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. llro /r EAr
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CONTENTS
1) COIIRSE STRUCTURE AI{D ScrmME
2) RULES FOR EXAMTNATION
3) RULES FOR I'IELD WORK
4) RT LES FOR DTSSERTATTON
5) RULES FOR rIELD
6)
ACTTON PROJECT
SYLLABUS:
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MASTER OF SOCIAL WORK
SYLLABUS AI\D SCHEME
Semester
st.
I
Paper No
Name of the Paper
No. of
Hours
Aileek
Wriften
Internal
Exam
assessm
2
80
2;
100
J
80
20
100
3
80
20
100
2
80
20
100
J
80
20
100
Community Organisation and Social
Aciion
2
80
20
100
Concurrent Fieldwork
l0
No.
I
2.
3.
4.
5.
CCI Paper I
CCI Paper II
CCI Paper III
CCI Paper IV
CCI Paper V
.History and Fields of social Work
CCI Paper VI
ent
Philosophy of Social Work
Sociology and Economics for Social
Work
Human Growth and Development
Social Casework
a
6.
Total
Marks
Total marks
100
700
I
r<r
II
Semdster
Sl.No.
Paper
No
Name of the Paper
CCII
So.cial Group Work
No.of Written
Hours/ Exam
Internal
assessment
Week
L
2
Paper
80
20
100
80
20
100
80
20
100
80
20
100
80
20
100
80
20
100
VII
2.
Psychology for Social Work
CCII
2
Paper
VIII.
3.
Paper
4.
CCII
Paper
of
2
Counselling
Abnormal Psychology
3
X
CCII
Paper
6.
IX
CCII
Paper
5.
Theory and Practice
CCU
Social Work Research
4
XI
Social Analysis and Strategies
Social Change
of
2
xII
l0
Concurrent Fieldwork
100
Viva Voce (Theory)
50
Total Marks
750
I
ll
Semester
st.
III
Paper No
Name of the Paper
No.
No.of
Hours/
rilritte
Intern
tr
al
Week
Exam
assess
ment
I
CCM
XIII
Paper
2.
CCIII
4.
5.
Development Communication
J
Quantitative Methods in Social Work
CCIII
Paper
J
XIV
Paper
J.
Social Work Administration and Participatory
Project Planning and Management
XV
Community Health and Health Education
oI-
Medicd Social Work
oIMPSW
7.
8
oII-
of
Community
RUCD I
Gandrian Philosophy
Development
ou-
Rural and Urban Community Development
om-
100
80
20
r00
80
20
100
80
20
100
80
20
100
80
20
100
80
20
100
80
20
100
80
20
100
2
)
Family Welfare and Population Dynamics
2
FCW I
10.
20
2
Work
RUCD II
9.
80
2
Psychiatric lnformation and Psychiatric Social
II
100
2
MPSW I
6.
20
J
Researeh
CCIII
PaperXVI
80
2
Child Welfare
l0
Concurrent Fieldwork
r00
Field Action Project
50
Total
750
lll
Semester
fV
\'
st.
Paper No
No.of
Hours/
Name of the Paper
:"
1.
XVII
CCry
Paper
3.
oIoIMPSW IV
5.
6.
Human resource Development in
Human Service Organisations
4
Social Legislation
J
XVIil
MPSW M
4.
Therapeutic Approaches in
Medical and Psychiatric Settings
4
Health Care Administration and
Legislation
4
4
oil-
Environmental Studies and
RUCD III
Disaster Management
oII-
Development Economics
om-
Women Development
Total
Marks
80
2C
r00
80
20
100
80
20
100
80
20
100
80
20
100
80
20
100
80
20
100
80
20
100
80
40
120
4
FCW III
8.
assessment
4
RUCD TV
7.
Internal
Exam
Week
CCry
Paper
2.
Written
om-
Youth Welfare and Development
4
FCW TV
Dissertation
Concurrent Fieldwork
Di ssertation Defence Viva
Viva-voce (Theory)
Block Field work
Total
Grand Total
l0
100
30
50
100
800
3000
lv
Examinations'
Rules
L
2.
The candidate has to secure 50 percent marks separate for all theory papers
field work , dissertation, field action project and viva voce.
The candidate has to sbcure 50 per cent marls separately for internal and
,
external evaluation.
,
3. The candidate needs to repeat only those papers he/she failed.
4. The candidate who secure more than 60 percent marks in aggregate is placed
.
in first class.
Field Work
Rules
Field work is designed to provide a variety of opportunities to develop and enhance
professional practice skills. trarning is aided through observation, analysis of social
realities and experience of participation in designing and providing social work
intervention. Major components of field work are observation visits, community
living experience/camp, concurent field worlq study tour, summer placement and
block placement.
Field work should involve the selective utilization of all social work methods. The
sfudent should also be assigned small research studies, organization of programmes
for the clientele of the agerrcy and training progrurnmes.
Each student is to be assigned to faculty supervisor who supervises the field work
activities of the student. Individual conferences with the students are recommended.
The Departrnent should prepare an evaluation'proforma to assess the level of
coriipi*ence of the student.- This should be givin to the agency supervisor for
assessment.
The students should prepare and submit the report of their activities during fieldwork.
They should also present a summary of activities in the fieldwork seminar held every
semester. A viva voce exam should be held at the end of each semester in which a
social work practitioner will be the examiner. This viva voce exam c:m be conducted
by the Departrnents themselves.
v
,
.
Fieldwork Schedule
Sl.No'
Semester
I
I
Field practicum
component
Duration/1.{o
( Minimum Requirements are
given)
a. Observation Visits
a. l0 organisations
b. Community living/
b.5 to 7 Days
Marks
t00
Carnp
c. l0 hours per week. ( Social
work methods )
c. Concurrent
Fieldwork
2.
3.
II
a. Observation Visits
a. Four Organisations
b. Concurrent
Fieldwork
b. l0 hours per week
(opportunities for casework,
group work and community
organization should be provided.)
a. Concurrent
a. l0 hours per week (Students
should be placed in organizations
according to their specializations.)
100
m
Fieldwork
100
I
b. Four to seven days to social
welfare organ izations and
4.
b. Study Tour
development projects
a. Summer Placement
a. Three to four weeks during the
ry
summer break after the third
semester (Opportunity for
100
involving in direct practice and
management operations of the
setting)
b.
Block Placement
b. One Month at the end of the'
fourth semester (Opportunity for
enhancing independent practice
competencies.)
vl
100
Assessment
17
The student is to secure 50 percent marks for a pass. Fieldwork marks are given after
internal assessment and there is no external evaluation.
Sl.No.
Criteria for Assessment
Marks
I
Fieldwork report (daily)
40
2.
Summary Report
5
Evaluation Proforma
(Average ofthe marks given by the
20
a
J.
agency and faculty supervisors to be
taken. Peq/Self evaluation can also be
done though it should not be
considered for assessment. )
4.
Field work seminar
(Criteria- preparation, presentation, use
of audio visual aids and general
participation in the seminar)
l5
5.
Field work Viva Voce
20
Total
100
vlt
/\
Dissertation
work
.
Rules
The student has to prepare and submit a dissertation under the guidance of a faculty.
engaged meaningfully in the process of problem formulation;
reviewing some literature related to the study; preparing the research proposal,
choosing an appropriate research strategy and developing instruments for data
collocfion, collecting data, data processing, analyzing and interpieting the data and
preparing the research report. The length of the research report may be between 80 to
100 pages and should not exceed 120 pages.
The student
is
The total marks for the dissertation work is 150. It is divided into three components;
80 marks for external evaluation, 40 for internal evaluation and 30 marks for the viva
voce. Minimum 50 percent is required for each component for pass. If a candidate
fails in the dissertation, the examiner will give comments and suggestions for
resubmission. Corrected dissertation should be submitted to the University within one
month of the receipt of comments from the University. The resubmitted dissertation
may be sent to an examiner for re valuation.
External evaluation : Marks : 80
Evaluation Criteria
Sl No
Item
Marks
I
5
2.
Choice of area /topic Scooe. research potentials ofthe theme
Review of relevant Comprehension, quality and quantity
3.
Objectives
t0
literature
4
5.
6.
Relevance, relation to research theme,
clarity
hypotheses
Research design or Appropriateness, selection of variables,
sample selection, description of the
methodology
method used
ToolV instruments Appropriateness, construction,
validation
used
Data analysis
and
and
interpretation
7.
Summary
Scheme, Application of analyticaV
statistical techniques, use of tables,
figures, relating findings to objectives
and literature, discussion on findings
earlier chapters,
Discussion
on
synthesis of research findings,
5
t0
l0
25
10
implications of the study
8.
Report Presentation
Ch4pter division, chapter sze l0
distribution, stucturing paragraphs,
vocabulary, clarity, coherence and
biblioeraphy
Total
vlll
80
Sl No
Item
l.
Interest of the student
2.
Synopsis Presentation
3.
Regularity
Points to be noted
Literature review, claritY
of concepts, Pilot studY
Clarity, presentation,
Marks
l0
l0
openness
5.
punctuality
of 'synoPsis,
tools. draft and final
Overall Performance
timelY
zuidance and supervision
Commitment, confidence
and
Submiision
l0
report, seeking
l0
I
and genuineness
Viva Voce
Marks:30
the capacity of the researcher to recall and
explain the research process and to defend the research work.
During viva the examiner can
assess
/'
tx
-l
Field Action Project
It aims at providing students with an opportunity for identi$ing
the need for
intervention, preparing, implementing and evaluating a project /programme. It should
be a group project. The students should be divided into groups consisting of five to
seven members. Eabh group should have a faculty supervisor to guide their activities.
'
The groups may identifi a need or problem either in their fieldwork setting or the
localcommunities which they can meaningfully address
Major Tasks
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
C
tdentification of a problem/need assessment
Project proposal develoPment
Feasibility analysis
Resource mobilization
Project [mplementation
Monitoring and Evaluation
Follow up
Submission of report
riteria for assessment
The performance of the student should be assessed individually using the following
criteria
Sl.No
l.
2.
3.
4
Marks
Criteria
Teamwork
Project proposal
Implementation of the proj ectlprogrilmme
Report
Total
x
l0
l0
l5
l5
50
MSW Semester
CCI
-
I Common
Course
(CCI)
'
Paper 1: History and Fields of Social Work
Learning Objectives
To get an insight into the basic concepts of social work
2. To understand the history of Social work and Social Work education in India
and abroad
3. To appraise social work as a profession
4. . To understand the various.fields of Social Work
l.
Module
1
Social
Basic Concepts: Sociat Worh Sociat Service, Social Welfare, Social Reform,
Justice, Sociaf Security, Social Policy, Social Defense, Social Development,
Voluntary Social Work.
Modulc
11
Social Work - A Historical Overview : Evolution of Social Work in UK and USA
Moral and Religious Values in the Practice of Social Service in Ancient lndia,
concept of social work in Hinduism, christianity, Islam and Buddhism.
Module 111
History of Social Welfare activities in India. Social reform movements. Gandhian
ptriloslphy of Social Work and its contribution to the development of Social work in
India.
Module
fY
So"iA Work Profession: Characteristics of a profession, Development of Professional
Social work in India; Social Work education- history, curriculum, courses and
specializations, Field Work, supervision, current trends in social work education,
St"t o of Professionat Social Workers, Professional Organizations: National and
International. Voluntary Sscial Work, Role of Govemment and Voluntary
Organisations in Promoting Social Welfare and Social Work Profession in India. "'
Module V
Fields of Social Work Family and Child Welfare. Social Work in the field of healthMedical and Psychiatric Social Work. Social work with women, Social work with
youttu Social Work in education, Social Work with differenfly abled, Social work in
the development of SC/ST, Social Work in correctional services, Social Work with
migrants and unorganized laborers, Disaster management and Social Work, Social
in industries, Social Work in geriatric setting. Social work in Urban
Development and Rural Development
*-t
A
a
References:
:
:
2. Fink A.E.
:
3. Friendlander, w.A
:
4. Gore M.S.
:
5. Khinduka S.K .
6. Woodroffee, Kathlean :
:
7. Stroup HH
:
8. Wadia.A.R
:
9. Banerjee G.R.
Institute
l. Friendlander,
'
10.
W.A
Dasguptha.S
:
Introduction to Social Welfare
The Field of Social Work.
concepts and Methods of Social
work
Social work and Social work education.
Social Work i4India
From Charity to Social Work in the UK and USA
Social work
-
An Introduction to the field
History and Philosophy of Social work in lndia
Papers of social work;-an Indian Perspective.
TATA
of Social Science, BombaY
Towards a Philosophy of Social Work in India. Popular
Book Service, New Delhi.
11. tndia, Planning
Commission: Social Welfare in India, Publication Division, Delhi,
1960.
12. Hans
NagPaul
: The StudY of
Indian Society, S.Chand
&Co.
14. Misra PD and Beena
Misra : Social work Profession in India, New Royal Book Co,
13. Encyclopedia
Lucknow
2
of Social Work.
MSW Semester I Common Course (CC I)
CCI
-
Paper
II - Philosophy of Social Work
Learning Objectives
l.
Z.
To understand the methods and functions of Social work
To understand the philosophical assumptions, values and ideologies of Social
Work
3.
To get an idea about the basic concepts in Social work Practice
Module
I
Functions and Methods of Social Work: - Preventive, curative and promotive,
developmental and empowerment. Methods of Social Work-. Social Case Work,
Social Group Work, Community Organization, Social Work Research, Social
Welfare Administration and Social Action. Knowledge base in social work.
Development of knowledge in social work.
Module
II
Philosophy of social work., Philosophical values of social work. - Democratic
frame work, worth and dignity of individual, interacting forces of human
behaviour, uniqueness of individuality, change and the potentiality to change, the
right for self direction, participation of clients in the helping process, right to self
frrlfillment to the extent of his capacity and within the limits, Society's
responsibiliry to facilitate self- fulfillment of the individual, group or community.
Principles of Social Work
_
-
ModuleIII
Sources of Social Work philosophy: Survey of western and Indian traditions:
Religious and spiritual traditions- Christian, Hindu, Muslim, Buddhist Religion and
ideologies, Liberalism, Humanism, Socialism, Democracy, Gandhism-
Module
fV
Concepts
in
Social Work: Concepts
of
need and problem, adjustnent
and
maladjustrnent, the client, agency, primary and secondary settings. Inter- agency cgoperation/team work. Relationship - elements of relationship, resistance, movement,
.
role, stafus, authority, counselling, referral, consultation, modification of
environment, objectivity, self help.
H::]iora
*J,
worker. eualities of a professional social worker. capacity to take
the wtrole view of man, Capacity for objectivity, Non-judgmental and non exertive
attitude, Capacity to relate and work with different types of people, Emotional
maturity, Capacity for self awareness and conscious use of self. Adherence to
Professional Code of Ethics. Ethical problems and dilemmas in Social Work practice.
.A
References:
l. Banerjee .G.R.
:
Papers on Social Work: An Indian
Perspective Tata Institute of Social
Science, Bombay
2.
Dasguptha.S
:
Towards a Philosophy of Social Work in
India. Popular Book Service, New Delhi
3.
Firendlander.W.A :
Social Welfare, Prentice Hall of India,
P\4. Ltd New Delhi.
4. Galaway and Compton
Social work Process. The Dorsey Press.
Homeword, Illinois 1979.
5. Gangrade.
K.D
Dimension of Social work Marvel
Publications, New Delhi
6. Khinduka.S.D
Social Work in krdia Sarvodaya Sahithya
Samaj, Rajasthan.
7. Misra.P.D
lntroduction of Social Work
8. Paul Chawdhary
Introduction to Social Work.
Atnna Ram and sons, New Delhi
9. Stroup. H.H
'
Social Work As Introduction to the
Field.
New York. American Book Co.,I953.
l0.Wadia. A.R
History and Philosophy of Sqcial Work in
India Allied Publishen, Bombay 1961.
11. Charles
Zashow :
The Practice of Social Work.
4
,
Y
MSW Semester I Common Course ( CC I )
CC l-Paper
III- Sociolory and Economics forSocial Work
Leaming Objectivm:
1. Understand the sociological concepts to examine social phenomenon.
2. Understand sodiel'and economic processes hnd systems.
3. Develop awareness of social and economic problems.
4. Understend devclopmolt and its impect
5. Understend plenning antl its impect on various areas
Module
,
I
Sociology and primary concepts in Sociology.
Sociology: Definitioru Significance of Sociology in Social Work. Society: definition
Characteristics, Theories of society: Significance of theoretical understanding of
society. Evolutionary, cyclical, conflict and systems theories.
Institgtions: Ilefinition, Characteristics and Functions. Family, Marriage, Education,
Religion and Economic and Political Institutions.
Community: flefinition, Characteristics and Types. Group: Definitions, nature, tlpes
.. - ,.andfunctions.
Module II
_ gocial Process: Definition, Types: Associative and Dissociative- Competitiiorl
'Conflict, Assimilation, Accommodatioq Co operation. Social Statification:
Definition, Theodes and Types, Caste and Race, Class, Gender.
Module
III
Socialisation: Definition, theories. Agencies of socialization.
Social Change: Definitioru Theories.'Factors of social change
Social control: Definition, agencies of social control. Means of Social
control
.,
Folkways, mores, rrorms etc. Social problems: Definition and characteristics.
Current Social problems in India.
Module
IV
Economics: Definitiqn. Significance of studyrng economics in social work. Basic
Economic concepts: Needs, demand and supply, Resourees, Production, Distribution
and Consumption.
Contemporary economic systems: Capitalism, Socialism and Mixed economy, their
features, merits and demerits.
5
,,,
\)
Module
III
Economic Development: Concept, Meaning. A historical overview with reference to
i"r of Asia, Africa and Latin America. Globalisation and its impact
developing
"o*t
on developing countries. Privatisation, Liberalisation. and stnrctural adjustrnent
programmes.
Roli of Intemational Financial Institutions, lnpact on social sectors.
poverty in lndia: Catrses, effects and implications. World Hunger-myths, magnitude,
causes'and remedies
planning for Development Economic Planning; meaning, Objectives of Indian
Planning, Five Year Plans.
-
-
References:
l.
Giddens, Anthony
- " Sociolo W"
-Black well Publishers Ltd.
U.K.
3'd edition
(2000).
2. Giddens, Anthony
(Ed.)
- Sgciology-lntroductory Readings, Excel Media, New
Delhi
'
-
3. Shankar Rao - Sociaology, S.ChaDd Co',2005
4. Abratram Francis .M - "Contemporary Sociology" -
An lntroduction to Concepts
and Theories, Oxford University Press (2006)'
5.
Macionis. J. John
- " [email protected]" -
Dorling Kindersley Pol
std New
(2006)
6.
7.
8.
Delhi
,'
Davis, Kingsley _ Human Society, Macmillan Company, New York, 196|
-Bete,Andre Sociology, oxford university Press, New Delhi 2002
-
Datt, Ruddar and Sundaram
-
Indian Economy, s.chand and co- New Delhi
lggg
g. Cage, Karl et al - Principles of Economics, Pearson Education Asia.2002
10. HansorU
ll.
J.L.:
A
./
gvans,
Textbook of Economics 7h Edition., Mac Donald and
[,ondoryl977
Lipsey and Crystal, AIec : Princrples of Econpmics, 96 ErtitiorU Oxford Press,
1999.
6
a\
MSW Semester I Common Course (CC I)
*
CC l-Paper IV -Human Growth and Development
Learning Objectives
1.
2.
3.
To understand the basic concepts in Human growth and development
To acquaint the students with the developmental stages in human life.
To familiarize students with the theories of development and its :'elevance in
'Human growth and develoPment
Module
I
Definition, Meaning and purpose of developmental psychology and its importance in
Social work practice. Theories of development: Biological theories, psychodynamic
theories, leaming theories and Cognitive thooriqs, Different developmental stages- an
overview.
Modulc
II
Biologicat basis of behaviour: Brain and behaviour, nervous system,
oorotrro"-itt"rs, Endocrine system, mode of action of hormones, mechanisms of
genetic transmission, importance
of
genetic factors, influence
of
heredity and
environment
- Modulc
III
negirming of life: Prenatal development and birth, social and emotional
aspects
of
hazards during pregnancy.
-pregnancy,
. Biror - Tlpes of Birth, complications, effects of preinaturity.
-: lnfancy, Baby hood, ild Child hood - characteristics, physical, emotional,
psychological and social changes, l:rrzards and developnental tasks.
Il{odule IV
Puberty and adolescence: characteristics, major physical and emotional changes and
influence on personal and social adjustments. Interests, social relationship, sex 11{.
sexuality in adolescence, Developmental tasks and hazards. Adult hood and middle"
age - p€rsonal and social adjustnents, Vocational and marital adjustrnents.
Module V
Old age: Ageing and Ageism, characteristics, Physical, psychological and social
changes, personal, social, vocational and marital adjustrnents. Health problems and
developmental hazards of aged. Dyrrg, death and bereavement'
7
Reference:
l.
Elizabeth. B. Hurlock
Developmental Psychology
-a Life
Span Approach, Tata McGraw
New Delhi,1996.
2. Hall & Lindsey
Theories of Personality.
3. Newman B.M, Newman P.R
Development through life
-
a
Psychosocial approach, Words
*Lrth, New York ,1999.
4.
5.
Elizabeth.B.Hurlock
Child psychology.
George G Thompson
Child Psychology
6.
E. Mavies Hetherington, Rose. D. Park
: Child psychology.
hill,
MSW Semester
CCI
-
I
Common Course (CCI)
Paper V : Social Case Work
Learning Objectives
1.
2.
3.
To understand the basic concepts in Social Case Work
To acquaint the students with the process of Social case work to enable them
to work with individual.
To develop in students the necessary attitude and skills to practice Social case
work
ModuIe
Social case work. DefinitiorU scope and Historical development, Philosophical
assumptions in case work- Relationship between case work and other therapeutic methods
like Counselling and psychotherapy. Behavioural concepts relevant to case work practice:
human needs, social role, stress and adaptation. Transference, counter transference,
family dynamic, life skills.
Module
II
The theoretical approach relevant to case work. Psychoanalytical, psychosocial and
fioblem solving approach. Diagnostic and functional approaches. Case work relationship
definition comportents and purpose relationship. Casework skills.
M_odule
III
!
Components of social casework: Person, problem, place and process. Setting of social
work. P-rimary & secondary, sources of information, primary, secondary and collateral
source. Process: psychosocial study, Diagnosis Treaftnent, Evaluation, Termination and
follow up. Treatment Techniques used in case work - Environmental manipulation,
Dhect treatment Techniques & counseling techniques (guidance clariflrcation, ventilation,
psychological, support, reassuranc,e, confrontation, accreditation, suggestion etc.)
socialT
Enhancing the client's problem solving (assertiveness, Stress management
skills). Enhancing social support systems. Termination steps, types and reactions td
termination. Evaluation: Objectives, Types & procedure
&
Module
fV
Listening, observation, Interview, Home visit Casework
Interview nature purpose and principles. Communication: verbal and non-verbal barriers
to communication. Recording: importance, principles and types: Narrative recording,
summary recording & verbatim recording. Uses of records.
Tools used
in social work.
9
Module V
Scope
of social case work in various settings: family case work, Role and fimction of
case worker in all settings; social case work in schools, child guidance clinics, foster care
and adoption service, Juvenile home, and other institutions for children.
.
o
Social casework in geriatric setting
Social casework with Disaster Victims
Social casework with women in distress, suffering domestic violence, abuse,
rape etc.
Social casewoi:k with adolescentsr Sex education, Life skill education as a
social work function.
Social Case Work with disabled
Social case work in medical and psychiatric settings
social casework in correctional and industrial settings.
- o.
'
o
o
o
.
Reference:
l.
Biestek.P.P
2.Graqe Mathew
3. Perlman
H.H
,
4. Brammer.L.M
r
5-.
Compton and GalawaY
The Case Work RelationshiP
:
: Social Case Work -
Social Work Process 1979
Theory and Practice of Social Case Work
- A Psycho -Social
CaseWork
7. Hollis.F
Therapy
Principles and Techniques in Social Case Work
& Kasius.G
analytic Theory and Social work
pructtc,e,1979
Psycho
Stream H.S
10. Garret
A Problem Solving Process
The Helping Relationship Process and Skills 1985
6, Hamilton.G
9.
Introduction to social case work
-
Interviewing: Principles and Methods
H.A
11. Hamilton, Gordon
Principles of social case recording
l2..Mary Richmond.E
What is social case work.
13. Gambrill Eileen
- A Competency based approach.
Social Casework - A Therapeutic Approach.
14.Upadhay.R.K
Case work
:
15. Fletcber, John
Effective Intervi ewing.
16. Bessell, Robert
Interviewing and counselling, 197 l -
17
Aptekar.H.H
The Dynamics Ca.se Work and Counseling
l0
)
I
MSW Semester I Common Course (CC D
CC I Paper
VI Community Organisation and Social Action
Learning Objectives:
Understand the elements of community organisation practice.
Understand the practice of community organisation in various fields.of social
work.
3. Develop skills and attitudes for participatory Community work.
1.
,
I
Module
Community: Meaning, Definition and types. Sociological and practitioner
Perspectives of cornmunity. Stnrchue and Functions of comlnunity.
II
Module
Community Organisation: Definition, Objectives and Historical Development
of
Community Organisation practice. Values & Principles of Community Org;isation
Community Organisation as a method of Social Woit. Community OrganiJation
and
Community Development.
Module
III
Analysis
Power
of
Communities: Leadership- Concep! types
--
of Community lreaders.
structure of Comrnunity: Concept of power.
Empowerment - concept, Barriers to and [email protected] of Empowerment.
Module
fV
in community organisation: Study, analysis, assessment, discussion,
organization, action, evaluation, modification and continuation. Models of
copmunity organisation. Methods in community organisation.
Advocacy, Networking and People,s participation
Roles and skills of community organisea commurity organisation
Practice in''
Different settings- current Issues in community organisation practice.
Phases
Module V
Social Action: Concept, Objectives, Principles, methods and stategies
of social
action. social action foi sociai reform and social a.uriop-rnt.
Scope of social action in India
- Social LegisHtion through social action. Social
Approaches
to
social
Action- Freire, Gandhi, Alinsky.
|fgvements.
Skills- Mediation, advocacy, conflict resolution. Social Action as a method
of.social
work.
ll
References:
l'
Ross Murray G, Community organisation: Theory and principles,
Harper and
Row Publication New york, 19g5.
.2. Arthur Dunham:
Commturity Welfare Organisation.
3- _Yeil, Mary @d) :- community practice.
Haworth. Press. Inc 1996.
conceptual Methods, New york: The
4-
Meenai, zubair: participatory community work. concept publishing
company,
NewDelhi 2008
5.
Siddiqui , H.Y. Working with Communities:
Work. Hira Publications, New Delhi 1997.
An Introduction to Community
Tropmaq John E, Erlic[ John L; and Jack Rothman: Tactics and
rechniques of
community lntervention - F.E. pea cock publication, [nc, Illinois
1995
7. Gangrade,
K.D. : Community Organisation in India
l2
\/
MSW Second Semester - Common Course
(CC[)
CCII - Paper VII -Social GrouP work
Learning Objectives
l.
2.
To understand the impact of group experience on individuals
of Social
To understand and appreciati Social Group Work as a method
Work
-3. To appreciate
Module
the applicability of Social Group Work
I
groups' In-group and
Social groqp, Definition. Types of groups. Primary and Secondary
goup. Impact of group experience
out-grorup, iask group and ieatnent group Reference
on individuals. Socialization
Modulc
II
up. Role, Rank and Relationship. Subcess. Associative and dissociative
. Communicatioq GrouP morale'
tions
of
leadership, Stages
of group
development
Module
III
al group work. Its relation to other
method of social work. Influential
ld theory and sYstems theory.
Module
IV
Group work process- shrdy' Diagrtosis
Values of gfoup work. ObjectiVes of grotrp
-*otk.work'
Programlne development in group wolk
and teafinent. Principler of group
worker.
Evaluation, Recording, Role, functions and skills of group
Module V
communities, hospitals, schools,
s, Hospitals, De-addiction centes,
Applications
ramity couns
Mental health
13
References:
l.
Group Dynamics. Peterson and Co. New
Cartrvright D and Z,anderc
York, 1960
Group Experiences and Democratic Values.
2. Coyle Grace.L
The Women's press, New York.
3.
.Working with Groups. Hutchlnston
Klien Josephine
University and Library, London, 1920
4.
Konopka.Gisela
: Social Group Work.
A Helping Process,
Prentice Hall, New Jersey, 1963.
5.
Group Process: Helping Process in a Group
Parihar.B.S
Kitab Mahal, Allahabad 1968.
Social Group Work Practice. Follett
6. Trecker.H.B.
Publishing Company, Chicago 1972
7.
Wilson and RYland
Social Group Work Practice, Houghston Miffin
r
Company, Cambrdige 1949
8.
Shepherd R Claris
Small Groups: Some Sociological
:
Perspective Chandler Publishing Company,
California
9.
'Ken Heap
1964.
: Group theory for social workers.
i
An
Introduction Pergmon Press 1977
10. Toseland and Rivas
:
An Introduction to Group Work Practice
Mc Millan Publishing ComPanY, New
York, 1984.
l4
II Common Course ( CCII )
CCII - Paper VIII- Psycholory for Social Work
MSW Semester
Leaming Objectives
1.
.
To familiarizethe students with basic concepts of psycholory to understand
human behaviour.
2. To develop an understanding regarding individual and collective behaviour
and determinants of social behaviour
3. To understand the need for Psychology in the practice of Social Work
Module I
Psychology: Definition and scope. General psychological concepts applicable to social
work- Learning, lntelligence, memory, thinking and language, emofion and stress,
motivation, personality- their definitions, theoretical framework and other basic
infomration.
Module II
Social Psycbology: Definition and relevance to social work. Sensory processes and
perception, social perceptiorg social cognitioq social influence and social relationships.
Module III'
Attitudes- Nature, definitiorl theories and measurement of attitudes, factors in attitude
change, attitrrde and behaviour. Prejudice-.definition, characteristics, tlpes and causes of
prcjudice. Aspects of social identity, self and gender. The self: components of orles
unique identity. Self-concept, self esteem and other aspects of self-functioning, Sex and
Gender, Gender identity and gender stereotypes.
Module
IV
Social influence, the Inter personal athaction and social interaction, pro-social behaviour.
factors, theoretical perspectives and determinants, Aggression- factors, theoretical
perspective and determinadts. Group morale- meaning, determinants and importance..
Characteristics of groups with high or low morale.
Module V
Propaganda definition and meaning psychological basis and techniques. Counteracting
misleading propaganda, propaganda in education. Collective behavior.u. Audience &
crowd. Theories of crowd behaviour, classification of crowd and audience.
Rumour : definition and meaning , circumstances responsible for spread of nunour,
causes for spread of rumour, check on propagation of rumours.
l5
,,'
References:
l.
David Krech and Richard.S.Crutehfield
And Egerton L. Ballachery.
2.
Kuppuswamy B
:
Individual in society
Elements of social
psycholory:
vikas Publishing House
1
h/t Ltd.
NewDelhi 1983.
Th"ories of social Psycholory:
Mcgraw Hill, New York 1970.
3-
Shaw M..E and Costanso .P.R
4.
Baron Robert.A.et.al
5.
Taylor Shelley et.al
social psycholory(2000) Prentice Hall, New Jersy.
6.
Sherriff.M & Sheniff.C.M.
Social psycholory, A harper
lnternational Edition, NJ. Harper
and Bow Publishers, 1986.
7.
Second .P.F and Backman .C.W
Social Psycholory, Internaglonal
Social psychology Prentice Hall
India" New Delhi.
StudentsPsycholory,N.Y.(}xf
u'*rd
University Press, I 972.
8; Hollender.E.P
Itinciples and methods of social
Psychology, New Delhi, wiley
Eastern hrt.Ltd. 1974.
9-, Lindgern.H.C
An lntroduction to Social
Psycholory, New Delhi, wiley
Eastern
10. Myers, David.J
I
L
Fernald, L. Dodge, Femald, Peter.S
N.Ltd.l974.
Social psycholory (1983) McGraw
Hill Book co. New Delhi.
Introduction to psychology (2003)
AIIBS Publishers, New Delhi.
t6
Semester
CC
II -
II
Common Course (CC
II)
IX: Theory and Practice of Counselling
Paper
Learning Objectives
1. To acquire knowledge and skills in the practice of counselling
2. To get an understanding about the'practice of counselling in
different
settings
Module
I
counselling: counselling
-an
ing profession. Introduction,
Definition,
Meaning, Scope and historical development. Goals and objectives of counselling:
counselling'
Counsetling, SocialWork and Psychotherapy, Principles
professional ethics in counselling. Types of counselling crisis counselling,
promotive counselling, Preventive couoselling, Facilitative counselling and curative
counselling. Gror.P Counselling
-
Module
of
II
Therapeutic approaches
to Counselling:
uppro*nCfient' centered therapy,
Psychoanalytic approach, - Humanistic
Tra onal Analysis,
Gestalt Therapy,
dxistential approac[ Realrty Th"rapy and Behavioural approach
Module
.:
III
Counselling skills: Contracting, Rappor! Empathy, Listening, Confrontation, Self
disclosure, n"f"11ut etc. Personal qualitieVattributes of counsellor
Module
[Y
Counselling relationshiP: Nature
relationship, Counse[ling Process,
Specific Techniques used in counsellin
listening, interview
s
Module Y
Counselling in different settings:
a)
b)
c)
Family cognselling: Premarital, marital counselling, sex education, family
planning counselling, abortion counselling. HIV/AIDS counselling etc.
ilducational counselling: scholastic backwatdness, emotional dishubances,
problems ofadolescence, sex education etc'
Vocational colnselling: carcer guidance, job adjustnents, placement
counseling etc.
d) Industrial counselling : Absenteeism, accident proneness occupational
stress, inter - personal conflict etc
e) De-addiction counselling
D Counselling in disasters.
t7
MSW Semestenll Common Course (CC
CC
II)
,
[ - Paper X: Abnormal PsYcholory
Leaming Objectives
t.
2.
3.
To help the students gairi an understanding regarding the concept of
abnormality and theoretical framework related to abnormality
To gain basic knowledge regarding etiolory, psychopathologr, treatment,
course and outcone of various mental disorders and dysfunctions.
To ecquire knowledge regarding the concept of mental health and mental
health issues in the contemporary society'
Moduh
I
Abnormal psychology: Definition Historical development Causes of abnormal behaviour
Organic, pry"totogi"a and socio cultural view point on abnormal behaviour. Concept of
n"i"rtity uU*r*.tity and various view points. Stress-Definition, Characteristics and
causes Reaction to Stress. Mental mechanisms -
Module
tr
Classification of psychological disorder in adults- major symptoms, causes' types,
outcome and managemeni of Anxiety disorders, Dissociative and somatoform
diserders, Affective 7 fr{ooa Disorders, schizophrenia and delusional disorders, epilepsy
zind dementia
Modulc
III
psychological disorders in children nd adolescents. Anxiety disorder, behaviour and
disorders, habit disorders, Attention deficit disorders, pervasive developmental
"onaust
disorders, learning disabilities, mental Retardation
Module [V
Alcoholism and drug addiction, causes, teafrnent and outcome, sexual deviations,
psychological disordJrs associated with disaster, psychosomatic disorders, sociopathic'r'
disorders
Module V
Contemporary Approaches
in
Therapy, Biontedical, Psychodynamic, Humanistic,
s. TheraPY for grouPs, social and
characteristics and determinants
rary societY
l9
of
References:
l. Narayanan Rao.
2. Fuster
S.
: Counselling Tata Mc Graw
J.M
3. George
Hill
: Personal counselling
: Group counselling -A Development approach,
and Bacon Boston.
MGaz
Allyn
: The Basic Essential of Counselling, Sterling Publishers
4. Dave, Indu
New Delhi.
..
: Guidance and counselling -An elective Approach,
5. Jaswal .S.S
Lucknow.
6. Fred Mickinney
Counselling for Personal Adjustment in Schools and
colleges, Houghton Mifflin co., Boston.
7. Joe currie
Barefoot counselor
8. Gladding.T. Samuael
Counselling a comprehensive profess ion, 1992.
9. Richard Shard
Theories of Psychotherapy and counselling
10. Corey, Gerald
Theory and practice of group counselling.
I
l. Philip Burnard
:
Counselling skills haining, Viva Books private Ltd
NewDelhi.
12. Gibson, L.R"
13. Nelson Jones
Mitchell
Introduction to Counselling and Guidance, Prentice
Hall India Ltd
Basic Counselling Skills
l8
- A helper's
manual
References:
l.
Coleman
2. Kaplan and Sadock
Abnormal prychology and modern life
Synopsis of psychiatry,
III
edn. (2001) Jaypee
Publishers, New Delhi
3. Sarason and Sarason
Abnormal psycholory
4. Callson and Butcher
Abnormal psycholory.
5. Holmes David.S
Abhormal prychology (200 I ),
Allyn and Bacon, Boston.
6. Carson, Robert.C et.al
Abnormal psycholory modem
Life, Pearson Edn (2000)
20
MSW Semesterll Common Course (CC
CC
II
II)
.
XI -Social Work Research
Paper
Learning Objectives:
l. To Understand the Significance and Characteristics of scientific research and
Social \ilork Research.
2. To develop the capacity to conceptualize a problem and execute research
3. To develop an understanding of the different research designs and data
collection .techniques
4. To develop skills in selection and use of the tools for data collection,
processing of deta and appreciation of statistical techniques.
5. To develop skills in interpretation, documentation and presentation of results
of research.
Module I
Scientific Research and social work: - Meaning of research, types of research,
Qlantitative Methods and social Research, Social work research - aims and
significance, Present position and agencies for social work Research.
Module
II
Research Problem formulation: - Concepts, Theoretical and operational definition
'
'
for
concep! Theory, Role of theory in research, Variables- Types, HypothesisDefinition, tlpes, sources and significance - Importance and methods of review of
Literature, Formulation of research proposal, Pilot study.
Module Itr
- Research Design:- Meaning, Purposes and tlpes: - Exploratory, Descriptive,
Diagnostic and experimental. Quasi-experimental design. Single subject designs,
group design, Qualitative Research - Significance and methods, Qualitative v/s
Quantitative Research, evaluative research, participatory research, action research.
Sampling procedures- Types, Techniques.
Module
IV
Methods of data collection
Primary data and Secondary data, pre test, validity and reliability, observation,"
interview schedule, guides, questionnaires, projective techniques, content analysis,
sociometry, Measurement-Levels, scales and scaling techniques
Module V
Data Analysis and Data presentation
Editing, Coding, tabulating, Interpreting, Descriptive and inferential Analysis,
Analysis and interpretation of Qualitative dat4 report writing- format, st5ile, contents,
and abshacts. Use of Computer in data analysis - SPSS
2l
References
1.
Karlinger, Fred N
Foundations of Behavioural Research
New York, Holt Rinshart &.Winston Inc.
2. Goods, W.J.
'
& F.K. Hatt
Methods in Social Research, New York,
Mc Graw Hill
Research Methods in Social Relations,
3. Jahoda.M
New York, Dryden Press.
: Methodology
4. Kaufrnan.F
of social science. London
Thomas & Hudson
5. Wonwiclq D.F.
&CLiginger
The Sample survey: Theory and practice.
New York, Ms Graw Hill.
Statistics in social Research. New York Wiley.
6. Weiss R.S
7. Yin Robert
:
K
:
Case Study Research, Washington,
Cosmos Corpon.
8. Gilbert, Nigel (ed)
10. Guptha C.B.
12, Laldas
of
Statistics for social sciences. Dayton
Wright State University.
9. Sirkin.R.M
11. Raymond
Researching Social Life. Universrty
Straj and SAGE Publications.
Mark
D.K
13 Sarantakos Sotirios
:
An Intr.oduction to statistical Methods.
Research made simple. Sage publications.
: Practice
of Social Research
Social Research, 1998, Macmillan Press Ltd.
22
MSW Semester llCommon Course
ccJI Paper-X[
(CC[)
t
-Social Analysis & strategies for social change
Learning Objectives
1. To develop and enhance understanding of social, political economic systems
2. To understand the concept of social change and various spproaches to
change.
3.
To develop knowledge and skills in planning and executing change strategies.
Module
I
Social Analysis: lntroduction; Structural Analysis- Economic System, social
System, potiticat System & Meaning System; Historical Analysis; Cultural
Analysis; Emergence of a responding individual- self awareness & social
awireness; N€ed for'political' action for change
Modulc
II
Social Change & Education as a change process - Goal of education as t
transformation ( Gandhi, Freire)
Change in fu ievels of social consciousness through educative process: closed
consciousness, confonning consciousness, reforming consciousness, and
transforming or liberating consciousness.
Module
III
Approaches to Social Changes: Religio-spiritual Approaches: Yugas & Pnlaya;
fir,gdom of God: A Liberation Theology for New Heaven & Earth; Buddhist,
Advaitic.
Man<ism - class war & classless society
Freire - Education, Conscienti zztion,Cultural Action & Transforrration,
Gandhi - Sarvodaya, non-violence & satyagraha for social change
Module fV
Strategies
'
for Goal Oriented and planned Social Change: Individuat contact,'
prrrsrr", legal action, cultnral action, political organisation" conscientisation,
campaigg negotiation and Conflict strategies'
Participatory Methods ( Skill Training)
Module V
Social Movements: Change strategies in practice. Models used by the voluntary
sector.
Assessing Social Change: Criteria & indicators.
23
.'
References
l.
Adams, Rober! Dominelli,Inna& Pa5me, Malcom (ed.), SocialWork: Themes,Issues
Critical Debates, Ch.l7, Radical Social Work.
2.
Freire, Paulo, Pedagory ofthe Oppressed, Adult Education
&
& Liberation, Penguin Books,
New York.l972
3. Freire, Paulo, Culnrral Action for Freedom, Penguin Books, New York.l972
4. Freire, Paulo, Education as Practice of Freedom, Penguin Books, New York.
- 5.' t.edrrri&, Margaret Community Development. A Critical
apptoach, Rawat
Publications,
NewDelhi,2006
6. Descrochers, John: Methods of
Social Analysis. Centre
for
Social Action,
Bangalorc,l977
7.
Hope, Anne and Timmel, Sally
:
Training for Transforniation-
A
Handbook for
Community Workers, Book I,II and III, Mambo Press, Gweru,1984
8. DlAbreo, Desmond A., From Development Worker to Activisl
9. Gandhi M.K., Social Service, Work & Reform ( 3 vols. )
10. Gandhi M.K., Village Swaraj
ll.
Ha5rnes, Karen S.
107 ff.
12. Johnson D.
&
Mickelson, James.S, Affecting Changes, Social Movements Pub.
& F.P. , Johnson,
1975, Joining Together, Group exercises
13. Jones, Howard (ed.), Towards a New Social Work, social Movernents ., Chap-2.
14. Knowels, Malcom, The Modem Practice of Adult Education.
15. Kramer,
-
RM. & H., Spechit
l4..Schumacher, Small is
1974, Community Organisation Practice, Sbategies.
Beautiful.
,
24
-
MSW Semester
CCm - paper
III
XIII:
I
Social Work Administration and Participatory Project Planning and
Management.
Learning Objectives
To understand the basic concepts in administration and management
of these organizations
2. To understand the type of orgintzations and registration
and State Ministries and
3. To acquaint the Social welfare Programm"t of central
1.
o"p..tl"""tt
management
4. To understand the basic concepts in project planning and
5. To develop skills in proposal writing a rd project management
through practical
experience.
Module
I
Administration, Organisation, Managements Bulines-s . Administration, Public
Administration arrd social work Admini-stration. Administrative
Administratioru sociJ
:
Office
process, Planning, organizing, staffing, Directing, Coordinating, Budgeting'
Prepzpation of reports
management, Reporting]maintenance of files, Documentation,
Module II
Voluntary agencies:
Characteristics, types, Role and firnctions. Registration of Societies'
Approaches to organizational
Trusts and Cooperatives, General Body,-ixecutive Committee.
Theory X and theory Y'
management-bureaub*ti", D"-ocratic, human relations model,
Marketing of Social services.
-
Morlule III
Central Ministries and
Social Welfare programmes: Structure and functions of State and
Deparunents. Central Social Welfare Board,
of Women and Child Development, State S
Rual Development Programmes, Local S
children, Women, Youtll Elderly, differently abled,
Module IV
Project: Definition Importance and Ele
and levels of participation. Steps in
PRA/PLA Techniques, Determining prioritie
specifing goats and objectives, identifying
Environment Impact Assessment
.'l
ertives, Background and history of the agency?
estimates .and financing. Organization and
out standing issugs, follow up details,
ve project formulation, basic datr- agency
details, legal aspects, organiz,attonal aspects, technical aspects'
25
Module V
'
Pj'j!:l*ff;"JilJ;ent
- preparatio r of cor. r,*,
resource mobilization- Techniques
and legal requirements, Budgeting, accounting, auditing, financial records.
Personnel Management: Selection, recruitment and training of project personnel.
Role and.functions of Project Stafl Logistics Management, Time Management,
Multiple roles. Public RelationS.
c) Monitoring and Evaluation of tfre project-purpose, types. Criteria for evaluation:
achievement of physical targets, utilization of benefits, people's participation,
educative value, technical aspects, deviation from the original plan,. procedural
accuracy, acbounting procedures, costs, srlpervision efficiency, public relations.
Workshop on Project Preparation-Proposal for fundraising, lncome generation projects
etc.
b)
References:
l.
Chandra Prasann4 Projects: Planning, Analysis, Selection, Implementation, and Review, Tata
McGraw Hill Pub. Co. Ltd, 1995.
2. Desai, Vasant., Project Management Preparation Appraisal, Himalaya Publications,l99T
3. Ghosh, A.S. Froject Management, Anmol Publishers. New Delhi, 1990
4. Roy, M. Sarn, Project Planning and Management - Focusihg on Proposal Writing, CHAI,
Secunderabad.
5.
6.
Loch Dennis, Handbook of project Management, Jaico Publishing House, Delhi, 1997
7.
.Patil R. I( Appraisal of Rural Development Projects through systems Analysig Nation'al Institute
of Bank Management, 197 6.
8.
hrttaswamaiah.K Aspects of Evaluation and Projoct Appraisal, Popular Parkashan, 1978.
Mohsin M, Project Planning and Control, Vikas Publishing House Pvt. Ltd, 1997
.
9.-.Dalal- Clayton, Barry, Dent, David and Dubois, Olivier: Rural Planning in Developing CountriesSuppgrtryrg Natural Resource Management and Sustainable Livelihoods, Earthscan lndia, New
Delhi;2003
10. Vasar-rt Desai, Project Marragement : Preparations, Aparaisal, Finance and Policy, Himalaya Pub.
House, Delhi, 1997.
ll.
Somesh, Kumar: Methods for Commuhity ParticipationVistaar Publications, New delhi, 2002.
A
complete Guide for Practitioners,
12. Chowdhari, Paul, Social Welfare Administration, Atma Ram & Sons, New"Delhi 1992
13. _S.L.Goel and
R.Rajan, Social Welfare Administration Vol: t & II
14. GuptaN.S., Organization Theory and Behaviour
15. Fred Luthans,: Organisation Behaviour, Itr and [V edition
lf.
Rajeswar Prasad: Social Administration
17. Kulkarni P.D.: Social Policy and Social Development in India Association of Schools
of Social
Work in India
18. Reidar, Dale: Evaluating Development Prograr4mes and Projects. Second Edition.,Sag€
hiblications,20M
26
'
III Semester
CC II -Paper XIV: Quantitative
'
MSW
methods in Social
Research
.
Learning Objectives:
l.
2.
To develop a basic working knowledge in statisticsTo equip the students in the relevanee and usage
techniques.
Module
of appropriate
quantitative
I
Definition, function, uses and limitations.
''tables, cumulative freqtirincy
Fi"q.r"rr"y distribution- construction of frequency
distribution. Diagrammatic and graphic presentation of data, Probability theory, Normal
distribution.
Statistics
Module
-
II
Measures of Central tendency, \computation of mean, median, mode ; Uses and Limitation.
Measures of dispersion- Range, Mean deviation, Quantitative deviation, Co efficient of
variation, concept of skewness, kurtosis, percentile ftrnges, Merits and demerits.
Module
III
Correlation:- Meaning, Correlation and causation, kinds of Correlation,
effrcient of Correlation, spearman's Conelation Co efficient-
Karl Pearson's
Co
Module fV
Testing of Hypothesis, Pr.inciples and Commonly used test, Level of Significance, Errors in
testing, Measures of association, Chi sqture test, t-test, ANOVA, Yules Co efficient and Phi
- Co efficient.
Modulb V
Introduction to statistical data analysis packages like SPSS.
References:
l. Gupta.S.O
Statistical Methods
2.MacMillan, W
Statistical Methods for Social Workers
3. P.V.Young
Scientific Social Suweys and Research
4. George A. Ferguson
Social Statistics
5. Garett. H.E
Statistics for Psycholory and Education
6.
Mohsin.S.M
An Introduotion to Statistical Methods
7. C.B Guta
8. Yeoman.
Methods in Behavioural Sciences
K.A
Statistics for the Sooial Scientists.
27
;r-(
'
'
MSW Semester
CC IV
-
.
IIf
,
Paper XV - Development Communication.
Learning Objectives
.
l.
To leam the role of communication in development.
Facilitate a criticel anely*is of the mass media.
To leam alternate, participetory techniques of communication in the contert of
development.
X'acilitate acquisition ofmediaskills.
Allow for practical application of thosc media skills.
2.
3.
'
4.
5.
Module
I
Commtrnication: Theories, Elements and Bauiers. Non verbal communication. Significance in
Social Work Practice.
Development
Communication Purpose & Content. Social Marketing.
Participatory
communication.
Module
II
Use of media for Development Communication.
Folk media :- Puppetry, Folk drama folk songs, folk dances. Street Theatre.
Communication
with Groups: frctures, group/panel discussions, games, role plays,
nipin rtr ana projeciJ
dembnstration, use of audiovisual aids like flrsh
flannel graphs,
"ar&,
audio'.visual aids.
Module
fV
Use of'media for Development
Communication.
I
Mq{s Media: Cinema, Television, Radio, Print Media Exhibitions, Posters. Inforrration
Technology and World Wide Web.
Module
fV
Media culture and values
Media Analysis: Critical analysis of Mass Media Representation of gender, race and events in
mass media. Impacr of mass media on developrnent. Media Research.
Module V
Skill Training: Effective Publics Speaking, Meeting,.Conference, Seminars, Effective written
commtrnication, Steet Theatre Workshop &
Designing of Posters and other low cost
participatory media.
28
Refcrences:-
'
'
'1. Gandhi, V.P:L Media and Communication
Today , Vol.l.2. and 3, Kanishka Publishers NeY
Delhi. 1995
2.
Melkote, Srinivas
R,
Communication for Development in Third world, Delhi : Sage Publication
1991.
3.
Mody, Bellq Designing Messages for Development in the Third world. Sage Publications.
Delhi.l99l.
4.
Servaes, Jan, Jacobson, Thomas and White, A. Shirley (Eds) Participatory Communication for
Social Change. Sage Publications New Delhi,2002.
5.
White, Shirley A, Nair, Sadanandan K. and Ashcroft Joseph: Participatory Cdmmunication
Working for change and development. Sage Publications. New Delhi,2D4.
6.
Mcquail,
Denis :
Mass Communication Theory an lntroduction. Third Edition,
-
Sage
Publications New Delhi. I 994.
7- &rjq
B.N. and Chabra, S.S. : Development Communication. Surjeet Publications, New Delhi
1992
L
shannq Diwakar: lv{ass Communication theory and Pnactice in the 2ls cenhrry- Deep
&
Deep
Publications. New Delhi.2004.
9.
Edwards,
Mice
: Key Ideas in Media and Cultural $udies, Nelson Thornes Ltd. Cheltenham,
u.K.200310. Berger, Ardrur : Narratives in Popular Culture, Media, and everyday Life. Sage Publications
New Delhi 1993.
,
I
I
.
Kumar, Keval.
J
: Mass Communication in India. Jaioo Publishing House. Delhi.2O0l
.
Melkote, Srinivas.R., Steeve,H. [,eslie: Communication for Development in the Third World. Theory
and Oractice for EmpowermenL 2d Edition, Sage Publicati<ms 2001
29
'
MSW Semester
CC
III -
Paper
III
XVI: Comlunity Health and health Education
Leaming Objectives
l. To harn basic concepts in health and health care
2. To understand the epidemiolory of common communicable and non communicable
diseases
3. To understand the community health programmes
4. To.acquaint with nutritional problems and management
I
Module
Basic concepts in health:- Definition and meaning- Health, diseases, Wellbeing, positive
health, determinants of healtta spectrum of health, Community health, righi to health,
Concepts of Prevention, iceberg phenomenon of disease, Community diugroris anj
community treatment
Module
II
Health Status and Health Problems: - Basics of health statistics, Indicators of
healtfu Epidemiology of communicable diseases- Tuberculosis, Leprosy,
pox, diarrhea, acute respiratory lnfections,
seases :- Cardiovascular diseases, hypertension,
style diseases. Medical care problems
Module
III
care- Principles,
d health- Water,
bome diseases,
n urban and rural area. Mother and Child health
care, First aid, Gender and healtll Nationar Rural Health Mission
Module IV
Nutrition and Health- Classification of foods, nutrients, mal nutrition, balanced diet,
nutritional problems in public health, assessment of nutritional status, comm,nity
nutrition
prograrnme
Moduh V
Health education:- Meaning, importance, principles, components, communication
in hedth education- mass media, audio visual aids, voluntary and
governmental agencies for health education.
References
l. O Park J.and Park .K
2. Mathur.S
3. BirchandranathGhosh
and Rabindranath Ghosh
4. Bedi,Yash Pal
Test Book of Social and Preventive Medicine
Hand Book of Social and preventive Medicine
A true line on Hygiene and public Health
Scientific Publishing co., Calcutta.
Hygiene and Public Heatlh, Anand publishers.
30
\r/
References:
1. Goldsteine
Medical Social Work Vol: I &
2.Mal.y Richmond
Social Diagnosis
3. Gouri Rani Banerji
Medical Social Work in India
4. O Park J.and Park
.
.K
II
Test Book of Social and Preventive Medicine
5. Mathur.S
Hand Book of Social and Preventive Medicine
6. Birchandranath Ghosh
A true line on Hygiene and Public Health
and Rabindranath Ghosh
7. Bedi,Yash Pal
Scientific Publis[ing co., Calcutta
Hygiene and Public Health, Anand Publishers.
Publication Division, Delhi, 1960.
32
-
MSW Semester fII
Optional I - Medical and Psychiatric Social Work
ol MPSW 11 -Psychiatric
rnformation and Psychiatric Social work
Leaming Objectives
1.
2.
3.
To help the students gain thorough knowlcdge regarding psychiatric illnesses, their
symptomatolory, etiolory, treatment and eftercare.
To help them gain an understanding regerding the relevance and scope of
psychiatric social work in the.care end tneetment of mentelly ill.
To develop in them the necessary skills and competence to work in a psychiatric
setting
Module I
Psychiaty- Definitioru historical development epi{emiology of mental disorder,
symptomatology, disorders of perception, thinking, emotion, memory, speech
Assessment in Psychiatry, Psychiatric interviewing, Case History taking and mental Status
Examination, classification inpsychiatry- ICD,DSM, theneed and importance. Forensic
psychiatry- civil and criminal liabilities of a mentally ill person, Mental Health Act 1987.
Module II
Psychiatic illness- Prevalence, etiology, clinical manifestation, course, outcome and
;different teatnent modalities of;a. Organic Mental disorder
: ' fu. Ftmctional psychoses (schizophreni4 mood disorders)
c. Aqietydisorders (OCD, phobic disorders, somatoforrn disorders, generalizd
anxiety disorders, dissociative disorders)
d. Personality disorders
e. Sexual disorders
f. ' Psychosomatic disorders
g. Eating disorders
Module tII
Child hood Psychiatric disorders, Pervasive developmental disorders, habit disorders,
attention deficit disorders, speech disorders, conduct disorders,leaming disorders,
psychological testing in psychiatry - Tests of intelligence, aptitude and personality. .l
Treatnent modalities in psychiatry: - pharmaicological teatment, ECT and other therapeutic
methods.
Module IV
Work- Definition, historical development, Psychiatic Social Work in
Indiq Multi disciplinary team approach in the treatrrent of psychiatic illness. Role and
functions, of psychiatric social worker in the team. The concept of social diagnosis and
social work interventions in psychiatic setting.- psychiatric hospitals, OPDs, half way home,
day care cen-Ees, de addiction Centes etc. Treafrnent and after care of mental patients,
application of social work methods in the treatnent
. Psychiatric social
'
33
v
Module V
Rehabilitation: Psychiatric rehabilitation, definition, principles and strategies, Community
psychiatry, concept, meaning and evolution of community psychiatry, Mental Hygiene
movement. Community mental health in Indi4 concept of prevention in psychiatry, National
Mental health programme, Prevention in Psychiatry- Primary, seconda4r,tertiary prevention,
Social and cultural factors, in psyihiatric disorders with special reference to India.
References:
A Text book of Psychiatry.
l. David Anderson
2. [awson
lffci
Psychiatiy for social workers.
3. Haratia.J.C
Psychiatric problems of children.
4.ICD-10
Oxford Press New Delhi.
5.
Introduction to psychiaty.
Niraj Ahuja
Introduction to psychiatry.
6.Abraham Varghese
T.American Psychiatric Association: Quick reference
TR(2005),
to the Diagnostic Criteria from DSM- IV-
Jay Pee Brothers Medical Publishers, New
a
8. Kaplan
9.
&
Saddock's
VyasJN,AhujaNiraj
: Synopsis of Psychiatry(2ffi7), Waverly hrt.
[-,rtd.,
Delhi
New
Delhi
: Textbook of Post Graduate Psychiatry Vol. I & ll(1999),
Jay
Pee Brothers, New Delhi
10. Hamilton
:
Max
Fish's outline
of Psychiatry for
students and p*actitioners
(1994), Varghese Publishing House, Bombay
I l.Dinesh Bhugra et.d Ed
12.VMD.Namboothiri
Handbook of Psychiatry, A South Asian Perspectivd2OO5),
Viva Publishers PW. Ltd., New Delhi
: Concise textbook of Psychiatry, B I Waverly flilt prl.I-tA., New
:
Delhi
13. Getder, Michel
etal
14. Vermq Rafit4
15. Hubschman
I
Kynn
:Concise oxford textbook of Psychitry, Oxford & IBH Publishing
Co., New Delhi
:Psychiatric Social Work in Indial99l., Sage Publications
: Hospital social work practise I 993,Pager publishers,USA
work
6. Frenctulois Meredi0r
: Psychiatic Social
17. Hudson,Barber
: Social work with Psychiatric patients, Macmillian
publishers,New Delhi
34
/
MSW Third Semester
II -Rural and Urban Community Development
oil - RUCD I: Gandhian Philosophy of community Development
Optional
Leaming Objectives
l.
Develop an understanding of Gandhi's concept of society and his approach to social
l.
transfomation.
Understand the Gandhian programmes for rural reconstruction and development of
weaker sections.
Module
I
Gandhian Thought : Salient features
Social change througlr non-violence
Module
of Gandhian Thought. Gandhian values,
Sarvoday4
II
Social Organisation. Indian Social Problems and Gandhian solution.
Caste system- Untouchability -women's problems-Illiteracy-alcoholism -Population
explosion-Health and hygiene- seven social evils. Education and its role
Gandhian Thor4ht
M'odule
&
III
'S4tient feanses of Gandhian Economics. Ethical basis of economics- purity of meanssimplicity of life-cooperation- bread labour-self reliance-classless society. Gandhiji's views
on industrialization. Machinery and production- problems and prospects of lqrge-scale
inluslries-appropriate technology indigenous technology. Trusteeship. Rural urban
relatiopship.
Module
fV
Village swaraj, swadeshi, Panchayati Raj CharkaGandhian approach
-of to nral development.
self reliance. Village industries, Constructive prograrnmes. Gandhian
a symbol
.i
movements- Sarvodayq Bhoodan and
Garmdan.
Module V
Gandlrian critique of developmont models. Capitalism, socialism, 9-oTT""ism and mixed
economy. Gandhian and professional social work Approaches similarities and differences
Economic development Vs integral development. Problerns of modern economic growth Energy and ecological crisis, rural -urban imtalance etc.
35
References:
Prasad
2. Ganguly.R.M
l.
Mahadev
3. Unnithan
.T.K
4. Arunachalam
-
5. Sreeman
.K
Narayanam
:Social Philosophy of Mahatma Gandhi
:Gandhi's Social Philosophy
:Gandhiand SocialWork
:Gandhian Approach to Social Work
: Gandhian Economics
6. Gandhi
.M.K
: Social Service, Work and Reform
K
Vepa
: A new technolory
7. Ram
8.
Kumarappa.J.C
9. Paremeshwair
Dayal
A Gandhian concept
:Gandhian Economics Thought
:Gandhian Approach to Social Work
Dasgupta
:Towards a Philosophy of Social Work.
11. Vithayathil, Thomas : Mahatna Gandhi and promotion of Human Rights- Pontifical
l0.Sugata
lnstitute Publication. Alwaye. I 993.
12.
.
Singh, Ram
Binod :
Gandhian Approach to Development Planning. Concept Publishing
Company, New Delhi 2006.
13. Misr4 R.P and Gangrade.K.D (Eds) : Gandhian Alternative Vol l-5. Concept Publishing Company.
New Delhi, 2005
14. Kaushik, Asha: Politics, Symbols and Political Theory- Rethinking Gandhi,
New Delhi
l5.Gandhi M. K., My experiments with Truth
36
Rawat
Publications,
MSW Semester
bptionat III
III
- Family
and Chitd Welfare
(FCl\)
OIII - FCW I - Family Welfare and Population l)ynamics
Learning Objectivcs
l. To understand family as a social system and institution, its significance
and
emerging trends in the family system
2. To understand the problems and crises faced by modern family
and social work
interventions.
3. To leam basic characteristics of Indian population and consequences and
implications thereof.
Module
I
The concepts of family and family welfare- its relationship with the concept of child welfare
and social welfare - Theoretical frarnework to study family. Family, a social institution:
Stnrcture, functions and relationships within the family- Impact of social change and
changing family pattern in India-Emerging trends; problems and needs. Family in, rural,
urban and tribal communities- Altemate family patterns like single parent families, female
headed households and adoptive families.
Module
II
' Family life cycle and developmental tasks at various stages -socialization of the childadolescenU youth and the family- mate selection- marital interaction- problems and needs of
the aged. Family dynamics-meaning and patterns of interaction nmong family members
Module
III
Family disorganization: types of problems and their causes-conflict and' adjustments,
economically destitute families, families in crisis, marital conflicts, abuse of women and
children. Changing patterns of marriage and its consequences.
Family Interventions: Family therapy, pre-marriage and marriage counselling, divorce
counseling, group therapy and crisis intervention. Famity life education, sex education
population education. Use of social work methods in helping families. Family Welfare
Services in India- Farnily welfare under the five year plans: policies and programmes.
Module
IV
Demography: meaning and importance, Determinations of population growth: fertility,
mortallty and migration- factors affecting them. Characteristics of India's population; aga;,
sex, literacy, marital status, etc. Basic demographic concepts: life expectancy, fertility rate,
mortality rate, birth rate, couple protection rate, etc. Global demographic trends and th-e Indian
situation. Implications of population growth at the micro and macro levels. Problems of
population growth in lndia.
39
J
Module V
Population policies in India: a historical over view. Population control measures, populatidn
Contraceptive methods:
Behavioural, mechanical, chemical, temporary, semi permanent and permanent. The ideal
contraceptive- cafeteria approach. Communication and motivation aspects of family plannirig.
education Family planning: The concept and methods.
Family planning in Indian context: Problems and prospects. Administration of Family planning.
progftunmes at national and state levels. Governmental and Non governmental organisations
in family planning.
References:
l. Goode, William
: The Family, Prentice Hall of India
New Delhi
2. Ashish Bose
From Population to People
3. RuthNanda
The Family-Its function and Destiny
4. AgathaBowley
The Problems of Family life
5. Pauline Bose
Family Stress Management
6. Yelien Young husband
Social Work with Families
7. Evelyn
Mills Duralt
Family Development
8. Aganral.S.N
9. Asha Bhende
Principles of Population
tO. Ctianarasetlar.S
Infant Mortality, Population Growttr and Family Planning.
I
t.
Hans R4i
lndia's Population Problems.
Snrdies
Population Studies.
12. SexenaG.B
lndia's Population in Transition.
13. Srinivasan & Mukherji
Dynamics of Population and Family Welfare in India
40
;
MSW Third
Semester
|
'
Optiona[I - Rural and Urban Community Development
OI-RUCD II-Rural
and Urban Community Development
L,eaming Objectives
l. To understand the concep( 'phitosophy and principles of Rural and
Community development
Urban
2- To leam the programmes and servicesin the govemmental and voluntary sector.
3. To develop knowledge about PRfs and their role in community development
Module
I
Rural and Urban community: Structure, Characteristics and Evolution comparative analysis of
rural and urban communities. Rural -urban continuum. Tribal Communities. Problems faced
by communities.
Module
II
Community development: Concept, Philosophy and Principles. Approaches to community
development Rural Recbnstmction Efforts before 1952. Historical review of community
development programmes since independence. Rural Housing and Rural Health programmes,
'Programmes for the development of Scheduled Caste and Scheduled Tribes. progra,m", oi
CSWB, CAPART and NABARD for Rtrat Development. Current Rural
piogrammes. Kudumbasree.
Module
d-evelopment
III
Rural Deyelopment Adminishation. Community development blocks: structure and fi.rnctions.
Other Agencies. Panchayathi Raj: Philosophy and History of Panchayathi Raj, structure and
fi.rnctions of Panchayathi Raj Institutions, Concept of participatory devliopment. 73d
amendment of the constitution. Panchayathi Raj in Kerala, People's Carnpaign and its
evaluation. Co-operative movement and Rural Development. Types of cooperativei, structure
and functions.
Module
IV
Community
Review
74"'amendment of the
Urban
principles. History of Urban Community
lopment prograrnmes. Current programmes.
functions of Local bodies.
D,evelotpment.
Module V
Urban and Rural problems. knplications for social work practice. Role of NGOs. Emerging
trends and strategies
Rural entrepreneurship development, micro finance , building peop-le,i
organisations etc.
-
37
References:
l.
Jacob Z Thudipar4 Urban Community Development, Rawat publication, New Delhi
2. Singh, Katar, Rural development- Principles, Policies and Management, Sage Publications, New Delhi
1999
3. Thudipara,Z.
4.
Jacob, Urban Community Development (2"d Ed), Rawat Publications, New Delhi,2007
Das, Kumar Amiya ,Urban Planning in ldJia, Rawat Publications, New Delhi, 2007
5. Ali, Sabir (Ed), Dimensions of Urban Poverty, Rawat Publications, New Delhi, 2006
'6.
Jain, Reshmi, communicatiirg Rural Dbvetopment Strategi,es and Altdrnatives. Rawat Prlblications,
New Delhi,2003.
7. Singh, Surat (Ed) Decentralised Governance in India- Myth and Reality, Deep and Deep Publications.
New Delhi,2004
8. Batnagar, K.K., Gadeock , K.K. (Ed.): Urban Development and Administration, Aalekh Publishers,
Jaipur,2007
9. Mohan, Sudha, Urban Development New [,ocalism, Rawat Publications, New D€lhi, 2005.
38
'\^
MSW
III
Semester
III - Famity and child Welfare (FCW)
OIII - FCW II - Chitd Welfare
Optional
Learning Objec{ives
1.
2.
. 3.
To understand the concept, services and programmes for child welfare
To learn the development needs and problems of children
To stridy the legal pro.visions andpolicies for children
Module
I
Emerging philosophy of child development, UN declaration of the tightt of the child -National
Policy for children. Constitutional provisions for the care protection and development of children
in [ndia.
Module
II
Developmental needs of children -stages of child's development: needs and problems at different
stages. Family as the basic unit of child's development- physical, emotional, cognitive and social
development. Common childhood diseases: their prevention and treatment. Early detection and
management of childhood disabilities. Behavior problems of children: prevention and heatnentrole of Child Guidance Clinics.
Mode III
Magnitude cause and remedial measures for the major problems of children in India: child
labou4 street children, juvenile delinquency, child abuse and neglect, physically and lnentally
disabled childrerU school drop-outs, orphans, gender discrimination, female infanticide and
feticide, c*rild marriage etc.
Module
IY
Child development programmes in India. A historical overview. Development services for
children under the five year plans. Institutional and non institutional services or chi-ld
development: scope and limitations. ICDS programme: a detailed study. Maternal ana cldta
health services.
Module V
Contributions of national and international organizations in the field of child development:
UNICEF, ILO, Indian Council of Child Welfare, NIPCCD, CSWB etc- NGO's and child
development. Legislations to protect the interests of children: Juvenile Justice Act 1986, Infant
foods @egulation of Production Supply and Distribution) Act 1992, Child Labour (Piohibition
and Regulation) Act 1986 etc.
4l
References:
1.
Child Development in India, Vol. I & II
Kumar.R
2.ElizabethHurlock
3. Bhalla
Studies in Child Care
M.A
4. Chaturvedi.T.N
5. Gokhale S.D.
Development Psychology
& Sohni N.K
Administration for Child Welfare
Child in India
6. Kale S.V.
Child Psychology and Child
7. Sumithra Gupta
Social Welfare in India
8. Visurathar S.J
Deviant Children
ri
42
\
MSW Fourth Semester
CCry paper XVII -Human Resource DevelopUent in Human Service Organisations
and NGO Management
Learning objectives
l. Tb understand human behaviour in Organisations
2. To develop skills in human Resource Dcvelopment
3.. To understand the'concepts in NGIO Maaagement
Module
I
Human Resource management: Meaning, na,trre and scope, functions, Importance.
Human behaviour and HRM, Qualities and skills of HR professionals, Evolution, origin
and development of HRM, e- Human Resource Management, Recent techniques in HRM
Module
II
Personnel administration: Definition, objectives ,and functions in HSO's. Man power
planning, recruifinent, selection, interview, induction, compensation, promotion transfer,
performance appraisal and retirement. Rewards and incentives
Module
..
III
Organisational behaviour. Motivation , morale, communication, group dynamics,
Leadership, job satisfaction and performance conflict and stress, stress management,
power, sources and types of power. Total quality management Quality circles.
-.Module V
Training ldentification
of training
needE organising training progrirmmes, different
training methods, Evaluation of training programmes. Case analysis, Personnel relations
and grievance handling, Organisational relations, trade unions, staffassociations conflicts
and disputes methods
of
maintaining organizational peace, gfievances, handling of
gtievances,. Social security schemes, employee counselling.
Module VI
Management of NGOs: Non-Governmental Organizations(NGos), types, .Range of NGO
aotivities, NGO approaches in solving community problemsrcase studies. Recent
approaches, Capacity building, financial management, Organisation managerial problems
in NGOs, firnd rising, monitoring and evaluation, networking and advocacy, information
management. Results based management, International NGOs. Challenges of NGOs.
Public- Private Partrership, Corporate Social Responsibility
43
,
References:
l. Epilpps,Edwin, B
Principles of Management, Mc,Graw Hill Publishing
company Ltd, New Delhi
2. Monappa, Arun and Sivadain
Personnel Management Tata Mc Graw-Hill
Publishing ComPanY Ltd, NewDelhi.
3. Ttripathi P.G
Personnel Management S.Chand and Sons, New
Delhi
4.P. Subba Rao
5. Luthans Fred
Personnel and Human Resource Management
Organisational Behaviour Mc. Graw
Company, New Delhi
44
Hill
Publishing
MSW hourth Semester
CCII - Paper XVIII: Social kgislation
Learning Objectives
l.
2.
3.
4.
To familiarize the students with Indien legal system ,Indian Constitution,
and the fundamental rights, duties and directive principles
To gain knowledge regarding personal laws, laws for the weaker section ,
social security legislations and laws for the prevention of atrocities
To acquaint them with the statutory bodies for the protection of the rights of
the individuats in general and wonen ard children in particurar
To equip the students to apply their knowledge of taw to help the .
underprivileged and needy
Module
I
Social Irgislation: Meaning & Scope. Historical development , Social [rgislation as an
instrument for Social Control, Social change & Social justice . Social Defense. procedure
involved in the making of a Indian con$itution and social Legislation, Fundamental
rights, Fundamental duties and Directive Principles of State policy Legislation.
Legislation system in India: Courts, Hierarchy of courts. Legal AID: Meaning,
organization & uses public lnterest litigation.
Module
II
Law of Crimes: Indian Penal code, CriminalProcedure code . Prisons & correction. Laws
related to atrocities against women, Laws related to domestic violence, rape, sexual
harassment and immoral traffic prevention, [-aws relating to probation and parol, Laws
related to atrocities against children. The rightof the child and laws relatedio children,
Women's Commission-its strucfure, functions, National Human Rights Commission.
Module
III
Personal Laws: laws related to Marriage Divorce, Dowry. Hindu Marriage Act,
Christian Marriage Act. Muslim Marriage Laws, Special Marriage Act. Laws re"lated to
adoption and guardianship.
Iaws related to succession and inheritance, Dowry Prevention Act, Family CourtStrucfure and functions.
Module IV
protection Act - Objectives and activities, Consumer Court, Environmental.
_Consumer
Legislation relating to conservation of forest and prevention of pollution and disposal
of
.waste. Persons with Disabilities Act 1995. Laws related to prevention of atrocities against
scheduled castes and-scheduled tribes ( l9g9), Laws relat& to co.rrpii*, ii"sdv
*o
Mental illness. Juvenile Justice Act., Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic substanil
a"t.
Module V
L;egislation on Social Security measure:The Factories Act l948,The payment of Gratuity
Act 1972, The Workmen's Compensation Ac\1923, The Employ."nt State Insurance
Act,l948.
45
References
' l. Gangrade K.D.
.
: Social Legislation India. Vol. I and II
concept publishing company, Delhi 1978
:
2. Kulkami P.D
Social Policy and social Development in
India
3. India
Government
: Constitution of India. Govt. of India Press,
New Delhi
4. Mathew
PD
: Public lnterest Litigation
Indian Social Institute, New Delhi, 1999
S.Tapan
Biswal
: Human rights, gender and environment
Viva books Pvt Ltd, New Delhi,2006
6. People law and
justice
: A case book of PIL,Vol 2
Orient [rcngman publishers,New Delhi, I 997
?
Introduction to constitution of India: Vikas publishers house pvt Lt4New Delhi
8. Bare Acts
and legislation
9. Encyclopediaof Social Work
10. Legal-.Education
Series
: Indian Social lnstitute, New Delhi, 1999
46
MSW Fourth Semester
Optional I
-
Medical and isychiatric Social work (IvtPS!$
OI -MpSW [I-Therapeutic Approaches in Medical and Psychiatric settings.
Learning Objectives
l.
2.
3.
To acquaint the students with contemporary psychosocial approaches to therapy
in medical ind psychiatric settings
To hdp them gain knowledge regardiog various therapies practiced in the field
of health end mental health
To hetp ttep develop compassioo, competencrc and conlidence to work as
modical and psychiatric social workers.
Module
I
Psychotherapy: definition, scope and types of Psychotherapies. Psychotherapies based on
Indian religious and cultural value system. Yoga and Meditation as therapies
Modute
II
Psychodynamic therapeutic approaches: psychoanalytic therapy (Freud), Analytic
pry"t oth"1apy (Grd Jung, Adler) Humanistic- Existential Therapies: l,ogo therapy (Frankl),
Person- Centered therapy @ogers), Transactional Analysis @erne), Gestalt therapy (Perls),
Existential therapy
Module
III
Cognitive Behavioural Therapy: Theories of Behaviour therapy, Classical Conditioning
@avlov.J.B.Watson), Operant Reinforcement theory (Skinner), Social Lrarning Theory
(Ellis ), Beck's Cognitive
@andura), Behavior therapy (Lazarus), Rational Emotive therapy
therapy, Reality therapy (Glasser)
Moaurc
fV
Interpersonal Therapies: Family therapy, Marital therapy, Group therapy, Psychodrama.
,
hilo&rle Y
Occupational therapy, Industrial therapy, Therapeutic community, play therapy, crisis
intervehtion, chanotherapy, electro convulsive therapy, Creative Arts Therapy: Art therapy,
Music therapy, Dance movement therapy, Laughter therapy, Neuro linguistic programming.
References:
l. Richard.S.Shrad:
:Theories
of
Psychotherapy and counseling concept and Cases,
Brooks/ Cole
Antony:
3. Charles Zastrow:
4. Turner
5. Kaplan and Saddock
6. Niraj Ahuja
7. Hall and Lindsey
8. LC.D-10
9. V/olberg
2. Fr. John
:lntroduction to Psychotherapy
:The Practice of Social Work Dorsey Press,Illinois
:Social Work Treatment
:
Comprehensive Text Book of Psychiatry
:Post Graduate Text Book of Psychiaty (
:Theories of personality
:Oxford Press
lntroduction to Psychotherapy, vol-I&II
47
vol: I &II)
.
MSW Fourth Semester
Optional I - Medical and Psychiatric Social Work
OI
-
-J,
MPSW fV -ffeaitn Care Administration and Legislation
Learning Objectives
l. To understand the health care systern in India
2. To undcrstand the basic conceph in Ilospital Administration
3. To learn legislations in the field df health
Module
I
tlealth Planning aird Management:- Health Plarining, Defiriition, Health Planning in
India, health in five year plans, changing perspectives of health services, National Healdt
Policy, the planning cycle, Population dynamics
Module
If
The health care system in India. At thc Cenhe, State, Dishict and Village leveh kimary
Health care in India, Administative structure and functions of PHC, Health prograiltmes
in lndia" Alternative healttt care systern.
Module III
Hospital Administration: Concept definition, general principles, functions and drlies of
hospital a&ninistrator, Hospital as an organization, Different deparfttents in a lrcspital,
Hospital Inforrration system, Waste management consumer health and health ptodrcrs,
Consumer laws on h€aldl
Module IV
Heaitlr iirogrammes by government and NGOs, Voluntary organiz.ations working in tt€
field of neaHr-to"ul, State, National and International. Health insurance, School lteattr
.
Programme
Module V
kgislation
l.
relared to health care in India
Mdical Termination ofpregnancy Act
2. Prevention of Food adulteration Act 1954
3. Drug ard Cosmetics Act 1940
4. The Pncnatal Diagnostic Techniques (Regulation
and Prevention of misuse)r
Act 1994
5. ESI Act l94l
6. Mental Health Act
7. Narcotic'and Psychohopic
"
zubstances
Aot
References
: Health Care Policy making and Planning
: Heatth Care system and management. Vol.3
3. Gupta Sakti ad Kant Sunil : Hospital and Health care Administration
Test Book of Social and Preventive Medicine
4. O Park J.and Park .K :
Goel
2. S.L Goel
l.
S.L
48
MSW Fourth Semester
Optional II- Rurat and Urban Cfmmunity Development
OII- RUCD Paper III - Environmental Studies and Disaster Management.
Learning Objectives :-
1. Understaud the inter relatedness of human life, living organisms aud environment.
2. Understand the environrrent problems nature and impact of development
3.
4.
'
initiatives.
Examine the utilization and management of natural resources.
Studythe role of social work practice in dealing with environm.ental problems and
in disaster menagement.
Module
I
Environment and Ecology. Basic eoology of earth: Vegetation Paffern, Biotic and a biotic
factors, climatic factors, food chain, food web. Bio Geo Chemical cycles. The
interrelatedness of living organisms and natural resources.
Natural Resources: Utilisation and Management.
Forest land, water, air and energy sources.
Module
II
Pollution and its Effects
Air Pollution -Types, Ozone Layer depletion, Green house effect. Clobal warming
.
Water Pollution- Tlpes and Sources. Land Pollution
- Types.
quarrying
pollution,
etc.
sand
mining,
Agricultural and chemical
Solid waste - Types . Solid Waste Management,
Thermal Pollution. Industrial Pollution. Nuclear Pollution- Radiation, effects and waste
disposal
Noise Pollution: Sources, tlpes and effects. Energy crisis. Deforestation.
hnpact of Development Initiatives. Impact of war.Module
III
Environmental Conservation: Methods- water shed management, bio-farniing social forestry,
aforestation, recycling; Sustainable Development. Environment Education. Environment
lmpact Assessment
Module
IY
.,.
Role of Governmen! NGOs and People's initiatives. International Treaties and Agreements.
Environment Lrgislation in India.
Social Work and Environment. Work with interdisciplinary teams, promotion of environment
movernents. Environment Movements in trndia & Kerala CHIPKO, APIKO, Narmada Bacho
Andolan, National Alliance for Peoples Movements etc. Global Summits.
Module V
Disaster: Definition, Natural and Human made disasters; multiple causes & effects; Stages of
disaster; Development & Disaster; Preventive Measures. Disaster Management: stagesrescue, relief, reeonstruction & rehabilitation. Role of government, Disaster Management
Policy; Rolg of volunary organizations.
49
.
References:
l.
Bharuchq Erach ( for
UGC) :
Textbok of Environmental studies for
Undergraduate courses. University
Press ( India) Private
2. Saxen4 H,M
:
Ltd. Hydrabad,2}O5.
Environmental studies, Rawat
Publications. New Delhi,2006.
3.
Pawar, S.N, Patil, R.B and
.
Salunkhe, S.A
(Fds)
:
Environmental Movements in India . Strategies and
Practice. Rawat Publications. New Delhi ,2005
Rachel
5. Biswal, Tapan
4. Carson,
:
Silent Spring , Penguin books, 1 962
: Human rights, Gender and Environment
50
MSW Fourth Semester
Optional'II-Rural Urban Community I)evelopment
@UCD) '
OII - RUCD fV- Developmental Economics
Learning Objectives
1.
To understand the conccpt and theories of economic development.
' 2. To develop
knowledge of composition of Indian oconomy- different sectorsand
their role
.Module
I
Economic Development: Definition and factors. Theories of economic development. Under
development: meaning and indicators. Common Characteristic of under developed countries.
Obstacles to development. Human Capital Development- Education, health and Nutrition
Indian economy: strucfure, current economic scene. Kerala economy: salient feafures
Module
II
Concept of poverty: measurement of poverty-magnitude of poverty in India. Determinants of
poverly: economic, social political, cultural and religious factors that perpetuate poverty.
Victims of poverty lndian: womsn, children other weaker sections. Implications.
Module
III
Agriculfure: basic characteristics, production and cropping paffern. Causes of low
productivity and measures to increase productivity. Rural credit ad inputs. Land ownership
and reforms in India/I(erala. Farm mechanisation and its effects. Impact
of
New Economic
Policy.
i
Modu-le
IV
The role of small scale and cottage industies in development. Khadi and village industries.
Micro-enterprises development. Rural unemployment agriculturalJabourers and minimum
wages. Impact of New Economic Policy. Service sector of the Economy. Role and
problems in the wake of New Economib Policy.
Planning for economic development in India. Priorities of the Five Year Plans Impact of Five
Year Plans on the different sectors of the economy. Features ofthe current Five Year Plan.
5l
References:
'
Agrawal
2. Chaudhuri .P
l. A.N.
3. Tandon, B.8., K.K.
4. Bardhan
Tiwari
.P
Rath
6. Bhagwati .J
7. Sankara4 .S
8. Varghese.K.v
9. prakash, B.A.
5. Dandekar
&
,
:
:
Indian Economy: Naturd, Problems and Progress
' v
The Indian Economy, Poverly and Development
Indian Economy, Tata Mcgraw
Hill
Publishing
Company. New Delhi,l 997
:
:
:
i
:
:
The Political Economy of Development in'lndia
PovertY in India
The Economics of Under developed Counties
Agrjcultural Economy of India.
Economic Problems of Modern India
Kerala's economic development - performance and
Problems in the Post Liberalisation Period, Sage
Publications, New Delhi,2004
.M.Again
I l. Sharma S.L.(od)
10. Seth
12. RugmarL
Alan
:Theory and Practice of Economic Planning.
: Development: Socio cultural Dimensions, Rawat
Publications, New Delhi, 1986
: The End of Globalisation, Random
200,0.
52
House, London
MSW Fourth Semester
Optional III- Famill I and Child Welfare(FCW)
O UI- FCW [I- Women's DeveloPment
Learning Obiectives
in India
understanding of women's issues and status of women
and programmes
seriv\ces
and
2. To learn the constituti[nal and'legat provisions
available for women
1. To develop
Module
I
women in relation to education and
Status of Women : Demographic profile of Indian
Changing roles and status of women in
employment in rural, urban iA^ttiUuicommunities'
groups' Democratisation and
India. Socio- legal status of women among different religious
women leadershiP.
Module
II
Women and Health
India'
Factors contributing to
in
Indicators of heatth and nutritional status of women
programmes for improving health
low health and nutrition among women. Policies and
child health servicesand nutition status of women- Maternity and
Module
Itr
Problems of Women : Problems of destitute
child etc. Atrocities against women: dowry d
ieoticide, sati. Sexual exploitation of women
system, Problems of working women in
discrimination in lndia SocietY.
Module [V
women's development
in Five Year
Plans'
Module V
Women
lmmoral
Indecent
(Regulat
commission- structure and functions'
National commission for women and Kerala women's
53
References:
l.
'
S.K.Ghosh
Indian women, Through the Ages
'
2. Chinnappa Reddy
Problems and Concerns of Indian women.
3.
Crime Against Women.
Ram Ahuja
4. Neera Desai
A Decade of \l'omen's Movement in India.
5. UshaRao
Women
6. Narayana Reddy
IVomen and Child DeveloPment.
7. Maurya.S.D
Women in India
8. Leelama Devasia
Women in India- Equality,.S.ocial Justice and
ir
a Developing SocietY.
Development
9. Srivastava.T.V
Women andthe Law.
10. UshaTahoar
Social Profile of Working Women
54
tra
'
MSW Fourth Semester
Optional
O
III- Famity and Child Welfare (FCly)
m- FCW IV- Youth Welfare and Development.
Learning Objectives
l.
To learn the status and problems of yo'uth
2. To understand the services and programme for youth
soctor
Modute
in the govt and voluntary
I
Youth: definition and characteristics. Demographic profile and youth in tndia. Needs,
aspirations and problems of youth. Unemployment youth unrest, generation gap, drug
addition, alcoholism, suicide and terrorism among youths in India.
Module
tr
Services for sfudent youth: Education, physical education, sports, recreation, vocational
guidance, leadership training, Bharat scouts and Guides, National Cadet Corps, National
Service Scheme, youth festivals, youth camps, student's counseling planning forum, etc.
Module
III
Services for student youth: Non- formal education for sctrool drop-outs, TRYSEN4 Prime
Miniser's Rozgar Yojanq Programmes by various government departments and NGO's.
Modub IV
Ndional Yo.uth Policy. Youth Welfare Organisations at the national and state level. Vishwa
Yuvak Kendra and Nehru Yuvak Kendra: Objectives and Programmes. Youth hbstels,
National Youth awards.
Module V
Principles of working with youth. Values, skills and functions
of a social worker working
among youth. Research in the youth welfare: nature and scope.
References:
.K.D.Gangrade
2. Erick H Erickson
3. Viswa Yuvak Kendra
4. Sinha
l.
:
:
:
:
Crisis ofValue.
Identity Youth & Crisis
lndian Youth: Procsss of SocialiSation
lntegration in India.
55
I
Fly UP