exilrninat-i()ns.
(b)
(c)
(d)
Re-appearance for bettemient of marks obtainecj in thc part A thi:gry papers o1'second year exarnination should be allowed only oncc alrirrrj
with.
thc sr-rbsequcnt third year exarnluatlon.
There will bc ntl prttv,.sion lor re-appearancc lor trcttcrincnt ol nrarks rrh.
tained iri Part A theory papcrs ol'thtrl ycar.
Thcre
r.s
no Jrn,vi.sion lor impru'emcntin other p:rrr.s
ic.
. B.
c
and t)
I,ART A
c
Each thcory pilpcr will c:rrry mir-ximum
.rnd l-5 mark.s titr tntemal assessment.
ol
?-5
marks
tilr
[-tntvcrsttv r:xi-tlrltnatloll
A candidarc who gcts -i-5"2 muks in cach papcr and get 4(lc7r aggrc.uutc rtrlrk.s ttr
Pan A in cach ycar will bc declarcd [o havc passed in thc part. There will bc provi.sron lorpapcr-wrsc pass al.so il'gcts 1(l% of marks. A candidate who gets 40'Z marks itt l papcr
rundcr parr A br.rt could n() gct the paper mintmum tor a pass in the part will bc dccl:.tred to
havc pas.scd in that paper in which he gets 4O%' of marks.
internal iLssessment fbr 25 marks in each paper rn Part A shall bc on thc hasts ol
Intcrnal examinations. usi-unmenls and evaluations conducted by the cttnccmcd tcuchcr
ver a period ol'one acedemic ycar r,vilh ll0 itten examination ol'3 hours dttnrtion for' .r {
n carrying a maximum ol l-5 nrark.s. Thc \
date must secure a se parate mittirnutn trt'-5 I
,i,./r.. ,. l_' .i :;l-l-. .t.i i
,/*\./i .t/l . I ,.t{-
IARTB
PHYSICAL ACTIVTTY SKILLS
Under Part B, tcn activities shlill be choserr i'or each Year fiorn thc totai nLIllthcr oi
.rctrvitrcs spccit'ied for BPE -UlrJlIl yexrs to suit administrative convenrencc r',1'thc centrc
con,-'erncd limiting rt to thc working hours. In,-ernaltest for 50 marks shall bc cottductcrd f or
5 uctr,.'ittes ca<;h out ol l0 actrviLicrs citi;sen, [or a tc,tal rrrark.s ol 25(! l(rr ciluir \r:ur SLitt]cnis
shiLll nruiutuin i-ccord brrok rvhich shlll be prcse ntcd at thc time of evuluation ul th,.'ct-ttclLtsr0n 0l tn:itrulcLi()n rrr cuch ucti.,,ll..,t() thc c()ncL:rned teaci]cl', NlinimLrrn lrt;- puss rn purt B rs
-1()7 rll'marks orch ucttvrty.'fhcdct:.rils ol ac:Livitiqr to l-.c cirtiscn urtdel par-t B lor BPE t/ll/
III lrt.eiven rrr tltc tahlc urrticr thc head ol'"Purt B Activitics BPE -Ulylll
I'ART C
TEACHING ABILITY
Cundi,latcs should takc l-5 rntcrnal and l-5 external lessons at diffcrcnt schotrls rn
thc ncrghhourhtiod antl should nraintarn a record book. to be evaluated firr a Iotal nrark trl
l-50 (sessional mark). Llniversitv examinadon should hc conducted for a total rnrrk ol l0()
br rrrtcmal and cxternal cxaminers. Mirrimum for a pass in part C is -1()% agri'c{ate
.
IART D
SPORTS SPECIALISATION
A Candidate shall specialise in snorts disciplines in each year as follows:
BPE-I
I
Track
BPE
'[rack and Ficld
& Ficld I
2. C)ptional game
-Ii
-l
BPE -III
l. Track &
Ficld
2. Optional Carnc -li
{o't'E:
l.
Track and fleld activities cim bc classil'ied iu Running events. Thnrwrng cvcnls
I
(,
I
&.iurnprng evet)Ls and taughi in BPE I/ttiIII year.\ accordtng ttr rht..rdnrrnrsuative convenience ol'the centrc-.
1
lvlalor games fbr ttptional game I and II can hc chosen l'ronr [hc lr.sr un,.]cr thu
head ol'"Ma.jor Game.s - Optional".
3
rL-cord book ts to be maintained tor evaluation dunn_u [-lnivcr.sit!, praerical
exatlltt'lation lttr 25 nrarks, to be assessed by intcnral and cxtcnrll cxam:r'rt'r's
.4,
COURSE AND EXAMINATION FOR B P. E. (TUREE YEARS) DECREE
PART A
THEORY PAPERS
o(
)(
) litir-lr:
Maxintuttt I'vlulkr.-
Paper
Subiect
University
Scssirlrtal
ExarninAtion
mark
maxilnutn
nrarks maximum
Papcr
Englislr
I
Prpcr Il
lJ_s
Gcncral Sciencc
lll
5it(
Duratior ol
Total
LJnr
vcrsitv
Exalrinulion
l-)
l(x)
l5
I
.1
(X)
lrours
J lrturs
Anatomy irnd tirst Aid
75
2-s
I (X)
.1
i'uper [V
Socit;irig_v
15
!5
100
J hours
Priper V
History ot Physicrl Education
75
25
r00
3 hours
Papcr
Toial
Note
i.
t
lrrlurs
5( X)
Paper minimum tbr pa.ss 35Vo and aggregate 40%, of the total nrark-s.
Paper wise pass 40%
PART B
PHYSICAL ACTIVITY SKILL
Tolal lrortrs J0{)
Total rruuks
2-'r0
Sessional assessmenLs will bc al'tcr conducting sessional cxuln in rtty ltvc tll'',.tltt
lcancd and recordcd rn the Record hook.
\
C.
I
PART D
SPORTS SPECIALISATION
-10()
H rs
lf
Ma-rirnurn tnirrks
I'Al'>FlR A :
-\
'|'R{CK AND F'IELI)
Session:rl
'lirtal marks
I
ll
Othciaring
Skills and specralisarion
Thcory- iuld
lll
Coachin.u
ahiliry.
25
25
75
25
Notc A Record book to bc marlrrained ft;r evaluatrnq during BpE III Exam.
PAPER B . OPTIONAL GAI\,IE I
Sessronal
[.lnlvcrsrty
ToUl
Mark
Exum marks
lnarks
I l'lrcrlrv alrtl ( )llrcnrtrns
2_i
ll Skills iuld Spceutli\ltr()n
2:
II
I
I\
(itxrchrng rrhilirt
s0
?.5
Reerlrd Brxlk
I -5()
2-5
I}.P.E.
II YEAR
PART .A . THEORY PAPERS
5()()lrrr
Maxrrrurrr rnarks 500
Su
Univcrsity
Exam
hirct
Maxinrum
V'l
Pirpe'r VII
Prr;:cr V lll
Plr;lct
Krncsrtrlogt' and Bromcclriutrcs
75
Etlucationid and Sports Psvchology
15
He
lrlth Educutiorr
P:rrrc4Xi. Tcaclttttr:
llletJrtxJology'
7-5
X
Plrvslologv iurd Physioltr.rlv of Exercise
Miuk
Maximun
Dumuon
ToUl
tll
Examn.
25
I (X)
I
25
l0()
'25
I00
I Hourr
I Hours
15
2-5
I (X)
75
2,s
rca
a
Plrpcr
Marks
Sessional
,s00
Hours
I Hours
I Hours
PART B . PHYSICAL ACTIVIT}' SKILL
0
Ttrtuj .l(X) Hours
Totul rrtarks l-5o
PART (] . TEACHING AI}ILITY
l(X) Hrs
Maxrrnuln rnarks
li0
Sessional
Maximunr marks
Part-icuiars
.\r
No
Lessons
Taking
Unrversity
plans
cl asses
Examination
Total
MiLinLtned
I
I
I
'leaching practice lntemal
25
50
Tcaching practice rn schtxrls
l5
)(.)
I50
I (X)
Final Universrtv Exim lessons
D . SPORTS SPECIALISATION
PAPER A . TRACK AND FIELD
PART
l(Y) l-iours
Scsstonal rrtirxrtnunt trrarks : 75
Scssronal rnirks
Pirtrcrr lars
l.
Thcory iurd ofliciating
25
ll
Skills and specialisutt-rn
25
III
Coirchirtg ithrlity
25
Total
75
|l]tltc: r\ rccord brltlk is [o be marntalned.
B.P.E.
III YEAR
PART A . THEORY
6(X) Hours
Maximutn rnarks - 500
Sublect
Papcr
Paper
XI
Foundation ot Physical Education
University
Marimum
Examinatiott
Mirxi. Marks
Sessional
75
25
-fotiLl
Dural.ron
of ExrrmrrtaIlons
Marks
(x)
--l
Hours
l)trpcr
XII
Managenrcnt tll phvsreal Fducatlon
and Sporls
Pupcr
-XIll
Physlrtherapv. Corrccrrve physrcal
Educatron and Adaptcd physicai
Education
Papcr
XIV
1es;nMeir"surement
0
,r*d
in
15
2s
l(x)
I Hours
75
25
I
(X)
I
75
25
100
J Hours
b-
loo
J H.urs
Physical Education
Prrpe
r
XV
Scrcnritlc Principles ol
Coachrng ji
Total
Hgurs
5U)
PART B - PHYSICAL,ACTIVITY SKILL
Total hours - 400
Toml marks - 250
PART D . SPORTS SPECIALISATION
Total Hours - 400
Ma:rimum marks - -l(X)
PAPER A . TRACK AND FIELD
S
I irio
Particulars
Mitxinrurtr
Sessional
University Exun
Miximrrm
Marks
mark.s
I
Tltco6- 1p6 Ollie
il
Skills and
ilt
Coaching Ahilrtl,
2_i
tV
Rccrlrd Btxlk
1i
rirtilrl
.spccralistrrion
2i
25
jo
PAPER, B . OPTIONAL GAME
Sl No
Particuiars
j\
1-s(
II
Sessional
Universtty Exam
l,ilaximun
Maximum _ Marks
marks
I
Thcury and Oti'iciaring
II
Skiilsanrr
il!.
Cloaclrirrg Ability
25
IV
Rccord Brxlk
25
!trlrhEfr8U
Totirl
Mirrks
Itrtal
Mzrrks
25
,<
LJ
50
l-50
I
SCHEMEAND PATTERN OF B.P.E. DEGREE COURSE . FIRST YEAR
IlIaximum marks
Teaching
Subicct
Hours
Part:
Duration
ofexam.
Sessional University
Examn, Examn
Toul
ATheory
Paper I
r20
3 Houn
l5
Paper II
120
3 Hours
25
85
lu)
75
100
lm
III
l?0
3 Houn
25
'75
Paper Iv"
120
3 Hours
25
75
t00
Paper V
120
3 Hours
25
75
100
Part B. Physical Activity Skill
400
2-s0
2s0
400
75
?1S
Paper
Part D - Sport Specialisalittn
Paper A Track and Field
Paper B Optional Game I
-llx)
50)
Toul Marks
975
B.P.E. SECOND YEAR
Maxlmummarks
Ti:aching
Srr[cct
Hours
Part:
Duration
ofexam.
Sessional
Exasrn.
University
Examn
i'otal
ATheory
Paper
VI
120 hours
3 Hours
25
75
100
Paper
VII
120 ltours
3 Hours
25
75
100
Paper
VIII
120 hours
3
Houn
75
75
tfi)
Paper
IX
120 hours
3 Houn
25
75
100
Paper
X
120 hours
3 Hours
25
75
100
Sklll
ability
Part B : Physical Activlty
400 Hrs.
250
Part C : Teaching
200 Hrs.
150
200 Hrs.
z1
zso
r00
250
Part D : Sports Specialisation
Paper A : Track and
Totzrl
Field
15
107_5
e
B.P.E. 'I'HIRD YEAR
Maximum marks
Teaching l)uration Sessional
Suhiect
Houn
l'art
:
o[
exam Examn
Urrivursity
Examn
Tourl
A Theory
Papcr
Xl
l20hours I Hours
Papcr
XII
Papcr
Xlll
l'apcr
XN
Hours
120hours I Hours
l20hours I Houn
120 hours 1 Hours
25
25
25
25
25
400 Hours
250
400 Hrs.
Ioo
50
rcQ
5e
120
l)aper X V
l'art B: Physical Activity
Skill
hours
I
75
'15
lU)
I
75
75
'15
(X)
I(X)
l(X)
l(X)
250
l'art D: Sports Specialisation
Paper A: Track and
Field
l)aper B: Optional Game
II
lirtat
PART
I
Ii : Activities
I yeiu
l.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7
8.
9.
10.
--7'2 ti
B.P.E.
Ball
Foot bdl
Acrobic dance
Calisthenics
Barathipm
Minorgames
Kabaddi
Kho-kho
Marching
Weight training
Basket
o-s0
I/Im[
II
year
Wresrling
Weighrlifring
powerlifting
Best physique
Badminton
Volley ball
Cricket
Gymnastics
Swimming
Rhythmics
Ball
III ycar
yoga
Badninrnn
Table Tennis
Tennis
Han<i ball
Hrckcy
BasebalUSoti bail
Cycling
Kante/Jud<r
Chess
================:=================:======================-=======
Activities can be interchanged according to the convenience of'the ccntre.
I0
PART D - MAJOR GAMES - OPTIONAL
l.
Badminton
2. Basket ball
3. Cricket
4. Football
5. Gymnastics
6. Handball
7. Hockey
8. KabadilIGo-Kho
9. Swimming
10. Volley ball'
1l
a
UNTVERSITY OF CALICUT
SYLLABUS FOR
BACIIELOR OF PITYSICAL EDUCATION(BPE)
(w. e f.195 Admission)
SPECIAL NOTE
l.
For 1995 admission only, Examination for BPE. I - Paper I - English (First Year)
shall be conducted along with Second Year BPE degree Examination ( at the end
of the academic Year 1996-97)
2.
The following changes are also made in the scheme in the case of 1995 adms
sion only,
(a)
For First Year, BPE. [ - Paper IV shall be "Physiology and_Phlrsiology ol
exercise" which is inciuded in the Sytlabus for Seconi V#fffpf fl'
-t\
Paper X.
(b)
For Second Year, BPE - II - Paper X shall be "sociology" which is included in the syllabus for First Year BPE iu BPE - I Paper IV.
Examinations for BPE - I Paper IV and BPE - II - Paper X shall be conducted accordingly frrr the candidates of 1995 admission only.,
S(V
REGISTRAR.
72
UNTVERSITY OF CALICUT
B.P.E. .
I PAPER . I . ENGLISH
SYLLABUS
OBJECTTVES
English language Teaching (E.L.T.), which forms Paper I of rhe Bachelor o1'physical Education Programme offere<l in the first year is intended to develop
in the student thc
communication skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking for practical purpgses.
COURSE CONTENT
(a) READING COMPREHENSTON
Understanding the meaning of words, phrases and sentences in context: understanding logical relationships between statements. Distinguishing statemenLs of facts fiom
beliet's, opinions, hypothesis etc., Inferring facts, opinions, reirsons. causes. resulLs.
requesLs,
conclusions etc-, fiom a given passage; Scanning a passage lilr specilic cletails: prnpointing
arguments in a given passage; summarising the main
idea_r a given
passagc.
(b) GRAMMAR AND VOCABULARY
Correcting given sentences using activeknowledge of grarnmatica-l structures;completing incomplete sentenceVfilling the blanks in sentences through correcr choice of grammatical structures and vocabulary; Inferring word meaning from available clues; speech;
Active Voice and Passive Voice; Direct and Indirect (reported) speech; using synonyms and
Antonyms; using one-word substitute.
(c) WRITTBN COMMIJNICATION
Re-ordering jumbled sentences to form a coherent paragraph.
Elaborating a given i<iea by tisting of points, Organising Points around major idea-s;
developing points to form connected sentences a-nd building paragraphs.
Writing summary/ Precis
Writing Personal./Business letters
Note-making
Mechanics of writing; Punctuation, different formats of writing etc.
l3
O
(d) oRAL coMMUNrcATroN
Listening comprehension
:
Undersq"di"g various types of questions and their scope
and focus understanding truncated utterances.
Training in oral communication for day - to - day routine activities such a^s introducing oneself to people; introducing others; making'inquiries; seeking intormatron; responding to inquiries; supplying information; making, accepting and refusing ofl'erVinvitations; expressing agreement/ disagreement in informal situations; using conventions of
politences and courtesy in speech.
RECOMMEI{DED READING (RELEVANT SECTIONS ONLY)
I.
GRAMMARAND COMPOSITION
!.
F.T.WOOD
A Remedial Engli.sh Grammar for
Foreign Students (Mc Millan)
2. A.J. THOMSON & A.V. MARTINET
A Practical English Grammar
(Oxford)
3. DAVID GREEN
Contemporary English Grammar
Structurcs and Comnosition
(Macmillan)
4. M.L. TICKOO
brcm"aiate Crammar
usage mrl
comnosition (Oriant Longman)
5. SARAH FREEMAN
Written Communication in English
(Orient Longman)
6. M. BHASKARAN & DAVID
MORSBURGH
Strength your English (Oxford)
7
Remedial Cour.se
P.K. DAS AND ANNIE DAVID
in Engli.sh fbr
Colleges Book (Oxford)
8. UNIVERSITY OF BOMBAY
(ELT Cell)
Exercises (University
of Bombay)
II. ORAL COMIVIIJNICATION
l-
R.K. Bansal & Harrison
Spoken English
for India
(Orient Longman)
2. C.I.E.F.L. (Hyderabad)
Exercises in Sfroken English
(Part I,II & m)
3. A.,. DUFF
Trger's Eye (BBC English, London
DUP_
DELHr).
Also, Audio & video cassettes brought our by (CIEFL, Hyderabad and BBC).
14
A
o
BPE . I - PAPER tr - GENERAL
SCIENCE
NUMBER OF TEACHING HOURS
120
TOTAL MARKS
75
PART A PHYSICS
25
PART B CHEMISTRY
25
PART C BIOLOGY
l'
25
General Topics: lmportance
ol'scientific knowledge in physical
Educatron.
PARTA. PHYSICS
UNIT - I
UNIT - II
UNIT
III
MECHANICS - distance, displacement"
speed, vermity, accererah.n - Types
of
mouon ( Linea'modon, Angular
mouon, general motion) Equations
,f motion Laws of motion' Projectile force
- centrirugal tbrce, cenrripetal
firrce. Gravity force of gravity, centre of gravity
- equilibjum work, power, energy,
efficiency,
transfbrmation of energy osmosis,
diffusion, density, specific gravity.
HEAT - Specific heat, latent heat,
transference .r'heat ( concruction.
c.nvecti.n,
radiation).
LIGHT - Reflection and refraction
at plme and curved
lenses.
surf'aces
of.mirror
and
UNIT - IV'
souND - Production and tansmission
of sound, Loudness pitch, Hea*ing process.
UNIT - v'
MAGNETISM AND ELECTRICITy
Magnets, magnetic arrracrion and
repur
sion - Electrification by function
and induction conductors and
non-conducLors
Current, Volt, Ampere, Electric
Cells.
-
PART - B. CHEMISTRY
UNIT-
I
MATTER- Atom, elemenl molecule,
compound and mixture - Metars
and nonmetals - oxygen, hydrogen, carbon,
niEogen, chlorine, water, carbodioxide,
ammonia (laboratory preparation
and uses) oxidation and reduction,
combustion
acids, bases, sarts, sorubility, crystalisation
- hard and soft water.
UNIT-
II'
INTRoDUCTION To oRGANICCHEMISTRY
- Carbohydrares. proreins,
arnino acids, fats _ oils, soaps.
15
I
PARt - C. BIOLOGY
UNIT-I
BIOLOGY : Its general concepts and scope-
UNIT- II
MAITER AND ENERGY
: a) Matter - Chemical Constituents
b) Energy - Definition First and Second Laws of Thermodynamics.
UNIT III.
BIOLOGICAL SPECTRUM: Protoplasm, cells, Tissues, Organs, Organ Systems,
Organism, Population, Community, Ecosystem, Bioshere.
U}.IIT IV.
Environment - Concept and definition
a) Physical
- Soil, Water, Temperature, Light.
b) Chemical
O, Co, Nuriens
c) Biological - Competition
Predation
Parasitism
Symbiosis
UNIT V
Concept of Ecosystme:
a) Producers
b) Consumers
c) Decomposers
d) Transfbrmers
UNIT VI
Habitat - Aquatic and Terrestrial (Characters and major divisions only)
UNIT VII
Pollution - Pollutans. effects and control
a) Air
b) Water
c) Soil
d) Noise
e) Radioactive Substances
UNIT VTTI
Parasitism and Human Welfare:
a) Micro Organisms
b) Parasites and Pathogens
l6
c) Transmission of Pathogens
l) Contaminative
2) Intrculative (Mention Vectors)
3) Sexual
d) very brief description of the symptoms, prevenuve mea;ures
management of the following diseases.
Chicken pox, Mumps, HIV
.
and
& AIDS
Typhoid, Pneumonia STDs - Gonorrhea, Syphilis
Dysentery - Amoebic Black fever (Lrishmanias)
Malaria - Vivur
WORMS
UNTT
Ix
Ascaris, Filaria, Tapeworms.
HEREDITY AND GENETICS:
a) Chromosomes and Genes
b) Mendelism
c) Blood Groups - Rh factors.
Nature and Nurture.
UNIT X
& Falciform.
CANCER - General conceprs
Carcinogens
Lyrnphoma
Sarcoma
Carcinoma
t7
BPE - I . PAPER trI ANATOMY AND FIRST AID
TEACHING HOUS : 120 HRS
MARKS: 75 MARKS
ANATOMY
UNIT I
INTRODUCTION - Definition of Anatomy.
Terminology used in describing Anatomical Positions Importanoe of study
of Anatomy in Physical Education.
UNIT II
BODY ORGANIZATION - Cell, Tissue, Organ and Organ
System.
Structure of a typical cell.
Structure and functions of cell organelles (Plasma membrane, Endoplasmic Reticulum, Golgi Apparatus, Lysomomes, Mitochodria, Centriores,
Nucleus, Nucleic Acids)
Brief account of Genetic Gode and Protein Synthesis.
Tissues
- Classification, structure and functions of each type.
Body fluids - Blood - Structure and functions
Skin - Structure and t'unctions
UNIT III
SKELETAL SYSTEM - Macroscopic
and microscopic srrucrure of a bone
Replacing and investing bone,s
Functions of bones.
General Organisation of skeletal system
Axial and Appendicular Skeleton
Skull, Vertebral Column, Lirnb bones, Girdles.
Strucute of a Pentadactyle tirnb.
Description and structrrre of the following bones.
a) Scapula
b) Humerus
c) Radius
d) Uha
e) Hip bone
f) Femur
g) Tibia & Fibula
.
h) Typic al Vertebra
r) Skull bones
i) niu
UNIT
IV
JOINTS - DEFINITION. CLASSIFICATION MOVABLE AND IMMOVABLE
Structure of a Typical movable joint, Types of movable and immovable ioints.
Movements around and the muscles associated.
a) Shoulder Joint
b) Hip Joint
c) Elbow Joint
d) Knee Joint
e) Ankle Joint
UNIT
V.
MUSCULAR SYSTEM
Types and functions of muscles - Voluntary, involuntary and Cardiac. Structure of
a rypical voluntary muscle.
UNIT
VI
RESPIRATORY SYSTEM Structure, Respiratory passages and lungs. Structure
of Larynx, Trachea, Lungs - Bronchial Tree. Muscles of Respiration.
Tidal air, Residual air, Complemental air, Supplemental air, Vital Capacity of
Lungs.
UNIT VII CARDIO VASCULARSYSTEM : Generai plan
Structure of heart, working of heart, Heart", beat, heart rate, Cardiac Cycle, Cardiac
Output, Heart sounds.
Sructure of Arteries, Veins, Capillaries
Blood pressure
Systolic and diastolic
Pulse pressure
me&surement of Blood
Pressure
Hypertension and Hypotension
Anemia
Types of Cloning of blood
Chemistry.
UNIT VIU DIGESTIVE SYSTEM
Structure of Alimentary Canal. Histological structure of glands.
UNIT. IX EXCRETORY SYSTEM
Structure of Kidney
Structure of Nephron
Role of skin and in excretion
19
&
its
-,/:
e
uNrr. x. NERVous sysrEM
Divisions
-
- Central and penpheriil,
cerebrospinal and autonomous nervous sys-
tem: Brarn and spinal cord.
Structure of
:
Cerebrum
Cerebellum
Pons
Medulla Oblongara
Spinal cord.
Maintenance of posture and equilibrium
UNIT
XI
SENSE ORGANS
Eye
:
Structure, function of each part, mechanism of vision. Eye
<iefects:
Myopia
Hyperopia
Presbyopia
Astigrnatism
Ear
Nose
Ta^ste Buds
:
Structure - Structure ol'mcmbranecus labyrinty tunction equilibrium and hearing
:
Structure - Smell
.
Types and distribution
UNIT XII ENDOCRINE SYSTEM
Location, Structure, Secretion. The roles ol'
a) Pituitary
b) Thyroid
c) Adrenal
d) Pancreas
e) Sex Glands
Abnormalities caused try Hypo and Hyper Secretion,
FIRST AID
Definitions and purposes of First Aid
Rules of first aid.
.
.,
.Artif,rcial respiration, external cardiac massage and treatment
of shock -
Dressings, bandages and slings - Wounds type.s and management - Fractures - types and management - Burns and scalds- Techniques of carrying iniured persons - First aid for chocking.
UNIT
MANAGEMENT OF SPORTS INruRIES
TI
Principles of prevention of injuries - treatment procedure for specific injuries such
as - stmins, sprains, contusions. ahra-sions, lacerations Principles <-rf'therapy and cryotherappy,
BPE.I.PAPERIV
SOCIOLOGY
'
TEACHING HOURS : 120
MARKS:75
UNIT.I
Sociology. and
;
;
I
;
iu
basic concepts:
Nature, scope and methods of sociology, Relation,ship of sociology with other socral sciencss.
Society, community, a*ssociations, institutions, cu.stoms and tolkways, values antl
norms.
Biological factors - Role of heredity and environment, race pre.judice.
UNIT II
Socialization, Nature and techniques of social control and their smial consequence:
Groups
-
:
Primary and secondary crowds and publics: Family kinship and marriage, social stratification, class and caste.
.,
UNff tII
Main features of Indian Society:
Religious pluralism (Hinduism, Muslim, Christianity).
UNIT IV
Origin and growth of culture, individual and culture; Culture and civilization
UNIT. V
Concept of personality, and influence of group and culture in its f'ormatrc;n.
UNIT VI
'r
Social and cultural change: concept and factors of social change, Sports es socral
phenomenon and a cultural product: Sports and Socialization.
2r
E
UMTWI
Social organisation and disorganisation. Characteristics of social disorganisation;
Distinction between social organisation and disorganization; Causes of social
disorganiza_
tlon.
UNIT
VIII
\
Introduction to sports sociology
Nature and scope, Aim, Values of spors in the society, Influence of
society gn
sports and vice - versa.
UNMIx
a) A brief over-view of the struggle for Indian Independence Constituent
Assembly, Salient features of the Indian Constitution. Preamble and
directive principles.
b) The parliament - its constitution and powers. organization
of Government at
the centre.
UNIT X
a) Franchise and election. Function of legislature. Types and Function
of Executive. organisation and Function of Judiciary, Losal self Government.
b)
The srare governmenr. The centre-State rerationship
REFERENCE BOOKS
l.
Iver. M.C. Society, London: MC Millan,Co. 1962
2.
oghburn, william F and Ninkofl Meyer F, Hand Book
of Sociology New Delhi
Eurasis Publishing House 1964.
3.
Mukheriee D.P. Sociology and of Indian Culturb: Jaipur.
Rawat publicatrons,
1979.
DASAI, A.R. Rural Sociology in India. Bombay: popular
prakashzr:n
private Lrd.
1969.
5.
.
Loy Jr. John W. Kenyon, Geralds and Mepherson, Barry S. Sports
Culrure and
6'
Phonomaryoy N,I. Sports and Society,. Moscow : Progress
publishers l9gl.
Society. philadelphia
_
Lea and Febiger, 196g.
:==-===:===
B.P.E.-IPAPERV
HISTORY OF FHYSICAL EDUCATION
TEACHING HOURS : 120
MARKS
75
UNIT - I
with refbrence
Definition, Meaning, Need and importance of Physicarl Education
India - Vedic period'
to historical perspective of education, physical education in Ancient
Epic period, Rajput period and Mughal period'
UNMII
physical Education in Ancient Greece, Sparta and Athens: Fanttellenic Festivals:
circus' Cladiatorialcombats'
Physical education in AncientRome, Utilitarianism, the thermae,
UNMItr
olypic Games
Ancient olympic Games: origin, events,. rules and values; Modern
olympic
- Revival, Olypic oath, olympic emblem, olympic Flag, cavalcade of the games'
motto, Hiitory of olympic games and Asian games'
UNIT IV
InstitutionsandinnervationsinPhysicalEducation:
(i)GreatBritain(ArchihalMaclaren,Britishgamesandspors)
(ii) Germany (Johan Basedow, Guts Muths, Fredrich Ludwig John ('furnverine
Diem)
Movement), Adolf Spiese, Philanthropoium Brushcheschaltar, carl
(iii) Sweden (Per Henric Ling, Hiramer Ling' Lingiad)
Movement
(iv) u.S.A. (Dr. Dio lrwis: Dr. Duldly Allen Sergent. The Turnverine
field college of P'E', Origin of
in America, Training of Physical Education Teachers. Spring
modern games and recreation movement)'
(v) U.S.S.R. (Physical education in schools and industry, The Spartakiad)
(vi)Japan(Beforeandafterworldwarll'Judo'Budo'Sumoetc')
UNIT - V
Vyayamshalas and their
Physical Education in Contemporqry India : Akharas and
training' Gymkhanas and
contributions. The British influence on P.8.. In India; Physical
Training lnstitution in P'E' lnsports clubs. YMCA and its contributions to P.E. Teacher's
State Associations'
dian Olympic Association, National Sporu Federations and
UNIT VI
and Comminees
Post Independence developments in P.E. Various Commissions
v
i
,
P.E.
(Ad hoc Enquiry Comminee 1958, Kaul Kapoor Committees, CApBE.).
National Plan of P.E. All India Council of Sports (AICS), National Physical Efficiency Drive ( NPED/NPFP); National Disciplines Scheme (N.D.S); National Fitness Corps
(NFC): National Cadet Corps (NCC): National Social Service (NSS): National Sporus
Organisation ( NSO)
UNIT VTI
Sports and Youth Programme: Netaji Subash National Institute of Sports (NSNIS):
Sporu Authority of India (SAI) and its schemes for promotion of Sports, Youth Welfare
Programme (NYK, Youth Hostels); National Sports Awards (Arjun Award, Dronacharya Award).
UNIT VTII
Professional Organisations of physical Education and Sports: Indian Association
of Teachers of Health, Physical Education and Recreation (IATTIPER); Indian Association
of Sports Scientist and Physical Educationallsts (IASSPE) ; Sporu Psychology fusociation
of India (SPAI); National Association of Physical Education and Sports (NAPESS); Development of Sport Sciences; Future of Physical Education.
REFERENCES
Hackensmith, C.W. History of Physical Education, New York, Harper
Van Dalen.
& Row Publishers.
1966.
D.B. Bennet, B.C: A World History of Physic.al Education
Englewood CMfs, N.J. Prentice Hall, Inc. 1973.
Tirunarayan, C and Hariharan Sharma, S: An furalytical History of Physical Education, Karaikudi
( 1978)
Khan, Erai Ahmed: History of Physical Education, Patna Scientific Corporation (1964)
Kunlesh. M.L; Physical &lucation Facts and Foundations, Faridabad P.S. Publication (pvt.Ltd)
( 1988).
Annual Report of Department of Youth Affairs and Sports from Ministry of Human Resource
Development, Govemment of India.
B.PE. SECOND YEAR
.
BPE .
II
PAPER VI KINESIOLOGYAND BIOMECHANICS
TEACHING HOURS : 120
MARK.S:75
UNIT - I TNTRODUCTION
Detinition and Scope of Kinesiology and Biomechanics - Brief history and contribution of Aristotle - lronardo da Vinci, Alfonaso Boreli, Weber Brothers an<l Duchene Role of Kinesi
in physical Educati"if"g_llyri.d Medicine.
T.'NIT tr BODY SYSTEMS INVOLVED
IN HUMAN MOVEMENT
Review of classification of joins- Orientation planes of the body and axes of motion - Difference between fundamental and anatomic starting positions- Descriptions of the
different joint movements in the human body- Brief understanding of structures of Skeletal
muscle and structural classification - concept of terminology for muscular attachmentslYpes of muscles- Agonists, Antagonists, Stabilizers, Neutralizers, synergists - Review of
structure of nervous system - Brief explanation of functions of cerebrum, cerebellum, Prop-
rioceptors and stretch reflex - Brief description of reciprocal innervation and inhibition,
gradation of muscle contraction and all - or-non law.
UNIT III MUSCULAR ACTIONS AT VARIOUS JOINTS
Major characteristics of the joints of shoulder Girdle, Shoulder Elbow, Forearm,
Wrist, Hip, Knee Ankle - Location, major attachments and actions of the following muscles
- Shoulder Girdle - Trapezius, Rhomboids, I-evator Scopulace. Serratus anterior, pectoralis
Minor - Shoulder joint; Deltoid, Pectoraisl Major, Lattissumus dorsi, Supraspinatus,
Infraspinatus, Teres Minor, Teres Major Subcapularis, Coracobrachialis- Elbow joint - Biceps, Branchialis, Triceps, Anconeus, Brnachirodialis - Readioulnar joint: Pronator teres,
.
Pronator Quadratus, Supinator - Hip joint; Iliopsoas, Sartorius, Adductor longus, Adductor
longus, Adductor brevis, Adductor magnus, Gulteus medius, Gluteus minimus, Glteus
maximus, Tensor fasciae latae- Knee joint; Quadriceps, Hamstrings - Muscular analysis at
these
joints - Stretching exes to major suscles.
L'NIT IV
Brief understanding of the movements and muscles producing these in: Ankle &
Foot - neck, Trunk..
UNIT V. APPLICAf,ION OF MECHAMCS
Definition and brief explanation of the following terms Mass, weight, force, motion, equilibrium - friction, velocity and momentum. - I-evers. Tlpes of levers, concept of
speed lever and force lever - Mechanical advantage of levers, Examples to anatomic levers.
Motion, Translatary Motion and Rotary Motion - Newton's laws of motion and their in
sports - Force - General principles of force application - general principles involved in a)
Moving one's body b) Giving to external objects c) Receiving impetus - projections. Brief
description of - Angle of Rebound, Angle of Projections. Effect of spin on a ball travelling
through air and rebounding off a surface - Equilibrium - concept of centre of gravity principles of board method of lqgating centre of gravity - principles of equilibrium and their
application in sports - equilibrium i water - Buoyaney.
Description of a good posture and factors contributing to it. Mechanical and muscular analysis of (a) walking (b) running (c) jumping (d) throwing (e) striking - Application
of Kinesiologic principles to motor skills used in daily life.
a
C
UNIT VII ExERCISES FoR SPECIAL PURPoSES
Exercises
for increasing range of motion at joints - Exercise for strengthening
muscles - Isotonic exercises; Isometric exercises, Isokinetic exercises.
UNTI VM TOOLS OF INVESTIGATION
Brief description of Electromyography, Goniometry, Stroboscopic Photography.
Computerised three dimensional - motion analysis system.
PRACTICALS
:
l. Reaction board method of locating
2. Measurement of
centre of gravity
joint angles with goniometer.
3. Demonstration of contraction of skeletal muscles with electrical stimulation.
4. Identification of the major skeletal muscles.
BOOKS RECOMMENDED
l. Kinesiology - Scientific
Basis of Human Motion - wells Katharine F, Luttegens Kathryn - 6th
Edition 1976. Sunders college, Publishing Philadelphia.
2. Applied Kinesiology and Biomechanics - Jensen Clayner, Schulu Gordon. W., Bangerter
Blaveril Third Edition 1984, M. Graw will International Book Company , Singapore.
3. Efficiency of Human Movement - Broer Marion. R, Second
Edition 1969 WB. Sauders Com-
pany, Philadelphia,
B.P.E. .
II
PAPER .
VII
EDUCATIONAL AND SPORT PSYCHOLOGY
TEACHING HOURS:
120
MARKS:75
UNIT I
Definition, Meaning and Nature of Psychology: as a Science, Branches of Psychology ; Sports Psychology - an emerging discipline.
I
UNIT II
Role of Psychology in building up theory and practices in education, Physical Education and sports, Important methods of Psychology (observation, Introspection, Experimentation, Testing, Case study etc.)
UNII Itr
The concept of Mind ( Cognition, Affection and Conation) ; A brief description of
the characteristics and powers pf Mind. Conscious, unconscious, subconscious and super
consciousness, stages of Mind Psychological unity of the human organism.
L.
UNIT IV
Growth and development : General
principles; Factors affecting growth;
stages of
growth and development
flnfancy, childhood, adolescence) with special emphasis
on perceptual sensory' cognitive, motor,
moral, physical, social and emotional
characteristics;
Maximizing deveropmentar effects through
exercise and sport.
UNIT V
lrarning : Meaning' Nature and Principles
of Irarning, Traditional theories of
Learning (Trial and Error; conditioned
Reflex, karning by Insight Lrarning
by Imitation);
laws of lrarning (Readiness Effect,
Exercise);Learning curve and its characteristics;
Trans_
fer of training, its types, conditions
of transfer of training.
UNIT VI
MotiVation and performance: Meaning
of Motivation: Motives unlearned (Innate)
Motive; Incentive and achievement motiva_
tron; sustaining motivation in exercise
and sport.
UNIT VtI
and Learned (acquired) motives:
Drive, Need,
Personality: Meaning and structure of personality,
Influence of genetics and environmental factors on personality development.
Personality traits of sports persons. Individual differences and their impact
of rearning and performance.
UNIT VItr
Guidance and Group work:
Meaning, Definition, Need and purpose of guidance;
types of guidance (Educa_
tional, Vocational, Recreational, personal/
Self Adjustive); procedure of Guidance,
organising guidance programme (Specialist
and class room teacher, paft played by youth
welfare ptogrammes, orientation programme,
Information c ntre (Employment Bureau).
Group work: Kinds of groups (Home, Educational
Institution, workshops, clubs,
Associations, Hostel, Special institutions);
Group process in education; Team cohesion;;
I-eadership in group work.
REr"ERENCES
Gratty, B.J. Psychorogy in contemporary
sport. (Third Edition): prenrice Hall, N.J. (1969)
Kamlesh,
M'L' psychorogy in physicar Education and sports
Metropolitan Book Co. (19g9)
(Second Edition), New Delhi
Mangal' S'K' Psychology An Introduction
to Human Behaviour New Delhi, sterling publishers
pvt. Ltd.
Bhatia'
K'K' And Purohit, Trinath: Educational Psychology
and Merhods of teaching (second
Edition) New Delhi, Kalyapi publishers, (19g5).
crow' L'D' and crow, A: Introduction to Guidance
New Delhi : Eurosia publishing House.
Jones A'J' Principles of guidance,
New York (fifth Edition) MC Grew Hill Book co. (19g3).
27
B.P.E. .
II
PAPER
VIII HEALTH EDUCATION
TEACHING HOURS: 120
MARKS:75
I.
tr.
m.
,,'
v'
HEALTH : Definition, Dimensions, Spectrum
and Determinants of hearth.
IIEALTH EDucArIoN: Definition, Scope, principres
and practice of Hearth
Education' pranning and Evaruation
in Hearth Education, programme.
organisation and Administrative set
up of Hearth services in India.
DISEASE: Disease cycre, Epidemiorogy
triads, Mode of disease
transmission _ Immunity.
HEALTH PROBLEM IN INDIA: probrems
rerated ro : Communicabre
vI'
disease, nutrition, environmentar
sanitation, medicar are and popuration.
HYGIENE: The concept hygiene and
personar hygiene - care of skin,
mouth,
nairs, crothing, bathing etc. Importance
of rest, sreep and exercises.
vm' HEALTH oF coMMtINITy: Brief
account of housing. water suppry
sewage
and refuse disposal.
x.
,L.
scHoo,- HEALTH
Hisrory, schoor heatth problems,
Hearth
appraisal, Hearthfur schoor
'ERVICE':
environment, Nutririonar Services,
mentar hearth,
school hearth records. safety
at pray fierds- First aid and emergency
care.
NUTRITI'N : crassification of foods - proximate
principres Rore of various
vitamins and minerars- baranced
diet- For prayers, schoor chirdren etc.
Malnutrition - Assessment of Nutritional
status - Food additives and adultration
of food.
xI. lnternational and Nationar
hearth organizations and agencies.
REFERENCE
l'J'E' Park' K' park-Text Book of Preventive
ers, Jabalpur 19g5.
t"to;f;rl"rk'
and social Medicine Banasidas
Bhanor publish-
Text Book of community Health
for Nurses Asrani pubtishers, Jabalpur
B.P.E.II PAPER IX TEACHING METHODOLOGY
TEACHING HOURS : t20
MARKS:
UNTT
75
I
Meaning and scope of Methods,
Factors Influencing the methods
of teaching, for-
mal and informal methods of teaching. basic and modern traits of teaching; differences in
class room teaching and teaching on the ground, teaching and learning process.
UNIT II
Age and sex characteristics, pre-school, primary, middle secondary, higher secondary and college levels; activity planning according to age sex; influence of sex differences in teaching and learning physical;, physiological, psychological and sociological needs.
UNTT
M
Principles of teaching - Simple Complex learning, individual and group-Motivation, feedback in learning, manner, materials, capacity of the learner frequency teaching
period recognition of learning and re-inforcement'classification of students.
UNIT IV
'
Methods of teaching physical activities; calisthenics. rhythmics. aerobics. dances,
light apparatus; gymnastics, individual and dual sports; lead-irp and minor games, major
games, mass acttvrtres.
TINT V
Presentation technique-steps in teaching motor skills. commands and their - importance, types, of class formation in teaching and learning process: class management, a
good class management.
UNIT VI
Lesson planning- importance and objectives, various facets of lesson plan. teaching and coaching lesson plans in physical education, Evatuation of general and specific
I
lesson plans.
UNIT VU
Audio-Visual aids, gadgets/in teaching physical activities need and importance,
criteria and steps in selecting teaching aids, their purchase and maintenances.
UNIT VItr
Dimensions and nreanings of sports and games areas (track and field and major
games). Tournaments and competitions in knock-out, league/round Robin, Combination
and Challenge Systems, Organisation and conduct of competitionltournament in individual,
dual team girmes and sports; group and mass competitions.
UNIT
Ix
Qualities of an ideal and successful teacher; evaluation of teaching methods and
learning procedures; creativity, modification and innovations in teaching.
REFERENCES
l. Tirunarayan C. Hariharan.
(1986)
S. Methods in Physical Education South India Press, Karaikudi
6
Cnarles A. Bucher and Constance R. Koening, Methods and Materials for secondary school
Physical Education.
The C.V. Mosby Company, Saint Louis (1978)
3. [-inus G. Dowell, Strategies for teaching Physical Education Prentic Hall, Inc.
(lgi5)
4. S.K. Kochhar Methods of Techniques of Teaching Sterling Publishers, Pvt. ( 1985).
5. M.L. Kamalesh and M.S. Sangral. Methods in Physical Education Prakash Brothers,
Ludhiana.( 1985)
6. Bucher and Wuest. Foundations of Physical Education and Sport Time Mirror/Tvlosby
( 1987)
T.Judith E. Rink. Teaching Physical Education for Lrarning. Times /Jvlirror/ Mosby ( 1985)
Miller and James S, Sullivan Teaching Physical Activities to impaired youth: John
Willey and Sons (1982).
8. Arthur G.
-
B.P.E.II . PAPER X. PHYSIOLOGYAND PHYSIOLOGYOFEXERCISE
TEACHING HOURS I20
MARKS:
PHYSIOLOGY
UNIT - I MUSCULAR SYSTEM:
Muscle contracti le proteins.
Physical and chemical change during contraction
Characteristics of a muscle - Excitability, elasticity and Contracticity
Neuromuscu I ar functions
Effects of exercise on muscles
Muscle tone and fatigue
Physiological aspects of warming up, conditioning and training
Factors affecting speed, strength and endurance, acquisition of skill.
UNTT
II RESPIRATORY SYSTEM
Mechanism of respiration
Respiratory rate - control
Gas exchange in the lungs
'Pulmonary (external)
respiration
Tissue (internal respiration)
UNIT III CARDIO VASCULAR SYSTEM - Generat plan
General plan of Blood Circulation - double circulation.
UNTT IV DIGESTIVE SYSTEM
Accessory Glands- Salivary glands; Liver and Gall Bladder.
E'
75
liver'
Pancreas. Their secretions and their actions. Functions of
Enzyme: Classification, Mode of action of digestive enzymes.
Absorption of products of digestion'
UNIT V EXCRETORY SYSTEM
Excretion - Ionic an d osmotic regulation
,
Physiology of excretion - Ultrafiltration, selective reabsorption, secretion'
Regulation of excretion - Ultrafilteration'
UNIT VI NERVOUS SYSTEM
Function of:
Cerebrum
Cerebellum
Pons
Medulla oblongata
Spinal Cord.
Functions of Autonomous nervous system
Reflex Action
UNIT Vtr METABOLISM
Fats and Proteins'
Catabolism and anabolism. Metabolism of Carbohydrates,
UNIT VItr TEMPERATURE
Maintenance of constant body temPerature:
Influence of temperature on metabolism
uNft
x
DEMONSTRATIONS
l.
Test for glucose in a given solution
2. Test for starch
3. Test for Protein
4. Stethoscope - Breathing, Heart Sounds
5. Reading of Pulse rate during rest and exercise'
PHYSIOLQGY OF E)(ERCISE
UNIT I
systems - composition
Effects of Exercise on respiratory, circulatory and muscular
during muscle contraction - nerve conand minute structure of Voluntary musCle - changes
training trol of muscular activity - physiological aspects of warming ul' "ond]t::nin83n!
and acquisition of skill - RelaPhysiological factors affecting speed strength, indurance
and cramps - aging changes in
tionship between duration and severity of exercise stitch
the body.
3l
B.P.E
Bf.E. III.
THIRDYEAR
OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION
PAPER . XI FOUNDATION
TEACHINGHOURS
I2O
MARK:75
Introduction to Education:
of education:
Meaning, aims, scope' nature
Types of education:
and their roles:
Agencies of education
relations'
Inrcgration and Intemational
Role of education in National
UNM tr
An objectives of physical
education
.
--:-- ^r,
Meaning,aimandobjectives'scope'naNreofphysicateducation'meaningofprinciples and their aPPlications;
with education;
of physical education
objectives
and
aims
Relationship between
at different levels;
Objectives of physical education
Physicaleducationasanathleticscience:abodyofknowledgeasanareandscience.
UNIT Itr
PhilosoPhical PrinciPles
Philosophy,itsmeaningandnanlre;Educationalphilosophiesasappliedtophysical
Realism' Existentialism'
Naturalism, Idealism' Pragmatism'
in curriculum constructlon;
Curriculum. Role of philosophy
education;
in education and physical
lmplication of philosophy
Contributionofthefollowingeducationalphilosopheres-Rousseau,Froebel,
DeweY' Gandhi & Tagore'
Montessory,
UNIT V
Bioiogical PrinciPles
a^s
and disadvantages; activities
advantages
its
position,
Evolution of man; biped
environment' sex difdifferences: heredity and
lndividual
life;
of
basis
the physical
differences in physical education:
implication of individual
types;
body
ference,
growth and degoverning physical and motor
principles
Growth and development;
32-
--.......-
veloPment;
their role
Chronological, anatomical, physiological and mental ages in individuals
in developing and implementing programmes of physical education:
Oxygen,debt,secondwind,principlesof'useanddisuse;
Training load, effect of exercise on physiological systems.
UNIT V
Psychological PrinciPles
Theories of learning - traditional and modern;
pri'rnary' associThe learning process-laws of learning; transfer of training/learning
ate and concommitant learning learning curye'
,
differences and learning;
Factors and conditions which promote learning; individual
maturation and learning'
I.INIT VI
Sociological PrinciPles
physical education and sports as social institutions and their influence on society;
physical activities (Games and Sports) as man's cultural heritage: Physical educain national integration as a factor in socialization of individuals and groups; role
tlon;
Brief description of theories of play,
youth
Role of physical Education in context to social problems- unemployment'
to social stratification
unrest, health related problems, mechanisation, Introduction
and soPorts.
UNIT Vtr
Recreation
misconception
Defi nition, Characteristics, leisure, objectives and
Voluntary commercial; Criteria
Agencies providing recreation in India-Got' Private'
and principles for community recreation
Recreational Programme of
:
Special groups- physically and mentally handicapped;
population
Industrial workers; senior citizens; rural and urban
Cinancing communitY recreation
UNIT VItr
Recent trends and problems in physical education;
hofessional preParation in P'E' leadership;
physical education at grass root level'
concept about sports for masses and
BOOK RECOMMENDEI)
and
of Education; Dblhi ' Boaha House' Booksellers
Bhatia and Bhatia, Theory and Principles
Publishers 1986'
1985'
of Education' Jullandhar' Pual Publishers
2. Walia J.S. Principles and Methods
of
principles of Education. philosophical and Sociological Bases
3. Agarwal. J.C. Theory and
l.
Education.N.Delhi,VikashrblishingHouse'PvLLtd'1987'
p.R- p'blications (P)
Foundations Faridabad
4. Kamlesh M.L. physical Education Facts and
Ltd. 1988.
Tenth
Foundations of Physical Education and Sports'
5. Bucher Charles. A. and West Beboraha;
6. Barrow
Ed.St.Louis,TimesMirror/MoshyCollegePrrblishing,l98T.
Physical Education' Third Edition:
Harold,M, Man and Movement : Principles of
Philadelphi a, l-Eaand Febiger' I 93'
B.P.E.
III
PAPER
XII
SPORIS
MANAGEMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCAIION AND
Teaching Hours: 120
Mark:75
THE MANAGEMENT PROCESS
in Physical Education and Spott;
Meaning, lmportance and Scope of Management
MajorManagementfunctions;theoriesandstylesofleadership.
EDUCAf,ION AND SPORT
MANAGEMENT STRUCTURES FOR PHYSICAL
PROGRAMMES
and Sport at school' college'
The Organisation and structure of Physical Education
and guidelines for rnanagement
University, district and state level, Principles
organisation and structure.
UNIT Itr
Facility management
layout and maintenance
Play fields - Location, Area standard, preparation,
and maintenance;
Gymnasium - Construction, allied facilities, care
34
Swiniming Pool - Construction, Dimensions, marking, filtration and supervision of
pool
NTT
IV
EQUIPEMENT MANAGEMENT
Need and importance, list of equipments, types of equipment, criteirion of selection,
procedure of purchase, store keeping and storing, care and maintenance, repair and
disposal, improvisation of equipment.
NIT V
PHYSICAL EDUCATION PERSONAL AND STUDENT LEADERSHIP
Principles of personnel mangement, personnel recruitment and selection, charactereduistics of physical educaion teachers and staff co-operation; student leadership'
cational importance, selection training and recognition of student leaders'
INIT VI
BUDGETING AND OFFICE MANAGEMENT
of fiImportance of financial management, the physical education budget-source
ofnancial support, Accountings and petty cash; Importance of office management'
fice functions and Practices.
UNIT VII TIME TABLE AND CLASS MANAGEMENT
affecting time
Need and importance of time table in Physical F,ducation; factors
Effective class managetable, physical education programme and routine functions;
ment, planning and preparation, checking attendance and records/
JNIT VTtr
PROGRAMME MANAGEMENT
units of
INTRAMURALS: Objectives of intramurals, organisation of intramurals,
competition; the programme of activities, prizes and incentives.
interinstitutional comEXTRAMLIRALS: Objectives of extramurals, principles of
petitions; mana gement personnel of extramural programme'
T]NTI D(
PUBLIC RELATIONS IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION
public relation technique and
Need and importance, principle of public relation;
media.
UNIT X
SUPERVISIONoFPHYSICALEDUCATIoNANDSPORT
of supervision'
Definition, scope and principles of supervision; changing concept
techniques of suPervision.
35
EiL.,
E:
.s
Bool(s REcoMMENDED
St.Louis
t. Charles A. Bucher, Management of Physical Education and Atheletic Programmes,
C.V. MosbY co. 1987.
and Administration
2. E. Voltmer, A. Esslinger, B.F. Mccuaand K.G. Tillmrin, The organisation
of Physical Education Englewood Cliffs, Prentice Hell Inc. 1979.
New York Macmillan
3. Harold J. vander zwag,sports Management in Schools and colleges,
Publishing Co. 1984.
education.
4. Dr. S. Dheer and Radhika Kamala, Organisation and Administration of Physical
N.Delhi, Friends Publlcations 1991.
5.ForsythandDuncanAdministrationofPhysicalEducationNewYorkPrenticeHall,Inc.
1951.
Bombay, 1956'
6. p.M. Joseph, Organisation of Physical Education, O.S.A.T.I.P.E. Kandivali
7. Charles. A. Busher, Administration of Physical Education and Atheltic
Programmes, St. Louis, The C.V. Mosby Co' 1975'
g. Hughas and French, Administration of Physical Education New YorkRonald Press Co. 1954'
B.P.E.III PAPER XIII
PHYSIOTHERAPPY, CORRECTIVE PHYSICAL EDUCATION
AND ADAPTED PHYSICAL EDUCATION
Teaching hours 120
Marks:
75
I,INIT I INTRODUCTION
Definition of corrective and adapted Physical Education: their history and objectlves.
MESSAGE
General Principles in giving message; Classification of Message manipulations and
their therapeutic uses; Stocking manipulations;Effeleurage, Stroking Proper; Pressure manipulations, kneading Perrissage, Friction, Percussion : (Tapotement) Hack-
ing, Clapping, Beating, Pounding; Shaking manipulations;Shaking; Vibration;General centra-indications of message - Physiological effects of massage'
EXERCISE THERAPPY
Importance of Relaxation; classification of therapeutic movements; Passive movements; relaxed, forced, active, movements - assisted, free, Resisted, Isotonic, Iso-
metric, Osolinetic.
36
strcngth
passive movernents - Manual muscle
Physiological efferts of a active and
assessment-ProgressiveResistiveExercises,Fundamentalpositions-LyingSitting,standing,Kneeling,Hangingandtheirdarivedpositions;techniques,advantages, disadvantages as and uses'
(Group Therappy) and its advantages'
organisation of corrective class
UNIT IV POSTURE AND BODY MECHANICS
Definitionandconceptofposture-disadvantagesofbadposturecausesofbadposture - BodYtYPes (Somato tYPes)
Testsofposilre(PostureEvaluation)PostureGrid-IownPostureTestNewYork
Examination of knock knees &
posture Rating Test- Foot impressions ( Pedograph)
bow legs.
TyPesofposturaldeviations,theircausesandcorrectiveexercies-Roundshoulder'
Kyphosis'FlatBack(inbrie0scolosis(inbriefl),Knockknees,Bowlegs,Genu
recurvation flat feet'
UNIT
V
ADAPTED PHYSICAL EDUCATION
disEduation - Definition of Impairment,
Physical
Adapated
of
goals
and
Purposes
abilityandhandicap-rypesofDisabilities-Briefutrderstanding-physical'visual,
problems'
auditory, behavioural problems' learning
principles involved -
and Biomechanicai
Prograrnmes adaptation - Physiological
crutches' calithe handicapped - wheel chair,
Brief understanding of aids usea uy
'
limbs'
Pers, artifical
PRACTICALS
Techniqueofgivingmassagetodifferentpartsofthebodyapplicationoftherapeutlc
exercises to different joint'
BOOK RECOMMENDED
l.
Third Edition 1986 and Recreation Sher,l claudine
physic.al
Education
Adapted
willian C'
Browe Publishers' IOWA' USA'
H' Prentice
ciarke' Harrison H Clarke David'
Education
AdaptedPhysical
2. Development and
INC' New JersaY' USA'
3.ThePrinciplesofExerciseTherappyGardinerDana.M.FourthEditionlgslDBelland
HYman Ltd' London'
37
B.P.E.
III
PAPER XIV
IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION
TESTS AND MEASTJREMENT
Teaching Hours: 120
Marks:75
l.MeaningoftheterrnstesLmeasurement'evaluationandstatistics'
physical education'
measurement and statistics in
2. Need and importance of test,
multipli- algebraic additions' substractions'
3. Review of elementary mathematics
root and logarithemic operations'
cations, divisions, extraction of squre
UNIT tr
l.
dati; kinds of data - continuous and
Meaning of Single Score and quantitative
discrete
(3) Measures of central tendency - mean' me2. consrruction of frequency tables
de(4) Measure of variability - range' quartile
dium and mode - meaning and uses
its uses (5) Perceptiles and quartiles
viation and standard deviation - meanlng and
poly(6) Graphical representation of data frequency
meaning, uses and calculations
gon,cummulativefrequencypolygon,smoothedpolygonorogiveandbardiagrams
and pie diagrams.
UNIT M
l. correlation - Meaning, magnitude
of prodand interpretation of sign' calculation
terms population and sampling' imporuct- moment correlation. (2)'Meaning of
of Sampling : Random, Stratified, Clustance and principles of sampling, Techniques
of computer in physical education' Elter and Systematic (3) Need for application
and Software'
ementary idea of comPuters Hard ware
of techinical standards (relifor test selection (a) Scientific authenticity
(c)
(b) Administrative feasibility or economy
ability, validity, objectivity, norms)
1. Criteria
Developmental Values (Physical, Social)'
2. Administration of testing programme
(a) Advanced PreParation
(b) Duties during testing
(c) Duties after testing
UNIT V
importance' Techniques fo taking
Anthropometric measurements. History and
(c) arm length (d) leg length (e) chest circummeasurements (a) weight (b) height
stance (f) upper arm girth (g) calf girth'
L
2' Classification : purposes and values, factors to be kept in mind for classification,
general method of classification. Classification indices (Mc Cloy's Nelson and
Cozen's, Thirunarayan and Hariharan).
3. Somato typing: History and importance. Kretchmer and Scheldon's body types
and their characteristics.
I.INIT
\rI
I. concept of physical fitness motor fitness and general motor ability
2. Measurernent of fitness conponents.
a) Muscular stregth (isometric, isotonic and isokinetic)
b) Muscular endurance (sit ups, pull ups)
c) Cardio-respiratory endurance (harward step stest, coopers l2 min. run/walk. test).
d) Agility (Shuttle run, squar thrust)
e) Speed (50m. dash,4 sec. dash)
l) Flexibility (sit and reach, gomimetry)
g) Powe (Medicine ball throw, vertical jump, standing bread jump)
UNIT VTI
l. Fitness stests
a) Rogers physical fitness index battery
b) Aahperd Youth Fitness Test
c) Indian Motor Fitness test
d) J.C.R. Test
e) Kraus-Weber test
2. Sports Skill test
a) Lockhart and
Mc Phersons badminton test
b) Johnson Basketball ability test
c) Mc Donald Soccer test
d) Broer Miller Tennis test
e) Brady Volleyball test
0 Dribbling
and goal schooting tesr in hockey
UNM VItr
l.
Selected Tests
a) Vision (Snellan's Chart)
b) Hearing (tunnig fork method)
c) B lood Pressure (Sphygnomanometer)
d) Vital capacity (Spirometer)
e) Pulse rate
39
\r'
r
diet and malnutrition
2. Nutritional status (a) concept of balance
(b)Measurementofnutritionalstanrs(subjectiveandobjectivemethod)ageheight
weight table, skin fold measures'
3. Social efficiency meaning and importance
(a) Mc Clays behaviour rating scale (b) Self concept'
REFERENCES
and Fducation
Garrett, Henry, E. Statistics in Psychology
Bombay, Vakils, Felter and Simons Ltd'
l98l'
and education
Mangal, S.K. Statistics in psychology
Company Limited' 1987'
New Delhi, Tata Mc Greaw Hill Publishing
Application of Measurement to Physical Education'
Clarke, H. Harrison and Clarke, David H.
-6theditionEnglewoodCliffs,N.J.PrenticeHallInc.l98T'
practical Measurements for Evaluation in physical educaJohnson, Barry L. and Nelson Jack K.
tion. Delhi : Surjeet Publications 1982'
Mathews'DonaldK.MeasurementinPhysicaleducation.LondonW.B.SaundersCompany
1973.
B.P.E.III PAPER XV
SCIENTIFIC PRINCIPLES OF COACHING
Teaching Hours: 120
Mark:75
I.INTT
I
qualities of a champhilosophy of coaching, qualities, and qualification of a coach
coachins, mealilg of sport,training'
pion, definition of conditioning, training and
aimsandobjectivesofsportstraining,principlesofsportstraining.
UNr II
UNIT Itr
super - compensation' significance
Training load, different types of load, adaptation,
frequencies and recovery)' overof load components (valume, intensity, density,
tacklin of over load'
load, symptems of overload, fatgue and
inter-varsity'
plannlng, short term plan (school, college, district, state, university,
nationaletc')longtermplan(Asian'Commonwealth,olypicandWorldlevel);
schedule'
periodization (single' double and triple) training
UNIT IV
abilities (strength' endurance' speed'
Training means for the development of motor
agility, fl exibility and co-ordinative abil ities)'
UNIT V
the
pep-talks, talking before' during and after
Psychological training of the players,
terms during the training and compecompetition, analysis of individual, group and
tition
BOOKS RECOMMENDED
Books, London, 2nd edition'
Frank w. Dick, Sports Training Principles Lepus
2 edition
and Methods' NSNIS' Patiala' India'
Hardayal Singh, Sports Training, General Theory
I
990
latest edition
John W. Bun. Scientific Principles of Coaching
James. G. Hay, The Biomechanics
3rd edition, 1985'
editions'
of Sports Techinques Prentice - Hall int'ernational
Berlin' 1982'
Harre, Principles of Sports Training Sportverlag
Dr
PART D . SPECIALISATION
THEORY AND OFFCIATING
TRACK AND FIELD
FUNDAMENTAL SKILLS
start and its variations' proper use of
Starting Technique- standing start crouch
Blocks.
3.
FinishingTechniques-Run,ThroughForwardLunging'shouldershrug'
relay zones'
of Baton Exchange and understanding of
4.
(Ljead leg action' Trail leg action)
Hurdles - Approach, clearance over the Hurdle
2.
Relays -various patters
and recoverY.
5.
Middle and long distance running
6.
recovery'
Steeple chase - Approach, clearance'
7.
Walking - Technique
air style) - Approach run' take off' flight
Long jump (hang style and runing in the
in the air and landing
flop) - Approach run take off'
High jump - (srraddle technique and Phosburry
clearence over the bar and landing'
and jun phase (action in the air)
Tripple jump - Approach run, take off hop step
8.
and landing
I
l.
Polevault-HandGripandpolecarry'Therunandpoleplant'takeoff'Bar
clearence and landing.
41
12.
13.
14.
l5'
16.
Shotput - Grip, stance. Glide, release and reverse.(o'brien style)
Discuss throw - Grip, stance preliminary swing, Turns Release and reverse.
Javelin throw - Grip,carry approach run, release"and reverse.
Hammer throw - Grip, preliminar! swing, turns, release and reverse.
Combined events - Deealthlon and Heptathlon.
RECOMMENDED BOOKS
l. Dybon, Geoffrey, G.H. The Mechanics of Athletics, London:
Ltd.
University of London press,
1962.
2. Deberly, J. Menneth, Modern Trach and Field Englewood Cliffs: N.J. prentice
Hall Inc.
3' Hooks, Gene, Application of Weight Training to Atheleitics, Englewood Cliffs, N.J. prentice
Hall Inc. 1962.
4. Malhotras, Ashokkumar, A guide to be an Athlete. Krishna Publications,
New Delhi 19g0.
5. Mohan . v.M. Atheletics for Beginners. Metropolitan Books. New Delhi
6' Robinson, Johnson, James and Hirschi, Modern Technique of Track and Field
London. Henry
Kimpton Publishers I 974.
7. Ken O. Bosen. Track and Field Fundamental Technique NIS publications patiala.
,
8. Parachiwala. J. Athletics.
II GYMNASTICS
UNIT I
Gymnasrics in the sysrem of physical Education:
Different kinds of Gymnastics:
a)
b)
c)
Basic Gymnastics
Sportive Gymnatics
Gymnastics for all kinds of sports
GENERAL DEVELOPMENT EXERCISES:
a) General development
exercises with objects
b) General development exercises without objects Structural and orderly exercises.
UNIT II
Gymnastics lessons: (45 minutes, g0 minutes, lg0 minutes)
Acrobasic exercises: Mobile games:
Vqriation of applied exercises for Gymnastic lesson.
UNIT
TII
CLASSTFICATION OF FREE EXERCISES
a)
free exercises with object
b)
free exercise without object
42
ruMPS
a) Simple Jumps b) Compless
Jumps
Practical materiar on dynamic
exercises: Exercises on apparatus.
UNIT IV
Apparatus measurements: Terminorogy
of Gymnastics : Training periods: various
types of Gymnasium halls.
UNIT V
Types of Gymnastics: Important
competitions at National and Inlernational
level
Rules of Gymnastics and their
interpretations.
UNIT VI
Organising and conducti ng competitions:
Types of Gymnastic competitions,
competition attire: Introduction of
Code of points
1989 edition.
UNM VII
History of Gymnastics:
Distinguished Personaritie.s connected
with Gymnastics Requiremenrs of A.
B. c. D
parts elements.
UNIT VItr
Seating of judges in different competitions.
Evaluation of compulsory and optional
exercises
Duties of officials, coaches and
Gymnatics.
Rhythmic Gymnastics for women.
RECOMMENDED BOOKS
I
' Tom De'
cario' Hand book of progressive Gymnastics, prentice
Hall, Inc. Englewood cliffs,
N.J. 1963
2' John Goodbody' The Illustrated
History of Gymnastics, Stanley paul, l.ondon
Melbourne,
Sydney, Auckland 1976
3' Tony Murdock and Niksruart,
Gymnastics, Franklin watts, l,ondon, New york,
Toronro. Sydney
r 995
4' Don Tonry And Barbara Tonry, sports
Illustrated women's Gymnastics - 2. Lippin
cote &
croweil pubrishers, New york (r9g0) ISBN
- 0690-0r906 (V.2) pak.
5' Physics Cooper and Milan Trnka'
Teaching Gymnastic skills to Men & women,
Surjeet publications, Delhi, India 19g2,
6' Anne williams' Curriculum
Gymnastics, A teacher's
,
guide to theory and practice. Hodder and
stonghton, London, Sydney, Aickland,
Toronto(19S7).
43
$ lqauc
spoRrs
lntroduction to swimming, diving and water'polo
and their historical developmenr
with special reference to India and World.
UNIT II
lmportant championships organised at. National
and Inter-national levels,
guished personarities rerated to swimming,
diving and water poro.
UNIT Itr
Fundamentar skiils, antry into the poor,
floating, bobbing, kicking, reading swim_
ming on the stomach swimming on the back,
standing dive, simpre jumping.
UNIT IV
Swimming strikes - front crawl - body position,
regs, arms movements and breath_
ing' back stroke- body position. Iegs, arms
and combined movements and breathing,
Butterfly - Dolphin' body aignment, movements
of legs and arms movements, breathing and co-ordination.
UNIT V
Starts and turns of all strokesm front start,
back stroke start. front crawl throw away
turn' back crewl spin turns with head out and
head under, breast stroke and butterflv
open turns.
UNTT VI.
Diving - Fundamentals of informal diving and
spring board diving; forward dive - a
approach' take - off, (Plain, Jack' knife,
and swau) backward dive starting position.
take - off, flight and entry in the water (Short
back drive
and rong back dive)
UNIT VII
water Polo-fund mental offensive skills
defensive skills, (individual and group) goal
keeping, various systems of attach and
defences.
UNIT VIII
Rules and regulations of competitive swimming,
diving and water poro. officiars
and their duties, swimming -pool specifications,
construction maintenance and supervision of swimming pool, objective
tests, selection of swimmers, short and long
term camps.
.
RECOMMENDED BOOICS
l' Coling
Hardy, Handbook for the Teacher of swimming
Felham Books, London ( l9g7).
2. Dr. Gerhard Lwin, Swimming Sportverlag
Berling(
lgTg\
Jr' and Robert p. Crayton Teaching Aquatics
surgeet pubrications, New, Derhi
2).
'y
44
IV HOCKEY
l.
History and Development
(ii) tn Asia (iii) tn rhe World.
In India
Important tournaments held at National and International levels and distinguished
persons related to the games.
Organisation
(i)
National level
(a)
(b)
(c)
National level Federation and its affiliated units
National, State and University level competitions
Coaching centres
International level
(a) lnternationai Federation and its affiliated bodies
(b) Main Internationalcompetitions (olympics Games, world Cup: Asian Games)
IV Officiating:
(i)
(ii)
(iii)
Rules and their interpretarion
Preparation and maintenance of play field
Duties and powers of offocials
) Specification of equipment and players kit.
'
V. Technique
(
iv
a) Rolling b) Dribbling c) Push-straight push reverse push, wrong foot push. d I Stop-
ping - Straight stopping, Right left side, stopping, Reverse stopping. e) Hit - Srraight
hit, wrong foot hit, reverse hit. turn around and hit. 0. Flick - Straight flick. Reverse
flick, wrong foot flick g). Scoop - Straight scoop, push scoop
h). Tackling -
i.
Shadow tackling 2. Luncing tackling 3. Feinting tackling 4. Tackling in rerrear
i) Dodging - Simple dodge Dodging right and left side of the opponner.
j)
Passings L Parellel pass
2. Through pass
3. Return pass
4. Back pass
5. Cross pass
6. Deflection
()
VL
Set plays - Penalty corner; Penalty stroke cornern 16 yards
hit (in attach and
defence)
VII
Positional play
a)
b)
c)
d)
VItr
D(
Goal keeper
Full backs
Halk backs
Forwards
Principles of attach and defence
System of play or formation
a) The pyramid system
X
b)
4-L3-l-l
c)
L24-l
system
system
a) Individual Tactics
b) Group Tactics
c) Team Tactics
d) Essential of Tactics
REFERENCE I RECOMMENDED BOOKS
l. Gansingh and Kuluwalia, Learn Hockey. This way International Hockey lnstitue, New Delhi
(India), 1979.
2. Chris Moore, Discovering of Hockey, Partridge Press, London 1988.
3. HorstWein The Science of Hockey, Pelham Books, London Revised Edition. 1985.
V BASKETBALL
UNM I
Historical development of game in India, Asia and world organisations, tournments, competitions at various levels; distinguished personalities, Arjuna Awardees in Basketball;
Need and importance of general and specific Motor, Physiological, anthropometric and
socio-psychological traits.
UNIT tr
Offensive fundamentals - Player's stance, ball handling, passing receiving; different
types of passing and drills; static and dynamic receiving; legal stop (stride, scoot)l
pivoting (iront of rear). Bribbling - start and stop of abribble, high Iow and combination of dribbles.
UNTT
I[
Shootlng - L.ty - up rhot nnd lir vGlailonc; cot chot,Jump shot, hock slrot, fade away
shot, dunk shot and tip-in, Rebounding- offensive, defensive, BIock/box out, handed
and one hand rebound; lead-up games and drills.
UNIT TV
Rules, regulations and their interpretations,; duties of officials, coach and captian.
game observation - individual and groups, scouting and statistical analysis of players and matches; objectives and subjective tests.
WlN
OFFENSIVE TACTICS
Individual passing fakes, shooting fakes, dribbling fakes, body and step fakes, Reverse dribble, change of pace and'direction different ways of cutting, cross-over
drible. Combined tectics-give and go, criss -cross, pick and roll, splitting the post.
post plays, out numhring situations, out of bound situations, jump ball situations,
free throw situations last movement situations.
UNIT VI
lndividual defence- guarding
a
man without the ball, with the ball, cutter, pivot player,
the shooter and overguarding defensive tactics- strict to man, sliding, switchin,
sandwitching, coupling, fronting.
UNIT VTI
Offensive team game- fast break attack, freelance offense. passing game, ofleruse
against man-man; offence against zone denfense, various systems of attach. set plays
and moves, Defensive gameman to amn defense, floating man-man: pressing man man Cefense, man to rnan cum zone defense; different systems of zone defense.
fl
exible man-man defense.
UNTT VItr
Selection of teams and organisation of short term camps; teachin! and coaching aids
and gadgets; [-ay-out, construction and maintenance of playground; equipment management, precautions and remedial measures of basketball injuries.
RECOMMENDED BOOKS
L Abbas Moontasir, Principles of Basketball
skanda Publications, Bombay.
2. Ebert Cheatum. Basketball W.B. Saunders Company.
3. Robert a Fox. The complete Hand book of individual skills, Baskethall. Prentice Hall,
Englewood cliffs, New Jersey.
4. Paul Stimpson. Basketball. The skills of the Game. The Crow-wood Press, Ramaburry,
Marlborough, Wiltshire.
BaskethallDrills from College Coaches. Parket Publishing Co. Inc. West Nyack,
New York
5. Roger Haun,
6. Dean Smith, Basketball Multiple Offence na Defence. Prentice Hall, Inc. Englewood CIitfs,
Ne Jersey.
47
VI FOOTBALL
L Introduction of the game, History an development of the game with special
reference to India.
tr
(a) Organisation set-up of the game in the world and in India
(b) lmportant competitions held at National and International levels.
Distingquished players of the game.
lII.General techniques: Drills and lead up activities.
lV. Fundamental factors of Soccer Strategy.
(a) System of Play: Definition, Development of the system of play from Heroic
Age of Soccer to the present day of total football.
(b) Tactics: Definition, Classification, General tactics, applied tactics - Tactics
of
attack and defence.
V. Game Analysis
(a) Analysis of the individual game
(b) Analysis of the collective work
IV Rules and their interpretations. Duties of officials, officating lay out and
preparation of the play field.
BOOKS RECOMMENDED
c. Sanadi. Arpad, Soccer, Budapast; Medicine Konyuklads, 1978. The Football Association.
Referees 'Chart and Players' Guide to the Laws of Association Football. London
Pan Books (Lat. ed.)
Hughes, Charles, The football Association Coaching Book of Soccer. Tactics and skills London:
British Broadcasting Corporation and Mac Donald Queen Anne Press, 1987.
MC Getlingan, James P. Complete Book of Drills for winnig Soccer, New York: Parket. 1980
MorriS. Desmond. The Soccer Tribe London: Jonathan Cape, t981.
Wade, Alien, The F.A. Guide to Training and Coaching London:
William, H. Einemann Ltd.
1981.
The Guiness Book of Soccer. Facts and Feasts. Great Britian Guinness Superlatives Ltd. (Latest
edition).
VII CRICKET
r;
I
History and development of the game, Cricket in the World. History of Indian
Cricket.
I
Important tournaments held at National and trnternational levels and distinguished
personalities related to game.
48
FH&
o
Itr Officiating:
The laws of cricket wlth interpretaitons and identification
Umpires and UmPiring
Necessary qualificatrons
The training of UmPires
The conduct of umpires
Necessary equipment carried by Umpiers
The umpires duties
Signals and Signalling
Scores and Scoring
IV. Fundamental Skills:
Batting.
Principles
Basics
Forward Strokes
Running between wickets
BOWLING
Attitudes
Basics
Lrngth and
direction
.
Pace
Spin
Variations
Field placing for different types of bowling.
FIELDING
Attitudes
Ground fielding
Catching
Positions
Wicket keeping
V. Captaining
49
VI. Fitness and Training
VlI. EquiPment
a
Vlll.Layingoutandmaintenanceofplayfie\ldsandequipment'
REFERENCE
Ramaburry' Marlborough SN
Shire The Crowood Press
Keith: 'l'he skills of cricket wilt
62 HE. 1984'
London Roai. Enfield' l9tt8'
MirJdreses Guinness Books,33
cricket
peter:
play
ro
How
Rice
H'use' 3-l welbeck
Bent and Sons Ltd. Aladine
J.M.
Scoring
and
Smith Tom : cricket umpiring
Street, London' 1990'
VM VOLLEYBALL
I.HistoryanddevelopmentofVolleyblalatWorld,Asiaandlndia.
organisationalsetupofttregameat.internationalandnationalandStatc
level.Importantcompetitionsatvarlouslevels,Distinquishedplayersoithe game-
of officials'
Rules and interpretations' Duties
ll.
u.Fundamentaltechniques:VQllevPass,Digpass,smash.service.tllocl<.
rolls & dives and its vana"tons'
lv.TacticsanclSvstemsofFlay:individualandgrouptactics.Systelnsof
etc'
system of defence
service reception. system of attack'
V.Analysisofthegameandscounting'Lead-upgames'ArlunaAward
Winners.Layout'constructionandmaintanenceofgrounds;teachtngard
and gadgets.
,
Vl.
of short -term camps'
Selection of team and organisation
Tests and measurements'
BOOKS RECOMMENDED
Cox.RichardH.,,TeachingVolleyball..'NewDelhi,surjeetPublications.
illinois' Lcisure Press
Volleyball, steps to Success" Champaign'
"
Teaching
Laun
Barbara
viera,
I
989.
1978'
,,Modern volleyball for teacher, coach and Player" London, Lepus Books'
York' Parker Publishing
volleybal! Techniques and Drills" New
Cozansky, Sue "chanrpionship
Co. Inc' 1983'
Crowood Press' 1986'
skills of the game " Great Britain: The
the
"Voll-vball
Keith
Nicholas.
Nicholas, Keith,
50
Fly UP