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r-NIVIRS]TY Df UALlcu1
ishcyrqctr
i\,-
>vii'* (CUCSS) ){::t:l
colleges Syiiabus and Sciienie
Impiementation oi' Cahcut Unlversi-ry ireriir Suitiss,o,
of
Social Work Course
in
"ifiliut"d
implemented with effect from 2010 Ad'mission
-
approved
-
implemented
-
Orders Issued.
GENERAL, AND ACADEMIC BRANCH IV 'B' Section
.a
Dated, Calicut University.P.O.,
GAIV/B1i520t03
;.;;,
3
ll07l20l0-
il1-;;;^ ;;;; -;;;;
ffi ; ;; ;;;;;
the meeting of the Board of Studies in Social Work (Single Board)
2j Vlinutes of
held cr^ 1 4.06-20 1 O.{trm No. 1)
3) Orders of the Vice Chancellor in the file of even number dtd..27-07-2010.
ORDER
Vide paper read
I't above, Calicut University Credit Semester System (CUCSS)
has been introduced at PG level in affiliated colleges of this University.
The Board of Studies in'social Work ( Single Board ) at its meeting held on
11-00-2010 considered the question of implementation of Calicut University Credit
Semester System (CUCSS) at PG level, and framed and approved the Syllabus for l"{aster
of Social Worr to be ot'fererJ in affiliated colleges, with effect from 2010 admission, vide
paper read 2nd above. (Item |"1o. I)
The Vice Ch.ancellor after having consrdered the urgency, approved iterr:r iio. I of
the ,,tinutes, exercising the po\ilels of Academic Council, subject to ratification by
Acaciemic Council.
Sanction has therefore been accorded for implementing the Syllabus of Master of
to
Social \l/ork Course in the affiliatert colleges. with effect from 2010 admission, subject
ratrficatton by Acacierris Councii.
Orders are issued accordinglY'
Syllabrrs is appended herewith
sd/DEPUTY REGISTXAX(G & A
FOT REGISTRAR
Tc:
The Principals of all Colleges offering MSW Cotuse'
Cop;,1e; Controtlei of Examinations/Ex Sn/EG Sd DR/ AR P'G Sn/ System
Administrator with a request to upload the syllabus in the University
website/Library/ GA I F Sn./ SFIDF/FC'
Forv5lded i By Order
SECTW OFFI CER
rv)
t.
t
TINIVERSITY OF CALICUT
MASTER OF SOCTAL WORK(MSW)
SYLLABUS AND SCHEME
2010
t
CONTENTSI
I)
COURSE STRUCTURE AND SCHEME
2)
RULES FOR FIELD WORK
3)
RULES FOR DISSERTATION
4)
SYLLABUS:
@
MASTER OF SOCIAL WORK
SYLLABUS AND SCHEME 2OTO
SCHEME AND SYLLABUS OF MASTER OF SOCIAL WORK (MS!9
Semester
I
Scheme
Instructio
st.
Course
No
(.iode
I
SWIC
0l
2.
SWIC
02
3.
SWIC
03
4.
SWIC
Title ()f Courses
History, Philosophy and
Fields of social Worl<
Sociology and Economics for
Social Work
Human Grouth and
Development
Social Casework
04
5.
6.
SWIC
05
SocialAction
Concurrent Fieldwork
06
Total
f
Credits
m
EE
IE
Total
Hou
Weight
Weight
Credits
rs
4
4
J
4
4
3
4
4
_t
4
4
J
30
l0
30
l0
30
r0
30
l0
30
l0
24
Community organ isation and
SWIF
n
Hours/we
ek
of
Examination
Exa
4
4
l0't*
4
30
24
3
40
Semester
II
Scheme
Instructio
sr.
No
Course
Code
I
S WII
2.
SWU
Title Of Courses
n
Hours/we
ek
SocialGroup Work
c07
Psychology for Social Work
c08
3.
SWII
Theory and Practice of
Counselling
Social Work Research
SWII
Social Analysis and Strategies
SWII
ofSocial Change
Concurrent Fieldwork
SWII
c09
4
5
cl0
c ll
6.
Ft2
Total
I
Credits
m
Hou
of
Exanrination
Exa
IE
'Iotal
Weight
Credits
EE
Weight
rs
4
4
J
4
4
J
4
4
3
4
4
3
4
4
J
0**
J
30
23
30
l0
30
t0
30
l0
30
l0
30
I'l
4
23
Semester
III
Scheme
lnstructio
sl.
i- ourse
No
(lode
I
SWIII
cl3
Title Of Courses
n
Hours/we
ek
Social Work Administration and
Participatory Project Plann ing
Exa
Credits
of
Examination
m
EE
IE
Hou
Weight
Weight
Total
Credits
r5
4
4
3
4
4
3
4
4
.,
4
4
3
Psychiatric Inlolrnation fcr
Social Work
4
4
3
Gandhian Philosophy of
Community Developrnent
4
4
J
4
4
)
4
4
3
4
4
3
l0**
4
30
24
30
l0
30
l0
30
r0
30
r0
30
l0
and Managemcnt
2.
J.
SWIII
c. t4
SWIII
c15
4.
SW
I}I EI
5.
t6
SW
III EI
Quantitative Methods in Social
Work Research
Community llealth and
Health Education
Social Work in Medical and
Psychiatric Settings
24
17
4.
SW
TII E2
)
30
l0
30
l0
30
r0
30
r0
t6
5.
SW
IJ'tE2
Rural and Urban Community
Developmenl
t7
4.
SW
Family Welfare and Population
III E3
Dynamics
l6
5.
SW
:iI
Child Welllre
E3
7
6
SW III
F
Concurrert Ficlclwork
18
Total
ill
f'
I
40
I
Semester
IV
Instructio
sl.
No
Course
Code
Title Of Courses
n
Houis/we
Credits
Iv
cl9
Human Resource
Management in Human
Service Organisations
SW
Social Legislation
SW
2
SW
Therapeutic Approaches in
Medical and Psychiatric
Settings
Health Care Administration
IV EI
and Legislation
SW
IV EI
2l
4.
3.
22
SW
IY E2
4
4
Environmental Studies and
Disastet Management
4
EE
IE
Hou
Weight
Weight
30
l0
30
t0
30
l0
30
t0
30
lf
30
l0
30
l0
30
t0
J
4
J
4
4
3
J
2t
4.
SW
IV E2
Development Economics
4
4
J
22
J.
SW
IV
2l
4.
SW
IV
Women Development
4
E3
E3
Youth Welfare and
Development-
4
4
4
22
5.
SW
Concurrent Fieldwork
.!0**
IVF
3
23
6.
7.
SW
IV Pr
24
SW
Dissertation
4
4
Viva-voce (Theory)
IVV
4
25
8.
SW
Block Field work
IVF
2
26
30
Total
!
I
tv
Total
Credits
3
4
4
IV
c20
3.
4
4
Exa
m
rs
ek
I
Scheme ,rf
Examination
n
3
3
29
{/
Field Work
Rules
Field work is designetl to provide a variety of opportunities to develop and enhance
P'ofessional practice skills. Learning is aided through observation, analysis of social
realities and experience of participation in designing and providing social work
intervention. Major components of field work are observation visits, community
living experience/camp. concurrent field work, study tour, summer placement and
block placement.
Field work should involve the selective utilization of all social work methods. The
student should also be assigned small research studies, organization of programmes
for the clientele of the agency and training programmes.
Each student is to be assigned to faculty supervisor who supervises the field work
activities of the student. Individual conferences with the students arc recommended.
The Department should prepare an evaluation proforma to assess the level of
competence of the sludent. This should be given to the agency supervisor for
assessment.
The students should prepare and submit the report of their activities during fieldwork.
They should also present a summary of activities in the fieldwork seminar held every
semester. A viva voce exam should be held at the end of each semester in which a
social rvork practitioner will be the examiner. This viva voce exam can be conducted
by the Departments themselves.
,f
.i
Fieldwork Schedule
Sl.No
Semester
l.
Field practicum
component
Duration/l"lo
( Minimum Requirements are
a. Observation Visits
a.
b. CommunitY livingi
Camp
b.5to7Da1's
Credits
a
ven
l2 organisalions
4
c. l0 lrours Per week . ( Social
work methorls )
c. Concurrent
II
2.
l0 hours per rveek (oPPortunities
Concurrent Fieldwork
for casework, grouP work and
communitY organ ization should
be provided.)
J
I
I
J.
III
a. l0 hours Per week (Students
should be Placed in organization;
according to their specializations')
a. Concurrent
Fieldwork
4
b. Fourr to seven daYs to social
weltare organizations and
i development Projects
b. Study Tour
4.
IV
a.
a. Concurrent
l0 hours Per week
(Students
shc,uld be Placed in organizations
acc:ording to their specializations)
Fieldwork
b. One Month at the end of the
fourth sentester (lt is an intemship
to lacilitate the transition from
academic to work life. AgencY
should be chosen so that
Opportun ities for enhancing
independcnt Practice
b. Block Placement
competencies are IIeviqgg:
vl
J
2
I
\
Assessment
Credits for Fieldwork irre given after intemal assessment and there is no external
evaluation.
Sl.No.
Critcria for
Assessment
L
Fieldwork report (daily)
2.
Summary Report
3.
Evaluation Proforma
(Average of the marks given by the
agency and faculty supervisors to be
taken. Peer/Self evaluation can also be
done though it should not be
considered for assessment.
4.
Field work seminar
(Oriteria- preparation, presentation, use
crf audio visual aids and general
in the semi
5.
Fieid work Viva Voce
Dissertation work
Rules
The student has to prepare and submit a dissertation under the guidance of a faculty.
The student is engagcd meaningfully in the process of problem formulation;
reviewing some literatrrre related to the study; preparing the research proposal,
choosing an appropriate research strategy and developing instruments for data
collection, collecting data, data processing, analyzing and interpreting the data and
preparing the research rcporl. The length of the research report may be between 80 to
l0r) pages and should not exceed 120 pages.
vil
.v
I
D'G
It is divided into two components: 30
General Grading pattern is
evaluation.
for external evatuation and l0 for internal
applicable to dissertation also. If a candidate fails in the dissertation, the exar"ner
wil give comments and suggestions for resubmission. Corrected dissertation should
from the
be su-bmitted to the Universi-i[ within one month of the receipt of comments
valuation.
re
for
examiner
an
to
sent
University. The resubmitted dissertation may be
The total credits for the dissertation work is 4.
External evaluation.: Weishtaee: J0
Evalualion CrifPria
Weightage
Sl No
Item
I
Choice of area / topic
Review
of
relevant
literature
2.
Objectives
and
Scope, research potentials ,rf the theme
.,
Comprehensiorr, quality and quantity
Relevance, relation to research theme,
clarity
hypotheses
Research design or Appropriateness, selection o1' variables,
sample selection, descrilltion of the
methodology
method used
J.
ToolV
instruments
validation
used
4.
Appropriatenest,
Data analysis
and
interpretation
5.
Schemt Application
construction,
of
analytical/
2
l0
statistical techniques. use of tables,
figures, relating findings to objectives
and literature, discussion on findings
Summary
on earlie r chaPters'
synthesis of research findings,
Discussion
implications of the studY
6.
Report Presqntation
7.
Viva Voce
I
5
Ability to recall and exPlatn the
research process and to defend the
5
research work.
30
Tnfql
vlll
;
"f
;
Internal evaluation
-
Weiehfgee.:
l0
Evaluation Criteria
Points to be noted
Interest ofthe student
Synopsis Presentation
Regularity
-
Literature review, clarity
of concepts, Pilot sttrdv
and
tools, draft and final
report, seeking timely
guidance and supervision
Overall Perf<rrmance
Commitment, confidence
and genuineness
Presentation of
fi nd i ngs
Clarity
,.g"Ailg
methodology and findings,
confidence in presentation
and ability
doubts
IX
to
clarifi
-.*
MSW Semester I
SW I C
0t
: History, Philosophy antl Fieltis ol'Social Work
Crcdits:
I
4
Iou rs/wcck: 4
Learning Objectives
1. To get an insight into the basic concepts of Social Wor[i
2. To understand the history of Social work :rnd Sociai iliork cducation in India
and abroad
3. To appraise social work as a profession
4. To understand the methods and functions of Social --,>v'ork
5. 'fo understand the philosophical assumptions. r'alues arrrl ideologies of Social
6.
Work.
To understand the various fields of Social \&'ork
Module I
Basic Concepts: Social Work- functions and metho,-ls Socriil Service. Social Welfare.
Social Refbrrn. Social Justice, Social Securitr,. Sociai Poii(--.. Social l)cl'cnsc. Social
Development. Voluntary Social Work.
Module 1l
History of Social Work Prof'ession and Social \\orii. i:i-iucrttiort: I:r,'olution ol'Social
Work in UK, US,A and India.
Social Work education- history. curriculunr. coLrrscs lircl s1;ccializ-atioirs. tield Work,
supervision, current trends in social work educittion
Module 1l I
Social Work Prof'ession: Characteristics
o1-
a prolcssion- l)e vcloprncnt
Social work in India: Status of Prof'essionlii
Organizations: National and lnternatiorral.
o1' [)ro{'e ssional
Socrrl \\'orkers.
Proli:;sional
of
(iovernmcnt ancl i rrlrrntarl' Organizations in
Promoting Social Welfare and Social Work Prol'ession irr lrrciia Prolcssional social
worker - Code of Ethics . Qualities of a prof'essional social r't orkcr
Voluntary Social Work. Role
Module IV
Philosophy of social work, Philosophical values ol'social i^.ork - l)cnrocratic fiante
worth and dignity of indivicjual. ir.rl.clautir.rl,. !irrccs <rl'lrurnan bclravior,rr,
uniqueness of individuality, change and thc potcniiaiit_r'i, rhangc. thc right tbr sell
direction. participation of clients in the helpins process :'!uht 1o scll' liilflllrnent to
work,
e
\,
the extent of his capat,it', and within the limits. Society's responsibility to facilitate
self-- fulfillment of the rndir.,idLral. group or community. Principles oI Social Work
S<;urces
of Social \\ork plrilosophy: Survey ol'western and lndian traditions:
Rcligious and spiritual traditiorrs- Christian. Hindu, Muslim, Buddhist Religion and
id.:ologies, Liberal isrn Il'-rrrart i sm. Soc ial ism. Democracy, Gandh ism.
Module V
Fields of Social Wuri<. l:arrii' ancl (lhild Welfare. Social Work in tlre field of healthMedical and Psychiatric Social Work. Social work with women. Social work with
Youth. Social Work in education. Social Work with differently abled, Social work in
the development of S(l S'i-. Social Work in correctional servicss, Social Work with
migrants and unorganizcd laborers. Disaster management and Social Work, Social
work in industries. Social Work in geriatric setting. Social work in Urban
Development and Rural Deveiopnrent
References:
l.
Fink A.F..
:
'f hc Field of Social Work.
2. Friendlander. W.A
Concepts and Methods of Sr-:cial Work
3. Core M.S.
Social Work and Social Work education.
4. Khinduka S.K
Social Work in India
5. Woodroffee. Kathlean
lironr Charity to Social Work in the l.JK and LJSA
6. Stroup llFI
Social Work
7. Wadia.r\.1{
[.listo11, and Philosophy
8.Banerjce (i.R.
Papers
- An Introduction
oiSocial Work in India
olsocial work;-An Indiarr Perspective,
IATA lnstitute of Social
9.Hars Nagpaul
:
.I'he
to the fleld
Science, Bombay
Study of Indian Society. S.Chand &Co.
[0. Encyclopedia of Social \\'orl<
I I .Misra PD and Beena M isra
: Social rvork Proflession in India, New Royal
Book Co,Lucknow.
12. Banerjee.G.R.
: Papers on Social Work: An lndian Perspective
-[-ata
13. Dasguptha .S
Institutc of Social Sciences. Murnbai.
'l'owards a Philosophy
of Sccial Work in
India. Popr-rlar Book Service. New Delhi.
G
A
14. Firendlander.W.A
:
Social Welfare. prentite llall of'lndia.
Pvt. Ltd New Delhi.
15. Galaway and
Compton
:
Social work proccss
Homervord. lllirrois
16. Gangrade.
:
K.D
:
I
he Dorsey press.
9 79.
Dimension of Social i,rorl< Marvel
Publications.
17. Khinduka.S.D
I
Neri t)ellri
Social Work in India. Sarv.odala Sahithva
Sama.i, Ra.jasthan.
18. Paul Chawdhary
:
Introduction to Social \!,rtrk.
Atma Rarr and sorrs. Ne w Delhi
I9. Stroup. H.ll
,1
{
I
il
ii
'Ji
i
:
20.Wadia. A.R
:
21. Charles Zastrow
:
Social Worl<: As Introclrrction to the Irie
ld.
New York. American tJook Co..l95-1.
History and lrhilosophy of Social Work
in
India AIlied t)uhlishers. tlombay 196t.
'fhe Practice o1'social
Wor.k.
MSW Semester I
SW I Cl 02 : Sociology and Economics for Social Work
Credits:
4
Hours/week: 4
Learning Objectives:
L
2
3.
4.
5.
LJnderstand thc sociological concepts to examine social phenomenon.
Understand social and economic processes and systems.
Develop awareness of social and economic problems.
Understand development and its impact.
flnderstand planlring and its impact on various areas
Module I
Sociology: Det'lnition. Signif icancc of Sociology in Social Work. Society: definition
Characteristics. Signillcancc ot' theoretical understanding of society. Evolutionary,
cl.,clical. conflict and systenis theories.
Social Institutions: Deflrrition. Characteristics and Functions. Family, Marriage,
Education. Religion arrd Ercor:omic and Political [nstitutions.
IVlodule
II
Social Process: Def"inition.'l'ypes: Associative and Dissociative- Competition,
Confl ict. Assimilati<tn Accornntodation. Co operation.
Social Stratification: Dcilnirion.'i-heories and 1'ypes, Caste,Class. Gender.
Module
III
Socialisation: Definiticrn, thcories. Agencies of socialization.
Social Change: Definition. !-heories. Factors of social change
Social control: Deflnitiorr. ascncics o1'social control. Means of Social control
F-,lkr,r,ays, rnores. n0nns c[c
Sosial problems: Definition and characteristics. Current Social problems in Inclia.
Module IV
Economics: Defrnition Sicniflcance of studying economics in social work. Basic
Economic concepts: Needs. dernand and supply. Resources, Production, Distribution
and Consumption.
Ctlntemporarv econonric svsrerns: Capitalism, Socialism and Mixed economy, their
features. merits and de nrerits
i
a+F
A
.t
Module V
Economic Development: Concept, Meaning. (iltrbalisution and its irnpact on
developing countries. Privatisation. l,iberalisatitrn arid structural adjustment
programmes.
Role of International Financial lnstitutions, Impact r,rr sociul sectors.
Poverty in lndia: Causes, effects and implications. Worlcl llunger-myths. magnitude,
causes and remedies
Planning for Development
Planning, Five year Plans.
-
Econornic Planninq. nrcarrirrs. Ob.iectives
of
lndian
References:
l.
Giddens,
Anthony
- " sociology" - Blacl< ucll
[)Lrl-rlisircrs l-icl.
l.-1.K. 3'd edition
(2000).
2. Giddens, Anthony
(Ed )
-
Sociologr,-lntrocluctorr Re;rdirres. l:xcel Media. New
Delhi
Rao - Sociaology,
J.
Shankar
4.
Abraham Francis .M
-
S.Chand Co.. 2005
"Conlemporarv
Sociolo!.r'' \.n Introductirtn to Ccrtrcepts
and Theories, Oxford University Press (2006)
5.
Macionis. J. John
- " Sociology" - l)orling l(inclcrslei,
[)ol
std Ncw
Delhi
(2006)
6. Davis, Kingsley - Human Society, Macrnillan Cornparrv. Neu York. l96l
7. Bete, Andre - Sociology, Oxford Universitr Press. \icrr Delhi 2002
8.
Datt, Ruddar and Sundaram - lndian l-iconorrrr. S.( harrd and Co. New Delhi
I
999
9. Cage, Karl et al- Principles of Economics.
10. Hanson,
J.L.:
A
Textbook
of
Pearson I:ducation Asia.2002
Econornics 7'l' i:clitiorr
. Mac t)onald and
Evans,
London, I 977
ll. t.ipsey and Crystal,
1999.
Alec : Principles ol'llcononrics.
!)1r
l:clition. Oxtbrd
Press.
MSW Serncsler I
SW I
(
03 : Human Growth and Development
Credits : 4
Hours/week : 4
Learning Objectives
l.
2.
3.
To understanrl thc basic concepts in Human growth and development
To acquaint the studcnts with the developmental stages in human life.
To familiarize students $ ith the theories of development and its relevance in
Human growth and development
lVlodule I
i)etinition. Meanirrg ancl pr.ri'posc of developmental psychology arrd its importance in
Social work practice l'hct'rlies ot'dcvelopment: Biological theories. psychodynamic
tneories. learning theories arrd Cogrritive theories, Different developmental stages- an
c,verr,'iew.
lvlodule
II
Biological basis
ol
and
l-rchrr iour:
Brain
behaviour, nervous system,
ncLlrolransmittcrs. [:rrcloct'ir.rt: sr s(ell. rrode ol'action of hormones. mechanisms of
genetic transnrission. irrrprtrtance ol genetic factors, influence
of
heredity
and
env tronment
Module
III
Beginning of life:
Prenatal development and birth, social ancl emotional aspects
pregnancy. hazards during pregnancy.
Birth - Types of'flirtir. cornplications, elfects of prematurity,
of
.
'
Infancy, Babl hood. and Child hood -' characteristics, physical, emotional,
psychological arrcl social changes. hazards and developmental tasks.
ltlodule IV
Puberty and adolescence: cltaracteristics. major physical and emotional changes and
influence on personal anrl social ad.iustments. Interests, social relationship. sex ancl
sexuality in adolcscertcc. l)cvclopmental tasks and hazards. Adult hood and middle
aqe - personal and socirl ad.iustrnents. Vocational and marital adjustrnents.
Module V
Old age: Ageing arrci ,\gcistr, ciraracteristics. Physical, pst,chological and social
clranges. personal. socilti. t ocliior.tttl and marital adjustments. Health problems and
c'rvelopmental hazards o1'aur:cl.
D_r
ing. death and bereavement.
6
t
Reference
l.
:
Developrnental Psr,'cht,log)
Elizabeth. B. Hurlock
Span Approach. Iata
-
a
\lc(lraw hill.
New Delhi.l99t;
2. Hall &
3.
Lindsey
Newman B.M, Newman P.R
:
Theories ol- Pclsorra I itr
:
Development through
lit-c
a
Psychosocial approach. Words
worth. Nen, Yorl< .1999.
4. Elizabeth.B.Hurlock Child psycholo'l
5. George G Thompson
Child Psvcholosr
6. E. Mavies Hetherington, Rose. D. Park : Child psvchtrlogy'.
:
:
Lif-e
?"
!lSW
:\\
Semester
I
I C i)4 . Social Case Work
Credits : ,1
Hours/week : 4
Learning Objectives
t.
2.
T'o understanrl the hasic concepts in Social Case Work
T'o acquaint tlre studcnts with the process of Socialcasework to enable them
3.
to work with individual.
f'o rlevelop in sturlcnis the necessary attitude and skills to practice Social casc
wrlrk
Module I
Social case u,r)rk. [)eflrrrlrorr scopc and t'listorical developnrent. ['hilosophicai
assumptions in case r.r,ork. ['t,cialrorrship between case work and other therapcutic metho,ls
like Counse lling and psvcirolhcrapl. flehavioural concepts relevant to case work practicr::
human needs. socral r(\l('. \lrus\ and adaptation. Transference. counter transf,erencc.
family dynamics, lil'e skilts
Module
Il
The theoretical approaclrcs rcievant to case work. Psychoanalytical, psychosocial and
problem solving approach. Diagnostic and functional approaches.
Case work relationslrip dcllniticrr. principles. components and purpose relationship.
Caservorker qualities :ur<l ski I l.
Module
III
Componcnts ol social cuserr orli. l)crson. problem. place and [)rocess. Case Work
-l-rcatment,
Evaluation. 'l-errnination and tbllorv
Process: psychosocial stud1. l)iap.rrosis
up. lrealment'l'eclrnirltrcs irsccl in r:ase woi'k - Environmental manipulation. Direct
trealrtrent'lechniqucs.t r;tiirnsclir.re techniques (guidance clariflcation. r'entilation.
psyr:,rological. support. rclrssLriar)cc. contiontation, accreditation. suggestion etc.)
Enhancrng the client's pr,rhierr solving (assertiveness, Stress management & social
skills). Enhancing social support svstems. l-ermination steps. types and reacticrns to
termination. Evaluatirrn: Ohicctir,rs.'l ypes & procedure.
Moclule lV
'fools uscd in social work iisterriirg. obscrvation. lnterview. l.lome visit.
Cascwork
Interview: nature purposc arrcl principles. Sources ol'information. prirnary. secondarl.' and
collateral source.
Communication: r'erbal anrl n()n-\,'erbal barriers to communication. Rer:ording:
importarrce. prirrciples rrnri ivpes: Narrative recording, summary recording & verbatim
recording. IJses of recorils.
't
I
Module V
lvork in various
ilt schoo[s,
lrorne. and other
u,orl<
.
family case work
. Social casework in geriatric setrinr.r
o Social casework with Disaster Victirrrs
o Social casework with women in clistrcss su1'l'ering domestic violence, abuse,
o
rape etc.
Social casework with adolescents: Scr cducatiorr. L.ile skill education as
social work function.
o Social Case Work u,ith disabled
. Social case work in rnedical ancl psvciriulrrc :;t.ltings
o Social casework in correctional and inrlustrial sertinqs.
Reference:
L
,
Biestek.P.P
The Case Work Relationship
2. Grace Mathew
:
3. Perlman H.H
: Social Casc Worl< \
4. Brammer.l-.M
Introduction to srtcial crr:;e u,ork
I)roblem Solving process
The Helping Relatiorrshin Pnrcess and Skills l9g5
5. Compton and Galaway
Social Worl< ['roccss i 97r)
6. Hamilton.G
7. Hollis.F
Theory and Practicc ol Soi:ial C'ase Work
CaseWork A l)svcho Social 'lherapy
8. Kasius.G
Principles and
9.
Psycho-- analvtic 'l'hcorv and Social work
practice. 197!)
Stream H.S
10. Garret H.A
I
l. Harnilton.
Gordon
-l-er:hrriqucs
in Social C-asc Work
Intervierving: Prirrciplr:s and Methods
Principles ol' social casc recording
12..Mary Richmond .E
What is social casc worli.
13. Gambrill Eileen
Case work
- A ('ornpetcncy
14. Upadhay.R.K
based approach.
'['herapeutic
Social Caseu,orl< ,\
Approach.
15. Fletcher, John
Effective I nterv iew,i n s.
16. Bessell, Robert
lnterviewing arrd coLrnsclling, I 97
I7 Aptekar.H.H
l
.
'[he Dynamics (]asc \\'orli and
Clounselino
a
q_
MSW Semester I
SW I C 05 : Communitv Organisation and Social Action
Credits : 4
Hours/week: 4
[.,earning Objectives
l.
2.
3.
:
Ilnderstand the clements of community organisation practice.
[Jnderstand the practice of community organisation in various fields of social
work.
Develop skills arrd attitudcs for participatory Community work.
Ii,[odule I
Community: Meanrng. [)elinitiorr and t]'pes. Sociological and Practitioner
Perspectives ol' Clonrrrr
Ivlodule
un il r . StrLrcture
and Functions of Commun ity.
II
Community Organrsation: t)eflnition. Objectives and Historical Development of
Community Organisaliorr niactice. Values & Principles of Community Organisation
Community Organisation a: a rnethod of Social Work. Community Or:ganisation and
Community Developmerri.
I\Iodule
III
Anall,sis o1- Conrnrurritics: i.eadership- Concept. types of Cornmunity Leaders.
[tower structurc o l'('orn rntrn itr,: Ooncept of Power.
[,mpowerment - (]orrcept. l]arricrs to and process of Ernpowerment.
Modulc IV
Phases in Clomtnurrilr ()rgarrisation: Study, analysis, assessment, discussion,
organization, acliorr. cvaluation. modification and continuation. Models of
Communitl Orgarrisltion \'lcthods in Community Organisation.
Advocacy, Networkine ancl Pcople's Participation
Roles and Skills ol' (lontrrunitl, gr*uniser, Community Organisation Practice in
Different settings- C-'urrent Issues in Community Organisation Practice.
Module V
Social Action: Oonccpt. otriectives. Principles, methods and strategies of social
action. Social action firr social rctirrm and social development.
Scope of social lrction in Incl ia Social Legislation through social action. Social
Movements. Approaches [o Social Action- Freire, Gandhi, Alitrsky.
Skills- Mediation. arlvocac.,- conflict resolution. Social Action as a method of social
work.
0
I
References:
l'
Ross Murray G,-Community Organisation: 'l'heorr and principles.
Harper and
Row Publicarion New york. 19g5.
2. Arthur Dunham: Community Welfare Organisarion
a
J.
weil, Mary (Ed) :- community practice.
Haworth Press. Inc 1996.
corrccprLral Methods. New
york:
The
4
Meenai, zubair: Participatory cornmunir\ r,uor-li ( oncepr publishing
NewDelhi 2008
5.
Siddiqui , H.Y. Working with Cornrnunitir:s: ,,\n lnlroduction t6 C6mmunity
Work. Hira Publications, New Delhi 1997
6.
Tropman,.lohn E, Erlich, John I-; and Jacl< Rothman: 'l'acrics arrd
I.echniques of
community Intervention - F.E. pea cocl< publicaritrr. Irrc. Illinois 1995
7. Gangrade, K.D. : Community
Organisation in Irrdia
ll
(_-ompany,
MSW Semester
SVV
II
II Cl (17 : Social ()roup work
Credits : 4
Hours/week:4
Learning Objectives
l.
2.
3.
I'o understatrd the impact of group experience on individuals
To understand ancl appreciate SocialGroup Work as a method of Social
Work
To appreciate the applicability of Social Group Work
Module I
Social group work. Historical developnrent of social group work. Its relation to other
method of social wot'k. Social Ciroup Work as a rnethod of social work. Theories related
to p.roup work
Module
II
Social group, Deflniliorr. 'lypcs ol'groups: Primary and Secondary groups. ln-group and
out-group. Task and trcaLtitcnt sroups. Reference group. Impact ol'group experience on
indiv id uals.
Module
III
Dynamics of group process. Structure of group. Role, Rank and Relationship. Subgrcups. Cliques. dyads triacls. isolates etc. Group process. Associative and dissociative
group process. Group intcraction. lnteraction process. Communication, Croup rnoralemeaning determinants and importance and characteristics of groups with high or low
morale. Croup cohesiorr. l.eadership. styles and functions of leadership. Stages of group
development.
Module IV
Values of group worl<. ()b.icctir,es of group work. Croup work process- study, Diagnosis
and treatment. Principles ol' uroup work. Programme development in group work.
Evaluation. Recordirrg. Ilolc. tirnctions and skills of group worker.
Mudule V
Apnlicatiorrs of grJu!r ,'r orii in ciil'fl'rent settings-. Clonrrnunities. lrospitals, schools.
Fanrily counsellinq ,:crrtre s. i'hild (luidance Clinics, Hospitals. [)e-addiction centres,
Mental health centres. ('olrectitinal institLrtions etc.
12
t'
t
References:
L
Cartwright D and Zanders
CtoLtp l)vnarn ics l)ctcrsorr and Co. Nerv
York.
2.
Coyle Grace.L.
1960
Group lixperient;es arrii Democratic Values.
The Women's press- Ncr,v York.
3.
Klien Josephine
Working with Groups. [-{utchinstorr
University and Library [-ondon. 1920
4.
Konopka .Gisela
: Social Group Work. A Helping Process.
Prentice Hall. Ncri .lcr:rey. 1963.
5.
Parihar .B.S
Group Process: Hclpinu Process in a Group
Kitab Mahal. Allahaba,l 1968.
6.
Trecker.H.B.
Social Groiip \'\ orl< Prrrctrcc. Follett
Publishing Cornpairr. t'hiczrgo I 972
7. Wilson
and Ryland
: Social
Croup W'orl< Prrrctrcc. Houghstorr Miffin
Company. Oarlbrcligc I c)49
8.
Shepherd R Claris
: Small Groups: Sc'rme Socrological
Perspective
Cl
harrd
ler I'ub I islr i n g Cornpany.
California 1964
9.
Ken Heap
: Group theorl' frrl
socill
rvorl<ers. An
lntroduction Pers,mon l)ress 1977
10. Toseland and Rivas
:
An IntrodLrction to (;r()up Work Practice
Mc Millan Pub!ishing Oornpany.
York.
1984.
l3
Ner,r'
-
\'[SW Semester [I
S\\'
ti (' 0{l : Psychology for Social Work
Credits : 4
Hours/week:4
Learning Objectives
1.
I'o familiarize the students with basic concepts of psychology and the need
for Psychologv in the ;rractice of Social Work.
2, To develop an understanding
3.
4.
regarding individual and collective behaviour
and determin:rnls ol' slrcial behaviour
To acquire knou'ledge regarding the concept of mental health and mental
health issues in the contemporary society.
To gain basic knowledge regarding various mental disorders and
dysfunctions.
Module I
Psychology: Detlnition rrnd scopc Ceneral psychological concepts applicable to social
work- l,earning. Irrtclligencc. rnernor]. thinking, emotion and stress. motivation,
personality- their clefinitions. tlrcoretical fianrework and other basic infbrrnation.
Module Il
Social ['sychology: Delinitiur', arrcl relcvance to social rvork. Social perception, social
cogrtition. social inf'lucncc artti social relationships.
Attitudes- Nature. delinitiorr. thcories and measurement of attitudes. factors in attitude
char,ge. attitude and behavior Prcjr-rdice-.definition. characteristics. types and causes of
prejudice. Aspects of social iderrtitt. selI and gender .The self: components of ones
unique identity. Self--concept. sclf esteem and other aspects of self-functioning, Sex and
Gender, Gender identity and gerrder stereotypes.
Motlule
III
Social inlluence. the Inter pei'sonlil attraction and social interaction. pro-social behaviour.
factors. theoretical perspeclivcs and determinants. Aggression- factors. theoretical
perspectivc and deterur i nartir
Propaganda definition ancl meaning psvchological basis and techniques. Counteracting
misleading propagancla" l)ropaganda in educatiolr. Collective behaviour. Audience &
cror,-;d. T'heories of crc'wtl behar iour. classiflcation of cro"vd and audience.
Rumour : definition and rrcariing circumstances responsible for spread of rumour,
causes firr spread of rLrnr,rrrr . e itccl< on propagation of'rumours.
Modulc
IV Abnorrnll psrcir.lrrg): l)ctlnition.
Historical development and Causes of
abncrmal behaviour .()oncept ol'norrnality abnorrlality and various vieu, points. Mental
Health-[lefinition. ni)tLu'c" churucteristir.rs and determinants of rnental health. Mental
Health issr-rcS in the contr'lnDtrri) r'\ strciet\'.
t4
f
^l
Module V
Classification of psychological disorder itt adLrlts- tnalot' s,\ mptoms. causes. types,
outcome and ,unug.*.ni of Anxiety disorders. [)isstlcirrtir'e and somatoform
disorders, Mood Disorders, schizophrenia and dclusiorttii disorders. organic rnental
disorders
psychological disorders in children and adolescents: l'rehavior-ttal and conduct disorders'
Attention deficit disorders, pervasive developmental disorclet's. and lcarning disabilities.
Alcoholism and drug addiction, psychosornatic disorders. socropathic disorders
References:
L
:
David Krech and Richard.S.Crutehfield
And Egerton L. BallacherY.
2.
Individr-ral in sttcicli
Elements of social p-.yclrologY':
vikas PLrblishing Ilt,irse Pvt [-td
Kuppuswamy B
New Delhi
1983.
Social ps1'cirologl l'rentice Hall
lndia. Neu' l)elhi.
4.
Baron Robert.A.et.al
5.
Taylor Shelley et.al
social ps.vclrology(31)0(t) Prentice IJall. New Jersy.
9.
Lindgern .H.C
An lntrodLtcliotl
10. Myers, David
I
l.
tc) Social
Psychology. Nerv Delhi. wileY
Eastern Pvt. Ltd. l() r4.
Social psvchology' ( l9tt3) McCraw
[{ill Book co. Nerr l)elhi.
.J
Fernald, L. Dodge, Fernald. Peter.S
12. Coleman
:
(2003)
AIIBS PLrblishers. New Delhi.
Abnormal psychology and rnodern life
Introduction
tcr i;svc:holog1,
3. Sarason and Sarason
Abnorrnal psychologl
14. Callson and Butcher
Abnonnal psvcholotr
15. Holmes David.S
Abnorrnal ps),cholog\ tl00
I
lt.
Allyn arrd Bacon. Bclstotr
16. Carson, Robert.C et.al
Abnorrrral psy'chologr
tr
loclern
Life. Pearson l;rln (2001 ))
t5
MSW Semester
SW
II
Il (l {.}9 : 'l-heon and Practice of Counselling
Credits : 4
Hours/week:4
Learning Objectives
1. To acquire knowledge and skills in the practice of counselling
2. To get an understanding about the practice of counselling in
different
settings
3. To get an understanding
about therapeutic approaches used in counselling
Moduk: I
Counselling: L-ounsclling an enrerging prof'ession. Definition, tneaning. scope and
historical developmerrt. (loals of counseling. Counselling, social case work and
psycholherapv. Princil"rlcs o1'corrnselling. Types of counselling - Crisis counselling,
pronrotive counsellirs. Ilr{j\ cntir"c counselling. facilitative counsellirrg and curative
counsel ling and grorrp cor-rnscl I ing
Moclule
II
Counsellor attributes ancj skills: Personal qualities/attributes of counselor-Empathy,
warrnth, genuineness. positive' regard. concreteness. sense of humor, sense of the
tragic. Self awareness etc Skills in observing, listening, interviewing, challenging,
supporting etc. CoLrnsellrng relatiorrship- Nature and characteristics, factors
infl uencing the relationship.
Module
III
Counselling process Phasesi stages in counselling process. Specific Techniques used
in counseling-clarillcation. i,entilation, reassurance, contracting, confrontation,
suggestion, self disclosure. paraphrasing. rehearsal etc. Ethical ahd legal aspects of
courrselling
Module IV
'fherapeutic approtrchc: lo ('ounselling: I'!sychoanalytic approach. Humanistic
approaches-Client ecntererl therapy, 'fransactional Analysis, Gestalt Therapy,
Existential approaclr. Cognitivc behavioral approaches-Rational []motive Behavior
therapy, cognitive therapr. classical conditioning, operant reinlbrcement theory,
reality therapy
Module V
CoLrnselling in
a)
b)
di11'er
ent set'.ings:
Family' counselling: Premarital, marital counselling, sex education, family
plann ing counsel I ing. abortion counsell ing. HIV/A !DS counsel I ing etc.
Educatiorral counselling: scholastic backwardness, emotional disturbances,
problems of adolescence. sex education etc.
r6
t'
,\
ltf
A
guidanet' itrll adjustments.
c) Vocational cor'rnselling: career
d)
e)
0
s)
Placement
counseling etc.
Industrial counselling : Absenteeistn' acciderlt prouerless. occuPational
stress, inter - personal conflict etc
De-addiction counsel I ingCounselling in disasters.
Grief counselling
References:
2. Fuster J.M
: Personal cor.rnscli irls
3. George M Gaz
: Group counselling
5. Jaswal .S.S
: Guidance and cor-rnsellinrl
6. Fred MickinneY
: Counselling
7. Joe currie
:
8. Gladding
.l'.
-A
De
veloprrlent approach' Allyn
and Bacon Bostott
-'\tr elective Approach'
Lucknow,
Samuael
9. Richard Shard
10. CoreY, GeralC
I 1. PhiliP Burnard
1br l)er:,ortirl 'Adiusttnent in Schools and
colleges. Hor-tghton \4i!llin co'' Boston'
Barefoot counselor
: Counsellitrg a e t,tltpt'cilttrsir e
: Theories
profcssioll' 1992'
of I)sl'cllolheraltv ancl coirnselling
Theory and practice
o1'-qr
ottp coLrnselling'
private Ltd
Counselling skills training. Viva Books
New Delhi.
Prentice
lntroclr-rction to Courlsellinlt and GLridance'
Hall lndia L,td
13. Nelson Jones
14. D.John AntonY
Basic Cor,rnsel ling
Skills
A lrelpcr's tnanrtal
PsychotheraPics in cotrrr ;t:ll ing
t7
I
SW
II
MSW Semester II
C l0 : Social Work Research
Credits : 4
Hours/week : 4
Lear ning Ob.iectivcs:
l'
'l'o Understantl !he Siqnil'icance
and Characteristics of :rcientific research and
i
3'
{'
Social Work llesearch.
To develop tae ca;racit' to conceptualize a problem
and execute research
To develop an undcrstanding of the difierent research designs
and data
collection techniques
ski's in
5'
of research.
Module I
and use of the toors for data corection,
ion of statistical techniques.
n' ( ocumentation and presentation of results
f data and
kills in int
'jcientific Research anci sr.,cial rryork: _ Meaning of research, types
of research,
Quarltitative Methotls and social Research, so-ciat work research
- aims and
significance. prescnt
pr-rsition and agencies for social work
Research.
Module II
Research Prohlent tbrrrrrrlatitrrr: - Cloncepts,
Theoretical and olterational deflnition for
concept.'l'heorr,'- Rore oi rheorv in research.
variabrei. .types. Hfpott,.sir_
[)efinition' types.. st)tr'ccs ln.l sigriif rcance Importance
and methods of review of
Literature. Formuratirrr.r
or rcscarch proposar, pirot studv.
Module
III
Q'esearch Design Diagnostic and exi:r
irrg.
and types: - Exnroratory. Descriptive,
rrar. euasi-experimeniar design. Singre
subject designs,
group design' QLral
Rcscarch - Signilican.. uni methods,
eualitative v/s
Quantitative Researclt. evaluative
Sam pl i ng procedu res
pLrrposes
research. participatory research, action
research.
- -l'\/pes. -l-cchn
iq ues.
Uodule IV
tvlethods of data collcction
Primary data and Secondarl' clata. pre test,
validity and reliability, observation,
interview schedule' uuiclcs. questionnaires, projectir.
t..rrniques. content analysis,
soci.metry. Measrrremenr-r.evcrs. scares and
scaring techniques
IVIodulc V
Data Analysis and I)irtn pr.csctrtatictrr
Editing, Coding. tabLrlarinq.
Analysis and
and
Inte
interprr.taritrn,it'gL,at
abstracts. t]se oi'('onrputcr
ir
8
Descriptive and inf.erential Analysis,
a. report writing_ fbrmat, style, contents.
lysis _ SPSS, MS Excel.
i
References
l. Karlinger, Fred N
Foundatiorrs of Belravioural Research
Neu, \'orl<.
2, Goods, W.J.
& F.K. Hatt
llolt Itinshart & Winstorr inc.
Methods in litrcial ilescarch. New York.
Mc (rrar.v H ili
3. Jahoda .M
Research Vlcttrods rn Social Relations.
New York. [)ryden Prcss.
:
4. Kaufman .F
Methodologr ol'social ;cicnce. [.ondon
Thomas
I
5. Wonwick, D.F.
& C Liginger
:
&
I lLrdson
'f he Sarnple- sLtrve\/' '['heorv
and practice.
Neu,Yorl<. \,ls (irau, Iiill.
6. Weiss R.S
7.
Statistics in social Itesearch. Nerv York Wiley.
Yin Robert K
:
Case Stud1, Ilesearch. Washington,
Cosmos Corpon.
8. Gilbert,
Nigel (ed)
9. Sirkin.R.M
Researching Social Lif'e. University' ol'
Suraj and SA(il': PLrblications.
Statistics for social scierrces. Davton
Wright Statc I riir cr:it_r
.
10. Guptha C.B.
ll. Raymond
Mark
12. Laldas D.K
l3 Sarantakos Sotirios
:
An Introdrrctiorr ro statistical Methods.
Research nradc sirn;tlc. Sage pLrblications.
:Practice of Social FLcscarch
Social Research. l()()$. 64r.rillarr Press l-td.
9
N,ISW Semester
SW
II (. ll
II
: Sriciai Anrlysis & Strurtegies forSocial Change
Credits : 4
Hours/week: 4
Learning Objectives
l.
2.
r.
4.
5.
'[o develop and enhancc understanding of social, political economic systems
'fo understand thc concept of social change and various approaches to
change.
'fo develop knorvledgc and skills in planning and executing change strategies.
'fo learn the role of cornmunication in development and social change.
'fo learn alternate. participatory techniques of communication in the context
of development and social change.
6. Allow for practical application of these media skills.
Module I
Social Analysis lrrtroduction: Structural Analysis- Economic System, social
System. Polit ical S\'st,:nr & Meaning Syster"n; Historical Analysis; Cultural
Analysis.
Media Analysis: (,riiicrrl anallsis of Mass Media. Representation of gender, race
and events in rrass nredia. lrnpact of mass media on development. Media
Research.
Module
II
Social Change- Approaclres to Social Change: Religio-spiritual Approaches:
Yugas & Pralaya: Liheration Theology fbr New Heaven & Earth; Buddhist and,
Advaitic approaches.
Marxism - class rrar & classless society
Paulo Freire - l:dLrcation. Corrscientization, Cultural Action & Transformation:
Change in the levels ol- social consciousness through educative process: closed
consciousness. con(olrning consciousness, reforming consciousness, and
transform i ng or i berati ns consciousness
Gandhi San'oda),a" rrorr r,'iolence & satyagraha for social change
I
Module
III
( riteria & indicators.
Strategies lirr ioal Oricntecl and planned Social Change: lndividual contact,
pressure. legal actitrrr. cultural action. political organisaticln. conscientisation,
campaign. negoliatior.r irnci C.ontlict strategles.
Assessing Social Chanse:
(
20
T
t
Module IV
Norr verbal conrtnunication'
Communication: Theories, Elements and Barricrs
Significance in Social Work Practice'
('( )ntcnt. Social Marketing'
DJveloprnent Communication Purposc &
Participatory communication'
Use of media for Development Communicatitltr'
iblli drinces. Street'flieatre'
Folk media :- puppetry, iolk drama folk songs.
group/panel. dis.cussions'
communication with Groups: Lectures. Braittstortnirrg'
ol.audiovisr.ral aids like flash
games, role plays, demonstratitln. usc
case studies,
cardS,flannelg*t'',flipchartsandProiectec]ar.rdioristralaids.
MassMedia:Cinema,Television.Radio.Prirlt\,tcdia.Exhibitions'Posters.
\\ ct'
lnformation Technology and World Wide
Module V
Seminars'
Publics Spealiins' !leetrng' corrterencc'
l'lrcatrc \\.il<sh.p & I)esigning of
Effective wriiten comtnunication. Street
media
Posters and other low cost participatorl
skill Training: Effective
'fraining)
Participatory Methods ( Skill
References
l.Adams,Robert'Dominelli,L,ena&Payne.Malcorlllcclr.SocialWork:-fhetnes.lssues&
\ orli'
Critical Debates, Ch'17' Radical Social
& I.ibc'ration' Pengtrin Books'
of the oppressed' Adult lltlLreaiiorr
2.
Freire, Paulo, Pedagogy
New York.l972
3.Freire,Paulo,CulturalActiontbrFreedorn.[)etlgr'tirli}irtll.s.NcllYork.l9T]
4.Freire,Par-rlo,EducationasPracticeofFreedorn'l)etlgr-tirlBooks'NeuYork'
,\ ('r'itital approacir' Rawat Publications'
5. Ledwith, Margaret: commuuity Developrrcnr
Nerv Delhi,2006
Descrochers,John:Methodsofsocial\rlairsi.(.clltretilrStlcialAction,
Bangalore'i977
7.
, ^,,
Hope, Anne and Timmel' Satly
Comrnuttity Wort
8.
9.
"t',
gook t'll and
'
.f-..:..
'Iraining
Ill'
A
llandbook lor
Manrbo I)ress' (lrrcrtr' l9tl4
,\r.1tr,tst.
Workcr tti
D,Abreo' Desmond A.' Fronl Development
& Retbrnr ( I r ols
Gandhi M.K., Social Service, Work
)
M.K., Village Swaraj
Pub'
Af'l'ccrirtg ('lrarrges. Social Movenrents
Haynes, Karen S. & Mickelson' 'larnes.S'
107 ff.
10. Gandhi
ll.
'on-
lbr lrarrslot'tr'att
2l
12. Johnson D.
& t'.P
. .lolrrrson. 197,;..loining Together. Group exercises
13. Jones, Howard (eci.). ior.urrcls u Nerv Social Work, Social Movements.,
14. Knowels. Malcorn l'ltc \rloclern Practice of Adult Education.
15. Kramer. R.M.
16. Gandhi,
& il..
Spechit. 1974. Cornmunity Organisation Practice, Strategies.
V.P:L Media zind (lornrnunication Today. Vol.l .2. and.J, Kanishka Publishers
New Delhi. 1995
17. Mody, Bella. Dcsiuninr \4essages
Publications. Delhi lt)t)
tbr
Development
in tlre Tlrird world. Sage
|
18.
White, Shirley r\. Nair. Sadanandan K. and Ashcroft Joseph: Participatory
Communicatiorr Working tbr change and development. Sage Publications. New Delhi,
'2004.
i9. Ahuja, B.N. and ('habra.
Delhi 1992
S.S. : Development Communication. Surjeet Publications, New
20. Sharrna.Diwakar: Mass(lorntnunicationTheoryandPractlceinthe2l'r century.Deep&
Deep Publicatirtnr, N*r I)elhi 2004.
21. Edwards- Mici:
I(c" lcleas
Cheltenharn. lj K l()01
22. Berger.
in Media and Cultural
stLrdies, Nelson Thornes Ltd.
Arthur : Narralivcs iir Popr-rlar Culture, Media, and everyday
PLrblications Nerv
t)elhi
199"1
22
Life.
Sage
MSW Semester
III
t'
C 13 : Social Work Administration and Participatory Project Planning and
Management.
Credits : 4
Hours/week : 4
I,earning Objectives
SW
1.
2,
3.
4.
5.
m
To understand the basic concepts in administration and management
To understand the type of organizations and registration of these organizations
To acquaint the Social Welfare Programmes of Central and State Ministries and
Departments
To understand the basic concepts in project planning and management
To develop skills in proposal writing and project management through practical
experience.
Module I
Administration, Organisation, Management, Business Administration, Pubiic Administration,
Social Administration and Social Work Administration. Administrative process- Planning,
organizing, staffing, Directing, Coordinating, Budgeting. Office management, Reporting,
maintenance of files, Documentation, Preparation of reports
Module II
Voluntary agencies:
Characteristics, types, Role and functions. Registration of Societies,
Trusts and Cooperatives, General Body, Executive Committee. Approaches to organizational
management-bureaucratic, Democratic, human relations model, Marketing of Social services.
-
Module III
Social Welfare Programmes: Structure and functions of State and Central Mrnistries and
Departments. Central Social Welfare Board, State social Welfare Advisory Board, Ministry
of Women and Child Development, State Social Welfare [)epartment, Prison Department,
Rural Development Programmes, Local Self Goveming Institutions, Programmes for
children, Women, Youth, Elderly, differently abled.
Module IV
Project: Definition Importance and Elements. Participatory Project Planning - Importance
and levels of particifation. Steps in Participatory project planning: Identifying needs.
pRA/PLA TechniqUes, Determining priorities, assessing feasibility- Cost Benefit Analysis,
specifying goats and objectives, identifying preferred solutions, preparing action plan.
Environment Impact Assessment'
project Proposal Writing: Components: Objectives, Background and history of the agency,
project description, .propit phasing, cost estimates and hnancing. Organization and
management, expeCtations and justifications. out standing issues, follow up details,
*n.*-*. details, important aspects for effective project lbrmulation, basic data, agency
details, legal aspects, organizational aspects, technical aspecls.
,/-)
,fd
Module V
\7
Project Administration:
a) Financial Management - Preparation of cost plan, resource mobilization- Techniques
and legal requiremetrts. Budgeting, accounting, auditing, financial records.
b) Personnel Management: Selection, recruitment and training of project personnel.
Role and functions o1' Project Staff- Logistics Management, Time Management,
Multiple roles. Public Reiations.
c) Monitoring and Evaluation of the project-purpose, types. Criteria for evaluation:
achievement of physical targets, utilization of benefits, people's participation,
educative value, technical aspects, deviation from the original plan, procedural
accuracy, accountitrg procedures. costs, supervision efficiencyi public relations.
Workshop on Project Preparation-Proposal for fundraising, Income generation projects
etc.
References:
l.
Chandra Prasanna, Projects: Planning, Analysis, Selection, Implementation, and Review, Tata
McGraw Hill Pub. Co. Ltd. 1995
2. Desai, Vasant., Project Manager.nent Preparation Appraisal, Himalaya Pirblications,1997
3. Ghosh, A.S. Project Managetnent. ,\nmol Publishers. New Delhi, 1990
4. Roy, M. Sam, Project Planning and Management - Focusing on Proposal Writing, CHAI,
Secunderabad.
5.
. 6.
7.
8.
9.
Lock, Dennis, Handboor ol'pro.iect Management, Jaico Publishing House, Delhi, 1997
Mohsin M. Project Planning and Crrntrol, Vikas Publishing House Pvt. Ltd, 1997
Patil R. K, Appraisal of Rural Development Projects through systems Analysis, National lnstitute
of Bank Management, 197 6.
Puttasrvamaiah.K, Aspects of Evaluation and Project Appraisal, Popular Parkashan, 1978.
Dalal- Clayton, Barry, Dent. Dar id and Dubois, Olivier: Rural Planning in Developing CountriesSupporting Natural Resource lvlanagement and Sustainable Livelihoods, Earthscan India, New
Delhi,2003
10. Vasant Desai, Project Managenrent : Preparations, Appraisal, Finance and Policy, Himalaya Pub.
House, Delhi, 1997.
ll. Somesh,
Kumar: Methods fbr Community Participation- A complete Guide for Practitioners,
Vistaar Publications, New delhi. 2002.
12. Chowdhari, Paul, Social Welfare Administration, Atma Ram & Sons, New Delhi 1992
13. S.L.Goel and R.Rajan, Social S/elfare Administration Vol: I & II
14. Gupta N.S., Organization l'heory' and Behaviour
15. Fred l-uthans,: Organisation Behaviour, tll and
IV
edition
16. Rajeswar Prasad: Social Aclrninistration
17. Kulkarni P.D.: Social Policy and Sccial Development in India Association of Schools of Social
Work in India
18. Reidr,., Dale: Evaluating Developnlent Programmes and Projects. Second Edition.,Sage
Publioations,2004
24
'
SW
MSW Semester
III
C 14
:
lll
Quantitative Methods in Social Research
Credits : 4
Hours/week: 4
Learning Objectives:
l.
To develop a basic working knowledge in statistics.
2. To equip the students in the relevance and usage
techniques.
lVlodule I
Statistics
-
of appropriate
quantitative
Definition, function, uses and limitations.
Frequency distribution- construction of frequency tables. cumulative frequency
distribution. Diagrammatic and graphic presentation o1' data. Probability theory, Normal
distribution.
Module
II
:
Measures of Central tendency, \computation of mean, median, mocle . Uses and Limitation.
Module
III
Measures of dispersion- Range, Mean deviation, Quartilc' Ceviation. Co efficient
concept of skewness, kurtosis, percentile ranges, Merits and delrlerits.
of
variation,
Module IV
Correlation:- Meaning, Correlation and causation, kinds of Correlation,
'efficient of Conelation, spearman's Correlation Co eft'rcient'
Karl Pearson's Co
Module V
Testing of Hypothesis, Principles and Commonly used test. Level of Significance, Errors in
testing, Measures of association, Chi square test, t-test. ANOVA, Yules Co efficient arrd Phi
Co efficient.
References:
l.
Gupta .S.O
Statistical Methods
2.Mac Millan, W
Statistical Methods for Social Workers
3. P.V.Young
Scientific Social Surveys and Research
4. George A. Ferguson
Social Statistics
5. Garett. H.E
Statistics for Psychologl arld Eduoation
6. Mohsin .S,M
Methods in Behavioural Sciences
7. C.B Guta
An Introduction to Statrstical Nlethods
8. Yeoman.
K.A
Statistics for the Social Scienlists.
25
-
NISW Semester
SW
III
Cl 15 :
III
Community Health and Health Education
Credits:4
Hours/week:
4
Learning Objectives
l. To learn basic concepts in health and health care
2. To understand the epidcmiology of common communicable and non communicable
diseases
. 3. To :rnderstand the communit"v health programmes
'
4.
To acquaint with nutritional problems and management
Module
I
Basic concepts in health:- Detlnition and meaning- Health, diseases, Wellbeing, Positive
health, determinants of health. spectrum of health, Community health, right to health,
Concepts of Prevention. iceberg phenomenon of disease, Community Diagnosis and
community treatment
Module
II
Health Status and Health Problems: - Basics of health statistics, Indicators of
healtir, Epidemioiogy of communicable diseases- Tuberculosis, Leprosy,
HIV/AIDS, Mumps, diphtheria. chicken pox, diarrhea, acute respiratory Infections,
measles, meningitis. Non communicable diseases:- Cardiovascular diseases, hypertension,
cancer, diabetes. accidents and injuries, lifestyle diseases. Medical care problems
Module III
Health Care of the Cornmunity :- L,evels of health care, Primary health care- Principles,
functions, Disease prevention and control, Immunization, Environment and health- Water,
Air, Ventilation, Iight. radiation, housing, disposal of waste, arthropod borne diseases,
Population problem, I{ealth care services in urban and rural area. Mother and Child health
Care, First aid, Gender and health. National Rural Health Mission
Module IV
Nutrition and Health- Classification of fbods, nutrients, mal nutrition, balanced diet,
nutrliional problems in ptrblic health, assessment of nutritional status, community nutrition
prog]'amme.
Module V
Health education:- Ivleaning, importance, principles, components. communication
in health education- mass media. audio visual aids, voluntary and
governmental agencies for health education.
26
I
1.
O Park J.and Park .K
2. Mathur.S
3. BirchandranathGhosh
;
and Rabindranath Ghosh
4.
Bedi ,Yash Pal
Test Book of Social and Preventive Medicine
Hand Book of Social and Preventive Medicine
A true line on Hygiene and Public Health
Scientifi c Publishi ng co., Clalcutta.
Hygiene and Public lleatllr, Anand Publishers.
27
J
MSW Semester
SW
III
III
Elective I -Medical and Psychiatric Social Work
E I l6: Social Work in Medical and Psychiatric Settings
Credits : 4
Hours/week:4
Learning Objectives
l. To understand the scope ol'Medical and Psychiatric Social Work in the field of health
2.To uncierstand the role and functions of medical social worker
3. To understand the role and functions of psychiatric social worker
3. To develop the skills to practice medical and psychiatric social work
Module
I
Medical Social work:- I{islol'ical development of medical social work in Western countries
and in India, Medical sociology and its relevance in social Work, Illness as a social problem
and its efI'ect on the individuat. family and community. The concept of patient as a person,
Sociai and emotional t'actors involved in disease, Hospitalization and its implications on
patieri and the family mernbcrs. nghts of Patients ,Modern trends in treatment of illness.
Modr:le
'
.
ll
Social workers in General heatth Care system in India, Skills and qualities of Medical social
Worker. Team work anrl multidisciplinary approach in the treatment of illness. Use of
.
methc,ds of Social Work i n medical settings, Role and functions of a medical Social worker,
Challenges in developing the freld of medical social work in India,
Module
III
Life style disorders antl social Work. Sexual health:- Sexually Transmitted
Diseases,
Palliative
and
bereaved,
HIV/.{,IDS, Social Work with terminally ill, social work with dying
Care, Social Work with cancer patients, Psycho oncology, Social work with neurological and
degenerative disorders. , Reproductive Health, Social Work in family welfare and Family
Planning:-. Small family Norm. Sex education, family life education, Population education.
Social Work interventions with diffbrently abled: Types of disability, early diagnosis,
Prevention and managemcnt, Rehabilitation of the differently abled
Module IV
'
.
Psychiatric social Work- Dcllnition. historical development, Psychiatric Social Work in
India, Multi disciplinari, teanr approach in the treatment of psychiatric illness. Role and
functrons. of psychiatric social vvorker in the team.
28
I
Psychiatric rehabilitation, definition, principles and strategies. the concept of social
diainosis and social work interventions in psychiatric setting.- psychiatric hospitais' half
*u! ho*., day care centres, de addiction Centres etc. Treatment and after care of mental
pat-ients, applitation of social work methods in the treatment o f mental disorders
Module V
present status of psychiatric social work inlndia, Institutions For higher education in the field
of psychiatric sociai work in India. Psychiatric social rvork in Schools, Psychiatric social
work in aftercare centers, geriatric setiings, victims of abuse and violence' Psychiatric social
worker in the field of community mentaihealth Challenges in developing the tield of
psychiatric social work in India.
.References:
l.
Goldsteine
& ll
2.Mary Richmond
Social Diagnosis
3, Gouri Rani Banerji
Medical Social W'ork in Irrdia
4. O Park J.and Park .K
Test Book of Social and Preventive Medicine
5. Mathur.S
Hand Book of Social and Preventive Medicine
6. Birchandranath Ghosh
A true line on Hygiene and I'rtblic Health
and Rabindranath Ghosh
7. Bedi ,Yash Pal
l.
.
Medical Social Work Vol: I
Verma, Ratna,
Scientifi c Publishing co.. Ca'cutta'
Hygiene and Public Health, Anand Publishers'
:Psychiatric Social Work in lndialggl ', Sage Publications
9. Hubschman KYnn
: Hospital social rvork practisc I 993,Pager publishers,USA
10. French,Lois Meredith
: Psychiatric Social wc'rk
12. Hudson,Barber
: Socialwork with Psychiatric patients, Macmillian
publishers,New Delhi
Pubtication Division, Delhi, I 960.
29
MSW Semester
III
Elective I -Medical and Psychiatric Social Work
SW III [] 1 l7 : Psychiatric Information for Social work
Credits : 4
Hours/week: 4
Learning Objectives
1.
2,
3.
'
To help the students gain knowledge regarding psychiatric illnesses, their
symptomatology, etiologl', trcatment and aftercare.
Tc,help the students gain an understanding regarding the policies and programmes
in the flreld of mental health
To develop in them thc necessary diagnostic and interryention skills and competence
to work in a psychiatric setting
'Module I
Psychiatry- Definition, historical development, epidemiology
of
mental
disorders,
Symptomatology: Disorders of perception, thinking, emotion, memory, speech
Branches
of
Psychitry:Adult Psychitry,Child and adolescent psychiatry,Family
psychiatry,Geriatric psychiatrv.community psychiatry,Forensic psychiatry.
Ass=ssnrent in Psychiatr\, Psvcl-riatric interviewing, Case History taking and mental Status
Exarnination, classilication in psychiatry-, the need and importance, ICD, DSM
Module II
Psychiatric illness- Prer alencc. etiology, clinical manifestation, course, outcome and
different treatment modalities o1 :a. Organic Mental disorder
b. Functional psychoses (schizophrenia. mood disorders and delusional disorders)
c. Neurotic stress related and somatoform disorder (OCD, phobic disorders, somatoform
disorders, generalized anxiety disorders, dissociative disorders, PTSD)
d.
e.
f.
g.
Personality disorders
Sexual disorders
Psychosomaticdisorders
Eating disorders
Module
III
Child hood Psychiatric disor<iers, Pervasive developmental disorders, habit
attention deficit disorders. speech disorders, conduct disorders, leaming
psychological testing in psl'chiatn' - 'fests of intelligence, aptitude and personality..
30
T
disorders,
disorders,
{t
Module IV
Alcoholism, Drug addiction and other addictions: Prevalettce, treatment, prognosis and
'
outcome. Psychiatric emergencies. Post partum psycl-rosis
Stress and mental illness: coping
with stress, protectile factors, resilience, risk
assessment,
psycho social assessment.
Module V
Community psychiatry, concept, meaning and evolution cf crtmmunity psychiatry, Mental
Hygiene movement. Community mental health in tndia. Prevention in Psychiatrv- Primary,
secondary, tertiary prevention, National Mental health programme, Social and cultural
factors, in psychiatric disorders with special reference trt lndia Culture bound syndrome
References:
l. David Anderson
A Text book of'Psyr:hiatrl
2. Lawson Lancy
Psychiatry for social rvorkers.
Psychiatric problerns of chi ldren.
,3. Haratia.J.C
Oxford Press New' Delhi.
4.ICD-10
5.
.
lntroduction to psych iatry.
Niraj Ahuja
Introduction to psych iatry.
6.Abraham Varghese
T.American Psychiatric Association: Quick reference
to the Diagnostic Criteria from DSM- IV-
TR(2005), Jay Pee Brothers Medical Publishers, Nerv Delhi
8. Kaplan
9.
&
Saddock's
Vyas J N, Ahuja Niraj
: Synopsis of Psychiatry(2007). Waverly Pvt. Ltd',
New
Delhi
: Textbook of Post Graduate Psychiatry Vol. I & il(1999),
Pee Brothers,
Jay
New Delhi
10. Hamilton Max
:
Fish's outline
Psychiatry tor students and practitioners
(1994), Varghese Publishing House, Bombay
I LDinesh Bhugra et.al Ed
:
Handbook
l2.VMD.Namboothiri
: Concise textbook
of
of Psychiatry, A South Asian
Perspective(2005),
Viva Publishers Pvt. Ltd., Neu Delhi
of Psychiatly, B I Waverly Hill Pvt'Ltd', New
Delhi
13. Gelder,
Michel et.al
:Concise oxford textbook
Publishing Co., New Delhi
3l
of
Psychiatry, Oxford
&
IBH
MSW Semester
Elective
sw III Ez
ll - I{ural and Urban Community Development
16 : Gandhian Philosophy of community Development
Credits : 4
Hours/week: 4
Learning Objectives
l.
2,
III
Develop an understanding of Gandhi's concept of society and his approach to
social
transformation.
Understand the Gandhian programmes for rural reconstruction and development
of
weaker sections.
Module
I
Gandh;an Thought : Salient t-eatures
Social change through non-violence
Module
of Gandhian Thought. Gandhian values,
Sarvodaya,
II
Gandhian'fhought
&
Social Organisation. Indian Social Problems and Gandhian solution.
Caste system- Untouchability -women's problems-Illiteracy-alcoholism -population
explosion-Health and hl,giene- seven social :vils. Education and its role
Module
III
Salient features o1' Ganclhian l:conomics. Ethical basis of economics- purity of meanssimplicity of life-co-operctior)- breacl labour-self reliance-classless society. Gandhiji,s views
on industrialization. Machinerl' and production- problems and prosplcts of large-scale
industries-appropriate tcchnology indigenous technology. T.rst".ship. Rural
urban
relationship.
Module IV
Gandhian approach to rural deve,lopment. village swaraj, swadeshi, Panchayati
. ' 'a
Raj Charkasymbol of self reliance. Village industries, constructive programmes. Gandhian
movements- Sarvodaya, []hoodan and Garmdan.
Module V
Gandrrian critique of devclopment models. Capitalism, socialism, communism and
mixed
economy. Gandhian and professional social work Approaches similarities and differences
Econqmic development Vs integral development. Problems of modern economic growth Energy and ecological crisis, r.ural -urban imbalance etc.
32
.-. i
References:
Prasad
2: Ganguly.R.M
L Mahadev
3. Unnithan
.T.K
4. Arunachalam
5. Sreeman
:Social Philosophy of Mahatrna Sandhi
:Gandhi's Social Philosophy
:Gandhi and SocialWork
.K
Narayanam
:Gandhian Approach to Social \L'ork
: Gandhian Economics
6. Gandhi
.M.K
: Social Service, Work and Reforrrr
7. Ram K
Vepa
: A new technology A Gandhian concept
8. Kumarappa
.J.C
9. Paremeshwair
Dayal
:Gandhian Economics Thought
:Candhian Approach to Social Stork
:Towards a Philosophy of Social Work.
Dasgupta
Vithayathil, Thomas : Mahatma Gandhi and pr0motion c>1'Human
l l,
l0.Sugata
Rights. Pontifical
Institute Publication. Alwaye. I 993.
12.
Singh, Ram
Binod :
Gandhian Approach to Developrnent Pltrnning. Concept Publishing
Company, New Delhi 2006.
13. Misra, R.P and Gangrade.K.D (Eds) : Gandhian Alternative Vol l-5. Concept Publishing Company.
New Delhi,2005
14. Kaushik, Asha: Politics, Symbols and Political Theory'- Rethinking Gandhi,
New Delhi
15.GandhiM.K., My experiments with Truth
33
Rawat
Publications,
ff'
MSW Semester
Elective
SW
III
E
Il Z
III
Rural and Urban Community Development
17 : Rural and Urban Community Development
Credits :4
Hours/week: 4
Learning Objectives
1. To understand the conc€pt, philosophy and principles of Rural and
Urban
Communiff development
2.
3.
To learn the programmes and services in the governmental and voluntary sector.
To develop knowledge about FRIs and their role in community development
Module I
Rural and lJrban communitr': Structure, Characteristics and Evolution comparative analysis of
rural and urban communities. Rural -r.rban continuum. Tribal Cornmunities. Problems faced
by communities.
Module
II
Community development: Concept, Philosophy and Principles. Approaches to community
development. Rural Reconstruction Effbrts before 1952. Historical review of community
development programmes since independence. Rural Housing and Rural Health Programmes,
Programmes for the development of'scheduled Caste and Scheduled Tribes. Programmes of
CSWB, CAPART and NABARD lor Rural Development. Current Rural development
programmes. Kudumbasree.
Module
III
Rural t-revelopment Administration. Community development blocks: structure and functions.
Other igencies. Panchayathi Rzrj: Philosophy and History of Panchayathi Raj, structure and
functions of Panctrayathi Ra.i Institutions, Concept of participatory development, 73'd
amendment of the constiturtion. Panchayathi Raj in Kerala, People's Campaign and its
evaluation. Co-operative ntovement and Rural Development. Types of cooperatives, structure
and furrctions.
'Module
IV
Urban Community Development: concept and principles. History of Urban Cornmunity
Development. Review of tlrban community development programmes. Current Programmes.
74th amendment of the constitution. Structure and functions of Local bodies.
34
I
i
I
Module V
Urban and Rural problems. Implications for social work practice. Role of NGOs. Emerging
trends and strategies - Rural entrepreneurship developm,rilt. r-ni cro f-rnance, building people's
organisations etc.
References:
l.
Jacob Z Thudipara, Urbair Community Development, Rawat publication, Neu, Delhi
2. Singh, Katar, Rural Development- Principles, Policies and Managemcnt. Sage Publications. New Delhi
1999
3. Thudipara,Z. Jacob, Urban Community Development (2"'j Ed), Rarvat Publications, New Delhi,2007
4. Das, Kumar Amiya,Urban Planning in India, Rawat Publications, New Delhi, 2007
5. Ali, Sabir (Ed), Dimensions of Urban Poverty, Rawat Publicatiorrs. New Delhi,
2006
6. Jain, Reshmi, Communicating Rural Development Strategies and Alternatives. Rawat Publications,
New Delhi,2003.
7. Singh, Surat, (Ed) Decentralised Governance in India- My'th anci Realit1,. Deep and Deep Publications.
New Delhi,2004
8. Batnagar, K.K., Gadeock , K.K. (Ed.): Urban Development anci Administration, Aalekh Publishers,
Jaipur, 2007
9. Mohan, Sudha, Urban Development New Localism, Rawat PLrblications. Nerv Delhi, 2005.
35
F.
f.
MSW Semester
Elective lI
SW
III
E
-
III
F'amily and Child Welfare (FCW)
3 I6 l-amily Welfare and Population Dynamics
Credits:4
Hours/week:
4
Learning Objectives
1. To understand family' as a social system and institution, its
2.
3.
significance and
emerging trends in the family system
To understand the ;lroblems and crises faced by modern family and social work
interventions.
To learn basic characteristics of Indian population and consequences and
implications thereof.
Module
I
The concepts of family and family welfare- its relationship with the concept of child welfare
and social welfare - 'l'hcoretical framework to study family. Family, a social institution:
Structure, functions and relationships within the family- Impact of social change and
changing family pattern in India-Emerging trends; problems and needs. Familf in rural,
urban and tribal communities- r\lternate family patterns like single parent families, female
headed households and adoptivc families.
Module
II
Family life cycle and dcveloprnental tasks at various stages -socialization of the childadolescent/ youth and the family'- mate selection- marital interaction- problems and needs of
the aged. Family dynamics-nreaning and patterns of interaction among family members
Module
III
of problems and their causes-conflict and adjustments,
ftrmilies.
families in crisis, marital conflicts, abuse of women and
economically destitute
children. Changing patterns of marriage and its consequences.
Familv disorganization: types
Family Interventions: Family therapy, pre-maniage and marriage counselling, divorce
counseling, group therapy and crisis intervention. Family life education, sex education
population education. Use of social work methods in helping families. Family Welfare
Services in India- Family welfare under the five year plans: policies and programmes.
'
'Module IV
Demography: meaning und inrportance, Determinations of population growth: fertility,
mortality and migration- lactors affecting them. Characteristics of lndia's population'. age,
sex, literacy, marital status. etc. Ilasic demographic concepts: life expectancy, fertility rate,
mortality rate, birth rate. ooupie protection rate, etc. Global demographic trends and the
36
f
Indian situation. Implications of population growth at the tnicro and macro levels. Pro
of population growth in India.
Module V
population policies in India: a historical over vierv. PopLrlation control measures, population
education, Family planning:
The concept and
methocls. Contraceptive methods:
Behavioural, mechanical, chernical, temporary, semi pennanent and permanent' The ideal
contraceptive- cafeteria approach. Communication and motir ation aspects of fhmily planning.
Family planning in Indian context: Problems and prospects. r\dministration of'Fa,:.rily planning
programmes at national and state levels. Govemmental antl Nt,tt gove'rnmental organisations
in family planning.
References:
l.
The Family, Prentice l-lali o1'tndia. New Delhi
Goode, William
2. Ashish Bose
From Population to PeoPIe
3. Ruth Nanda
The Family -Its function and Destiny
4. Agatha BowleY
The Problems of FamilY life
5. Pauline Bose
Family Stress Managernent
6. Yelien Young husband
Social Work with Families
I
7.'Evelyn Mills Duralt
8. Agarwal.S.N
9. Asha Bhende
10. Chandrasekhar.S
I
1. Hans Raj
Family DeveloPment
India's PoPulation Problems.
Principles of Population Studies.
Infant Mortality, Popr-rlation ( irowth and Famill'Planning.
Population Studies.
l-ransition'
12. Sexena.G.B
India's Population
13. Srinivasan & Mukherji
Dynamics of Population and lrarnily Welfare in lndia
37
ir-r
MSW Semester
Electivc
Ilt- Farnilv and Child Welfare
S\tr'
Ilt
E
3
V
III
(f'CW)
17 : Child Welfare
Credits : 4
Hours/week: 4
Learning Objectives
1.
2.
3.
To understand the concept, serv'ices and programmes for child welfare
To learn the development needs and problems of children
To study the legal provisions and policies for children
Module
I
Emerging philosophy of child developmc:nt, IIN declaration of the rights of the child - National
Policy for children. Constitutional provisions for the care protection and development of children
in India.
Module
Il
Developr;:ental needs of children -stages of child's development: Reeds and problems at different
stages. Family as the basir: unit of child's development- physical, emotional, cognitive and social
development. Common childhood diseases: their prevention and treatment, Early detection and
management of childhood disabilities. Behavior problems of children: prevention and treatmentrole of Child Guidance Clinics.
Module
tII
Magnitude cause and remedial measures for the major problems of children in India: child
labour, slreet children, juvenile delinquency, child abuse and neglect, physically and mentally
disabled children, school drop-outs. orphans, gender discrimination, female infanticide and
feticide, child marriage etc.
Module IV
Child development progranrmes ir.r lndia. A historical overview. Development services for
children under the five voar plans. Institutional and non institutional services or child
development: scope and lin.ritations. ICIDS programme: a detailed study. Matemal and child
health services.
Module V
Contributions
of national and intcrnational organizations in the field of child
UNICEF ILO, Indian Council
development:
Child Welfare, NIPCCD, CSWB etc- NGO's and child
developnrent. Legislations to proter:t the interests of children: Juvenile Justice Act 1986, Infant
foods (Regulation of Prcduction Suppli and Distribution) Act 1992. Child Labour (Prohibition
and Regulation) Act 198ri etc.
o1'
38
f
References:
l. Kumar .R
Child Developrnent in India, Vol. I & II
2.Ehzabeth Hurlock
Development Psychology
3, Bhalla
M.A
Studies in Child Care
4. Chaturvedi.T.N
5. Gokhale S.D.
& Sohni N.K
Administration for Child Welfare
Child in India
6. Kale S.V.
Child Psychologl' and Child
7. Sumithra Gupta
Social Welfare in lndia
8. Visurathar S.J
Deviant Children
39
/
f
MSW Semester I!'
SW IV C 19 : Human Resource Management in Human Service Organizations
Credits : 4
Hours/week: 4
Learning objectives
1. To understand human behavior in Human Service organisations
2. To understand basic concepts, process and functions of Human Resource
Management
3. To understand concepts relating to organisational Behavior.
4. To understand the concepts of Employee Relations'
Module
I
of Human Resource management: Meaning and def inition, nature and scope,
lnternational
functions, importance of HRM, qualities and skills of HR professionals,
Concepts
Human Resource Management'
Module
II
planning, recruitment, selection, induction, compensation,
HRM processes: Man power
'performance -appraisal
and employee separation (lay-off'
promotion, transfer,
Social
retrenchment, retirement and death), employee counseling, Corporate
Responsibility.
Module
III
deveiopment'
Training and development: Concept, difference betrveen training and
training
different
Identification of training needs, organizing training programmes'
prograrnmes.
methods, Modern training methods, Evaluation of training
Module IV
job satisfaction and
organizational behavior. Motivation, morale, I-eadelship,
occupational stress
performance, Conflict - meaning, types, stages, conflict lnanagement,
circles, Organizational
and stress management, Totai quatity *-unug.r"'t' .Quality
staff'
and
climate, organisat-ion culture, organizational structure -line
Module V
and characteristics of
Employee Relations and grievance redressal: Meaning,functions
peace' Grievances Employee Relations, mithods of maintaining organizational
securitl, schemes.
handling of grievances, Employee welfare and social
health hazards' employee tum over'
Problems in organizations: Absenteeism, Alcoholism'
'
down sizing, sexual harassment in work place'
40
o
\
References:
L Flippo,Edwin,
B
2. Monappa, Arun and Sivadain
Hill publishing
Principles of Management, Mc,Graw
company Ltd, New Delhi
Personnel Management
Tata Mc
Graw_Hill
Publishing Company Ltd, New Delhi.
3. ThripathiP.G
4.P Subba Rao
5. Luthans Fred
6. Robbins, Stephen.p
Personnel Management S.Chand and Sons, New
Delhi
Personnel and Human Resource Management
Organisational Behaviour Mc. Graw
Company, New Delhi
Organisati onal Behavior
-
Hill
publishing
Concepts,
Controversies, Applications. 4th Ed. prentice Hall
(2004).
7. Aswathappa, K
Human Resource Management: Text and Cases, 5,h
Edition, Tata Mc,Graw Hill publishing company
Ltd, New Delhi.
8. i.ao, V.S.P
Human Resource Management Text and Cases,
Excel Publishers.
9. Agochiya, Devendra
Every Trainer's Handbook, Sage publications Ltd,
New Delhi,
lO.Armstrong, Michael
A handbook of Human Resource Management
Practice, Kogan Page Limited, London.
4t
MSW Semester IV
SWry C20 z Social Legislation
,'#
Credits : 4
Hours/week: 4
Learning Objectives
1.
2.
3.
4.
To familiarize the students with Indian legal system , Indian Constitution,
and the fundamental rights, duties and directive principles
To gain knowledge regarding personal laws, laws for the weaker section ,
social security legislations and laws for the prevention of atrocities
To acquaint them with the statutory bodies for the protection of the rights of
the individuals in general and women and children in particular
To equip the students to apply their knowledge of law to help the
underprivileged and needY
Module
I
Social Legislation: Meaning & Scope. Historical development , Social Legislation as an
instrumeni for Social Control, Social.change & Socialjustice . Procedure involved in the
making of a legislation ,Indian constitution and social Legislation, Fundamental rights,
Fundamental duties and Directive Principles of State policy
Legislation. Legislation system in tndia: courts, Hierarchy of courts. Legal AID:
Meaning, organization & uses public Interest litigation'
Module
II
i
Law of Crimes: Indian Penal code, Criminal Procedure code . Prisons & conection. Laws
related to atrocities against women, Laws related to domestic violence, rape, sexual
paroi, Dowry
harassment and immoral traffic prevention, Laws relating to probation and
prevention Act Laws related to atrocities against children. The right of the child and laws
related to children, Women's Commission-its structure. functions, National Human
Rights Commission.
Module
III
Act,
Personal Laws: Laws- related to Maniage Divorce, Dowry' Hindu Maniage
Act.
christian Maniage Act. Muslim Marriage Laws, Special Marriage
Laws related to adoption and guardianship.
iu*r related to suc;ession and inheritance, Family Court- Structure and functiorrs.
Module IV
laws relating
Consumer protection Act, Consumer Court, Environmental Legislation and
Persons with
waste'
of
disposal
and
to conservation of forest and prevention of pollution
castes
scheduled
Disabilities Act lgg5. Laws ielated to prevention of atrocities against
illness'
Mental
and scheduled tribes ( 1989), Laws related to Corruption. Beggary and
Juvonile Justice Act., Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic substances Act'
Module V
of Gratuity Act
Legislation on Social Security measure: Factories Act l948,The Payment
igii, The Woikmen's Compensation Act,l923, The Employees State Insurance
Act,l948.
i
42
I
\'
References
l. Gangrade
K.D.
: Social Legislation India. Vol. I and II
concept publishing company, Delhi 1978
2. Kulkarni
: Social poricy and social
P.D
Development
lndia
3. India
Govemment
: constitution of India. Govt. of India press,
New Delhi
4. Mathew
PD
: Public lnterest Litigation
lndian Social Institute, New Delhi, 1999
5.Tapan
Biswal
: Human rights, gender and environment
Viva books pvt Ltd, New Delhi,2006
6. People law and
justicc
:
A
case book
of plL,Vol 2
Orient Longman publishers,New Delhi,l997
7
Introduction to constitution of India: Vikas publishers house pvt Ltd,New Delhi
8. Bare Acts and legislation
9. Encyclopediaof Socizrl Work
10. Legal Education
Series
: lndian social Institute, New Delhi. 1999
43
in
.MSW Semester
IV
.s..
Electivel.MedicalandPsychiatricSocialwork(MPSW)
SW 1y E
l Zl: Therapeutic Approaches in Medical and Ps;rchiatric settings.
Credits : 4
Hours/week: I
Learning Objectives
approaches to therapy
To acquaint the students with contemporaq' psvchosocial
in medical and psychiatric settings
in the field
Z. To hetp them gain knowledge refarding various thcra,;ics practiced
of health and mental health
3.Tohelpttremdevetopcompassion,competenceantlconfidencetoworkas
medical and psychiatric social workers'
Module I
of Psyc.hotherapies' l)sychotherapies based on
Psychotherapy: definition, scope and types
Yoga and lvleditation as therapies
lndian religious and cultural vaiue system.
1.
. Module II
psychodynamictherapeutic-approaches:psychoanalytictherapy(Freud)'Analyic
'fherapies: Logo therapy (Frankl)'
dxistential
psychotherapy lCarJ lung, Adler)'Hu*uniui.]
(Be.ie)' Gestalt therapy (Pearls)'
person- Centered therapy (Rogers), frunru.iional Analysis
Existential theraPY
Module
III
CognitiveBehaviouralTherapy:Behaviortherapy'RationalEmotivetherapy(Eltis)'Beck's
(Glasser)
Colnitive therapy, Reality therapy
Module IV
maritaltherapy' croup therapy' Psychodrama'
lnterpersonal Therapies: Family therapy,
Module V
play therapl,' crlsls
therapy, . The.raperrtie^ cotnntunity'
lndustrial
therapy,
occupational
Art 'herapy'
.onrrtriu. theiapy, creative r\rts Therapy:
intervention, chemothrerapy, electro
progranrming'
linguistic
therapy, Jaughter therapl. Ncttro
Music therapy, ounce movement
'
References:
1.
Richard.S.Shrad:
2. Fr. John AntonY:
3. Charles Zastrow:
4. Turner
5. Kaplan and Saddockr
6.
Niraj Ahuja
7. Hall and LindseY
8.l.c.D-10
9. Wolberg
:Theories
of
concept and Cases'
Psychotherapy and counseling
Brooks/ Cole
:lntroduction to PsYchotheraPY
Dorsey Pless'lllinois
:The Practice of Social Work
:Social Work Treatment
of Psychiatry
: Comprehensive Text Book
:PostGraduateTextBookofPsychiatry(Vol:l&ll)
:Theories of PersonalitY
:Oxford Press
: lntroduction to Psychotherapy'
44
vol-l&ll
j
MSW Semester IV
Elective I - Medical and Psychiatric Social Work
SWIVEI22: Health Care Administration and Legislation
Credits: 4
Hours/week: 4
Learning Objectives
1. To understand the health care system in India
2. To understancr the basic concepts in Hospitar Administration
3. To learn legislations in the field of health
Module
I
Health Planning and Management:- Health
Planning, Definition, Health planning
in
India' health in five year plans' changing perspectives
of hearth services, National Health
Ptlicy, the planning c1 cle. popLrlation' dynamics
iVlodule
II
The health care system in lndia. At
the centre, State, Districtand village
levels. primary
F-'ealth care in India, Administrative
structure and functions of pHC, Health programmes
in India, Alternative health .ur. ,y.t.m.
Module III
Hospital Administration: concept,
definition, general principles, functions
and duties of
hcspital administrator, Hospital'as
an o.ga rirarion, Differ;;; departments
in
a hospital,
Information 's)'srem, ,ronrrr.r-ierrth
ani i-*itt pr"aucts, consumer raws on
il""":l;"'
Module IV
Health programmes by government
and
voruntary orga.nizations working in
the
State, Nlatioral ano\G.os,
Internationar. H;.r;i insurance,
schoor Hearth
fl:il1lt:lth-Local,
Module V
Iegislation related to health care in
India
I. Medical Terrninatjon ol. pregnancy
Act
2. Prevention of Food adulieraiion
Xt
tgsq
3. Drug and Cosmetics Act 1940
4.
Diagnostic Techniques (Reguration
and prevention of misuse)
il:rt#l-at
ESI Act 194 I
Mental Health Act
7. Narcotic and psychotropic
substances Act
5.
6.
References
t. S.L Coel
:
2. S.L Goel
:
3. Gupta Sakti an<j Kant Sun ii ;
Health Care system and management,
Vol,3
Hospita! and Health care Administration
4. O Park J.and p;rrk .K
: Test Book
Flealth Care policy making and planning
45
1
of Socialand preventive Medicine
MSW Semester IV
Elective 2 - Rural and Urban Communitl' Developntent
SW IV E 2 21: Environmental Studies and Disastt:r N{anagement.
Credits : 4
Hours/week : 4
Learning Objectives :-
1. Understand the inter relatedness of human life, living orgitnisms and environment.
2. Understand the environment problems nature and irnpact of development
3.
4.
initiatives.
Examine the utilization and management of natural resources.
Study the role of social work practice in dealing rvith environmental problerns and
in disaster management.
Module
I
Environment and Ecology. Basic ecology of earth: Vegetation Pattern. Biotic and abiotic
factors, climatic factors, food chain, food rveb. Bio (lcc'Chemical cycles' The
intenelatedness o{' living organisms and natural resources,
Natural Resources: Utilisation and Management.
Forest, land, water, air and energy sources.
Module
II
Pollution and its Effects
(llobal rvarming
Air Pollution - Types, Ozone Layer depletion, Green house ef'fect.
Water Pollution- Types and Sources. Land Pollution - Type:;'
Agricultural and chemical pollution, sand mining, quarr)'rng etc'
Solid waste - Types . Solid Waste Management,
Thermal pollution. Industrial pollution. Nuclear Pollution- Radiation, eff-ects anti waste
disposal
Nolse Pollution: Sources, types and effects' Energy crisis. Deforestation'
Impactof Development Initiatives' Impact of war'
Module
III
forestry,
Environmental Conservation: Methods- water shed management, bio-farming, social
aforestation, recycling, Sustainable Development. Environment F'ducation'
Module IV
'freaties and Agreements.
Role of Government, NGOs and People's initiatives. Internatiorral
Environment Legislation in India.
promotion of environment
Social Work and Environment. Work with interdisciplinarl' teanls.
movements.
Bachao Andolan,
Environment Movements in India & Kerala CHIPKO. z\PIKO. Narmada
Summits'
National Alliance for Peoples Movements, Silent Vallel Movemcnt etc. Clobal
Module V
& effects; Stages of
Disaster : Definition, Natural and Human made disasters; multiple causes
stagesManagement:
Disaster
disaster; Development & Disaster; Preventive Measttres.
46
Jh..
,J
rescue, relief, reconstruction & rehabilitation. Role
Policy; Role of voluntar), organizations.
of government, Disaster
\,
Management
References:
l.
Bharucha, Erach ( for
tJcC) :
Textbok of Environmental studies for
U
ndergraduate courses. University
Press
2. Saxena, H,M
:
( lndia) private Ltd. Hydrabad, 2005.
Environmental studies, Rawat
publications. New Delhi,2006.
3.
I awar, S.N, Patil, R.B and
Salunkhe, S.A
(Eds)
Rachel
5. Biswal, Tapan
4. Carson,
:
Environmental Movements in India. Strategies and
Practice, Rawat publications. New Delhi ,2005
Silent Spring, penguin books, 1962
: ljuman rights, Gender and Environment
*
\,
47
A.
MSW Semester IV
Elective 2 - Rural Urban Community Development (RUCD)
SW
M2
I
22: Developmental Economics
Credits : 4
Hours/week : 4
'
Learning Objectives
1. To understand the concept and theories of economic del'clopment.
2. To develop knowledge of composition of Indian cconomy- different
sectors and
their role
3.
l.
to introduce students to existing academic
approaches that grapple with the complexity of developirrg countries
Module I
Economic Development: Definition and factors, Theories olecononric development.
Economic growth and structural change
Under development: meaning and indicators. Common Characleristic of under developed
countries. Obstacles to development, Human Capital Developrnent- Education, health and
Nutrition
Indian economy: structure, current economic scene. Kerala economy: salient features
Module
II
Poverty: measurement of povefty-magnitude of poverty in lndia. Unemployment, undernutrition, migration,. Victims of poverty [ndian: women, childrerr other weaker sections.
Implications. Gender issues.
Module
III
Agriculture: basic characteristics, production and cropping pattern. Causes of low
productivity and measures to increase productivity. Rural credit ad inputs. Land ownership
and reforms in India/Kerala. Farm mechanisation and its eftects. lmpact of New Economic
Policy on agriculture and aUied sectors.
Module
IV
The role of small scale and cottage industries in developrnerrt. Khadi and village industries.
Micro-enterprises development. Rural unemployment. agricultLrral-labourers and minimum
wages. lmpact of New Economic Policy. Service sector of the Ec:onomy. Role and
problems in the wake of New Economic Policy.
Module V
Planning for economic development in India. Priorities of the Five Year Plans . Impact of
Five Year Plans on the different sectors of the econom)'. Features of the current Five Year
Plan.
-
48
t
\ tv
References:
l. A.N. Agrawal
lndian Economy:Nature, Problems and Progress
2. Ciraudhuri .P
The Indian Economy, Poverty and Development
3. Tandon, B.8., K.K. Tiwari
lndian Economy, Tata Mcgraw
Hill
Publishing
Company. New Delhi,l997
4. B.rrdhan .P
The PoliticalEconomy of Development in India
5. Dandekar
& Rath
Poverty in India
6. Bhagwati
.J
The Economics of Under developed Countries
7. Sankaran .S
Agricultural Economy of India
8. Varghese.K.V
Economic Problems of Modern India
Kerala's economic development - performance and
Problems in the Post Liberalisation Period, Sage
Publications, New Deihi,2004
9. Prakash, B.A.
10. Seth .M.Again
I
l.
Sharma S.L.(ed)
12. Rugman, Alan
:Theory and Practice of Economic Planning.
: Development: Socio cultural Dimensions, Rawat
Publications, New Delhi, 1986
:
The End of Globalisation, Random House, London
2000.
49
I
MSW Semester IV
(FCW)
Elective 3 - Family and Chilct Wclflre
SW M 3 21: Women's DeveloPmcnt
Credits : 4
Hourslweek:
4
Learning Objectives
and status of lvomen in India
l. To develop understanding of women-'s issues
provisions ancl services and programmes
2. To learn the .*riitrtional and legal
available for women
Module
I
education and
profile of lndian \vornen in relation to
Status of Women : Demographic
status of women in
communities' changing roles and
ino'tribai
rural,
in
and
;;l"y-;t
"uun
different religiotts groups. Democratisation
among
women
of
status
legal
India. Socio,
women leadershiP.
Module
II
Women and Health
contributing to
Factors
status of women in India'
Indicators of health and nutritional
and progratntnes f,or improving
r"d nutrition among women' Policies
and chird health services.
nutrition status of wo;;;- Mft",ity
i;;;;il
Module
III
Problems of women
:Proble
health
and
't*:1:'ili"*JrTil;-i[
rape, Prostitution, devadasi
organised sectors' Gender
Module
rv
t:
oDment in Five Year Plans'
:ondensed course of education
girls'
homes for women and
p'og'u*"I l-9tio economic
,, : \/^:^-^ Drnorq
of CSWB etc' Role of
Samriddhi Yojana- e'og'u'iltnEs
women,s Development corpr
Droqramme- DWCRA- Matrila
iiCbt in the develoPment of r omen
Module
V
:
o Protec
Women and Law: Constituti
Immoral Traffic, Prevention '
Indecent Representation. of
(Regulation and Prevention o
"t
\
196l'
li::ffii Act etc.
NationalCommissionforwomenandKeralaWomen,sComrnission-structureandfunctions.
50
j
References:
l.
S.K.Ghosh
Indian rvomen, Through the Ages
2. Chrnnappa Reddy
Problems and Concerns of Indian women.
3. Ram Ahuja
Crime Against Women.
4. Ne.ra
r\
Desai
Decade of Women's Movement in India.
5. Usha Rao
Wornen in a Developing Society.
6. Na:ryana Reddy
7. Maurya.S.D
Women and Child Development.
8. Leelama Devasia
Women in India- Equality, Social Justice and
Women in India
Development
9.
Srivastava.T.V
10. Usha Tahoar
vVomen and the Law.
Social Profile of Working Women
5l
V
\,
MSW Semester
I\/
J
Elective 3 - Family and Child Wellarc (FCrW)
SW
M3
222
Youth Welfare anrl Development.
Credits : 4
Hours/week : 4
Learning Objectives
l. To learn the status and problems of youth
2. To understand the services and programme for youth in the govt. and voluntary
sector
Module
I
Youth: definition and characteristics. Demographic profile and 1,outh in lndia. Needs,
aspirations and problems of youth. Unemployment, youth unrest, generation gap, drug
addition, alcoholism, suicide and terrorism among youths in India.
Module
II
Services for student youth: Education, physical education, sports, recreation, vocational
guidance, leadership training, Bharat scouts and Guides. National Cadet Corps, National
Service Scheme, youth festivals, youth camps, student's counseling planning forum, etc.
Module
III
Services for student youth: Non- formal education fbl school drop-outs, TRYSEM, Prime
Minister's Rozgar Yojana, Programmes by various government departments and NCO's.
Module IV
National Youth Policy. Youth Welfare Organisations zrt the national and state level. Vishwa
Yuvak Kendra and Nehru Yuvak Kendra: Objectives and Programmes. Youth hostels,
National Youth awards.
Module V
Principles of working with youth. Values, skills and lunctiorrs of a social worker working
among youth. Research in the youth welfare: nature and scope.
References:
l.
Crisis of Value.
K.D.Gangrade
2. Erick H Erickson
ldentity Youth & Crisis
3. Viswa Yuvak Kendra
Indian Youth: Process of Socialisation
4.
Integration in India.
Sinha
52
1'
:":
t
Fly UP