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UNIVERSITY OF CALICUT M.Ed. CURRICULUM    Board of Studies in Education (PG) 

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UNIVERSITY OF CALICUT M.Ed. CURRICULUM    Board of Studies in Education (PG) 
 UNIVERSITY OF CALICUT
M.Ed. CURRICULUM (With effect from 2013 Admission) Board of Studies in Education (PG) Universitty of Calicut 1
Preface The National Council for Teacher Education has requested the University to revise the curriculum of Teacher Education programmes in the light of National Curriculum Framework for Teacher Education 2009. University of Calicut is a forerunner in revising the B.Ed. curriculum. But the M.Ed. curriculum was left untouched for quite a long time. The present M.Ed. curriculum will not be a challenge for the forthcoming B.Ed. holders of the University of Calicut. Hence, in the first meeting of the newly constituted PG Board of Studies in Education, held on 26th June 2013, it was unanimously decided to revise the existing M.Ed. curriculum. A working group was constituted to develop a broad frame work of the programme. The working group met on 11th July 2013 and developed the framework for the revision of M.Ed. curriculum. The out of the house meeting of the PG Board of Studies in Education held on 25th July 2013 approved the framework and constituted 28 Expert Committees to prepare Syllabus of 6 Core Courses and 25 Specialisation Courses. As such the task was assigned to the Expert Committees and they have prepared the syllabus. University has conducted a Workshop on 13th August 2013. In the Plenary Session Prof. A. Faziluddin presented the Structure, Regulation and Scheme of Examination of the revised M.Ed. programme. It was followed by Presentation Session under the chairmanship of Prof. (Dr) P. Kelu in which the Expert Committees presented gist of the drafted syllabus. The Working Group met on 22nd August 2013 at Farook Training College modified the Structure, Regulation and Scheme of Examination based on the suggestions of the participants of the Workshop. The Working Group once again met on 31st August 2013 at Tagore Nikethan and consolidated the syllabus. The draft M.Ed. curriculum was uploaded in the University Website and a press release was given inviting suggestions from educationists, teachers, teacher educators, research scholars and students. The responses were encouraging. The Board of Studies met on 6th September 2013 modified the curriculum based on the suggestions e‐mailed by stakeholders and approved it. I wish to record my sincere gratitude and immense indebtedness to Dr. M. Abdul Salam, Hon. Vice Chancellor and Prof. K. Raveendranath our Pro Vice Chancellor who have blessed us with their valuable suggestions and scholarly advice in materialising this venture in each phase of its development. I am obliged to all teacher educators of the University’s Department of Education, Government Colleges, Aided Colleges, University Teacher Education Centres and Self Financing Colleges who have contributed in this prestigious effort. I also extend a word of gratitude to Dr. P.P. Noushad who designed the entire graphic works in the curriculum. I am quite confident that the newly developed M. Ed curriculum will be a model for other Indian Universities too. Hope the curriculum will be a catalyst for professionalising Teacher Education at the Post Graduate level. University of Calicut dedicates this curriculum to those who love education and admire the profession of an educationist. Prof. (Dr) K. Sivarajan Chairman Board of Studies in Education (PG) 2
C O N T E N T Sl No Content
Page No
1 2 3 4 5 PREFACE STRUCTURE OF THE M.Ed. CURRICULUM
I. M.Ed. REGULATION
II. M.Ed. SCHEME OF EXAMINATION & INTERNAL ASSESSMENT III. M.Ed. SYLLABUS – SEMESTER I
CORE COURSES I, II & III
i. Advanced Philosophy of Education
ii. Psychology of Human Development and Learning
iii. Introduction to Educational Research and Statistics
SPECIALIZATION COURSE I
i. Advanced Methodology of Teaching Arabic
ii. Advanced Methodology of Teaching English
iii. Advanced Methodology of Teaching Malayalam
iv. Advanced Methodology of Teaching Hindi
v. Advanced Methodology of Teaching Urdu
vi. Advanced Methodology of Teaching Tamil
vii. Advanced Methodology of Teaching Sanskrit
viii. Advanced Methodology of Teaching Mathematics
ix. Advanced Methodology of Teaching Physical Science x. Advanced Methodology of Teaching Natural Science
xi. Advanced Methodology of Teaching Commerce xii. Advanced Methodology of Teaching Social Science
2
5
12
13
18
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 xiii. Advanced Methodology of Teaching Computer Science SPECIALIZATION COURSE II
i. Teacher Education
ii. Non formal Education
iii. Early Childhood Care and Education
iv. Elementary and Secondary Education
CORE COURSES IV, V, VI
iv. Education and Society
v. Psychology of Individual Differences
vi. Advanced Educational Research and Statistics
3
19
23
29
33
37
43
46
50
58
60
62
65
68
73
77
81
84
88
91
95
101
104
108
SPECIALIZATION COURSE III
Guidance and Counseling
Educational Technology
Educational Measurement and Evaluation
Educational Management and Administration
29 30 31 32 i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
33 34 35 36 SPECIALIZATION COURSE IV
i. Education for Human Rights and Values
ii. Curriculum Development and Transaction iii. Iii. Environmental Education
iv. Iv. Inclusive Education APPENDIX
37 38 39 i. Board of Studies in Education (PG) ii. Working Group iii. Expert Committee 4
112
117
120
123
127
130
134
137
143
145
147
M. Ed. CURRICULUM Regulation, Scheme of Examination, and Syllabus STRUCTURE OF THE M.Ed CURRICULUM 1. Introduction Master of Education (M. Ed.) is a professional and research oriented post‐graduate programme in Education. To be at par with the professional requirement of the programme, the Board of Studies in Education (PG) pooled the best expertise available in various areas to modify and improve the existing curriculum. The board has re‐formulated the M. Ed. programme by diversifying the courses offered and strengthening the content and structure of the programme, in tune with the National Curriculum Framework for Teacher Education (NCFTE), 2009. The diversification is largely done in introducing the advanced methodology of teaching school subjects and new specialization courses in emerging areas of the discipline. The structure of the programme is enriched by adding field experiences / practicals in both semesters. The evaluation scheme is further systematized. 2. Vision Purpose of the M. Ed. programme is to prepare professionally committed and competent teacher educators, educational researchers, educational administrators, and educational planners who can develop education according to the national aspirations and global trends. It seeks to prepare educational experts capable of generating knowledge and to find solutions to the problems and issues relating to the theory and practice of the varied fields of education viz., Teacher Education, Non‐formal Education, Early Childhood Care and Education, Elementary and Secondary Education, Guidance and Counseling, Educational Technology, Educational Measurement and Evaluation, Educational Management and Administration, Education for Human Rights and Values, Curriculum Development and Transaction, Environmental Education, and Inclusive Education. It also focuses on comprehensive and integrated professional development of personnel engaged in educational management and administration. 3. Programme Objectives The M. Ed. programme aims at preparing truly professional teacher educators and other personnel specialized in different areas of education. The programme intends to achieve the following objectives: • To understand the nature of education as a discipline • To understand how concepts/ theories/issues drawn from disciplines cognate to education 5
•
•
•
To develop specialized knowledge and understanding of the bases of education To develop national and international perspectives on educational theory and practice To develop understanding of human behaviour and personality for guiding efficient and effective learning • To acquire skills required to take up leadership roles in the areas of education • To develop a rational conceptualization of educational research • To enhance essential ICT skills required for educational practice and professional empowerment • To develop competence in specialized areas such as: i.
Advanced methodology of teaching school subjects ii.
Teacher Education iii.
Non formal Education iv.
Early Childhood Care and Education v.
Elementary and Secondary Education vi.
Guidance and Counselling vii.
Educational Technology viii.
Educational Measurement and Evaluation ix.
Educational Management and Administration x.
Education for Human Rights and Values xi.
Curriculum Development and Transaction xii.
Environmental Education xiii.
Inclusive Education 4. Structure of the programme M. Ed. programme is a research oriented professional education programme. The programme consists of two semesters of 105 days each. The structure of the course is in tune with the pattern suggested by NCTE. This consists of 5 courses per semester [three Core Courses (CC) and two Specialization Courses (SC)]. Master of Education (M.Ed.) SEMESTER ‐ I Paper Title a) Core Courses CC. I Advanced Philosophy of Education
CC .II Psychology of Human Development and Learning CC .III Introduction to Educational Research and Statistics Course Code Contact Hours Int. Marks Ext. Marks Total Marks MED101
MED102
90 Hrs.
90 Hrs.
20 20 80 80 100
100
MED103
90 Hrs.
20 80 100
6
b) Specialization Courses (Select one from each group)
SC. I i.
Advanced Methodology of MED111 Teaching Arabic ii.
Advanced Methodology of MED112 Teaching English iii.
Advanced Methodology of MED113 Teaching Malayalam iv.
Advanced Methodology of MED114 Teaching Hindi v.
Advanced Methodology of MED115 Teaching Urdu vi.
Advanced Methodology of MED116 Teaching Tamil vii.
Advanced Methodology of MED117 Teaching Sanskrit viii.
Advanced Methodology of MED118 Teaching Mathematics ix.
Advanced Methodology of MED119
Teaching Physical Science x.
Advanced Methodology of MED120 Teaching Natural Science xi.
Advanced Methodology of MED121 Teaching Commerce xii.
Advanced Methodology of Teaching Social Science MED122 xiii.
Advanced Methodology of Teaching Computer Science MED123 SC. II i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
Teacher Education Non formal Education Early Childhood Care and Education Elementary and Secondary Education 90 Hrs 20 80 100
90 Hrs 20 80 100 90 Hrs 20 80 100 90 Hrs 20 80 100 90 Hrs 20 80 100 90 Hrs 20 80 100 90 Hrs 20 80 100 90 Hrs 20 80 100 90 Hrs 90 Hrs 20 80 100 20 80 100 90 Hrs 20 80 100 90 Hrs 20 80 100 90 Hrs 20 80 100 20 20 20 80 80 80 100 100 100 20 80 100 50 25 175 NIL NIL 400 50
25
575
MED131 MED132 MED133 90Hrs 90Hrs 90Hrs MED134 90Hrs . c) Formulation of Research Proposal d) Field Experiences / Practical – (1) Total of Semester I 7
SEMESTER ‐ II Paper Title Course Code Contact Hours Int. Marks Ext. Marks a) Core Courses CC IV Education and Society MED201
90 20 80 CC V Psychology of Individual Differences
MED201 90
20 80 CC VI Advanced Educational Research and MED201
90
20 80 Statistics b) Specialization Courses (Select one from each group)
SC. III i.
Guidance and Counseling MED211 90
20 80 ii.
Educational Technology MED212 90 20 80 iii.
Educational Measurement and MED213
90
20
80 Evaluation iv.
Educational Management and MED214
90 20 80 Administration i. Education for Human Rights and MED221
90 20 80 SC. IV Values ii. Curriculum Development and MED222
90 20 80 Transaction iii. Environmental Education MED223 90 20 80 iv. Inclusive Education MED224
90 20 80 c) Dissertation (Dissertation work started in Semester I will be 50 100 completed by the end of Semester II) d) Field Experiences / Pactical – (2) 25 NIL e) Viva Voce for Dissertation NIL 50 Total of Semester II 175 550 Grand Total of Semester I and II (575+725) 8
Total Marks 100
100
100
100
100 100 100 100 100 100 100 150
25
50
725
1300
5. Distribution of Marks 6. Distribution of days/hours 9
Semester I 10
Semester II 11
I. M. Ed. REGULATION a. Duration of the programme Duration of the M. Ed. programme shall be at least one year with two semesters of at least 105 days each. b. Eligibility for admission Candidates with B. Ed. Degree of University of Calicut or any other university equivalent there to with not less than 55 % of marks are qualified to seek admission to the M. Ed. Programme. Relaxation of marks will be given for SC/ST/OBC and other eligible categories as per the University / Government rules. In‐service Teacher candidates from government / aided institutions with a minimum of 5 years continuous regular service will be given a relaxation of 5% marks in the minimum for eligibility. c. Admission Procedure Candidates have to undergo an entrance examination conducted by the University for admission to M. Ed. programme. The selection of candidates will be based on a rank list prepared on the basis of the following criteria. Entrance Examination 50% weightage, B. Ed. Degree 40% weightage, B. Ed. from University of Calicut 5%, and Teaching Service 5% weightage (1% weightage for each year subject to a maximum of 5%). d. Medium of instruction Medium of instruction and examination of the M. Ed. programme shall be English. e. Scheme of instruction There shall be 90 contact hours for each theory course. Ten hours is also assigned for practicals/tests of each theory course. One contact hour per day is allotted for teacher supervised dissertation work in both semesters. Apart from this, 25 hours is assigned for Dissertation work in each semester. Students shall submit the Dissertation on or before the tenth working day from the date of closure of II semester. Seminar: Seminar is accepted as one of the transaction strategies of the syllabus; Each M.Ed. student should be assigned one seminar on a topic in any of the ten courses of the programme so that all students get an opportunity of presenting seminar using ICT Tools. f.
Attendance 84 days of attendance is essential for appearing in each of the end semester examination. Only
those students who have secured the required minimum attendance in the I Semester and
registered for the first semester end University examination are eligible to continue studies in the
II Semester. 12
g. Shortage of attendance Condonation for shortage of attendance will be as per University rules. h. Re‐admission rules There shall be provision for readmission in the same institution in the second semester within a period of three years for those who have satisfactorily completed first semester and also registered for first semester University Examination, provided there is vacancy in the institution and the syllabus being the same. Re‐admission shall be permitted during the first week of 2nd semester. II. M.Ed. SCHEME OF EXAMINATION &INTERNAL ASSESSMENT There shall be End Semester University Examinations in each semester. The ratio of internal to external examination for theory courses is 20:80. a. Pattern of University Examination question paper shall be as follows: Type of Total No. No. Marks Marks Question of Questions to for each Questions be answered question Essay/ Long Answer Type Short Essay/ Problem Solving/ Application Type Total 6
4
10
40 12
10
4
40 18
14
‐‐‐
80 b. Duration of written examination : 3 hrs c. End Semester theory course evaluation : Maximum 80 marks There shall be double valuation for theory courses .The average of the marks awarded by
both examiners shall be taken as the final award for that particular course. In case of 10% or
more deviation in the marks awarded by the two examiners, the script shall be referred to a third
examiner and the average of the nearest two marks shall be considered for the final award of
marks. There shall be no revaluation.
d. Internal Assessment of Theory Courses Internal assessment shall be for 20 marks in each theory course and shall be assessed through 2 internal tests of 5 marks each (2x5=10 marks) and 2 assignments as detailed in respective courses of 5 marks each (2X5 = 10 marks). There shall be no separate minimum for internal assessment of theory courses. To make internal assessment objective and transparent, the student should be made aware of 13
the criteria / indicators of assessment well in advance. The Internal marks shall be published periodically. Students may seek redress of grievances of internal evaluation at the teacher educator level or at the department/ college evaluation committee level. The consolidated mark lists of all courses of a semester shall be submitted to the University immediately after the closure of each semester. e. Field Experience/ Practical M. Ed. students need to have hands on experiences/field experiences which could enable them to ascertain the extent of their understanding of concepts discussed in theory courses and comprehension of the discipline as a whole. Hence Field Experience/Practical prescribed for M.Ed. programme should be a comprehensive activity intended to provide opportunity to expose students to a variety of field experience or experiments .Field experience/Practical is prescribed in each semester which carries 25 marks each in both semesters. Each student shall be assigned one activity from the given list in each semester. The institution should make sure that all the given field experience/practical are distributed among students’. They shall formulate a plan of action for the execution of the activity either in the laboratory or in the field. On completion of the activity, the student should submit a detailed report of the activity. Seminars shall be organized for presenting and discussing the report. Internal Evaluation of the Field Experience/ Practical should be based on students work, report, presentation and reflections and there is no minimum for a pass in field experience. List of field experience/practical I Semester • Develop two lesson transcripts for inculcating Democratic Values and transact in a primary class of your locality. Prepare a report on your experience. • Visit a school of your locality and identify the types of learning disabilities of children • Visit an institution which propagate the philosophy of any of the thinkers and conduct a study on its functioning II Semester • Prepare history of any one educational Institution of your locality using oral and written sources • Administer any one standardized psychological tool in a school of your locality and prepare a report on it. • Conduct a survey on measures of protection of child rights in your neighborhood schools. f.
Research proposal Dissertation work constitutes an important component of the M.Ed. Programme. The purpose of the dissertation is to provide the student with practical/hands‐on experience in the scientific process of research. The student in consultation with the Research supervisor should identify a research problem. Having identified a research problem, the students need to 14
formulate a brief outline of the conduct of study which is known as Research Proposal. The Proposal should be a blue print which outlines the process of research to be adopted. The Proposal may be developed considering considering the following. (i)
Title of the Research Problem (ii)
Introduction (iii)
Statement of the Problem (iv)
Objectives of the Study (v)
Hypotheses (vi)
Methodology of Research – Method of study, Sample, Tools &Techniques, Data collection, Analysis (vii) References. Evaluation of Research Proposal: Research Proposal will be evaluated by the Board of Internal examiners. The Board consists of the HOD/Principal as Chairman and all the research supervisors as members. For evaluation of the Proposal the student may be asked to present it before the Board. Maximum marks for the Research proposal is 50.There shall be no minimum for a pass. Only on receiving a satisfactory feedback from the Board of examiners, the student shall execute the Research proposal. Evaluation of the research proposal shall be based on the criteria provided below. Criteria for evaluation of research proposal
(Each criterion carries five marks)
Sl.No
Criteria
Rating
1.
Statement of the proposed problem
5 /4/3/2/1
2.
Identification of relevant variables
5 /4/3/2/1
3.
Stating clear Need and significance of the study
5 /4/3/2/1
4.
Expression of acquaintance with relevant literature / theories
5 /4/3/2/1
5.
Identification of appropriate method of research
5 /4/3/2/1
6.
Description of sample
5 /4/3/2/1
7.
Introductory description of proposed tools / techniques
5 /4/3/2/1
8.
Identification of possible and relevant analyses
5 /4/3/2/1
9.
Identification of broad steps/ stages in the study
5 /4/3/2/1
10
Confidence with the topic during the presentation
5 /4/3/2/1
The board may suggest changes to the proposal, which can be incorporated by the student in
consultation with supervising teacher. However, the broad area of study proposed cannot be changed
further. The institution has to keep the approved proposal till the viva-voce.
15
g. Evaluation of Dissertation Students shall submit the Dissertation on or before tenth working day from the date of closure of II semester. Candidates shall not be permitted to submit a dissertation on which a degree or diploma has already been conferred on her/him by the university or any other institution. Evaluation of Dissertation shall be both internal and external.[50 internal and 100 external=150 marks] The dissertation shall be internally evaluated by the concerned supervising faculty member and externally evaluated by examiners appointed by the controller of examinations. Minimum for a pass in dissertation shall be 75 (marks secured in internal and external evaluation put together). However there shall be no separate minimum for internal and external evaluation. The evaluation of dissertation shall be based on the Criteria/Guidelines given below. Criteria for evaluating M.Ed. Dissertation 7.5
14
7.5
7.5
15
15
4
1
5 4 16 4 1
7 4 18
19
20
4
10
10
Viva Voce: Each student shall attend a viva‐voce on dissertation conducted by the university. The Board of examiners for the viva‐voce consists of chairman and 2 members, out of which one will be an expert from outside the University. There shall be no minimum for a pass in viva‐
voce. Required number of Viva-voce boards shall be constituted by the University to complete
the process in all institutions within a time duration of 8 days. A Co-ordinating Cirman shall be
appointed for co-ordinating the work of all boards. The Head of the Department of Education
shall be the Co- ordinating Chairman. Each board will conduct viva-voce for a maximum of 4
institutions. The duration of viva-voce in an institution shall be based on student’s strength; and
one day for a strength of 20 students. Additional days will be provided as per student intake.
16
Spelling, organization of the content in logical order with appropriate titling 7.5
13
Table, Figure, Reference,Pagination, Appendices, Ref., Spacing, Typing, Appendix, Binding 25
12
Format
Approx. Summary 5 11
Relevant suggestions 10 10
Edl. Implications 5 9
Conclusions 5 Major findings 8
Discsn. Interprtn. 7
Hypo/qstn. Answered 6 Analysis tech. 5 Summary/Conclusion Implications and Suggestions Tool description 4 Upto date ,exhaustive ,conclusion 3 Analysis
Sampling Marks 2 Compre. Procedure 1 Methodology
Scope & limitations Review of Related Literatur
e Objs. & hypothesis Introduction Oprational Defnitions. Na
me of the Stu
den
t Edl. Significance Name of the Supervisin
g Teacher h. Submission of other written accounts for internal evaluation The time schedule for submission of the written accounts for internal evaluation shall be as follows: Sl. No Written accounts Not later than i.
Research proposal 75th Working day of I semester ii.
Assignments 90th Working day of I&II semesters iii.
Field Experience and Practical 95th Working day of I&II semesters i. Eligibility for pass Minimum marks for a pass in each theory course shall be 50% (marks obtained in internal and external evaluation put together). A candidate shall be declared to have passed the programme if s/he obtains not less than 50% of marks in each theory course and dissertation as well as 50% of the total marks assigned to the whole programme. j. Classification of Successful Candidates First class with Distinction ‐ 75% and above First class ‐ 60% and above Second class ‐ From 50% to less than 60% k. Revision of Regulation Not withstanding all that has been stated above, the university has the right to modify
any of the regulations, scheme and syllabus of the programme from time to time.
17
III. M.Ed. SYLLABUS SEMESTER I 18
MED 101
Core Course ‐ I ADVANCED PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION (Instructional hours – 90) Course Objectives 1. To understand the nature of education as a discipline 2. To examine the philosophical origin of educational theory and practice 3. To analyse critically postulates of various schools of philosophy, vision of great thinkers and their educational implications 4. To enable the student to develop a philosophical point of view towards educational problems. Course content MODULE 1. Education as a field of study Origin and development of Education as a discipline –Aims of education in India in the context of democratic, secular, egalitarian and humane society ‐ education as pedagogic science ‐ teaching as a profession – Interdisciplinary nature of education; relationships with disciplines such as philosophy, psychology, sociology, political science, economics and anthropology. (16 hours) MODULE 2. Philosophy of education Meaning, definition and significance of philosophy of education – major philosophical divisions – metaphysics, epistemology and axiology and their relationship with education – Aims of Education (10 hours) MODULE 3. Indian Schools of philosophy Unique characteristics of Indian philosophy and its relationship with India’s cultural heritage – The Orthodox and Heterodox schools of philosophy – critical analysis of the educational implications of Upanishads, Sankhya, Yoga, Nyaya, Vysesikha, Utharameemamsa, Poorva meemamsa – Budhism, Jainism and Charvaka – Educational thoughts of Swami Vivekananda, Rabindranath Tagore, Sri Aurobindo and Gandhiji ‐ Aims and ideals of education exemplified in Bhagavat Gita, Quran and Bible (30 hours) MODULE 4. Western Schools of Philosophy Critical analysis of the axiological metaphysical and epistemological aspects of idealism, humanism, naturalism, realism, pragmatism and existentialism and its educational implications – Educational thoughts of Plato, Friedrich Frobel, Maria Montessori, Jean Jacques Rousseau and John Dewey (20 hours) MODULE 5. Social Philosophies Critical analysis of the Educational implications of Individualism, Democracy, Socialism and Totalitarianism – concept of freedom and discipline ‐ critical analysis of curriculum with reference to various social schools of philosophy. (14 hours) Transaction Mode Lecture Seminars Assignments 19
Power point Presentations Field visits Book Reviews Assignments 1. Survey of recent researches in philosophy of Education 2. Book Review ‐ prepare a review on any one great work of an eminent educational thinker 3. Review of school curriculum at pre primary/primary/secondary/higher secondary level. References 1. Bageley, W.C. (1935). Educational and the Emergent Man, NewYork: Thomas Welson & Son, 2. Banks,O. (1967). The Sociology of Education, London: Prentice Hall 3. Banrs, J.A. (1996), Cultural diversity and education: Foundations curriculum and teaching (4th ed.) Boston: Alynand, Becon. 4. Beyer, L.E. (Ed.) (1996) Creating democratic classrooms: The struggle to integrate theory and Practice. New York: Teachers College Press. 5. Bourdieu, P. 1977. Outline of a Theory of Practice. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge Univ Press 6. Bourdieu, P. and L.J.D. Wacquant. 1992. An Invitation to Reflexive Sociology. Chicago and London: Univ of Chicago Press 7. Bourdieu, P. and Passeron, J.C. (1990). Reporduction in Education Society and Cultutre. London:Sage 8. Broudy, H.S. (1965). Building a Philosophy of Education, Delhi: Prentice Hall, 9. Brubacher, J.S. (1961). Electric Philosophy of Education, Newyork: Prentice Hall Inc., 10. Brubacher, J.S.(1939). Modern Philosophies of Education, McGraw Hill Book Company, 11. Bruubacher, John S.; (1969) Modern Philosophies of education, Tata McGraw‐Hill, Publishing Company Pvt LTD, New Delhi. 12. Butchvarov, P. (1970) The Concept of knowledge. Evanston, Illinois, North Western University Press. 13. Butler, J.S. (1951). Four Philosophies and their implications in education and religion, London: Harper and Bros.,. 20
14. Butler, J.S. (1977). Idealism in Education, New York: Harper & Row, 15. Chatterji, S.C. & Dutta, D.M. (1954) An Introduction to Indian Philosophy, University Press, Calcutta. 16. Chauhan,S.S & Sharma, R.K (2001). Philosophy of Education. New Delhi: Atlantic publishers 17. Dearden R. F. (1984). Theory and practice in Education. Routledge K Kegan & Paul. 18. Debra Heyes, Martin Hills, Pam Chistie and Bob Lingard (2007) Teachers and schooling: Making a Difference, Allen and Unwin, Australia. 19. Dewey, J. (1916/1977): Democracy and Education: An introduction to the philosophy of education. New York: Macmillan. 20. Freire, P. and Shor, I. (1987). A Pedagogy of liberation. London, Macmillan Education. 21. Freire, Paulo (1970). Pedagogy of the oppressed. New York: Continuum. 22. Freire, Paulo (2005). Education for Critical consciousness. New York: Continuum. 23. Gurbe, R. (1994). The philosophy of Ancient India. Madras: suvitha Publishers 24. International Encyclopedia of Education. (1994) 2nd edition. Vol.10. Perganon Press. 25. Kendel, I.L. (1930). Conflicting Theories of Education, Newyork: Macmillion,,. 26. Kneller, G.F. (1966).The Logic and Language of Education, Newyork: John Willey, 27. Livingstone, R. (1941). The Future of Education, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press,. Longman, 28. Matheson, D. (2004). An Introduction to the study of education (2nd edition). London: David Fulton Publish. 29. Naganatam, R. (1958). New Frontiers: East and West Philosophies of Education, London: Orient 30. Nunn, P. (1957). Education: Its Data and First Principles, Newyork: Annold and Co.,. 31. O’Connor, D. (1961).Introduction to the Philosophy of Education, London: Methuen & Co., 32. Palmer, Joy A, (2001). Fifty Modern thinkers on education: From Piaget to the present Day. Routledge Flamer. London. USA. Canada. 33. Peters, R.S. (1967), The Concept of education, Routledge, United Kingdom. 21
34. Peters, R.S. (ed), (1975). The Philosophy of education. Oxford University Press, London. 35. Radhakrishnan, S. (1952). Indian philosophy. University of California: Allen & Unvin Ltd. 36. Ross, J, S. 1937) . Groundwork of Educational Theory, George G. Harrap and Co., Ltd., 37. Slatterry, Patrick & Rapp,D (2002). Ethics and the foundations of education‐ Teaching Convictions in a postmodern world. Newyork: Allyn & Bacon. 38. Wall, E. (2001). Educational theory: philosophical and political Perspectives. London: Prometheus Books. 39. Whitchead, A.N. & Gifa. (1951).The Aims of Education, London: William & Horgate, 40. Winch, C. (1986). Philosophy of human learning, London: Routledge,. 41. Winch, C. (1996). Key Concepts in the philosophy of education. London: Routledge. 22
MED 102
Core Course II PSYCHOLOGY OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING (Instructional hours – 90) Course Objectives: 1. To acquaint the learner with the methods and approaches of scientific psychology and psycho‐
pedagogy 2. To acquaint the learner with the stage related developmental characteristics and roles of teachers to facilitate development. 3. To enable the learner to understand that learning and development are interactive processes 4. To acquaint with the complex phenomena of learning, the various theories and implied instructional strategies 5. To familiarize with motivational theories and their class room implications 6. To acquaint with the theories of remembering and forgetting and ways to ensure good retention 7. To enable the learner to understand and apply the principles of transfer of Learning 8. To conduct studies on socio‐cultural, technological, impacts on behaviour and learning styles Course Content MODULE ‐ I : The Science of Psychology Objectives • To acquaint the learner with the methods and approaches of scientific psychology and psycho‐
pedagogy Content outline: • Psychology: Origin, Meaning, Nature and Functions ‐‐ Trends in Problems and Trends in Methods ‐‐ Scientific Characteristics of Psychology. • Approaches to Study Human Behaviour: Bahaviourist, Cognitive, Psychodynamic, Socio‐cultural, Humanistic and Neurobiological perspectives. • Educational Psychology: Meaning, Definition and Scope – Relevance of Educational Psychology in Teaching and Learning. (10 hours) MODULE – II : Developmental Psychology Objectives • to acquaint the learner with the nature and characteristics of development and their educational implications • to help the learner to understand adolescent problems and their remedial measures • to make the learner understand the theories of development and their educational implications Content outline: • Meaning‐Principles‐Stages And Aspects Of Development‐Physical,Mental,Social,Emotional Characteristics Of Each Stage (In Brief)‐ Develentopmental Hazards and Tasks. • Adolescent Problems and Remedial Measures‐Recent Researches In Adolescent Education‐ 23
•
•
•
Theories Of Cognitive Development‐Piaget,Bruner(Basic Postulates,Develpomental Stages,Educational Implications) Theory Of Moral Development‐Kohlberg Theory Of Psychosocial Development‐Eric Erikson(Basic Postulates, Stages Of Psychosocial Development, Educational Implications) (16 hours) MODULE – III : Learning and Instruction Objectives • To define learning • To understand the significance of learning to human development • To realize the scope of the construct – learning • To be aware of the factors that affect human learning Content outline: • Learning: Definition– Relation of Learning To Maturation And Development ‐ Levels of Learning And Teaching • Introduction to Learning Theories‐ Brief Historical Sketch (From Philosophy‐Based Learning Theory to Psychology‐Based Learning Theory) • Overview of Factors Affecting Learning • Special Features of Adult Learning. (5 hours) MODULE ‐ IV: Motivation and Learning Objectives 1. To define motivation 2. To understand different types and explanations of motivation 3. To analyze factors that affect human motivation 4. To apply the principles of motivation in educational practice 5. To develop own model of understanding motivation of learners 6. To apply meta‐cognitive principles in enhancing own and other’ learning Content outline: • Types And Historical Perspectives • Important Factors in motivation from Different Perspectives And their Educational Implications o Behaviourist Approach (Drives and Reinforcement), o Social‐Cognitive Approach (Goal Orientations, Perception Of Control, Self‐Efficacy Belief) o Cognitive Explanation Of Motivation‐ Achievement Motivation (Expectancy‐Value, Anxiety, Self‐Worth, Involvement, Attribution) o Humanistic Approach To Motivation (Maslow’s Hierarchy, Actualizing Tendency), • Model Of Motivated Learning (Pintrich And Schunk), • Characteristics of Motivated Learners, Metacognition And Self‐Regulated Learning • Classroom Motivational Techniques 24
(10 hours) MODULE – V : Theories of learning and Instruction Objectives 1. To develop summary understanding of the principles of learning advocated by different schools of psychology 2. To apply principles of learning in enhancing student learning at various levels of education Content outline: • Behaviorist Learning Theories – Classical conditioning, Trial and Error, And operant conditioning, Need Reduction, Simultaneous conditioning • Behaviorist Perspective on Strategies That Facilitate Learning (with focus on Skills & Habits) • Cognitive Learning Theories‐ Influences on Cognitive approach to Learning ‐ Sign –Gestalt Learning (Tolman), Gestalt Learning (Principles Or Law For Perceptual Organization), Lewin’s field theory, Mastery Learning (Bloom & Block), Social Learning Theory And Observational Learning, Information Processing Theory Of Learning, Gagne’s Types &Conditions (Taxonomy Of Learning Outcomes And Phases Of Learning), Meaningful Learning (Ausubel), The Schema theory (RC Anderson) o
Cognitive Strategies In Instruction And Learning (with focus on concepts) • Constructivist Theories Of Learning –characteristics‐ Cognitive Structuralism (Piaget); Social Constructivism (Vygotsky); Bruner (Learning Via Insight and Discovery), Comparison of Developmental and Social Constructivist Views Of Learning o Constructivist Strategies Used In Instruction/Learning • Humanistic Approach to Learning‐ characteristics Non‐Directive Learning (Rogers), Experiential Learning (Kolb) • Humanist Strategies in classrooms (with focus on attitudes, values) • Learning In Formal Vs Informal Contexts‐ Comparison And Implication For Education • Role Of Family and parents In school Learning • A Summary Comparison Of Approaches To Learning (28 hours) MODULE – VI : Neuroscience of Learning, Memory, Forgetting Objectives: 1. To understand learning and memory from neuro‐physiological perspective 2. To appreciate the role of brain and its parts in learning 3. To apply mnemonic techniques in facilitating own and others’ learning Content Outline: • Neural Organization, Brain‐Structures And Key Functions, Catering Teaching To Hemispherity, Neuro‐physiological Theory of Learning • Multi‐Store Model of Memory And Its Implications For Education. • Types Of Memory‐ Enhancing Memory‐ Mnemonic Techniques ‐ The Information Processing Theory Of Forgetting ‐ Implications of neurobiology For Teaching And Learning (6 hours) MODULE – VII : Transfer of learning 25
Objectives : 1. To appreciate the significance of transfer of learning to educational system 2. To exemplify different types and explanations of transfer in learning Course Content • Relevance Of Transfer Of Learning In Education, Types Of Transfer, Theories Of Transfer, Experimentally Supported Generalizations About Transfer (6 hours) MODULE ‐ VIII : Skill education, Mental health and Adjustment Objectives • To appreciate the importance of life skills education • To understand the means of developing life skills, and mental health in learners Content outline: • Meaning of Life skill Education ‐‐ Need and Significance • Concept of Mental Health ‐‐ Definition (WHO) ‐‐ Classification of Mental Illness (DSM ) ‐‐ Maladjustment ‐‐ Defence Mechanisms ‐‐ Characteristics of Mentally Healthy Person ‐‐ Education for Mental Health. (10 hours) Assignments 1. Develop a summary comparison of various approaches to study human behaviour 2. Prepare a review of research studies related to adolescent education 3. Interview a teacher at any level, and list the views on factors affecting learning at that level. 4. Prepare a concept map of learner motivation, incorporating major factors proposed by various theories of motivation 5. Prepare a the Summary Comparison Of various Approaches To Learning, incorporating the details on type of learning explained, important variables affecting learning, and educational practices/ strategies/ methods promoted by each approach. 6. Draw and label, the important areas related to learning and memory of, human brain 7. Identify 10 teacher behaviours exemplifying different modes of transfer from course content on education psychology and make a report 8. Develop a lesson plan for any one appropriate life skill in learners at level of education of your choice References 1.
Anderman, E., & Corno, L. (Eds.). (2013). Handbook of educational psychology. Routledge. 2.
Ausubel, D. P., Novak, J. D., & Hanesian, H. (1968). Educational Psychology‐ A Cognitive View. New York: Holt,Rinchart and Winston, INC. 3.
Bandura.A (1977). Social Learning Theory. Cliff.N.J; Prentice Hall. 26
4.
Bhargava, M. (1964). Introduction to Exceptional Children. Sterling Publishers Pvt Ltd., New Delhi. 5.
Bigge, M. L., & Hunt, M. P. (1968). Psychological foundations of education: an introduction to human development and learning. Harper & Row 6.
Bower, G.H. and Hilgard, E.R. (1981) Theories of learning. Prentice Hall, Inc. Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey. 7.
Bruner, J.S. (1977). Process of Education, Harward University press, 8.
Chauhan, S.S (2006) Advanced Educational Psychology New Delhi : Vikas Publishing House. 9.
Crow.L.D &Crow Alice(2008) Human Development and Learning, New Delhi, Surjeet Publications 10.
Daniels, H. & Edwards, A.(2004). Psychology of Education. New York: Routledge Falmer. 11.
DeCecco, JP, & Crawford, WP (1974). The Psychology of Learning and Instruction. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice‐Hall. 12.
Child, D. (1986). Applications of Psychology for the Teacher. Taylor & Francis Group. 13.
Erickson, E.H. (1968). Identity, Youth and Crisis. New York: W.W. Norton. 14.
Fontana, D.(1995). Psychology for Teachers. U K and London: Macmillan Press Ltd. 15.
Good, T.L & Brophy, J.E.(1990). Educational Psychology‐A Realistic Approach. New York: Longman Publishers. 16.
Hurlock E.B (1995)Development Psychology A Life Span Approach. New Delhi : Tata Mc Grow Hill Publishing Co. 17.
Hurlock, E.B (1955) Adolescent Development MC Graw – Hill Co Inc, Nw York.. 18.
Kagan, J., & Lang, C. (1978). Psychology and education: An introduction. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. 19.
Kakkar S.B (1992), Advanced Educational Psychology New Delhi : Oxford & IBH Publishing Co. 20.
Kaplan, L. (1971). Education and mental health. Harper and Row. 21.
Kincheloe, L. & Horn Jr, R. A.(2007). The Praeger Handbook of Education and Psychology. New Delhi: Atlantic Publishers & Distributers(p)Ltd. 22.
Klausmeier, Herbert J (1985). Educational Psychology. Harper and Row, Pub. New York. 23.
Lingren, H.C. (1980). Educational Psychology in the Classroom (Sixth ed.) New York: Oxford University Press. 27
24.
Mangal, S.K (1997) Advanced Educational Psychology New Delhi Prentice Hall of India 25.
Maslow, A.H. (1970). Motivation and Personality (2nd edition). New York: Harper & Row. 26.
Piaget, J. and Inhelden, B. (1969). Psychology of the child, New York: Basic Books. 27.
Pintrich, P.R.; and Schunk, D.H. (1996). Motivation in education: theory, research and applications. Englewood Cliffs, N.J. Merill. 28.
Schunk, D. H. (1991). Learning theories: An educational perspective. Macmillan Publishing Co, Inc. 29.
Skinner, C.E. (Ed) (1974). Educational Psychology. New Delhi: Prentice‐Hall of India Private Limited. 30.
Snelbecker, G.E.(1974).Learning Theory, Instructional Theory and Psycho‐educational Design. New York. McGraw Hill. 31.
Sprinthall, R. C., Sprinthall, N. A., & Oja, S. N. (1981). Educational psychology: A developmental approach. Addison‐Wesley. 32.
Traxler, A. E. (1957). Techniques of guidance. Harper. New York. 33.
Vygostsky. L. (1986) Thought and language (A. Kazulin, Trans). Cambridge, M.A.: MIT Press. 34.
Conklin, W. (2006). Instructional Strategies for Diverse Learners: All Grades. Shell Education. 35.
Wolman, B. B., Stricker, G., Ellman, S. J., Palermo, D. S., & Keith‐Spiegel, P. (Eds.). (1982). Handbook of developmental psychology. Prentice‐Hall. 36.
Woolfolk, A. (2004) Educational Psychology. New Delhi:Pearson Education (Singapore) Pvt Ltd. 28
Core Course III MED 103
INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH AND STATISTICS (Instructional hours ‐ 90) Course Objectives On completion of this course, the students will be able to: 1. describe the meaning, purpose, scope and types of research in education. 2. explain the characteristics of quantitative, qualitative and mixed research. 3. conduct a literature search and develop a research proposal 4. prepare a research proposal on a selected theme 5. understand the role and use of statistics in educational research. 6. convey the essential characteristics of a set of data by representing in tabular and graphical forms 7. compute relevant measures of central tendency, measures of variation and correlation Course Content Part‐A MODULE – I : Introduction to Educational Research i)
Meaning, purpose and scope of educational research ii)
Research as a method of science iii) Types of educational research: basic , applied, action and evaluation research‐ Classification by Time ‐Cross‐sectional, Longitudinal and Retrospective. Classification by research objectives‐
Descriptive, Exploratory and Explanatory iv)
Research paradigms in education: quantitative, qualitative, mixed (15 hours) MODULE ‐ II : Identification and conceptualization of Research problem i) Sources of research problems; Statement of problem; research questions in qualitative and quantitative research ii) Review of the literature ‐purpose and sources‐ primary and secondary ; literature search: Manual, using databases and internet. iii) Hypotheses: Need, sources and functions; different ways of stating hypotheses; criteria for a good hypothesis iv) Basic concepts of a. Variables b. Techniques and Tools for research c. Sampling (20 hours) 29
MODULE ‐ III : Preparation of a Research proposal i)
Framework of the research proposal‐Preparation of research proposal ( As a practical work, the student shall prepare a Model Research proposal on a selected theme‐No external evaluation needed) (10 hours) Part ‐B MODULE ‐ I : Descriptive Analysis of Quantitative Data i) Need of statistics in Educational research‐Data types: Nominal, Ordinal, Interval and Ratio scales. ii)
Organizing data : Frequency Distributions‐ Basic ideas , preparation iii) Graphical and diagrammatical representation of data: Histogram, frequency curve, ogive, pie diagram‐Basic ideas and application of each. (10 hours) MODULE ‐ III : Descriptive Statistics i) Measures of central tendency: Mean, median and mode, computation and uses, merits and demerits ii) Measures of dispersion: Computation of range, standard deviation, quartile deviation, uses of each measure, merits and demerits. iii) Percentiles and percentile ranks as relative positions‐ computation‐(mathematical and graphical). Derived scores‐z, T and Stanine scores iv) Normal distribution: characteristics of Normal Probability Curve and its applications‐ determining percentage of cases, determination of limits, overlapping, relative difficulty and separation of a given group into subgroups. Deviation from normality: Skewness and Kurtosis. (25 hours) MODULE ‐ III : Correlation i) Concept of correlation, Scatter plots and their interpretation ,product moment coefficient of correlation and rank coefficient of correlation, interpretation of coefficients, application of correlation. ii) When to use Biserial, Point Biserial, Partial,Multiple, Tetrachoric and Phi Coefficient of correlation( computation not needed) (10 hours) Assignments 1. A comparison of Pure, Applied and Action Researches and prepare a report 2. Prepare Tables and Graphs using any one software based on a data obtained 30
References Research Methodology 1. Best J.W. (1999). Research in Education, New Delhi: Prentice Hall of India Pvt.Ltd. 2. Borg, W.R. and Gall, M.D. (1983). Educational Research – An Introduction, NewYork: Longman, Inc. 3. Christensen, L. (2007). Experimental Methodology. Boston: Allyn & Bacon. 4. Clive Opie (2004). Doing Educational Research‐ A Guide for First timeresearchers. New Delhi: Vistar Publications. 5. Cohen, Lewis and Manion Lawrence (1994) Research Methods in Education New York : Holt Rinchart and Winston Inc. 6. Fraenkel, J.R., Wallen, N.E. (1996). How to Design and Evaluate Research in Education. New York: McGraw Hill. 7. Flick, Uwe (1996): An Introduction to Qualitative Research . London sage publication 8. Kaul, Lokesh (1984). Methodology of Educational Research. New Delhi: Vikas Publications. 9. Keeves, John. P (ed)(1990) Educational Research Methodology and Measurement: An International Handbook. New York : Pergamo Press 10. Kerlinger, F.N. (1986). Foundations of Behavioural Research. Fort Worth, TX: Harcourt Bmce Jovanovich. 11. Kirkapatrick, D.L. (2005). Evaluating training Programmes: The four Levels. San Francisco: Brrett‐Kochler. 12. Jill Porter & Penny Lacey (2005). Researching Learning Difficulties‐ A Guide for Practitioners. Paul Chapman Publishing. 13. Mc Millan,J.H& Schumacher,S ( 2010) Research in Education: Evidence based enquiry(7th Ed).New Jersey: Pearson Education. Inc. 14. Pamela Maykut & Richard Morehouse (1994). Beginning Qualitative Research‐ A Philosophic and Practical Guide. The Falmer Press London. Washington D.C. 15. Patton. M.Q. (2002). Qualitative Research and Evaluation Methods. Thousand Oaks: C.A: Sage. 16. Reason, P. & Bradbury, H. (Eds) (2006). Handbook of action research: Concise paperback edition: Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. 17. Scott, David & Usher, Robin (1996). Understanding Educational Research. New York: Routledge. 18. Shank, G.D. (2002). Qualitative Research. Columbus, ott: Merill, Prentice Hall. 19. Sharma, Bharti (2004). Methodology of Educational Research. New Delhi: Vohra Publishers and Distributors. 20. Sharma, S.R. (2003). Problems of Educational Research. New Delhi: Anmol Publications Pvt. Ltd. 21. Stake, Robert E. (1995). The Art of Case Study Research. Thousand Oaks: C.A:Sage. 22. Travers, Robert M.W. (1978). An Introduction to Educational research (4th edition). London: MacMillan. 23. Van Dalen, Debonald, B. and Meyer, William J. (1979)Understanding Educational Research: An Introduction. New York: McGraw Hill. 31
Statistics 1. Cononver, W.J. (1971). Practical Non‐Parametric Statistics. New York: John Wiley & Sons Inc. 2. Ferguson, G. (1981). A Statistical Analysis in Psychology and Education, New York: McGraw Hill. 3. Garrett , H.E & Woodworth , R,S.( 1961) Statistics in Psychology and Education. New York: Longman Greens & Co. 4. Gibbons, J.D. (1971). Non‐Parametric Statistical Inference. New York: McGraw Hill. 5. Glan, G.V., & Hopkins, K.D. (1996). Statistical Methods in Education and Psychology, (3rd edition). Boston: Allyn & Bacon. 6. Guilford, J.P., and B. Fruchter. (1987). Fundamental Statistics in Education and Psychology. Tokyo: McGraw Hill (Student‐Sixth edition). 7. Henry, G.T. (1995). Graphing data: Techniques for display and analysis. Thousand oaks, CA: Sage. 8. Howell, D.C. (1997). Statistical Methods for Psychology. Belmont, CA: Duxbury Press. 9. Huck, S.W. (2007). Reading Statistics and research. Boston: Allyn & Bacon. 10. Popham and Sirohic (1993). Educational Statistics‐Use and Interpretation, New York: Harper and Row. 11. Siegal, S. (1956). Non‐parametric Statistics for Behavioural Science, New York: McGraw Hill. 12. Miles, M.B., & Huberman, A.M. (1994). Qualitative Data Analysis: An expanded Sourcebook. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. 13. VanLeeuwen, T & Jewitt, C. (Eds). (2001). Handbook of Visual analysis. London:Sage 32
Specialization course I (i) MED 111
ADVANCED METHODOLOGY OF TEACHING ARABIC (Instructional hours – 90) Course Objectives On completion of the course the educant will be able to: 1. understand the nature and functions of language and linguistics and its implication for teaching and learning 2. develop a deeper understanding of the theories related to language learning and language acquisition 3. survey various problems and issues related to language curriculum development and language teacher preparation 4. examine the nature and scope of research in the area of language education 5. analyze different approaches, methods, and techniques for teaching language and literature in the context of L 1 and L 2 6. examine the theories of assessing competence and learn to practice it. 7. Integrate technological, pedagogical and content knowledge and practice it in classroom situations. Course Content MODULE ‐ I : Arabic Language Education •
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Language: Meaning, definitions, characteristics and functions First Language, Second Language and Foreign Language Arabic as a second language Status of Arabic language in India and abroad Arabic Language: Phonology, Morphology, Syntax and Semantics Arabic Language and its Socio cultural contexts (10 hours) MODULE ‐ II : Theories and approaches related to Arabic Language Learning and acquisition •
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Behaviorist Theories Cognitive Theories Constructivist Theories Social Constructivist Theories Psycho Linguistic Theories Chomskian Concept of Language Development 33
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Krashen’s Theory Socio Linguistic Theories Socio Cultural Theories (15 hour) MODULE ‐ III : Methods and Strategies of (Arabic) Language Teaching •
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A critical analysis of traditional and modern methods and strategies for language teaching An evaluation of methods and strategies currently used for teaching Arabic in the state schools of Kerala Pedagogical practices adopted for teaching Arabic in the higher education sector in Kerala (13 hour) MODULE ‐ IV :Techno‐pedagogy and Arabic Language Teaching •
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Content knowledge, pedagogical knowledge and technological knowledge The concept of techno‐pedagogic content knowledge analysis (TPCKA) Scope and challenges of TPCKA in Arabic language teaching E‐Learning and E‐Teaching Forming forums of online learning E‐Books, digital text books, E‐Library. E‐twinning for promoting professional growth / institutional growth (12 hour) MODULE ‐ V : Curriculum Development •
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The curriculum: concepts and types Principles and approaches to curriculum development Modern trends in curriculum development Problems of curriculum development in the multi lingual context of India National curriculum framework for teacher education 2009. NCF 2005 and KCF 2007 and language curriculum development Curriculum development and differential learning: learner autonomy, teacher autonomy, the problem of inclusion Concerns in curriculum development 34
(10 hour) MODULE ‐ VI : Testing and assessment of Arabic Language Learning •
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Theories of assessment Assessment of learner achievement in Arabic language Preparation and administration of various testing instruments (10 hour) (10 hour) MODULE ‐ VII : Language Teacher Preparation •
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Preservice teacher education Planning lessons based on contemporary methodologies Mentoring skills Practice teaching and internship Programmes Observation rubrics In‐service teacher education MODULE : VIII ‐ Research and innovations in Arabic Language Education •
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Review of latest research studies on Arabic Language Education with special emphasis on curriculum revisions, pedagogy, testing and assessment, development of innovative techniques Research gaps in Language Education (10 hour) Transaction Mode Lecture followed by discussions, seminars, assignments and debates Assignments 1. Comparison of elective course of B.Ed programme of the university related to Arabic Language Education with that of any other university. 2. Prepare a review of a latest literary work in Arabic References 1. Al Haila, Muhammed Mahmood, (2001)Tharaaiqu al Thadrees wa isthiratheejathuhu, (1st edition), Dar al Kuthub al Jami’e 2. Al hasmi, Abid Thoufeeqe, Al Muwajjahul Ameli li Muderrisi Luga Al Arabiyya Al Risala Publishing House Bairoot Lebanon 35
3. Alkhuli, Muhammed Ali, (1986) Asaaleebu Thadreesi al Lugath al Arabiyya, M. A. al‐Khūlī, the University of California. 4. Alrikabi, Jawdath. Thuruq thadrees Allugathil arabiyya published Darul Fikir 5. Azeez, Salih Abdul, Majeed & Abdul Hameed Abdul, Al tharbiyathu wa Thuruqu al tadrees Part I and II 6. Bates, E., Tal, D., & Janowsky, J.S. (1992) Early language development and its neural correlates. In I. Rapin & S. Segalowitz (Eds), Handbook of Neuropsychology. Vol. 6, Child Neurology, Amsterdam: Elsevier 7. Brown, H.D. (2000) Principles of Language Learning and Teaching (4th edition), Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice Hall. 8. Chaudron, C. (1988) Second Language Classrooms: research on teaching and learning, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 9. Chomsky, Noam. On Language, Penguin Books, India 2003. 10. Ellis, R. (1994) The Study of second language acquisition, Oxford University Press, Oxford. 11. Fletcher, Paul. and Garman, Michael. (1981) Language Acquisition ‐ Studies in first language development, Cambridge University Press, UK. 12. Gernbacher, M.A. (Ed) (1994) Handbook of psycholinguistics, San Diego: Amsterdam Press 13. Gleason, J. Berko (Ed) (1993) The development of language, 3rd edition, New York: Macmillan 14. Ibrahim, Abdul Haleem, Al Muwajjahul Ameli li Mudarrisi, Luga Al Arabiyya. Daru Maarif Egypt 15. Numan, D. (1992) Research Methods in Language Learning, Cambridge University Press. 16. Prabhu, N.S. (1987) Second language pedagory, ELBS, Oxford University Press, Oxford. 17. Shrum, John L and Glisan, Eileen W, Teachers’ Handbook, contextualized Language Learning, ELBS, Oxford University Press, 1987. 18. Stern, H H (1987) Fundamental concepts of language learning, Oxford University Press, Oxford. 36
Specialization Course I (ii) MED 112
ADVANCED METHODOLOGY OF TEACHING ENGLISH (Instructional hours – 90) Course Objectives 1. To generate a cohort of professional humane teachers and teacher educators empowered with contemporary curricular and pedagogic resources to enrich English as Second Language classrooms in the socio cultural and linguistic contexts in India. 2. To scaffold the English language learner, teacher and teacher educator with the life skills demanded of a Twenty first century language learner. Course Content MODULE – I : National Concerns in Teaching and Learning of English Objectives 1. To develop awareness of national concerns regarding teaching and learning a global language in the twenty first century 2. To experience the need for a progressive shift in pedagogy and methodology of teaching English 3. To recognize the role of English as second language in Indian classrooms Review of recommendations of various education commissions and educational policies on English language education – University Education Commission (1948‐49), Secondary Education Commission (1962), Kothari Education Commission (1964‐66), New Education Policy (1992), National Curriculum Frame Work, Kerala Curriculum Frame Work, National Curriculum Framework for Teacher Education‐ role of English in Indian context – ESP,EGP,ESL,EFL. Mode of Transaction Brain storming session on the role of English in Indian context Survey of education commission reports and policies (individual work) Discussion on the need for a shift in methodology and pedagogy of English (7 hours) MODULE – II : Theories on Second Language Acquisition Objective To boost meta‐cognition on contemporary theories of second language teaching, learning and acquisition A critical analysis of behaviorist, cognitivist and constructivist theories on English as second language learning / acquisition – principles, characteristics and application of psycholinguistic theories, sociolinguistic theories and socio cultural theories in foreign language teaching. Mode of Transaction Debate on implications of behaviourism, cognitivism and constructivism in English language learning/ acquisition Lectures on the latest theories (10 hours) 37
MODULE – III : Integration of ICT Capabilities in English Language Acquisition Objectives 1. To understand the role of social networking in self directed learning 2. To provide firsthand experience in integration of ICT in English language teaching 3. To develop the skills to access the avenues of authentic resourcing and e‐content authoring Course Outline Technology of language learning – interface of technological and traditional resources – teacher autonomy in English language classrooms – theory of connectivism – theory of self directed learning‐ importance of self learning materials English language teaching and acquisition through IT resources – online sources, blended learning, E‐library, Massive Open Online Courses, i–book, pod‐casting, webinar – strategies for authentic resourcing – e‐content authoring Mode of Transaction Lectures Participatory learning Online learning Learner centered individual and group tasks on transaction of any one of the curricular units integrating IT resourses Development of e‐content for prospective teachers (14 hours) MODULE –IV : English Language Curriculum for Twenty First Century Learner Objectives 1. To understand issues of authentic learning materials and teaching methods in a heterogeneous context 2. To develop techniques based on realistic sociocultural context 3. To contextualize curricular materials based on local needs 4. To identify curriculum areas for twenty first century learners and attain expertise in curriculum designing 5. To critically examine the existing learning materials and classroom environment 6. To plan, develop and implement differential learning strategies to meet individual differences Course Outline i.
Principles of English Language curriculum development at secondary level‐ role of family and community resources in English language acquisition 38
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Multi‐culturalism – multi‐ lingualism – learner styles and learning strategies‐ contextualized language learning – development and experimentation of contextual learning resources like local texts teacher made texts etc. iii.
Differential learning – learner diversity in language classrooms with respect to learning styles, learner strategies, socio cultural background etc. – philosophy of inclusion – concept and process of differential learning – learning environment, curriculum approaches, instructional strategies and assessment in differential teaching iv.
Critical analysis of secondary and higher secondary English course books, source books and other learning materials Mode of transaction Lecture‐cum‐discussion Development of instructional strategies based on differential learning, as group task (14 hours) MODULE – V : Models of Teaching Objectives 1. To identify appropriate models of teaching for different language forms and language elements 2. To plan lessons based on synectics, critical thinking model and direct instruction model An introduction to families of models of teaching – theory and planning of lessons on synentics, critical thinking and direct instruction model Mode of transaction Lectures Preparation of lesson plans based on the three models (individual work) (10 hours) MODULE ‐ VI : Assessment of English Language Skills Objectives 1. To understand process of skill accreditation and performance testing in English 2. To understand issues in foreign language assessment 3. To design instruments for language testing Concept of skill accreditation – assessment tools for English language skills – proficiency tests – limitations in language testing – washback effect in testing Types of editing – remediation through student support system Mode of Transaction Lectures Online searching Discussion 39
(14 hours) MODULE – VII : Professional Development through Supervision and Mentoring Objectives 1. To perceive the importance of practice teaching sessions with reference to the objectives and processes 2. To inculcate continuing professional development strategies among prospective teachers 3. To ensure quality in the professional preparation of teachers through increased sensibility, capacity and skills 4. To understand teaching as a continuous evolving process through reflection Planning of lessons based on contemporary methodologies ‐ objectives of practice teaching cum internship program – mentoring skills – supervision strategies –classroom dynamics‐ development of observation rubrics – teacher stress – techniques for feedback and reflections – developing and experimenting with contextualized methodology Mode of Transaction Discussion of contemporary methods followed in schools Lectures Development of Rubrics Preparation of reflective journals Development of Techniques for contextualization in ELT (8 hours) MODULE ‐ VIII : Developing a Humane Teacher Objectives 1. To make English language learning a joyful, a participatory activity 2. To develop a humane English teacher who cares for children in a stress free language rich environment 3. To dissolve the disconnect between a foreign language teacher and the learner 4. To develop classroom techniques ensuring equality, justice, liberty and acceptance Humanistic approach in English language classrooms‐interpersonal communication as a component of soft skill development and multiple intelligences ‐ language anxiety and learner stress ‐ Krashen’s Monitor Hypothesis‐the humane foreign language teacher‐classroom strategies to dissolve the disconnect between the teacher and the learner Mode of Transaction Observation followed by discussion of video lessons Lectures Discussion based on research findings (8 hours) 40
MODULE – IX : Research and Innovations in English Language Teaching Objectives 1. To integrate academic learning with productive work 2. To experience the benefits of participatory learning by developing a platform for interaction 3. To facilitate deeper discourses in English language teaching 4. To develop a ‘culture of freshness’ in English language teaching through innovations and experimentation Review of latest research studies (since 1990’s) on English language teaching with special emphasis on vocabulary, grammar, methodology, integration of ICT, testing and assessment – open distance learning – current issues in English language teaching – development of innovative techniques appropriate for Indian classrooms – establishment of teacher learning centers – access to higher education, research and development through social networking Mode of Transaction Survey of dissertations, theses, research journals, compendium of seminars etc. Presentation of reports based on the survey Discussion of innovative techniques developed Enrichment through English teacher learning centre at university level Dissemination and discussion of thrust areas reflected in seminars and conference attended (5 hours) Assignments 1. Prepare a review of a latest literary work in English 2. Prepare a lesson transcript based synectics model of Teaching References Books 1. Siddiqui, M.A., Sharma, A.K.& Arora, G.L.(ed.).(2009).Teacher education: reflections towards policy formuations .New Delhi: NCTE 2. Lantolf, J.P. (2000).Socio‐cultural theory and second language learning. Oxford: Oxford. 3. Traxier, M & Ann, M .(ed.).(2006).Handbook of Psycholinguistics. UK: Elsevier. 4. Wardhaugh, R .(2010).An introduction to sociolinguistics .USA: John wiley. 5. Larsen, F,D. & Martin ,A.(2000).Techniques and principles in language teaching. Oxford: Oxford. 6. Kelley, F,S..Cain ,Mc Ted.& Jukes ,I.(2009).Teaching the digital generation. California: Corwin. 7. Talesra,H., Marashdeh, W. & Nagda, M,L.(2005).Web‐based learning. Delhi: Authorspress. 41
8. Holmfeld ,L.D.& Mc Connell, D.(ed.).(2010).Exploring the theory ,pedagogy and practice of networked learning. London: Springer. 9. Shrum, J.L.,& Glisen, E.W.(2000).Teacher’s handbook‐contextualized language instruction.USA: Heinle & Heinle 10. Gregory, G.H.& Chapman, C.(2007).Differential instructional strategies: one size doesn’t fit all.CA : Carwin. 11. Joice, B.& Weil, M.(2003).Models of Teaching. New Delhi: Prentice Hall. 12. Kunnan .,A.J.(ed.).(2000).Studies in Language testing‐Fairness and validation in language assessment.UK: Cambridge . 13. Evans,C., Midgley,A. ,Riglay,P., Warham,L. & Woolnaugh,P .(2009). Teaching English‐developing as a reflective secondary teacher. Delhi:Sage. 14. Richards, J.C.& Farvell, T.S.C.(2005).Professional development for language teachers:strategies for language learning.USA: Cambridge. 15. Tanner, R.&Green, C.(1998).Tasks for teacher education: a reflective approach. London: Longman. 16. Tickoo, M.L.(2004).Teaching and learning English: A source book for teachers and teacher trainers. New Delhi: Orient Longman. 17. Cohen,L. ,Manion,L. & Morrison, K.(2007).A guide to teaching practice.(5th ed.).London: Routledge Flamer. 18. Widodo, H.P.& Cirocki, A.(2011).Innovations and creativity in ELT methodology .USA: Nova Science. On line sources 1. http://en.wikipedia.org/wik/language_acquisition 2. www.ncte‐india.org 3. www.usingenglish.com 4. http://eleamspace.org 5. http://www.connectivism.ca/wiki/Coolconnections 6. www.authentic‐resourcing.com 7. www.americanhumanist.org 8. www.communityeducation.org 42
MED 113
Spercialization Course I (iii) ADVANCED METHODOLOGY OF TEACHING MALAYALAM (Instructional Hours: 90) Course Objectives To enable students: 1. To acquaint with the Nature and Functions of Language 2. To acquaint with the Pedagogy of Malayalam Language 3. To understand the Interrelationship between Basic language skills and their Sub skills 4. To acquaint with the Theories of Language Acquisition 5. To acquaint with the Multiple Intelligence theory and Language Teaching 6. To get an idea about the Development of Language Curriculum 7. To acquaint with Relevant areas of Research in Malayalam Language Education 8. To understand the Modern trends in the Assessment of Malayalam Language Learning 9. To get an idea of using ICT to support Malayalam Language Learning 10. To acquaint the Professional competency, Teacher empowerment and Consciousness as a Language Teacher Course Content MODULE – I : Language as a system of communication • Language, Culture, Society and the Individual • Developing competence in the language skills –Listening and reading, speaking and writing • Reading and listening as a process • Active reading and listening • Exposure to new style, vocabulary and linguistic practice • Being selective‐pairs and strings of words • Noting words and phrases‐organizing words and phrases • Pronunciation and intonation • Accuracy and fluency • Style and register (15 hours ) MODULE ‐ II : Aims and objectives of Malayalam language with reference to secondary and higher secondary level • Principles of language learning • Theories of Language acquisition –Environmentalist theory of language acquisition, Nativist theory of language acquisition, and Interactionist theory of language acquisition • Critical pedagogy and other relevant theories regarding current practices at secondary and higher secondary level • Detailed study of multiple intelligence theory and its class room implications with special reference to language education 43
•
Suitable models of teaching for Malayalam language‐Synetics and Concept Attainment Model (15 hours) MODULE ‐ III : Curriculum in Malayalam Education • Curriculum‐ Bases and principles • The curriculum process and stages‐selection of aims, Goals and objectives • Major approaches to curriculum development • Role of curriculum in effective teaching and learning • Role of teachers in curriculum development • Nature of language curriculum • Basic considerations in curriculum planning • Modern trends in curriculum construction (13hours) MODULE ‐ IV :Researches in Malayalam Education • A survey of available researches which can be applied in Malayalam language education • Relevant areas of research in Malayalam language education • Identification of research topics and preparation of research designs (5 hours) MODULE – V : Evaluation in Malayalam Education • Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy • Assessment of Malayalam language teaching • Variables of language testing‐ Elements and skills. • Elements‐Pronunciation, Stress and Intonation • Skills‐Listening,Speaking,Reading and Writing • Assessment of different skills • Teacher made test and standardized test • Standardization procedure of an achievement test • Different assessment techniques used for discourses • Portfolio assessment ( 15hours ) MODULE – VI : Resources in Teaching Malayalam • ICT to support Malayalam language learning • Electronic resources‐ Computer assisted language learning (CALL) material,Web,E‐
books,Electornic dictionaries and grammers. • Productivity tools –All aspects of text production‐ word processing, presentation tools, spread sheets and database. • Communication tools –Computer mediated communication (CMC) 44
(12hours) MODUEL – VII : Malayalam Teacher • Professional traits of a teacher • Need for professional development of teachers • Pre‐service and in‐service training, Induction phase • Different modalities of in‐service training • Professional organizations • Reflective teaching • Teacher portfolio • Strategies for copping personal and professional stress (15hours) Assignments 1. Development of Unit plans and Lesson plans considering theories of Nativist theory of language acquisition, Interactionist theory of language acquisition. 2. Preparation of lesson transcript based on Synetics Model References 1. Gurry P., Teaching of mother‐tongue in secondary schools 2. Chomsky,N (2000)New horizons in the study of language and mind. 3. Lado,R.(1961)Language Teachung :A scientific Approach 4. Lado,R.(1979 Language Testing,The construction and use of foreign language tests. 5. H.Stella &M .Linda (eds) (2006).Success with languages. 6. Ebel,L &Frisibe,A.(1991).Essentials of educational measurement. 7. Eggen,d.(1979) Strategies for teachers:Information processing models in the classroom. 8. Fosnot,C.(1996) Constructivism:theory,perspectives and practice. 9. Gardner,FH.(1983) Frames of mind;the theory of multiple intelligences 10. Joyce,B &Weil,M.(2003).Models of teaching 11. Bindhu,C.M.(2011)Mathrubashabodhanam;Pravathakalum Reethikalum. 12. Vidayabasa parivarthanathinu oramukam‐ a group of authors‐kerala sastra sahitia parishath 45
Specialization Course I (iv) MED 114
ADVANCED METHODOLOGY OF TEACHING HINDI (Instructional hours – 90) Course Objectives On completion of the course Teacher educand will be able to: 1. Gain an understanding of the nature, functions and the implication of planning for teaching Hindi language. 2. Become familiar with the linguistic, psychological and social processes underlying learning of languages. 3. Acquaint the teacher educands with the different approaches, methods and strategies for teaching and evaluation. 4. Develop ability in teacher educands to make use of information technology in teaching‐learning process. 5. Get familiarized with the with the theories of language acquisition for effective transaction of curriculum. 6. Get an idea about the steps involved in construction of language curriculum 7. Make the teacher educand aware of the latest research works going on in the field of Hindi Education. MODULE ‐ I : Nature, origin and development of Hindi language Nature, origin and growth of Hindi language ‐ Devanagiri script, Hindi, Urdu and Hindustani – Importance of language learning in education. The importance of learning Hindi ‐ Place of Hindi in non‐
Hindi speaking areas ‐ Hindi in Kerala ‐ Hindi as a language taught in schools and colleges ‐ Hindi as the National and Official language ‐ The multilingual problems and its implications ‐ Hindi as the Lingua‐ Franca of India ‐ Hindi as the second language in our schools ‐Three language formula ‐ its importance ‐ Pedagogical problems arising from the three language formula ‐ Solutions. (15 hours) MODULE – II : Theoretical bases of Language Development Psychological bases of language learning, readiness in relation to language skills, principles of language learning – Different psychological theories Special focus on: • Behaviorism • Cognitivism • Piaget • Bruner 46
Social constructivism – Vygotsky • Chomsky Language Acquisition Device (LAD) • Outcome based curriculum. (10 hours) MODULE ‐ III : The aims and objectives of teaching Hindi Aims of teaching Hindi as a National language • Linguistic aim • Vocational aim • Social aim • Cultural aim • Instructional objectives of teaching Hindi at different levels • Primary, secondary, Higher secondary and UG level MODULE – IV : Dynamics of Skills Development and Innovative teaching techniques. Dynamics of skill development (L, S, R, W) • Basic • Intermediate and • Advance Level Methods • Direct Method: • Inductive – Deductive method • Activity oriented method • Project method • Co‐operative and Collaborative learning • Reciprocal teaching • Suggestopaedia • Mind mapping • Brain storming. Etc (5 hours) (20 hrs) MODULE – V : ICT and Language Learning Scope and importance of ICT in Language Education ‐ Application of current learning technology for language education ‐ e – Learning ‐ M – Learning ‐ Video conferencing ‐ Virtual class room ‐ Ubiquities learning etc (10 hours) MODULE ‐ VI : Developing the language curriculum and syllabus Dimensions, factors and principles that influence the curriculum - Selection and grading of content - Transaction techniques and evaluation techniques. - Review of National curriculum frame work (2005) - Kerala curriculum frame work (2007) 47
(8 hours) MODULE – VII : Evaluation Modern concept of Evuluation Types – Formative and summative Types of test, Achievement test, Written test, Oral test. - Teacher made test - Standardized test - Norm referenced, criterian referenced test a Diagnoses and Remedial teaching. - Continuous and comprehensive evaluation. - Portfolio preparation - Anecdotal records, rubric development - Student journals, Portfolio, peer assessment, self‐assessment (12 hours) MODULE ‐ VIII : Research in Language Education Scope of research in language acquisition – Analys any two recent research reports in Hindi language education. (6 hours) MODULE ‐ IX : Contextual problems Discussion of Govt. policies and plans for the development of Hindi. Problems faced by teachers in teaching Hindi as second language. (4 hours) Assignments 1. Prepare a review of a latest literary work in Hindi 2. Prepare lesson transcripts on different approaches to teaching Hindi References 1. Anandan, K.N & Kaladharan (2000). Bhasha Padanam. DPEP. Kerala. 2. Anandan, K.N.(2006).Tuition to intuition. Malappurarn: Transcend. 3. Ausubel, D.P (1965). Educational psychology: A cognitive view. New York: Holt Rinehart and Winston. 4. Bhattacharya lndrajit.(1998): An approach to Communication Skills. New Delhi: Dhanapathi Rao & Co. 5. Brooks, N. (1964). Language and Language learning theory and practice (2nd ed). New York: Harcourt Brace. 6. Bloom B.S., (1964). Handbook on Formative and Summative Evaluation of student learning, USA: Mc Graw Hill, Inc. 48
7. Brown, H. (1980). Principles of Language and Teaching. N.J: Prentice Hall Regents. 8. Bhai Yogendra Jeeth. (1986). Siksha Mem Audunik Pravrithiyam. Agra: Vinod Pustak Mahal. 9. Cohen, E. (1994). Restructuring the classroom: Conditions for productive small groups. Review of Educational Research, 64, 1‐35. 10. Chomsky, N (2000). New Horizons in the study of Language and Mind, Cambridge University Press. 11. Ellis, Rod. (1984) Integrated Second Language Acquisition, Massachussetts: Basil Blackwell Inc. 12. Gardner, H (1983). Frames of mind: The theory of multiple intelligences. New York Basic Books. 13. Forgartty, R (1995). Best practices for the learner – centered classroom. Arlington Heights, IL: Skylight Training and Publishing. 14. Joyce, Bruce, & Weil, Marsha (2005). Models of teaching. Prentice Hall of India Pvt. Ltd. 15. Johnson, D., & Johnson, F (2003). Joining together; Group theory and group skills (8th ed.). Boston: Allgn & Bacon. 16. Kadambari Sharma & Tripat Tuneja (1988). Teaching of Language and Linguistics. New Delhi: Commonwealth Publishers. 80 17. Krashen S.D (1980). Second Language Acquisition and Second Language Learning, Pergamon Press. 18. Larsen, D.F (1995). Techniques and principles of language teaching. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 19. Littlewood, W (1981). Communicative Language teaching. An introduction: Cambride : Cambridge University Press. 20. Mohan, Krishna and Banerji, Meera. (2004). Developing Communication skills. Delhi: Macmillan. 21. Mc Donough, S (1981). Psychology in foreign language teaching. London: George Alley & Irwin. 22. Gillies, Robyn M (2007). Cooperative Learning ‐ integrating theory and practice. London: Sage Publications. 23. Richard. J.C. & Theodore S. Rogers (2001). Approaches and Methods in Language Teaching. New York: 24. Piaget, J (1950). The Psychology of intelligence, London: Routledge & Kegan. 25. Piaget, J (1980). Science of Education and the psychology of the child, New York: Viking Press. 26. Stern, (1992). Issues and options in language teaching, Oxford: Oxford University press. 27. Slavin, R (1996). Research on cooperative learning and achievement: What we know, what we need to know. Contemporary Educational Psychology, Sousa, D (2006). How the brain learns (3rd ed.) 21, 43‐69, Thousand Oaks. CA: Coroin press. 28. Skinner, B.F (1953). Science and human behaviour. New York: Macmillan. 29. Thompson Linda (1996). The Teaching of Poetry. London: Red wood books. 30. Taggart, G.L, Phifer, S.J., Nixon, J.A., & Wood, M (Eds) (1988). 31. Rubrics ‐ A hand book for construction and use. Lancaster, P4: Technonic. 32. Vygotsky, L (1986). Thought and Language. MIT Press. Cambridge: Mass. 33. Wiggins, G (1988). Educative assessment. San Francisco: Jossey ‐ Bass. 49
MED 115
Specialization Course –I (v) ADVANCED METHODOLOGY OF TEACHING URDU (Instructional hours – 90) Course Objectives On completion of the course, students will be able: 1. To acquaint the students with comprehensive ideal of professionalism 2. To acquaint the students with the nature, functions and the implications of planning for teaching language/languages 3. To acquaint the students with the language learning with Psycho‐Socio‐Philosophical and Technological bases. 4. To acquaint the students with the pedagogy of language learning and language teaching. 5. To acquaint the students with different approaches, methods and technology for differentiating between teaching language and teaching literature in the context of first language and second language 6. To acquaint the students with various areas of research in language education 7. To survey various problems with respect to language learning: Language acquisition, contextual, curriculum, evaluation, teacher preparation related etc. 8. To reflect on factors which shape language planning and policy 9. To evaluate the status of Urdu education in the state of Kerala and National level Course Content MODULE – I: Language Learning‐Urdu Objectives: To realize the differences between the conscious process of language learning and non conscious process of language acquisition. To understand the never static position of the language, mastery on dialectic, indolectic and sociolectic status of Urdu Language acquisition: Factors affecting language learning and language acquisitions‐Language development of the Individual ‐ An over view of the field of language acquisition to develop a critical approach towards first (L.1) and second (L.2) languages and other languages (L.3) learning. Linguistic, psychological and social processes that underlie learning and acquisition of languages and its use. Current research findings from the perspective of professionals of the first and second language and other languages. Differences in objectives, instructional materials, processes, evaluation, etc. in the first, second and other languages; Factors affecting the teaching of L.1, L.2 and L.3 – 50
Cultural nature of language –The Social context of language acquisition‐Contribution of Bloomfield, Edword A Sapier, Robert Lado and Benjamin L Whorf and Social constructivism. Models of Language Acquisition: Introduction to language acquisition research. Critical examination of major hypotheses about the ways in which languages develop Chomsky‐
Language Acquisition Device, Piaget‐ Cognitive constructivism and Language, recent theorizing: intentionality; Application of these theories and findings to the development of methodologies for teaching language. Discussions will include a range of languages. Models include a variety of approaches: co‐operative‐based, functionalist, generative, process based, socio‐cultural, universals of language, nuero psychological research. Developing the Urdu language curriculum and the syllabus: dimensions, factors that influence the curriculum, selection and grading of contents, selecting the contexts and treatments for teaching and learning, transaction techniques and evaluation techniques‐ Curricular, Co‐
Curricular activities‐Urdu in National and International field, Urdu and National Integration‐
Urdu in E‐learning fields‐Urdu Curriculum determinants‐ Progressive and Constructive nature‐
Researches Classification of Urdu structures‐Phonological‐Morphological‐Syntactical‐Semantically‐
Graphically‐Developing an idea on speech organs‐Urdu Pronunciation‐Graphemes and allograph approaches‐Organic approaches in Reading and Writing. Evaluation of Listening Speaking, Reading, Writing. Functional way of editing processes. Developing basic language skills and intermediate as well as advanced language skills, Communication Skills, life skills those are level specific viz. primary, secondary and senior secondary with mastery level. Innovative techniques in functional way for teaching grammar, reading comprehension, written expression. Modern Grammar: An examination of the principle features of the Grammar. The course draws upon traditional, structural, functional and transformational grammar with an emphasis on the pedagogical application of these in the teaching of Urdu language Discourse Analysis: Theories of discourse analysis including speech acts, conversational maxims, conversational analysis, ethno‐methodology, text analysis, and critical discourse analysis. Applications of these theories to areas of special interests including native speaker – non‐native speaking interaction, non‐native speaker conversation, classroom discourse and analysis of language in professional settings Contrastive Discourse: Cross‐cultural text organization from the native and non‐native reader’s and writer’s viewpoints. Various aspects of texts to be emphasized, including coherence and cohesions, and formal and cultural schemata in genres such as expository writing, letters, news, articles, and narratives and apt discourses. Analysis of genres/discourses in the textbooks/Materials based on syllabus. 51
(25 hours) MODULE – II: Individualization of Language Learning‐Urdu Objectives: To evaluate some individualized techniques of Urdu learning and acquisition. To apply alternative methods for CWSN To understand various support mechanism in Urdu Education Need, techniques, viz. differential assignments, classroom tasks, personalized system of instruction Pedagogical Analysis of Curriculum, Syllabus, Readers (Text), Units, Modules Language Learning Technology: Theories of language learning and acquisition underlying language learning technology. Current language learning technology for language learning, teaching, testing, interpreting and research TECHNOLOGY APPLIED IN URDU TEACHING Non projected and Projected aids, Aural Aids, Simulations and modeling, direct and indirect experiences, instructional machines, micro‐ macro teaching, Language laboratories, constructivism based models of teaching, information and communication technologies, artificial and neural network, www, and E‐learning and other important instructional activities and materials relevant for language teaching. Role of Clubs and Associations: thrust areas and field activities, learning corner, language resources, natural materials Recent researches in language teaching and language learning‐Curriculum approaches‐Technology and instructional materials‐ verbal learning and language development‐ social; constructivism of language learning and acquisition‐ Socio emotional correlates of language learning‐ Bilingualism, Environmental variables, affecting the profile of the professional language teacher, Classroom atmosphere, Class management. STRATEGIES/TECHNIQUES Strategies classification according to discourses, genres and treatments and units. Group work, games, dramatization, miming, simulations, modeling, questions, brain storming, brain trust, narration, open ended, communication, assignments, discussions, case study, library , co‐
operative and collaborative techniques, integrated methods with art and work education. Multi grade, multi level, multiple alternate strategies required for children with special needs – inclusive education for disabled children (IEDC), VI, HI, LD, OH, MR, Scholastic backwardness‐ Gifted and creative students, teaching language at coastal, tribal and remote area students. Diagnosis remediation and compensatory programs and resource supports. 52
Support mechanism‐Parents, PTA, Co‐Workers, BEO, DEO, DIET, SCERT, NCERT, RIE, Universities, CTE, CIIL, NCPUL, Centrally sponsored programs (RMSA, RUSA) (20 Hrs) MOULE ‐ III‐Teaching Language and Teaching Literature in the Context of Language 1 and Language 2‐Urdu Objectives: To evaluate various methods of teaching Urdu To develop skills for organizing child friendly class rooms To develop advanced techniques of evaluation in Urdu teaching with focus on research considerations. Differences in their nature, content and emphasis interrelationships ‐ Techniques for fostering and developing creativity in language, fluencies and divergent. ‐ Various methods of teaching Urdu, Traditional, constructivist, Differentiative studies on behaviorist and constructivist methods ‐ Direct, Translation, Communication and Social interaction ‐ Teaching of some specific areas, Prose, Poetry, Library articles, discourses ‐ Various methods of functional way of editing, methods of language development through organic bases ‐ The teaching of contents in the present textbooks‐ Social Community language acquisition, Role of local recourses and local texts ‐ Child friendly joyful class rooms – the nature of children and their rights, RTE, Democratic approach, the role of a teacher, trainer and master. Advanced techniques of Evaluation.: Theory on Language Evaluation, Behaviorist and Constructivist evaluation, Cognitive and non Cognitive areas. Process wise product‐ CE ‐term end‐Assessment of the students competences to analyze, critic and appreciate the different genres. Tools, Techniques and portfolios applied in language evaluation. Preparation of Question Papers and work sheets, evaluation in Schools, teacher education institutions, Records and Interpretations. Conducting mini projects ,Action researches, and Actual dissertation. Finding Problematic areas, Plan submissions, Field actions, follow ups. Statistical considerations covering incidentally by E‐statistics. Language, summary of dissertations collection from ERIC AIU, UGC,NCERT,NCTE,NUEPA.CIIL and Universities (11 hours) MODULE ‐ IV : Contextual Problems in Language Teaching‐Urdu To identify and find solutions and disseminate the contextual problems and issues in Urdu Education 53
Multilingual context of India and global languages‐ Constitutional provisions regarding language education and their impact‐ Reservation of minority and heritage languages ‐ Three language formula – original as well as modified and its present status ‐ National Integration ‐ International link of Franca‐ Careers/ Job opportunities ‐ Medium of instruction – controversy, recommendations in NPE 1968, 1986, 1992, and NCF2000‐ 2005 ‐ Issues in Curriculum Development in Multilingual Context of India (10 Hrs) MODULE – V: Preparation of Language Teachers /Experts/ Resource Persons/Mentors/ Masters‐
Urdu To develop teacher commitments, functions and professionalism with ideal personality. To develop skills for literary appreciation Pre‐service education, in‐service education onsite support for professional development ‐ Planning, inputs, transaction and evaluation ‐ Refresher and Distance mode ‐ Alternative course designs‐
Analysis of profiles – Academic‐Social Humane‐Teacher Educator‐Master Educator‐Aptitude arouser, Prognosis‐ diagnosis‐ researcher‐mediator‐Qualities and Role functions‐Recent researches in profile of professional teacher. (10 hours) MODULE – VI: Language, Literary and Cultural appreciations‐Urdu To develop attitudes towards literary appreciation Urdu literary appreciation, poetic principles based on important genres of poems(Radeef, Qafia,tashbeeh Istiaara, Kinaya wagairah) –Review of Urdu literary historical developments with focus on developments of various genres ‐ Review of Urdu language development and its contributions. (14Hrs) Transaction Mode Lecture cum discussion, hands on practice in language laboratory, self‐ study, visits to language teaching institutes, library, interview with experts, E‐learning, presentations in seminar through group discussions assignments etc. Assignments The Student may undertake any two of the following activities: 1. A study of letters, news articles and narratives in Urdu to study its organization in terms of both coherence and cohesion of content. Comparison with writings in other Language. 54
2. Identification of minority languages within their states and discussion of government plans and policies for their preservation and development. 3. Seminar on Urdu Education, research and theories 4. B.Ed/T.T.C/D.Ed/D.L.Ed Curriculum Analysis 5. IX or X Standard Urdu Textbook analysis – SCERT/NCERT References In Urdu: 1. Shafee Ahmed Suddiqui. Urdu Zaban o Qawaid : Hissa Awwal, Duva ‐ Maktaba Jamia New Delhi 2. Mueenuddin. Urdu Zaban ki tadrees. NCPUL 3. Mugni tabassum. Zaban o Adab 4. Iqtidar Hussain. Urdu Sarf o Nahv 5. Omkar kaval and Masood Siraj Urdu Asnaf ki tadrees. NCPUL, New Delhi 6. Jameel jalbi. Taareekh e adab e Urdu EBH Aligarh 7. Khaleel Ahmed Mirza. Urdu ki Lisani tashkeel EBH Aligarh 8. Shoukath sabzwari.Urdu lisaniyat EBH, Aligarh 9. Muhammed Hasan. Adabi samajiyat Maktaba jamia., New Delhi 10. Manager Pandey. Adab ki samajiyat: Tasavvur aur Tabeer EBH, Aligarh 11. Shervani. Tadrees e zaban e Urdu 12. Rasheed Hasan Khan. Sahi Imla 13. CIIL Mysore. Urdu Phonetic Reader 14. Gyan Chand Jain. Tahqeeq ka fan 15. Moulavi Abdul Haqq. The stanadard English Urdu Dictionary. Anjuman Tarqi Urdu Hind. New Delhi 16. Naseemul Balagah 55
In Enlish 17. Bennett,W.A.(1969).Aspects of Language and Language Teaching. Cambridge University Press: London. 18. Braden, K (2006).Task Based Language Education: From Theory to Practice.Cambridge University Press. 19. Britton, James (1973). Language and Learning. Penguin Books, England. 20. Byrnes, Heidi (2006). Advanced Language Learning: The Contribution of Halliday and Vygotsky. Continuum International Publishing Group. 21. Chomsky, N.A. Review of Verbal Behavior by H.F. Skinner Language, 1959, 35:26‐58 22. Hodges and Rudolf (1972). Language and Learning to Read – What language teachers should know about language. Houghton Mifflin Co, Boston. 23. John Lyous: Language and Linguistics‐inn introduction. Cambridge University Press, 1981. 24. Joyce and Banks (1971) Teaching the Language Arts to Culturally Different Children. Addison – Wesky, Pub Co., London. 25. Krashen, Stephen (1988). Second Language Acquisition and Second Language Learning. Prentice Hall International. 26. Lado, Rober. Language Teaching: A Scientific Approach, Bombay: Tate McGraw Hill, 1964. 27. Martinovic,Tic (2004). Discourse Across Languages and Cultures. John Benjamins Publishing Company. 28. Nolliday, K.A.K the Linguistics Science and Language Teaching, London: Longmans, 1968. 29. Ornstein, Jacob (1971). Programmed Instruction and Education Technology in Language Teaching Field ‐ New Approaches to Old Problems. The Centre for Curriculum Development Inc, Philadelphia. 30. Osherson, N Daniel & Howard Lasnik (1990). Language an Introduction to Cognitive Science: ‐ Vol.1, Massachusets Institute of Technology, USA. 31. Pavelenko. Aneta et al (2001). Multilingualism, Second Language Learning and Gender. Walter de’ Gruyter Gmbh & Co. KG, Berlin. 32. Schiffrin, Deborah. et. al.(2001). The Handbook of Discourse Analyses. Blackwell Publishing. 33. Tidymar, W.F. et.al., Teaching the Language Arts, Newyork: Mc Graw Hill, 1969. 34. Vygotsky, L.S. (1985). Thought and Language. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press. 56
35. Wilkinson, Andrew. (1971). The Foundations of Language. Oxford University Press: London. 36. CF‐2005 • NCFTE ‐2009 57
MED 116
Specialisation Course I (vi) ADVANCED METHODOLOGY OF TEACHING TAMIL (Instructional hours ‐90) Course Objectives To enable the learners to: 1. gain an understanding of the nature of language. 2. identify the theories of language acquisition. 3. get an idea about the steps involved in construction of language curriculum. 4. gain an understanding of the different approaches,methods and strategies in language learning. 5. familiarize with various approaches/methods/models of teaching. 6. internalize various skills involved in teaching tamil. 7. apply the acquired skills in actual classroom situations Course Content MODULE ‐I: Tamil language‐ its Nature and Scope. Nature,origine,growth and characteristics of Tamil language ‐ The aims of teaching the mother tongue ‐ Scope of Tamil language education at school and college levels; at undergraduate and post graduate teacer education programmes. (10 hours) MODULE ‐ II : Dynamics of skill Development. Developing language skills (basic,advanced) ‐ Activities. (10 hours) MODULE – III: Theoretical bases of Language Development with reference to Tamil language. Behaviourism ‐ Cognitivism‐Piaget,Bruner,Chomsky ‐ Constructivism‐ Social constructivism‐
Bandura,Vygotsky (10 hours) MODULE ‐ IV : Curriculum Development in Tamil language education. Language curriculum construction‐Principles ‐ Changing concept of curriculum ‐ Review of National school curriculum (2000),NCF (2005),KCF (2007) 58
(10 hours) MODULE ‐ V : Modern Techniques in teaching Tamil. Strategies: Discussion,Team teaching ,Brain storming, CAI, Mind mapping, Role play, Co‐operative and collaborative learning. (10 hours) MODULE ‐ VI : Models of Teaching Introduction‐ Classification of Models ‐ Families –Elements‐Synectics Model,Concept Attainment Model, Advance Organizer Model, Juriprudential Inquiry Model. (25 hours) MODULE ‐ VII : Modern evaluation techniques in Tamil language education. Modern concept of evaluation ‐ Types of evaluation‐internal and external,formative and summative, continuous and comprehensive, criterion referenced evaluation ‐ Types of test items‐objective,short answer and essay ‐ Achievement tests,diagnostic test, teachermade tests and standardized test ‐ System of grading. (15 hours) Assignments 1. Prepare a script for role playing in Tamil. 2. Analysis of folk art forms and their cultural background References: 1. Pinthamizh karpikum muraikal C.Venugopal 2. natramizh karpikum muraikal V. Ganapathi 3. natramizh payitralin nokamum murayum Mu.Govindarajan 4. karpithal mathirikal oar anugumaurai V.Ganapathi 5. kalaithitta valarchi matrum karpithal nutpaviyal A.Meenakshisundaram 6. kalviputhumaikal Kumuthagopalan 7. kalvi nutpaviyal A.Meenakshisundaram 8. position of languages in school curriculum in India chathurvedi.M.G and Mohale.B.V 59
MED 117
Specialization Course I (vii) ADVANCED METHODOLOGY OF TEACHING SANSKRIT (Instructional Hours ‐90) Course objectives On completion of the course the learner will be able to: 1. Gain an understanding of the nature of language 2. Be familiar with linguistic, psychological and social process underline learning of language 3. Get awareness about the various aspects and dimensions of teaching Sanskrit as an ancient language in the schools and colleges in Kerala 4. Identify the theories of languages acquisition 5. Get an idea about the steps involved in the construction of language curriculum 6. Gain understanding of the different approaches, methods and strategies in Sanskrit curriculum transaction 7. Internalize various skills involved in teaching Sanskrit 8. Apply the acquired skills in actual classroom situations 9. Familiar the Sanskrit commission and Krishna Varrier committee reports MODULE – I : Nature and Scope Sanskrit as a language, origin and development of Sanskrit, Sanskrit as mother of Indian languages, Sanskrit as a language of Epics, Nature and importance of Sanskrit Education. Its prospects in modern language education. Aims, objectives and values of studying Sanskrit at different levels from primary to Higher Education, Relevance of Sanskrit Education in present education scenario, influence of Sanskrit to various sciences and languages (10 Hours) MODULE – 2 : Theoretical Bases of Sanskrit language development • Theories of language acquisition • Behaviourism • Cognitvism – Piaget, Bruner, Chomsky , Universal Grammar, Transformative Grammar, Generative Grammar • Social constructivism – Vygotsky, Natural approach (15 Hours) MODULE ‐ III : Curriculum Development‐ Language curriculum construction‐language syllabus‐types‐structural, skill based, situational, notional, Functional, communicative, discourse based, Review of Sanskrit commission report1957, Krishna Varrier committee report (15hours) 60
MODULE – IV : Instructional dynamics of languageeducation‐ Approaches and methods: Patasala method,Text Book method,Direct method, Bilingual method, Communicative approach. language games, role play, dramatization, collaborative learning, ability grouping, group work and peer group, learning through narratives and discourses, Brain storming, C.A.L. mind mapping – portfolio writing (20hours) MODULE ‐ V : Ancient and modern methods of Sanskrit Evaluation Oral, salka, anyonya, modern evaluvation with the help of ICT (15 hours) MODULE – VI : Dynamics of skill development Developing language skills, (basic, intermediate, advanced – activities, evaluation). (10 hours) MODULE ‐7‐Recent researches in the field of Sanskrit education‐ (5 hours) Assignments 1. Prepare a brief report on Sanskrit commission or Krishna Varrier committee 2. Analysis of the curriculum for Sanskrit language in any standard under secondary level. 3‐ A study on the difficulties experienced by untrained Sanskrit teachers References 1. The Teaching Of Sanskrit D.G.Apte 2. The Problems Of Sanskrit Teaching – Hupanikar 3. Samskrithashikshanavidhi Regunathsaphay 4. Samskritadhyapana. G.Viswanathasarma 5. Samskruthashiksha. Ramsakalpandey 6. Principles Of Language Learning‐ Palmer 7. Language In Education Michel West 8. History Of Sanskrit Literuature‐ Keith. 9. Samskruthashikshane Nuthana Pravidhaya‐ Chln Sarma&Fathesingh 10. Samskruthasikshanam‐ Dr.Udaysankar Jha 11. Samskruthashikshanam‐ Venpadi Sambasivamoorthy 12. Samskruthaadhyapanam. M.Sahadevan 13. Report Of Sanskrit Commission 1957 14. Krishnavarrier Committee Report On Sanskrit Education. 61
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Specialization Course I (viii) ADVANCED METHODOLOGY OF TEACHING MATHEMATICS (Instructional hours – 90) Course Objectives On completion of the course the future teacher educators will be able to: 1. Appreciate the nature of mathematics 2. Distinguish between science and mathematics 3. Realize the importance of history of mathematics education 4. List the major aims and objectives of teaching mathematics at various levels 5. Analyze various approaches, methods and techniques of teaching mathematics 6. Create understanding about the curriculum development and major curricular reforms in India with special reference to mathematics education. 7. Develop understanding about the theoretical basis of teaching and learning mathematics. 8. Realize the contributions of scientific research to mathematics education. 9. Construct and standardize achievement test in mathematics 10. Construct diagnostic test in mathematics and prepare remedial programmes 11. Deal with technological developments in mathematics education 12. Develop research attitude among students Course content MODULE – I : Nature and Structure of Mathematics • Meaning and characteristics of mathematics– Science and Mathematics – Development of Mathematics: empirical, intuitive and logical • History of Mathematics education : Ancient period to 21st century • Contributions of eminent Mathematicians( Western &Indian‐4 each) • An outline to Branches of Mathematics: Arithmetic, Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry ‐
Undefined terms – Axioms – Postulates – Theorems – Proofs and verification in mathematics – Types of theorems: Existence and Uniqueness theorems – Types of proofs: Direct, indirect, by contradiction, by exhaustion, by mathematical induction • Euclidean geometry and its criticisms – emergence of non Euclidean geometry. ( 13 hrs) MODULE – II : Objectives and Approaches of Teaching Mathematics • Aims and Objectives of Teaching Mathematics: At primary, Secondary and Higher secondary levels – Goals of mathematics education‐Mathematical skills: Calculations, Geometrical, and interpreting graphs – Mathematical abilities‐ Problem solving ability. • Approaches to teaching Mathematics: Behaviorist approach, constructivist approach, Process oriented approach, Competency based approach, Realistic mathematics education. • Analysis of various Methods of Teaching Mathematics: Lecture, Inductive, Deductive, Analytic, Synthetic, Heuristic, Project, Problem solving, and Laboratory methods. • Techniques of Teaching Mathematics: Questioning, Brain storming, Role‐playing, Simulation. Non‐ formal techniques of learning Mathematics 62
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Models of Teaching: Concept attainment model, inquiry training model, Inductive thinking model. ( 18 hrs) . MODULE – III : Curriculum of Mathematics • Meaning – Types – Curriculum development: Construction, Organization, and Evaluation – Principles and Approaches • Curricular reforms in India with special reference to mathematics education‐ NCERT, NCF, KCF • A critical analysis of the present secondary school curriculum with respect to above major curricular reforms, Problems In Teaching And Learning of Mathematics , Misconceptions in high school mathematics learning, Importance of teacher’s pedagogical content knowledge in mathematics ( 15 hrs) MODULE – IV : Theoretical Basis of Teaching and Learning Mathematics • Theories and their implications on teaching and learning of mathematics: Piaget, Bruner, Gagne, Vygotsky and Gardner • Research perspectives‐ Survey of recent researches in mathematics education (12 hrs) MODULE ‐V : Technology in Mathematics education • Technology integration strategies for Mathematics‐web based lessons‐webquest, cyberguides, multimedia presentation, Tele‐computing projects, online discussions • E‐content development‐concept ,formats, steps for preparation • Mathematics teachers’ attitudes , beliefs and concerns about the use of digital technologies. • A survey of website used in Mathematics teaching and learning. ( 15 hrs) MODULE – VI : Evaluation in Mathematics Education • Concept of evaluation –Measurement, Assessment, Examination – Types of Evaluation: Summative, Formative, Diagnostic, Criterion referenced, Norm referenced • Informal assessment strategies for Mathematics classroom( application cards, exit cards ,graphic organizers, guided reciprocal peer questioning, etc) • Principles of construction of different test items –Construction and standardization of achievement test in mathematics – Diagnostic test and remedial measures • Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy, Evaluation of affective domain. ( 17hrs) 63
Assignments 1. Construct and standardize an achievement test in Mathematics at secondary level 2. Construct a diagnostic test on any topic in High school Mathematics 3. Prepare a report on the critical analysis of the existing secondary school curriculum based on any of the curricular reform. 4. Prepare an evaluation tool for any of the affective variables related to mathematics learning 5. Create a multimedia presentation for teaching Mathematics References: 1. Bloom, B.S. (1983).Hand book on formative and summative evaluation of student learning, New York: Mc Grow Hill Book Co. 2. Butler, C. H., & Wren, F. L. (1965). The teaching of secondary Mathematics, New York: McGraw‐ Hill Book Company. 3. Chambers, P. (2008). Teaching Mathematics. Developing as a reflective secondary teacher, London: Sage Publications. 4. Holt, L. C., & Kysilka, M. (2006). Instructional patterns. Strategies for maximizing student learning, New Delhi: Sage Publications 5. Kaput, J. (1992). Technology and mathematics education. In D. Grouws (Ed.), A handbook of research on mathematics teaching and learning (pp. 515‐556). New York: Macmillan. Prentice Hall. 6. Linn,R.L & Grunlund, N.E.(2005). Measurement and assessment in teaching, Delhi: Pearson Education. 7. Mukhopadhay, M. (2007).(Ed.) Educational technology‐ Knowledge assessment, Delhi: Shipra Publications. 8. Nickson, M. (2006). Teaching and Learning Mathematics, New York: Continuum. 9. Orlich, D. C., Harder, R. J., Callahan, R. C., & Gibson, H. W. (2001). Teaching Strategies. A Guide to better instruction, New York: Houghton Mifflin Company. 10. Ramanujam,R. & Subramaniam, K.(2012). Mathematics Education in India : Status and Outlook. Mumbai: Homi Bhabha Centre for Science Education. 11. Roblyer, M. D. (2008). Integrating educational technology into teaching, India: Pearson 12. Singh,R.(2007).Techniques of measurement and evaluation. New Delhi: Common Wealth publishers. 13. Snowman, J., & Biehler, R. (2000). Psychology applied to Teaching, New York: Houghton Mifflin Company 14. Tanner, H., & Jones, S. (200). Becoming a successful teacher of mathematics, London: Routledge. 15. Travers, K. J., Pikaart, L., Suydam, M. N., & Runion, G. E. (1977). Mathematics Teaching, New York: Harper & Row Publishers. 16. http://www.ncert.nic.in/new_ncert/ncert/rightside/links/pdf/focus_group/math.pdf 17. http://www.iste.org/docs/excerpts/NETTB2‐excerpt.pdf 64
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Specialization Course I (ix) ADVANCED METHODOLOGY OF TEACHING PHYSICAL SCIENCE (Instructional hours: 90) Course Objectives 1. To acquaint the students with the history and philosophy of Science that helped to shape the present day Physical Science education. 2. To understand the modern psychological theories and their bearing on Science curriculum development, methods of teaching and evaluation. 3. To understand and apply the modern pedagogical practices in teaching Physical Science. 4. To acquaint the students with the recent developments, contemporary issues and researchon Modern Physical Science education. 5. To help the students to understand the changing role of a teacher and concept of professional development. Course Content MODULE ‐ I: Nature of Science Evolution of science as a discipline, science as a dynamic expanding body of knowledge; development of scientific knowledge; scientific method Empiricism, vocabulary of Science– terms & concepts, hypothesis, theories and laws. Science as an ever changing construct ‐Formulation of hypothesis; Induction and Deduction, Hypothetico‐deductive model, Significance of verification (proving), Corroboration and falsification (disproving) (12 hours) MODULE ‐ II : Curriculum of Physical Science Education Trends in physical science education ‐ at national and international level; Instructional materials including textbook: criteria and concerns. Integrating co‐curricular activities with science education. Vision suggested by NCF 2005 and KCF 2007 with regard to Physical Science Education. (10 hours) MODULE : III ‐ Approaches to Learning and Evaluation a) Approaches: Constructivist Approaches , collaborative learning, Guided Discovery approach, Problem based learning , Project based learning, Experiential learning . Theories of Piaget and Vygotsky – its bearing on teaching and learning of physical science. Critical Pedagogy by Freire ‐application on teaching and learning Science. Planning and organisation of laboratory work :reporting skills, procedural knowledge, improvisation in the laboratory and low cost science experiments. ICT integrated pedagogy – Resources 65
for teaching Science in EDUBUNTU. Online learning – Scope and limitations of learning management System, MOODLE – major features b) Evaluation: Continuous and Comprehensive Evaluation , Planning and assessment of portfolios in science learning. Rubrics as a tool for assessing an academic task ‐Advantages (44 hours) MODULE ‐ IV: Recent Developments and Contemporary Issues Recent Developments : Concept Mapping‐ Vee Maps, Theoretical overview of Fink’s ‐ Taxonomy‐ Popular Science Journals and Science Education Journals, Impact factor of a journal ‐ Contemporary issues: Contribution of women in science ‐ Scientific and technological Literacy ‐ Ethical aspects of science‐Innovations and Creativity in Science. Science for Sustainable Development ‐ Research perspectives : Important research areas in Physical science education‐Identification of areas in Physical Science Education in which more research is needed . (14 hours) MODULE – V : Professional competence of a science teacher Changing roles and responsibilities of Science Teacher‐ Concept of Profession; Teaching as a profession. Service conditions of school teachers, Professional ethics for teachers. Teacher appraisal and accountability. Concept and importance of professional development. (10 hours) Assignments 1. Review of researches in physical Science done in India and abroad 2. Preparation of lesson plans in physics or Chemistry based on modern strategies 3. Preparation of ICT oriented learning materials useful for physical science teaching 4. An action plan for adopting a multi sensory approach to teach science to students with special needs. 5. Seminar on contribution of women to science and their implications to women empowerment. 6. Development of a Vee map for a selected experiment in Physics or Chemistry; 7. Development of a concept map of a selected topic in Physics/Chemistry. 8. Construction of a rubric for assessing an academic task. References : 1.
http://strangebeautiful.com/other‐texts/popper‐logic‐scientific‐discovery.pdf 2.
http://www.thirteen.org/edonline/concept2class/constructivism/ 3.
http://www.tltgroup.org/resources/flashlight/rubrics.htm 66
4.
http://docs.moodle.org/25/en/Pedagogy 5.
Alan J. McCormack. Trends and Issues in Science curriculum in Science Curriculum Resource Handbook: A practical guide to k12 science curriculum. Kraus International Publications 6.
Black, P (1998). Testing: Friend or Foe? Theory and practice of Assessment and Testing. Falmer Press, London. 7.
Carey, S. (1986). Cognitive Science and Science Education. American Psychologist. 41 (10), 1123‐ 1130 8.
Chalmers, A. (1999). What is the thing called Science.3rd Ed. Open University Press, Bucking ham. 9.
Driver. R, Leach. J, Millar. R and Scott, P. (1996). Young Peoples’ Image of Science. Open University Press, Buckingham. 10.
NCERT, National Curriculum Framework‐ 2005, NCERT. New Delhi. 11.
NCERT, ‘Focus Group Report’ Teaching of Science (2005). NCERT New Delhi. 12.
Novak, J.D. & Gown, D.B. (1984). Learning how to learn; Cambridge University Press. 67
Specialization Course I (x) ADVANCED METHODOLOGY OF TEACHING NATURAL SCIENCE (Instructional hours – 90) MED 120
Course Objectives On completion of this course, the students will be able to: 1. understand the nature of science as a dynamic, expanding body of knowledge and as a social endeavour; 2. understand the difference and complementarities between Science and Technology; 3. understand the need to evaluate curricula and evaluate the same on the basis of different validities; 4. know about and critically study innovative curricular efforts in India and abroad; 5. appreciate the role of co‐curricular activities in science education; 6. understand the Constructivist approach to science instruction; 7. understand the role of assessment in the teaching –learning process in science; 8. familiarize with new, innovative trends in assessment; 9. analyze various issues in Science education 10. acquaint with the modern psychological theories and their bearing on Science curriculum development and methods of teaching 11. acquaint with the recent developments and research in modern Science education. 12. familiarize with resources for teaching/learning Science 13. appreciate linking science with society 14. familiarize with I T related inputs of science teaching. 15. acquaint with some modern procedures and techniques in teaching Science. Course Content MODULE ‐ I : Nature of Science What is Science? • Evolution of science as a discipline with special reference to Natural Science. • Science as a dynamic expanding body of knowledge; Nature of Science‐ empiricism. • Common misconceptions of pupils about the nature of science; • Vocabulary of Science – terms & concepts, hypothesis, theories and laws • Development of scientific knowledge; Scientific method and Scientific Explanation. • Science as a social Endeavour; • Science and Technology‐ complementarities between Science and Technology; • Characteristics of different disciplines of science, their interrelationship and integration. (10 Hours) MODULE ‐ II : Curriculum Trends in Natural Science Education • A brief history of Science Education 68
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Trends in science education from the beginning of the nineteenth century to the present‐ at national and international level; Criteria of validity of science curriculum: content, cognitive, process, historical, environmental, ethical. Curriculum at different stages. Curriculum development‐Principles and Approaches of curriculum organization, Modern trends in curriculum development Psychological theories of Piaget, Bruner, Vygotsky and Gagne and their implication on Curriculum development Study of various curricular projects in science in the world‐ BSCS, Nuffield. Curriculum – The vision suggested by NCF 2005 and KCF 2007 with regard to Science Education. (18 Hours) MODULE ‐ III : Approaches to Science Learning • Multiple Intelligence – It’s bearing on teaching and learning Science. • Constructivist theories by Piaget and Vygotsky ‐ It’s bearing on teaching and learning Science. • Critical Pedagogy by Freire ‐ It’s bearing on teaching and learning Science. • Approaches to concept learning, conceptual change model (reconstructing alternative concepts in science). • Constructivist paradigm and its implications for Science learning; the learning cycle. • Different types of constructivist approaches to science learning: inquiry method, problem solving strategies, investigatory approach, guided discovery approach, inductive method, project based learning, planning different types of projects, co‐operative and collaborative learning, and activity based learning. • An analysis of various Methods of Teaching • Role of experiments in science, integration of theories and experiments in science • Meta cognitive Strategies‐ Teacher as a reflective practitioner. (28 Hours) MODULE ‐ IV: Assessment in Natural Science Education • Role of assessment in Science Teaching and Learning. • Trends in assessment from paper‐pencil tests to authentic assessment: from single attribute to multidimensional assessment, from individual assessment to group assessment, from learning outcome to learning experiences, performance based assessment of Projects, activities and investigative skills, Feedback to students. • Assessment of affective measures in Science: use of tools and techniques such as observation, rating scale, check‐list, anecdotal records, attitude scales, interest inventories and interviews. • Self‐assessment by students and peer assessment, assessment of teachers by students. • Portfolios: Planning and assessment of Portfolios in Science learning. • Assessment of Laboratory skills and procedural knowledge. • Assessment of Content knowledge through Activities and Experiments. • Rubrics – advantages, construction of a rubrics for assessing academic tasks. 69
(12 Hours) MODULE ‐ V : Resources and Techniques of Natural Science Education • Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy – Framing of Objectives, Learning Experiences and Evaluation • Fink’s Taxonomy of Significant Learning • McCormak and Yagar Taxonomy. • Models of Teaching – A survey of information processing models‐ Inquiry Training, Concept Attainment , Advance Organizer and Inductive Thinking models. • ICT integrated pedagogy – Resources for teaching Science in EDUBUNTU. • Online learning – Scope and limitations of learning management System, MOODLE – major features, MOODLE as an e‐platform for social constructivism • ERIC, INFLIBNET – Concept and use in research, Popular Science and Science Education Journals, Impact factor of a journal (10 Hours) MODULE ‐ VI : Focus Areas in Science Education • Equity and Access to Science Education. • Process skills and methodological aspects of science. • Science, Technology, and Society: Critical appraisal of their interface. • Scientific and Technological Literacy. • Language and science. • Ethical aspects of science. • Creativity in Science. • Innovations and Researches in Science Education • Professional Development of teachers (12 Hours) Transactional Mode Lecture‐cum –discussion,Demonstration , Group discussion, Panel discussion, sharing of experiences. Seminar presentation by students on selected themes individually and collectively leading to discussion,Library readings Assignments 1. A critical study of any two discoveries selected from different areas of science to illustrate the importance of history of science . 2. A critical study of a curricular project selected from any one area ‐ BSCS, and Nuffield O and A level Curricula. 3. Visit to science research centres/science museum/places of scientific importance and present a report. 4. Develop a constructivist based lesson plan in a collaborative mode; 70
5. Prepare low‐cost and no cost teaching aids and study their effectiveness in a classroom transaction. 6. Integrate pedagogical content knowledge and ICT in a selected topic in Biology; 7. Critical evaluation of a question paper focusing on converting wrong questions into correct ones; 8. Prepare a Rubric for evaluating Practice Teaching 9. Conduct a seminar on Ethical aspects of science References 1. Alan J. McCormack. Trends and Issues in Science curriculum in Science Curriculum Resource Handbook: A practical guide to k 12 science curriculum. Kraus International Publications 2. Anderson,J.B.(1980) Cognitive Psychology and its implications. San Fransisco: W.H. Freeman and Co. 3. Anderson, C. and K. Roth. (1992). Teaching for Meaningful and Self Regulated Learning of Science. Advances in Research of Teaching, VoI. 1, J. Brophy, ed. Greenwich, Conn : JAI. 4. Alsop, S. & Hicks, K. (2003) Teaching science. New Delhi: Kogan page India Private Ltd 5. Arons, A.B. (1983). Achieving Wider Scientific Literacy. Daedalus Spring 91—122. 6. Aggarwal, D.D. (2001): Modern Methods of Teaching Biology. 7. Black, P (1998). Testing: Friend or Foe? Theory and practice of Assessment and Testing. Falmer Press, London. 8. Bhatt, B. D., & Sharma, S.R. (1996). Methods of Teaching Science. Delhi: Kanishka Publishing House. 9. Carey, S. (1986). Cognitive Science and Science Education. American Psychologist. 41 (10), 1123‐
1130 rd 10. Chalmers, A. (1999). What is the thing called Science.3 Ed. Open University Press, Buckingham. 11. Driver. R, Leach. J, Millar. R and Scott, P. (1996). Open University Press, B.uckingham. Fink, L. D. (Young Peoples’ Image of Science. 2003). 12. Creating significant learning experiences: An integrated approach to desi San Francisco: Jossey‐
Bass gning college courses. 13. Gagne, R.M., Briggs, L.J. & Wagner, W.W. (1986). Principles of Instructional Design (3rd ed.). Chicago: Holt, Rinehart and Winston Inc. 14. Gentn, D. & Stevens, A.L.(Eds.).(1983). Mental Models. Hillsdale, New Jersey: Larence Erlbaum Associates, Publishers 15. Gipps, C.V. (1994). Beyond Testing. Falmer Press, London. 16. Hull, D. L., (1988). Science as a process. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press. 17. International Journal of Science Education; Taylor & Francis. 18. Joyce, B. & Weil, M. (1986). Models of Teaching (3rd ed.) New Jersey: Prentice Hall Inc. 19. Journal of Research in Science Teaching (Wiley‐Blackwell). 20. Lowman, J. (1995). Mastering the Technique of Teaching. Second Edition, San Francisco. 21. Minkoff, E.C.& Baker, P.J. (2004). Biology Today: An Issues Approach, garland science. New York. Pp.1‐32. Biology: Science & Ethics. 71
22. Minkoff, E.C. and Pamela J. Baker (2004). Biology Today: An issues Approach. Garland Science New York pp. 1‐32, Biology: Science and Ethics. 23. Mohan R (2011) Teacher Education, New Delhi Prentice Hall India Ltd 24. NCERT, National Curriculum Framework‐ 2005, NCERT. New Delhi. 25. NCERT, (2005). ‘Focus Group Report’ Teaching of Science NCERT New Delhi. 26. Novak, J.D. & Gowin, D.B. (1984). Learning how to learn; Cambridge University Press. 27. Science & Children STA’s peer reviewed journal for elementary teachers). 28. Science Teacher (NSTA’s peer reviewed journal for secondary science teachers). 29. Sutton, C. (1992). Words, Science and Learning. Open University Press, Buckingham. (N STA’s peer reviewed journal for elementary teachers). 30. Science Teacher (NSTA’s peer reviewed journal for secondary science teachers). 31. Sutton, C. (1992). Words, Science and Learning. Open University Press, Buckingham. 32. http://www.thirteen.org/edonline/concept2class/constructivism/ 33. http://www.tltgroup.org/resources/flashlight/rubrics.htm 34. http://strangebeautiful.com/other‐texts/popper‐logic‐scientific‐discovery.pdf 35. http://docs.moodle.org/25/en/Pedagogy 72
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Specialization Course I (xi) ADVANCED METHODOLOGY OF TEACHING COMMERCE (Instructional hours – 90) Course Objectives 1. To enable the learner to understand the nature, scope, aims and objectives of commerce education. 2. To acquaint the learner with the psychological theories and their bearing on commerce curriculum. 3. To update on the present practices of learning and instruction in the Higher Secondary Schools of Kerala. 4. To equip the student with various approaches, strategies, methods, techniques and models in the teaching of commerce. 5. To be proficient in selecting most appropriate teaching approaches/methods/ techniques/model of teaching in varied context and content. 6. To enable the learner to analyze the role of IT in commerce education and use of materials and media in commerce teaching. 7. To develop insight into modern practices of student evaluation and assessment. 8. To acquaint the learner with the recent researches in commerce education. Course Content Module I : Nature and Scope of Commerce Education • Meaning, Definition, Importance and Scope of Commerce Education • Historical development of Commerce Education – Recommendations of various committees on Commerce Education • Aims and Objectives ‐ An analysis of broad and specific objectives • Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy • Values ‐ Strategies adopted for inculcating values • Competency Based Instruction‐ Meaning, features and steps‐Basic competencies in Commerce • Knowledge management and commerce education – Meaning and importance • Vocational education, Entrepreneurship education, Consumer education‐Meaning features and importance (15 Hours) Module II : Curriculum Development • Concept of Curriculum and Curriculum transaction‐Meaning and Definition • Curriculum development‐Principles and Approaches of curriculum organization, Modern trends in curriculum development • Types of Curriculum • Curriculum Evaluation‐techniques of curriculum evaluation 73
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Psychological theories of Piaget, Bruner, Vygotsky and Gagne and their implication on Commerce Curriculum • Curricular reforms by NCF(2005) and KCF (2007) – A brief outline • Supplementary materials in commerce‐importance and types • Individual difference and commerce curricula ‐ Children with diverse needs, Strategies to deal with differently able, slow learners, gifted students in heterogeneous class room. • Pedagogical content knowledge analysis (PCK) ‐Meaning, Scope, Features of PCK analysis, significance of PCK analysis in commerce discipline (20 Hours) Module III : Approaches for Teaching Commerce • Approaches to Instruction – Direct instruction, Indirect instruction, Interactive instruction, Independent study • Learner centered approaches ‐ Self study approach, Experiential learning, Reflective learning, Contract learning, Modular approach, Discovery learning, Inquiry based learning, Problem Based Learning, Co‐operative learning • Methods of Teaching Commerce‐Lecture, Demonstration, Socialized methods, Project method, Problem solving method, Inductive and Deductive, Analytic and Synthetic, Case study, Directed Study, Source Method (An analysis) • Team teaching • Techniques of Teaching Commerce – A survey of various techniques • Non‐Formal Techniques of Teaching Commerce‐Field trips, Reading, Open learning from resource centers, Placement etc. • Models of Teaching Commerce‐Advance Organizer Model, Apprenticeship Model Jurisprudential Inquiry Model (23 Hours) Module – IV : Technology in Commerce Education •
Technology for Individual, Small group and large group instruction •
Teacher as a Techno‐Pedagogue: Meaning and qualities, Meaning and purpose of Techno‐Pedagogy •
IT enabled instructional resources: Importance of videos, YouTube resources, animations, film clippings, Educational blogs, e‐journals, pod casting, e‐learning, web based learning, Online learning, Video conferencing and Tele conferencing in teaching of commerce. •
e‐content development – concept, forms of e‐content and steps in the preparation of e‐
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Multimodal Design in commerce classroom (12 Hours) Module ‐ V: Assessing student performance • Evaluation of process, product and performance abilities • Formative and Summative Evaluation 74
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Criterion Referenced and Norm Referenced Test Continuous and Comprehensive Evaluation Recent trends in Evaluation; Grading, Choice Based Credit and Semester System‐
Internal and External assessment, Portfolio assessment, Rubrics, Free online assessment tools etc. Standardization of Achievement test in Commerce Diagnostic test and Remedial teaching. (13 Hours) Module VI : Recent Researches in Commerce Education •
Research in Commerce Education‐ Need and importance •
Action Research in commerce discipline •
Survey of Recent Researches in Commerce Education with special reference to: a) Commerce curriculum and resource materials. b) Instructional procedures c) Technology in commerce learning e) Evaluation in commerce education. (7 Hours) Assignments 1. Seminar on the topic “Commerce Education and Employability”. 2. Prepare a report on the critical analysis of the existing Higher Secondary Curriculum based on the curriculum reforms. Or Analysis of curricular materials with reference to development of values. 3. Identification of difficulties in Accounting/Computerized accounting and suggestions for improvement. 4. Preparation and use of animation films/video clippings in teaching of Commerce. 5. Prepare a rubrics/portfolio for evaluating seminar/ project/symposium/practice teaching/specific behavioural traits. 6. Review of recent researches in Commerce Education‐any 10 Studies Or Conduct an Action Research on any specific area related to teaching of commerce Transactional Mode Group discussion, lecture‐cum –discussion, panel discussion, symposium, school visits and sharing of experiences, project, group and individual field based assignments, workshops and seminar presentation. 75
References 1. Aggarwal, J.C. (1996). Teaching of Commerce: A Practical Approach. New Delhi : Vikas Publishing House Pvt Ltd. 2. Anderson,W,L and Krathwohl,D,R. (2001). A Taxonomy for Learning, Teaching, and Assessing: A Revision of Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives. Boston : Allyn & Bacon. 3. Bloom, B. S.et.al., (1956). Taxonomy of Educational Objectives, Hand Book 1: Cognitive Domain. New York : Longmans green &Co. 4. Borich, Gary D (2012). Effective teaching methods: Research based practice. New Delhi: Pearson Education 5. Boynton,L.D.(1955). Methods of Teaching Book Keeping and Accounting. South Western. Ohio: Publishing Company. 6. Browm,J.W and Lewins.(1973). Audio Visual Instruction Technology, Media and Methods. New York : Mc Graw‐Hill Book Co.. 7. Calhoun,C.C . (1980). Managing and Learning process in Business Education. California: Wadsworth. 8. Cohen. (2012). Assessment of Children and Youth with Special Needs, 3ed. New Delhi: Pearson Education. 9. Ebel, L & Frisbie, A. (1991). Essentials of Educational Measurement. New York: McGraw Hill. 10. Gratz,J.E.(1967). Future Curriculum in Business Education. Washington: Business Education Association. 11. Gehlawat,M. (2012). Information Technology in Education. New Delhi: Pearson Education. 12. Gronlund, N.E. (1976). Measurement and Evaluation in Teaching. New York: Macmillan. 13. Harrow, A.J.(1972).Taxonomy of Psycho‐motor Domain. New York: Mc Kay. 14. Joyce,Bruce and Weil,Marsha. (1997). Models of Teaching. New Delhi: Prentice Hall of India Pvt Ltd. 15. Krathwohl.et.al. (1956). Taxonomy of Educational Objectives, Hand Book II: Affective Domain..New York: Mc Kay. 16. NCERT.(2005). National Curriculum Framework. New Delhi: NCERT. 17. Pophan,Scharg and Blockhus. (1975). A Teaching Learning System for Business Education. New York : Mc Graw‐Hill Book Co. 18. Roa, Seema. (1995). Teaching of Commerce. New Delhi: Anmol Publications pvt. Ltd. 19. Satlow, I.D. (1964). Teaching of Business Subjects Effectively.New York: Prentice Hall Inc. 20. SCERT. (2007). Kerala Curriculum Framework. Trivandrum: SCERT. 76
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Specialization Course I (xii) ADVANCED METHODOLOGY OF TEACHING SOCIAL SCIENCE (Instructional hours – 90) Course Objectives After completion of the course the student teachers will be able to: 1. Develop an understanding about the meaning, nature, scope of Social Science Education. 2. Find out the distinction and overlap between Social Studies and Social Sciences. 3. Understand the role of various methods and approaches of teaching Social Sciences 4. Understand different Approaches to organisation of social science curriculum and methodology of developing curricular materials 5. Employ appropriate strategies for the transaction of social science curriculum. 6. Effectively use different media, materials and resources for teaching Social Sciences 7. Construct appropriate assessment tools for teaching‐learning of Social Sciences and undertake evaluation Course Content MODULE ‐ I : Conceptualisation of Social Science Education Concept, meaning, nature, and scope of social sciences‐ Evolution of Social Sciences with special emphasis on recent trends‐ Epistemological frame proposed in educational policy documents and various National Curriculum Frameworks concerning teaching‐learning of social sciences. Relevance of Social Sciences in school curriculum. Aims and objectives of teaching Social Sciences ‐ Conceptual, inquiry, skill and affective objectives of teaching Social Sciences ‐ Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy of Educational objectives ( 15 Hours) MODULE ‐ II : Social Science Curriculum Approaches to organisation of social science curriculum; Current social science curriculum at various stages of school education in Kerala. Methodology of development of curricular materials viz., textbooks, teacher handbooks, teacher’s education manuals, activity book, self instructional materials –their conceptualization and processes; ( 16 Hours) MODULE ‐ III : Approaches to Pedagogy of Social Science Critical appraisal of approaches to teaching learning Social Sciences – Behaviourist approach; constructivist approach; inter disciplinary approach, integrated approach; Critical Pedagogy and Problem posing education. ( 12 Hours) MODULE ‐ IV : Teaching‐ Learning Strategies in Social Science 77
Critical appraisal of various teaching learning strategies viz., lecture cum discussion, Seminar, projects, field survey, problem solving, role‐play, simulation, field visits etc. Models of Teaching: Elements, features and families with special reference to Jurisprudential Inquiry, Concept attainment and Advance Organizer models. Cooperative learning, Peer tutoring, Concept Mapping, Generative Learning Strategy‐ Ensuring inclusion in Social science classrooms ‐ Creativity in Social Science classrooms. ( 22 Hours) MODULE ‐ V: Media, Materials and Resources for Teaching‐Learning of Social Science. Use of new technology in Social science classrooms‐Effective use of print media and audio‐
visual materials for social science instruction; ‐ Integration of ICT in teaching‐learning of social science, web‐based learning, e‐learning. ( 13 Hours) MODULE ‐ VI : Evaluation in Social Science Education Competency based evaluation, continuous and comprehensive evaluation; Grading, formative and summative evaluation; assessment tools; construction of standardized achievement test Alternative assessment: rubrics, portfolios and projects, Evaluation of attitudes , values, etc. ( 12 Hours) Assignments 1. Assignment / term paper on selected themes from the course and presentation in seminar. 2. Organization of activities like quiz, mock‐parliament, field trips, exhibitions and any other co‐curricular activities at B.Ed. level 3. Analysis of a social science syllabus or a textbook of a stage/class 4. Review of articles on social science education from print/e‐journals. 5. A Survey of Recent rseraches in Social Science education Transaction Mode Lecture‐cum‐discussion, panal discussion, project, oral history, workshops, seminar, Assignment, group discussion around issues and concepts. group and individual field based assignment focused by workshops and seminar presentations with ppts. References 1. Alan J Singer (2003), Social Studies for Secondary Schools: Teaching to learn, earning to teach, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Mahwah, New Jersey. 2. Arora, GL (1988), Curriculum and Quality in Education, NCERT, New Delhi. 3. Ashley Kent, (2001) Reflective Practice in Geography Teaching, Paul Chapman Educational Publishing, Ltd. 4. Avijit Pathak, (2002) Social Implications of Schooling: Knowledge, Pedagog and Consciousness, Rainbow Publishers, New Delhi. 78
5. Binning and Binning (1952), Teaching Social Studies in Secondary Schools, McGraw Hills, New York. 6. David Lambert and David Balderstone (2000), Learning to Teach Geography in Secondary School: A Companion to School Experience, Routledge Falmer, London. 7. Digumarti Bhaskara Rao (ed.), Techniques of Teaching Social Sciences, Sonali Publications, Delhi. 8. Digumarti Bhaskara Rao and Ranga Rao (2007), Techniques of Teaching Economics, Sonali Publications, New Delhi. 9. Ferris, J.Pamela (2003), Elementary and Middle School Social Studies: An Interdisciplinary instructional approach, McGraw Hills, New York. 10. Jarolimek,J. (1990). Social Studies in Elementary education. New York: MacMillaian. 11. GOI (1993), Learning Without Burden: Report of the National Advisory Committee appointed by the Ministry of Human Resource Development, Department of Education, New Delhi. 12. GOI (2005), Regulatory Mechanisms for Textbooks and Parallel Textbooks Taught in Schools Outside the Government System: A Report, Committee of the Central Advisory Board of Education, Ministry of Human Resource Development, New Delhi. 13. Indian Economic Association Trust for Research and Development (1991), Teaching of Economics in India, Interest Publications, New Delhi. 14. Jack Zevin, (2000) Social Studies for the twenty‐first century: Methods and materials for teaching in Middle and secondary schools, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Mahwah, New Jersey. 15. James Hemming (1953), Teaching of Social Studies in Secondary Schools, Longman Geen & Co, London. 16. Kenworthy,L.S.(1962). Guide to social studies teaching. California: Words worth Publishing Co. 17. Krishna Kumar, (2002), Prejudice and Pride, Penguin Books India, Delhi. 18. Maggie Smith (2002), Teaching Geography in Secondary Schools: A Reader, Routledge Falmer, London, 19. Michaelis, J.U. & Garsia, J.(2000). Social studies for children: Aguide to basic instruction. (12th ed.)New York: Allyn & Bacon. 20. NCERT (1972), Preparation and Evaluation of Textbooks in Geography: Principles and Procedures, National Council of Educational Research and Training, New Delhi. 21. NCERT (1976), The Curriculum for the Ten‐Year School: A Framework Reprint Edition, National Council of Educational Research and Training, New Delhi. 22. NCERT (1988), National Curriculum for Elementary and Secondary Education: A Framework, Revised Edition, National Council of Educational Research and Training, New Delhi. 23. NCERT (2001), National Curriculum Framework for School Education, Reprint Edition, National Council of Educational Research and Training, New Delhi. 24. NCERT (2005a) National Curriculum Framework Review 2005 National Focus Group Position Papers Vol.II, Systemic Reforms (Position Paper on Curriculum, Syllabus and Textbooks), National Council of Educational Research and Training, New Delhi. 79
25. NCERT (2005a) National Curriculum Framework Review 2005 National Focus Group Position Paper on Curriculum, Syllabus and Textbooks, National Council of Educational Research and Training, New Delhi. 26. NCERT (2005a) National Curriculum Framework Review 2005 National Focus Group Position Paper on Teaching of Social Science, National Council of Educational Research and Training, New Delhi. 27. NCERT (2005b), National Curriculum Framework 2005, National Council of Educational Research and Training, New Delhi. 28. NCERT (2006a), Syllabi for Secondary and Higher Secondary Classes, National Council of Educational Research and Training, New Delhi. 29. NCERT (2006b), Syllabus for Classes at the Elementary Level, National Council of Educational Research and Training, New Delhi. 30. Rajni Kumar, Anil Sethi and Shalini Sikka, (2005) School Society and Nation: Popular Essays in Education, Orient Longman, Delhi. 31. Williams E. Becker, Michael Watts and Suzanne R. Becker (2006) Teaching Economics: More alternatives to chalk and Talk, Edward Elgar Publishing, Northampton, USA. Journals 1. Economic and Political Weekly (published from Mumbai, India). 2. Journal of Economic Education (published from United States of America). 3. Teaching of History (published from United Kingdom). 4. Journal of Social Sciences Social Science Quarterly. 5. Journal of Curriculum Studies (published by Routledge, United Kingdom) Others 1. Encyclopaedia of the Social Sciences. 2. Encyclopaedia Britannica Websites 1. www.ncert.nic.in 2. http://www.history.org.uk (for accessing e‐version of teaching history). 3. www.epw.in (for accessing e‐version of journal of economic and politicweekly). 4. www.geographyteachingtoday.org.uk 5. http://www.indiana.edu/~econed/ (for accessing e‐version of journal of economic education) 80
Specialization Course – I (xiii) MED 123
ADVANCED METHODOLOGY OF TEACHING COMPUTER SCIENCE (Instructional hours – 90) Course Objectives 1. To acquaint the students with new trends in Information and communication technology. 2. To make the students aware of the significance of Information and Communication technology in education. 3. To make the students aware of new interactive and online learning Management systems. 4. To develop the skill to utilise the modern information and communication technologies effectively. 5. To develop skills in production, selection and evaluation of educational materials. 6. To acquaint the learner with the relevant security features to be taken while interacting with online and computer based environments. 7. To develop favourable attitudes towards using modern educational media. 8. To acquaint the learner with the recent researches and developments on Computer education. Course Content MODULE – I : Computer Science Education Aims and objectives of teaching Computer Science, Digital divide, Computer Literacy, Convergence of Communication and Computing, Information and Communication technology (ICT), Computers in Education, ICT enabled Teaching and Learning ‐ Instructional materials for computer instruction: Nature, Scope, Preparation and use, Process oriented approaches, Programme for providing training in higher order thinking – Social Constructivism and Interactive Environments. Models of Teaching Computer Science ‐ Information processing, concept attainment, jurisprudential, Enquiry training models; simulation and games. (15 hours ) MODULE ‐ II: Resource Overview Advances in Computing and its applications in Education – Artificial Intelligence, Man Machine Communication, Natural Language Processing, Computer Vision, Remote Sensing and Geographical Information Systems, Introduction to Mobile computing, Mobile operating systems and application development, Mobile based Learning, Device Interoperability, Basics of cloud computing. Software Freedom – Free and Open source software – Introduction to GNU/Linux, Linux distribution, File System, Hierarchies, User interfaces, Running an Application, File and Directory Management in Linux. Introduction to Educational Softwares: GeoGebra, Stellarium, PhET, Scilab. 81
(15 hours ) MODULE ‐ III: Planning Infrastructure Smart rooms/resource rooms, Need for planning the computer laboratory, Laboratory Design, essential infrastructure, Organization of Practical work: Administration, grouping of pupils, Instruction to pupils, discipline in the lab – Care and Maintenance of Hardware and Software in the Computer Science Laboratory. Computer networks, Data communication system, Topologies, Media, Devices, Protocols and Addressing systems, Virtual Private Network (VPN),Wireless Technologies: Blue Tooth, Global Positional System, Infra Red Communication, Wi‐Fi, WiMAX (15 hours ) MODULE ‐ IV: Internet and Web based learning Internet as a knowledge repository, Impact of e‐learning, e‐resource, ecommunication: Forums, blogs, bulletin boards, Social networking in Education, Arrangement of e‐resources. e‐textbooks, e‐journals, digital library, e‐Governance (A case study). Computer Based Multimedia Instruction, Tele and Video conferencing, e‐Learning – Constructivism in e‐learning – Theories of e‐Learning – Interaction in e‐
Learning – Model of e‐Learning – Teaching Methods in e‐Learning, Creating Online Learning Environments, Designing instruction for online environment: instructional design, online course development, Communication and Collaboration, Role of instructor and learner. Learning Management Systems(LMS) and Course Management Systems (CMS): Online Learning, Blended Learning; LMS/CMS Software Features: Blackboard, Moodle, Desire2Learn. (25 hours ) MODULE ‐ V : Communication on Web and Cyber Security Communication on Web, Web Server, Web Server Software, Web Hosting, URL, FTP, Static and Dynamic Web Pages, Advanced features of HTML, Structured Query Language(MySQL), Introduction to Scripting Languages, Server Side (ASP, JSP, PHP), Client Side (JavaScript) Need of Cyber ethics Awareness programmes in education– Cyber space, Cyber ethics, Cyber crimes, Security, Privacy, Anonymity and identity, IPR Issues, Role of Teacher, Cyber Lows, India IT Act. (10 hours ) MODULE ‐ VI : Research in Computer Science Education Meaning of Research – Objectives, Motivation and Significance of Research, Scope and functions of computer science educational research – latest trends. Significance of report writing, Research Report: Structure, Components and types, Exposure to LaTeX, Installation, Creating reports and articles, Text 82
environment, Math environment, Figures, Tables, BibTeX – reference manager, Camera Ready Preparation. (10 hours ) Assignments 1.
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Develop an on‐line Learning Material. Prepare a recorded audio aid and video aid with your own sound. Prepare a spoken tutorial of 1 hr Preparation of a multimedia teaching unit based on any teaching model. Develop an e‐attendance register, e‐progress report, e‐graphical illustration which is suitable for your subject. Refecences: 1. Ashok K Talukder, (2005).Roopa R Yavagal, Mobile Computing, Tata McGraw Hill, 2. Bernhardensen Tor, (1999)Geographic Information Systems: An Introduction, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 3. Kothari C.R., Research Methodology Methods & Techniques, 2nd Edition, Wishwa Prakashan Publishers. 4. D. Jurafsky and J. Martin, (2008).Speech and Language Processing: An Introduction to Natural Language Processing, Computational Linguistics, and Speech Recognition, 2nd Edition, Prentice Hall, 5. David Flanagan, Javascript the definitive guide, O Reilly & Associates inc. 6. Rich E., Knight K. & S.B.Nair, Artificial Intelligence, 3rd Edn. TMGH, New Delhi. 7. James A Senn, Information Technology: Principles , Practices and Opportunities, Prentice Hall. 8. Jason Gilmore, Beginning PHP and MySQL, 3rd Edition, Apress Publications 9. Leslie Lamport, LaTeX: A Document Preparation System, Second edition, Addison Wesley. 10. N. B. Venkateshwarlu, (2005). Introduction to Linux Installation and Programming, B S Publishers Hyderabad, 11. Robert W. Sebesta, (2009). Programming with World Wide Web, 4th edition, Pearson Education, 12. William Stallings, (2005).Wireless Communications & Networks, Pearson Education, 83
Specialization course II (i) TEACHER EDUCATION (Instructional hours – 90) MED 131
Course Objectives This course is to provide you with experiences that will enable you to: 1. Gain insight and reflect on the concept of teaching and the status of teaching as a profession, 2. Understand the roles and responsibilities of teachers and teacher educators 3. Prepare teachers for reflective teaching 4. Reflect on the issues and problems related to teacher education in the country 5. Understand the nature and objectives of teacher education for three levels of schooling 6. Know methods and techniques for transaction of teacher education curricula 7. Examine the role and contribution of various Regulatory Bodies and support institutions for improving quality of Teacher Education. 8. Develop understanding of various strategies of teachers’ professional development Course Content MODULE ‐ I: Teachers, Teaching and Teacher education Objectives 1. To gain insight and reflect on the concept of teaching and the status of teaching as a profession, 2. To understand the roles and responsibilities of teachers and teacher educators content •
Teaching and teacher education‐meaning, definition, scope, functions. changing roles of teachers in India‐historical sketch •
Concept and definition of a Profession; Status of teaching as a profession. Future of teaching as a profession, Impediments to professionalization–aspects of pedagogy •
Professional ethics for teachers •
Teacher educators in India –profile and status •
Brief history of teacher education in India (15 hours ) MODULE ‐ II: Teacher Education system in India Objectives 1. To understand the structure of teacher education system in the country 2. To reflect on the issues and problems related to teacher education in the country 3. To analyze the emerging tendencies in teacher education in India in comparison to neighbouring countries Content • Types of Teacher Education Institutions in India NCTE‐ objectives, structure and functions • Roles, functions and networking of institutions like UGC, NCERT, NUEPA • Status of teacher education in India –DIETs, CTEs, IASEs, SCERTs, BITEs 84
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Issues, concerns and problems of pre‐service teacher education The Centrally Sponsored Scheme for the Reconstructing and Strengthening of Teacher Education Case studies of teacher education in Asia Pacific (8 hours ) MODULE ‐ III: Structure of Pre‐Service and In‐service teacher education in India Objectives 1. To understand the nature and objectives of teacher education for three levels of schooling 2. To understand the different modes of teacher education 3. To be aware of system of teacher education for areas other than the general academic areas 4. To appreciate the variety in teacher education to practices in the country Content • Complementary nature of pre and in‐service teacher education • Pre‐service teacher education in India – Growth and development , structure, evolution of curriculum, future trends – objectives and curriculum of Teacher Education for pre‐primary, elementary, secondary and senior secondary, vocational senior secondary stages • In‐service teacher education‐ Growth, development and practices ; Rationale, Functions Objectives, Strategies • Teacher education through distance mode • Teacher preparation for alternative systems of school, special needs education, physical education, and education of teacher educators • Innovations in Teacher education in India (17 hours ) MODULE ‐ IV: Teacher Education Technology Objectives 1. To know the various phases of pre‐primary teacher preparation 2. To innovate strategies and practices for teacher development 3. To develop skill to supervise and guide student‐teachers 4. To know variety of teacher preparation techniques 5. To apply microteaching technique for developing teacher skills 6. To use models of teaching for enhancing repertoire of teaching strategies 7. To Be ready for reflective practice in teaching Course content • Components of pre‐service Teacher Education‐theory, internship, practical activities. • Concept of School Experience Programme (SEP)‐ Planning and organization, Monitoring and supervision of SEP. 85
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Planning for teaching‐educational objectives (aims, goals and objectives; Taxonomy; Writing inst‐‐‐ objectives unit planning, lesson planning, and teacher’s diary). •
Methods and Techniques (Lecture‐cum‐Discussion, Demonstration, Group Discussion, Brain storming seminar, Workshops, Team Teaching, Use of ICT, Case analysis, reading and review of original texts, projects and assignments ) • Teaching skills and competencies required of an elementary school teacher • Microteaching • Models of teaching as teacher education technique • Practice teaching : Limitations of the Traditional Structure of Student Teaching • Internship: concept; planning and organization • Strategies for Professional Learning: Reflective teaching ‐ concept and strategies for making teachers reflective practitioners. Self‐study and action research. • Role of ICT and professional learning communities Constructivism in Teacher Education (30 hours ) MODULE ‐V: Quality, Evaluation and research in teacher education Objectives 1. To acquaint with extant terms and concepts in teacher evaluation 2. To develop and apply different techniques for evaluation of teachers 3. To be aware of own teaching styles 4. To analyze current challenges of teacher education 5. To identify of research trends in teacher education Course content • TQM in Teacher Education: concept • Using Evaluation to improve teaching • Assessment of teaching proficiency: criterion, tools and techniques • Teacher Appraisal and accountability .observation, interviews, self‐appraisal, testing, Portfolio assessment • Identifying Teaching styles • Evaluation of school experience/internship programmes. • Contemporary Challenges to teacher education • Trends in Research in teacher education Assignments • Conduct interview of teacher educators at any two level and make a report of their qualifications, professional responsibilities and avenues for professional development • Compare the core curriculum of pre‐service teacher education at pre‐primary, primary, secondary, physical education, language and art teachers • Improve a lesson transcript of a student teacher by applying the principles of any two modern models of teaching of your choice 86
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Develop a Rubric for observing and rating teaching competencies of student teachers at a level of your choice and improve it by trying out it for observation of three student teachers. Make a report of your experience (20 hours) References 1. Caggart, G.L. (2005): Promoting Reflective Thinking in Teachers. Crowin Press. th 2. Cohen Louis, Minion Lawrence & Morrison, Keith (2004). A Guide to Teaching Practice (5
edition). Rout ledge Falmer. London and New York. 3. In‐service Teacher Education Package for Primary and Secondary Teachers (1988), Volume I & II, NCERT, New Delhi. 4. In‐service Teacher Education Package for Primary and Secondary Teachers (1988), Volume I & II, NCERT, New Delhi. 5. Jangira, N.K. & Ajit Singh (1992): Core Teaching Skills – A Microteaching Approach, NCERT – New Delhi. th 6. Joyce, B., and Weal, M. (2003). Modals of Teaching (7 Ed.). Boston: Allyn & Bacon. 7. Kauchak, D.P. & Paul, D. Eggen (1998): Learning and Teaching. Allen & Bacon. Sydney. 8. Linda Darling Hammond & John Bransford (ed) (2005): Preparing Teachers for a Changing World. Jossey‐Bass, San Francisco. 9. Linda Darling, Harmmond & John Bransford (2005): Preparing Teachers for a changing World. John Wiley & Son Francisco. 10. Loughran, John (2006): Developing a Pedagogy of Teacher education : Understanding Teaching and Learning about Teaching. Routledge: New York. 11. Martin, D. J. & Kimberly S. Loomis (2006): Building Teachers: A constructivist approach to introducing education. Wadsworth Publishing, USA. 12. NCERT (2005): National Curriculum Framework. 13. NCERT (2006): Teacher Education for Curriculum renewal. 14. NCTE (1998): Perspectives in Teacher Education. 15. NCTE (2005). Report on ECCE Teacher Education: Curriculum Framework and Syllabus Outline, New Delhi 16. Report of the Delors Commission, UNESCO, 1996 17. Schon, D. (1987): Educating the Reflective Practitioner: Towards a New Design for Teaching and Learning in the Professions. New York, Basic Books. 18. UNESCO (2006): Teachers and Educational Quality. UNESCO Institute for Statistics Montreal. 19. UNESCO (2006): Teachers and Educational Quality: Monitoring Global Needs for 2015. UNESCO Publication. Montreal. 20. Wragg, E.C. (1984): Classroom Teaching Skills, Croom Helm, London. 21. Yadav, M.S. & Lakshmi, T.K.S. (2003): Conceptual inputs for Secondary Teacher Education: The instructional Role. India, NCTE. 87
MED 132
Specialisation Course ‐ II (ii) NON ‐ FORMAL EDUCATION (Instructional hours ‐ 90) Course Objectives To enable the students: 1. To understand the meaning, scope, and importance of Non‐Formal Education 2. To well verse with the theoretical basis of non formal education 3. To make aware of the concept of Non‐Formal Education as different from Informal Education and Formal Education 4. To gain knowledge about the relationship between Non‐Formal Education and Adult Education 5. To acquaint with the modern development in the field of Non‐Formal Education 6. To appreciate the importance of providing Lifelong Learning 7. To familiarize with the contributions of great educators and agencies to Non‐Formal Education 8. To get an idea about the psychology of Non‐Formal Education learners 9. To learn the curriculum and methods of Non‐Formal Education 10. To look into the modern instructional materials available in the field of Non‐Formal Education 11. To get an idea about the social and economic framework of Non‐Formal Education 12. To know the modern techniques of evaluation in Non‐Formal Education Course Content MODULE ‐ I: Nature and Scope of Non‐Formal Education Meaning, Definition, Scope, Importance, and Objectives of Non‐Formal Education, Difference between Formal Education, Informal Education, and Non‐Formal Education; Role of Non‐Formal Education in Universalisation of Education, Non ‐ Formal Education as an alternative to Formal Education, Philosophical, Sociological and Spiritual basis of Non‐Formal Education‐ Non‐Formal Education and disadvantaged groups of the society –Clientele of NFE ‐ Scheduled Caste and Scheduled Tribes, Women and Economically Weaker Sections. (16 hours) MODULE ‐ II: Contributions of Great Educators and Agencies Rousseau, John Dewey, Paulo Freire, Welthy Fisher, N.F.S.Grund Wig, Ivan Illich, Everet Reimer, John Holt, Paul Goodman, Ivan Lister, Charls Silverman, Mahatma Gandhi, Jiddu Krishnamoorthy, Sri Aurobindo ‐ German Adult Education Association, Indian Adult Education Association, Lucknow Literacy House, Kerala Gradhasala Sangham, Kerala Association For Non‐Formal Education and Development, Kerala Sastra Sahithya Parishad , NCERT (14 hours) MODULE ‐III: Non‐Formal Education and Adult Education Relationship between Non‐Formal and Adult Education, Literacy Programmes – A World Perspective – USSR, USA, Tanzania, Ethiopia, Cuba, Iran, Burma, Vietnam, China ‐ Literacy Programmes in India, Liquidation of Illiteracy in Kerala, Post Literacy and Continuing education, Role of State Resource Centre in promoting Non‐Formal Education (8 hours) 88
MODULE ‐IV: Non‐Formal Education and Global Trends in Education Concepts and definition of the following ‐ Continuing Education, Distance Education, Correspondence Courses, Open Schooling, Open University, Lifelong Learning –Alternatives in Education ‐ Population Education, Women Education, Environmental Education, Peace Education, Vocational Education, Workers Education, Health Education, Family Life Education (10 hours) MODULE ‐ V: Psychology of Non‐Formal Education Factors facilitating Non‐Formal Learning – Methods to motivate the learners for Non‐Formal Learning – Problems and remedies of Non‐Formal Education Learners (6 hours) MODULE‐ VI: Curriculum and Methods of Teaching Principles of Curriculum construction for non formal education‐ curriculum for different age groups, different subjects‐ Literacy, Numeracy, General Science, Social Studies‐ Methods of teaching ‐ Story Telling, Seminar, Workshop, Group Discussion, Debate, Demonstration, Dramatization, Role Play, Buzz Group, Field Trip, Folk Arts, Tele Conferencing (10 hours) MODULE‐ VII: Instructional Materials Nature and Type of Instructional Material needed for the Non‐Formal Education Programme ‐ Improvised materials, Projected and non projected aids ‐ Instructional skills required for Non‐Formal Education Teachers‐ Technological Impact on Non‐Formal Education – Multi media and IT products in educating Non‐Formal Education learners (10 hours) MOULE ‐ VIII: Social and Economic Framework Non‐ Formal Education and National Development – Non‐Formal Education and Human Resource Development – Non‐Formal Education and Economic Development – Non‐Formal Education and Acculturation – Social Transformation – Life Skills and Quality of Life (8 hours) MODULE ‐IX: Evaluation Techniques Concept of Evaluation, Difference between Evaluation in Formal and Non‐Formal Education, Construction of Test Items in Different Subjects of Non‐Formal Education Centres; Local Specific Nature of Test Items; Maintenance of Cumulative Records, Anecdotal Records (8 hours) Transaction Mode 1. Discussion 2. Group Discussion 3. Debate 4. Seminar 5. Demonstration 6. Project 7. Role play 89
8. Buzz group 9. Brain storming 10. Folk art forms Assignments 1. Case Study of Non‐Formal Education Centres 2. How to organize a Non‐Formal Education Centre? 3. Setting up a Non‐Formal Education Centre in a Village 4. Evaluating Reading & Writing Material used in Non‐Formal Education Centres 5. Visit to State Resource Centre and prepare a Report References: 1. Bordia, Anil, J. R. Kidd and J.A. Draper. (1973). Adult Education in India – A Book of Reading, Bombay Nachiketa Publications. Ltd. 2. Chandra,Aravind; and Anupama Shah.(1987). Non‐formal Education for all, New Delhi, Sterling Publishers Pvt. Ltd. 3. Cropley, A. J. (1977). Lifelong Education – A psychological analysis New York, Perganon Press. 4. Dutta, S.C.(1986). History of Adult Education in India, New Delhi, Indian Adult Education Association. 5. Edger Faure, et al(1972). Learning to Be, A World of Education Today and Tomorrow , Paris, UNESCO, Paris. 6. Freire, Paulo.(1977) Pedagogy of the Oppressed, New Zealand, Penguin Books Ltd. 7. Holt, John. (1974). The Under Achieving Scholl, New Zealand, Penguin Books Ltd. 8. Illich, Ivan .D.(1975). Deschooling Society. New Zealand, Penguin Books. 9. Krishnamurthy. J.(2006). Education and the Significance of Life, India, Krishnamurthi Foundation. 10. La Belle, T.J. (1982). Formal, non‐formal and informal education: holistic perspectives on lifelong teaming”. In: International Review of Education, Vol. 28, No. 2, pp. 159‐175. 11. Paranaji. S. (Ed).(1988). Distance Education.,New Delhi, Sterling Publishers Pvt Ltd. 12. Percival and H. Elligton (1981). Status and Trends of Distance Education, London. 13. Pillai, Sivadasan K.(1979). Education in a new perspective, Trivandrum,Kalanikethan Publication. 14. Reimer, Everett. (1974). School is Dead, Australia, Penguin Books Ltd. 15. Rogers, Allen.(1981). Teaching Adults, New Delhi, Sterling Publishers Pvt. Ltd. 16. Saxena, D.P. (2006). Non‐Formal and Adult Education, New Delhi, Cyber Tech Publication. 17. Sivarajan, K. (1989). Vayojana Vidyabhasom, Calicut, Sahayprasadhana. 18. UNESCO.(1972). Learning to be, Paris, UNESCO. 19. Vankataiah,S.(2001). Non‐Formal Education, New Delhi, Anmol Prakashan. 20. Youngman, F.(2000). The Political Economy of Adult Education, London, Zeal Books. 90
MED 133
Specialization Course II (iii) EARLY CHILDHOOD CARE AND EDUCATION (Instructional hours – 90) Course Objectives On completion of this course the student will be able to: 1. Understand the need and significance of early childhood care and education 2. Understand the policy perspectives on ECCE in Indian and the world 3. Understand social and personal development of children (3‐6 years) 4. Understand the quality‐dimensions i.e., curriculum, programmes and workforce for ECCE. 5. Understand the need for providing compensatory programme for children deprived genetically familial and socially 6. Develop readiness in children for engaging informal education. 7. Help parents to develop understanding about the development traits and needs of children who belong to ECCE. Course Content MODULE ‐ I : ECCE: Policy and Perspectives Concept, significance and objectives of ECCE. ECCE in India: Policies and Programmes in National Policy on Education (NPE, 1986) and POA (1992), National Plan of Action for Children, 1992 and 2005; National Curriculum Framework (2005), National Curriculum Framework for Teacher Education (2009). ECCE in Global Perspective: United Nations Convention on Rights of the Child (UNCRC, 1989), Millennium Development Goals (2000) and Global Monitoring Report (UNESCO) 2007 – concerns and issues. Comprehensive development of the child by way of physical motor, emotional, social cognitive (including intellectual and linguistic, social and moral and aesthetic) domains. (14 hours) MODULE – II : Psycho‐Social Philosophical Context of Pre‐school Education Developmental characteristics and norms‐ physical, cognitive, language and socio‐emotional; during early childhood. Transition from home to school – issues and concerns. Socio‐cultural contexts in school and home and child‐rearing practices in different cultures. Contributions of educations to ECCE ‐ Rousseau, Pestalozzi, Frobel, Montessori, Gandhiji, Dewy, Piaget, Tagore. (18 hours) 91
MODULE ‐ III : Curriculum for Pre‐school Education Curriculum for School Readiness‐ physical, cognitive, socio‐emotional dimensions; characteristics of learning experiences and approaches. Different types of pre‐school curriculum/Montessori, Kindergarten, Balawadi and Anganwadi Centres, Support of workforce: teachers, parents, governmental agencies and community support in functioning of ECCE centers, contributions of Kudumbasree mission. (14 hours) MODULE ‐ IV : Strategies/Approaches and Resources Characteristics of programmes for different settings – Pre‐primary and early primary grade children – needed emphasis and rationale. General principle to curricular approaches – activity based/ play‐way, child‐centered, theme‐based, holistic, joyful, inclusive using story‐telling, puppetry, musical and rhythmic exercises, dramatization, role‐play, art activities, indoor and outdoor play, field trips and explorations as methods in primary and early primary stages‐meaning, rationale, method of transaction in specific context. Local specific community resources‐ human and material and their integration to curricular activities; preparation and use of learning and play materials – principles and characteristics; community involvement in effective implementation of ECCE programmes. Informal evaluation through observation and remediation; training of ECCE workers. Dealing Differentially Abled child. Early identification and intervention strategies. (20 hours) MODULE ‐ V : Training, Research and Evaluation in ECCE Need and significance of personnel involved in ECCE programme. Status and nature of training programmes‐ pre‐service and in‐service – a critical evaluation, issues, concerns and problems. Areas of research studies in ECCE. Evaluation of ECCE programmes, methodology and implications. (10 hours) MODULE ‐ VI : Health care concerns and Child welfare Health as a pre‐requisite for all domains of development, Role of family, pre‐school, community and Governmental agencies. Nutritional needs –common disease ‐ immunization Precaution – first aids – comprehensive health programmes Child sex abuse – protection of child Rights – role of teachers, parents and community (14 hours) 92
Transaction Mode Group discussion: reviews and analysis of book/reports/documents; Observation of activities of the children followed by case studies Visit to pre‐school, Anganwadies/ICDS centers and pre‐school Teacher Education institutions followed by discussion. Film shows followed by discussion. Seminar presentations followed by discussion. Research review and criticism Development of research proposals. Projects and assignments focusing on observation and interaction with children on specific theme. Assignments 1. Case study of Anganwadi or pre‐school centers 2. Study of present status of ECCE in one State//District 3. Collection of information on infrastructure of ECCE centers and comparison with NCERT minimum specifications (1992). 4. Reflection on literature on equality ECCE services of one western country (internet, journals). 5. Writing of journal articles on different issues on ECCE. 6. Survey of play materials and comparing with the socio‐cultural set‐up 7. Survey of child rearing practices in different cultures. Essential Readings 1. NCTE (2009) National Curriculum Framework for Teacher Education, New Delhi. 2. Govt. of India (2005). National Plan of Action for Children, 2005: Department of Women and Child Development, New Delhi. 3. NCERT (2005). Position Paper of the National Focus Group on Early Childhood Education, NCERT, New Delhi. 4. UNESCO (2007): Strong Foundations: Early Childhood Care and Education. Paris. References: 1. Aggarwal, J.C. and Gupta, S. (2007). Early Childhood Care and Education (1st Ed.) Shipra Publications, New Delhi. 2. Government of India (1986). National Policy on Education, Department of Education, New Delhi. 3. Mishra, R.C. (2005). Early Childhood Education Today, Prentice Hall Publisher. 4. NCERT (2005). National Curriculum Framework, New Delhi. 93
5. NCTE (2005). Report on ECCE Teacher Education: Curriculum Framework and Syllabus Outline, New Delhi. 6. NIPCCD (2002). Children in Difficult Circumstances: Summaries of Research, Resource Centre on Children, New Delhi. 7. Pugh, G. (1996). Contemporary Issues in Early Years: Working Collaboratively for Children (2nd Ed.) National Children’s Bureau, London. 8. Seefldt, Carol (1990). Continuing Issues in Early Childhood Education, Merrill Publishing Company, Columbus, Ohio. 9. Swaminathan, M. and Daniel, P. (2000). Activity‐based Developmentally Appropriate Curriculum for Young Children, Indian Association for Pre‐school Education, Chennai. 10. UNESCO (2007). Strong foundations: Early Childhood Care and Education, Paris, UNESCO. 11. UNICEF and MHRD (2001). Early Childhood Care for Survival, Growth and Development, New Delhi. 94
MED 134
Specialisation course II (iv) ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION (Instructional hours ‐ 90) Course Objectives 1. To understand the development of elementary education in India since independence. 2. To understand the importance of elementary education envisaged in different education reports and policies. 3. To understand the concept, objectives, rationale and extent of success of UEE 4. To understand the role of UEE in universalising elementary education 5. To develop understanding about different constitutional provisions related to education 6. To understand EFA and RTC 7. To reflect on the relevance of strategies and programmes for universalising elementary education 8. To understand the programmes and interventions made by central and state government for the realisation of UEE 9. To gain insight for the success of the UEE programmes in India 10. To give an idea critically to the current status of primary education ion India 11. To understand the positive impact of the UEE on Indian primary education 12. To discuss the hurdles of UEE 13. To develop research insight for elementary curriculum development 14. To develop an understanding of underlying principles of curriculum development and evaluation at elementary stage 15. To know the various provisions under Child Rights Convention 16. To understand the basic rights of the child 17. To develop an awareness about the child right legislation in India 18. To understand the present status of child rights in India 19. To gain insight in to the need, objectives and importance of in‐service teacher education at elementary level 20. To understand the role of various institutions and organisations to promote professional Excellency of teachers 21. To understand the quality of the present teacher education curriculums 22. To understand the recommendations of different education commissions regarding secondary education commissions 23. To know different programmes and policies of for realising the constitutional obligations related secondary education in India 24. To understand the concept of quality education in secondary level 25. To evaluate the view points of Delor regarding the quality of education 26. To understand different programmes and agencies for ensuring the quality of education in India 27. To develop an idea about the structure of secondary education in India 95
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To reflect upon different issues, concerns and problems of secondary education in India To develop an awareness about the need for vocationaisation of secondary education in India To understand principles, aims and features of secondary school curriculum To examine the present school curriculum To understand the new trends in secondary school evaluation To analyse the present evaluation system in secondary level Course Content MODULE ‐ I : Elementary education in India after independence Meaning, need and significance of elementary education in India ‐ Focus of elementary education as envisaged in different education commissions and policies (Kothari Commission, NPE 1986, Yashpal committee) ‐ Elements of Quality Primary Education (5 Hours) MODULE – II : Universalisation of Elementary education (UEE) UEE (Concept, objectives and justification, role of UEE in Universalising elementary education in India) Measures towards realization of UEE a. Adoption of “No Detention Policy.” b. Free supply of uniform dress to girls and other students of backward community. c. Attendance scholarship for girls and SC/ST children. d. Provision of Mid Day Meal e. Primary Education Curriculum Renewal (PECR) f. Operation Blackboard (OB) g. Project Mass Orientation of School Teachers (PMOST) h. Centrally sponsored scheme of Integrated education for disabled children (IEDC) i. Early childhood Care and Education (ECCE) j. District Primary Education Programme (DPEP) k. Sarva Siksha Abhyan (SSA) With special reference to specific programmes and interventions at National and State level Constitutional provisions related to elementary education ‐ Recommendations of Saikia Committee ,1997 ‐ 86th Constitutional Amendment Bill (RTE) ‐ EFA‐ Education For All with special reference to Early Childhood Education, improving Schooling and financing quality education (12 Hours) MODULE – III : Current Status of Primary Education in India Critical appraisal of the Current Status of Primary Education in India (Universal access to enrolment of primary education, Retention of children in the age group of 6 to 14, Improvement in quality of education to enable all children to attain essential levels of life) ‐ Positive Impacts of Universalization of Primary Education (Bridging the gender and social gaps, Getting rid of poverty and social discrimination 96
nexus, Breaking inter generation cycle of illiteracy, Developing self confidence in new generation) ‐ Hurdles Faced in Popularizing Primary Education (7 Hours) MODULE – IV : Curriculum and Evaluation in Elementary education Principles of elementary school curriculum ‐ Objectives, Planning and Organisation of curriculum ‐ Psychological basis of present elementary school curriculum ‐ Evaluation in elementary level (principles, strategies and tools) ‐ Term Evaluation (TE) and Continuous Evaluation (CE) (10 Hours) MODULE ‐ V : Child Rights and Elementary education Child Right Conventions (CRC 1959,1989) ‐ Basic rights of the Child (10 Basic Rights) ‐ Child rights legislation in India (National Policy on Children‐ 1974, ratification of CRC in 1992, Juvenile justice Act 1986 and its amendments in 2000 and 2006, child Labour Prohibition and Regulation Act 1986, and the protection of children from Sexual offences act 2012) ‐ The present status of child rights in India in the field of Education, Health and Nutrition, Child labour and Gender discrimination (10 Hours) MODULE – VI : Professionalising Elementary Teacher Education In‐service elementary teacher training programmes (need and significance, role of CRC, BRC, DIET etc) ‐ Pre‐service elementary teacher training programmes (types, objectives etc) ‐ Critical appraisal of the elementary teacher education programmes in the state (8 Hours) MODULE – VII : Secondary Education in India Recommendations of different commissions and policies on secondary education (Mudaliar commission (in detail, aims, Problems and Recommendations), Kothari commission, Yashpal Committee) ‐ Policies and programmes for realising the constitutional obligations related to secondary education (NPE 1986, PoA 1992, RMSA) ‐ NCF and KCF 2005 (emphasis of Secondary education) (10 Hours) MODULE ‐ VIII : Quality in secondary Education Quality education(concepts, indicators of quality, setting standards for performance) ‐ The present status of quality education in India (status and prospects) ‐ Delor’s Commission Report regarding quality‐ Professional enrichment of secondary teachers (different in‐service programmes for ensuring quality, ‐ different agencies ‐ SCERT – NCERT – CIET – NUEPA – IASE etc) (8 Hours) MODULE – IX : Structure and issues of secondary Education in India Structure of secondary education in India (10+2+3 pattern of education) ‐ Problems and issues of secondary education in India (equalisation of educational opportunity, wastage and stagnation in secondary level) ‐ Nature and forms of inequality including dominant and minor groups , gender inequality in schooling, public ‐ private schools, rural ‐ urban ‐ tribal schools) Vocationalisation of secondary education in India (the efforts, present status, problems and prospects) (10 Hours) 97
MODULE – X : Secondary Education Curriculum and Evaluation Secondary School curriculum (features, principles, relevance) ‐ Critical appraisal of present Secondary School curriculum in the state ‐ Assessment and evaluation in secondary level (new trends in evaluation – grading – internal assessment – semester system, need and importance of CCE, ) ‐ Critical appraisal of the present evaluation system in elementary level (10 Hours) Mode of transaction Lecture, seminar, panel discussions, group discussions, projects, field visits etc Assignments 1. Prepare a report on the evaluative studies of SSA, DPEP, PECR, OB, PMOST, EDC etc 2. Visit a BRC and prepare a report on how far BRC supports elementary school teachers 3. Collect news paper evidences related to violation of child rights. Analyse the evidences and suggest some measures to prevent it 4. prepare a PowerPoint presentation on any topic of your choice to take a one hour resource class to secondary school teachers 5. Conduct a panel discussion on Delor’s Commission Report regarding quality References 1. Chopra, R.K. (1993). Status o Teachers in India, New Delhi : NCERT 2. Gupta, V.K. (2003). Development of Education System in India, Ludhiana: Vinod publications 3. Khan, R.S & Ahammed. I . (1997). Elementary Education & the Teacher, Delhi: IASC, Jamia Millia Islamiya 4. Mohanty.J.N, (2002) Primary Elementary Education, Deep & Deep Publications: New Delhi 5. NCERT (1991). Elementary Teacher Education Curriculum. Guidance and syllabi, New Delhi, NCERT 6. NCF 2005, NCERT : New Delhi, 7. NCTE (2009) NCF for Teacher Education: New Delhi 8. Rajput, J.S. (1994). Universalisation of Elementary Education, Role of the Teacher, New Delhi: Vikas Publishing House 9. Rao. V.K (2007) Universatisation of Elementary Education, Indian Publishing House: New Delhi 10. Siddiqui. M.A. (1993). In‐service Education of Teachers, New Delhi, NCERT 11. Singh, .L.C. (1990). Teacher Education in India, A Resource Book, New Delhi, NCERT 12. Singh, .L.C. and Sharma. P.C(1995). Teacher Education and Teachers, New Delhi: Vikas Publishing House 98
13. Shukla Subir (1999) A brief note of efforts to Address Multi grade teaching in India June, New Delhi 14. UNESCO (2004), Education for All Quality imperative , EFA Global Monitoring Report , Paris 99
SEMESTER II 100
MED 201
Core Course ‐ IV EDUCATION AND SOCIETY (Instructional Hours ‐90) Course Objectives 1. To develop an understanding of the relationships between education and social processes 2. To analyse economic perspective of education and to identify the linkage between education and development 3. To trace the history of education in India and use sound historical knowledge to solve contemporary educational problems 4. To reflect upon the dynamic political context in which educational processes taking place 5. To critically examine the contemporary concerns and issues of education in the Indian society Course content MODULE 1. Education in the social context Meaning and Definition of Educational sociology ‐ Dynamic relationship of education with society ‐ Social purposiveness of education – understanding the nature of contemporary Indian society –‐ process of socialization and acculturation ‐ education and social change – culture and education – social mobility – social control – social stratification – a critical analysis of the impact of education in modernizing Indian society (20 hours) MODULE 2. Education and development Education and economic development – education in capitalist, socialist and mixed economies – education as an investment – decentralization of education – educational planning management and finance (15 hours) MODULE 3. History of Education in India Education in Ancient, Medieval and Modern India – constitutional provisions related to education – Critical study of policies and commission reports on education in post independence period (viz. University education commission, Secondary Education commission, Indian education commission, National policy on education 1968, New education policy 1986, NEP reviews, NCF 2005, NKC Report 2007, Yashpal committee report on Indian Higher education 2009, NCFTE 2009 and RTE Act 2009 etc.). Programmes for Universalization of Education –DPEP, SSA, RMSA, RUSA (25 hours) MODULE 4. Education in the political context Relationship between education and political systems – education and state – education in democracy – multiple school contexts in terms of locale, management, medium of instruction and schools affiliated to different boards – educational legislations – impacts of neo liberal policies – teacher autonomy and institutional autonomy ‐ equality of educational opportunities – social inequalities – educational ideas of Karl Mrax, Paulo Friere and Pierre Bourdieu. (15 hours) 101
MODULE 5. Current issues in Education Critical discussion on education for Protection of Human rights, Conservation of environment, Eco‐
pedagogy, Energy management – Population education ‐ Peace education ‐ Women empowerment – Consumer rights – Inclusive education – Issues of education for marginalized (15 hours) Transaction Mode Lecture Seminars Assignments Power point Presentations Field visits Book Reviews Assignment 1. Survey of recent research trends in education and society 2. Trace out the local educational history 3. Survey on GER at different levels and areas (any one level) References 1.
Brembeck, C, S. (1966). Sociological Foundations of Education, Cross‐Cultural Approach, Newyork: John Wiler & Sns,. 2.
Brown, F.J. (1947).Educational Sociology, Newyork: Prentice Hall, 3.
Cook, L.A., Cook, E.F. (1960).A Sociological Approach to Education, Newyork: McGraw Hill Book Company, 4.
Delors, Jacques, et al; (1996). Learning: The Treasure within report of the international commission on education for 21st century, UNESCO. 5.
Dunsoft.(1975). An Introduction to Sociology, New York: Macmillan, 6.
Dutts, R.F. (1941). Cultural History of Education, Reassessing an Educational Tradition, Newyork: McGraw Hill, 7.
Mannheim, K. & Steward, A.W.C. (1962).An Introduction to the Sociology of Education, London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 8.
Mathur, S.S.(2000). A Sociological Approach to Indian Education, Culcutta: Vinod Pustak Mandir, 9.
MHRD, Gov. of India (1992), National policy on education (revised) New Delhi. 102
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Naik, J.P. (1975) Equality, quality and quantity: The elusive triangle of Indian education, Bombay: Allied Publications,. 11.
NCERT (1983).The Teacher and Education in Emerging Indian Society,Newdelhi:NCERT 12.
NCERT (2005). National curriculum framework, New Delhi. 13.
NCTE(2009) National Curriculum Framework for Teacher Education, New Delhi. 14.
Ottaway, A.K.C. (1953).Education and Society, London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 15.
Robbins. (1969). Educational Sociology, New York: Greenwood Press pub., , 16.
Ruhela, S.P. & Vyasa, K.C. (1970).Sociological Foundations of Education in Contemporary India. Dhanpat Rai & Sons, 17.
Ruhela, S.P. (Ed.),(1970). Sociology of the Teaching Profession in India, Newdelhi: NCERT. 103
MED 202
Core Course V PSYCHOLOGY OF INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES (Instructional hours – 90) Course Objectives 1. To understand the phenomenon of individual differences as causing variation in development and learning 2. To enable the learner to understand the psychological causes of behavioural problems of students and to render guidance and counseling 3. To enable the learner to conduct research studies based on developmental and learning problems 4. To give insights to the phenomenon of individual differences in domains like IQ,EQ, personality, creativity, learning difficulties and disabilities MODULE ‐ I : Individual difference‐ its implication on education and Guidance Objectives •
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To understand the concept of individual difference in psychology To define individual difference To know the approaches in psychology in explaining individual difference Content outline: Concept and Definition – Different Aspects/ Factors of individual Differences: Biological, Socio‐
cultural, Environmental, Mass media (Intelligence, Gender, Creativity, Personality, Learning, etc..) – Dealing with Individual Differences ‐‐ Its implication on education and Guidance (5 hours) MODULE ‐ II : Intelligence and cognitive functions Objectives 1.
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To acquaint the learner with the nature and concept of intelligence To familiarize the learner with intelligence theories of Spearman, Thurston, Guilford, Sternberg To make the learner understand the concepts of multiple intelligence and emotional intelligence Content outline •
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Concept‐ Definition‐Historical Perspective Theories of Intelligence Spearman,Thurston‐Guilford‐Sternberg(Basic Postulates,Educational Implications) Theory of Multiple Intelligence(Types of Intelligence,Educational Implications) Theory of Emotional Intelligence‐Concept of EQ Measurement of Intelligence‐IQ Tests‐Classification‐Controversies Regarding Measurement of Intelligence (25 hours) 104
MODULE ‐ III : Personality (25 hours) Objectives 1. To aquatint the learner with the meaning and nature of personality in a historical perspective 2. To familiarize the learner with the personality theories of Freud, Jung, Adler,Allport, Eysenck, Cattel, Rogers 3. To make the learner understand the techniques of measuring personality in the educational context Content outline: •
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Introductory Concepts‐Definitions‐Historical Perspective Theories Of Personalityfreud‐Jung‐Adler‐Allport‐Eysenck‐Cattel ‐ Rogers(Basic Postulates And Educational Implications) Measurement Of Personality‐Inventories‐Tests‐Rating Scales‐Projective Techniques‐Situational Tests Of Character MODULE ‐ IV : Exceptional Learners – (preliminary concepts on Identification and Curriculum Adaptations) Objectives 1.
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To classify the exceptionalities among learners To classify learning disabilities by nature and scope To classify Students with learning Disabilities To identify different types exceptional learners To acquaint with curriculum adaptations around the globe to cater to exceptional learners Content outline: •
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Education Of Gifted, Education for Creativity, Catering To Slow Learners, Learning “disabilities”: Barriers to learning, Major Categories of Learning Difficulties, Impairments‐ hearing, visual, physical, intellectual. other impairments‐ ADHD, autism spectrum disorders, epilepsy Specific Learning Disabilities and Educational Implications Social, emotional and behavioural difficulties (15 hours) MODULE – 5 : Style Preferences in Learning Objectives : 1. To relate among the constructs of learning styles, teaching styles, cognitive styles and thinking styles 2. To understand the importance of learner’s emotional‐, cognitive‐, physiological‐ preferences and preferences in relation to learning environment in effectiveness of learning 3. To be aware of the relevance of knowing teaching style to adapt teaching in tune with that of learners 4. To summarize ways of catering to varied learner preferences in classroom and out‐of‐classroom learning 105
Content outline: •
Concept of Styles In Relation To Individual Differences ‐ Styles That Affect Learning – Thinking styles, Cognitive styles, And, Learning Styles Definitions of Learning Styles, Approaches, Orientation And Strategies The types of Learning preferences – and Their Implication For educational practice‐ Proposed By Following classifications • Learning Approaches (Biggs)/learning Orientations (Enwistle) Approaches –Types of Learning Styles‐ (Cognitive, Affective And Physiological) • Psychological/Affective Styles: (Myers‐Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) • Physiological Styles: Honey And Munford Learning Styles, Learning Style ‐Kolb, Sensory Modality Preferences • Multidimensional Styles: Dunn& Dunn, Sternberg’s Classification of Styles • Cognitive Styles: Field‐Dependent Or Independent, Impulsive Or Reflective, Whole Or Serial; Multiple Intelligence As Learning Preference, Felder –Silverman Model •
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Introduction to The Concepts of Teaching Styles, Matching Teaching Styles To Learning Styles And Role of Teachers In Facilitating Learning, significance of models of teaching in catering to style differences (10 hours) MODULE – VI : Guidance & counseling Content outline: Transactional Analysis., Neuro Linguistic Programming and other New Trends in Educational Counselling–The Guidance Approach – Different Types of Guidance – Procedure and Practices ‐‐ The teacher educator as a counselor. (5 hours) Assignments 1. Practical experience in measurement and interpretation of a verbal or nonverbal test of intelligence 2. Practical experience in any one personality test and a projective technique like TAT 3. Prepare a table of types of exceptional learners (at any level of education), their identifying features, and educational practices that cater to each of them 4. Identify learning styles of your peers using any available instrument/technique, and make a brief report. References 1.
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Anastasi, A. (1966). Differential psychology: Individual differences. , Van Nos trand. Princeton Ausubel, D. P., Novak, J. D., & Hanesian, H. (1968). Educational Psychology‐ A Cognitive View. New York: Holt, Rinchart and Winston, INC. Chauhan, S.S (2006) Advanced Educational Psychology New Delhi : Vikas Publishing House. 106
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Dandapani, S. (2001) Advanced educational psychology, (2nd edition), New Delhi, Anmol publications pvt Ltd. Daniels, H. & Edwards, A.(2004). Psychology of Education. New York: Routledge Falmer. Fontana, D.(1995). Psychology for Teachers. U K and London: Macmillan Press Ltd. Gardner, H. (1983) frames of Mind: The theory of multiple intelligence. New York: Basic Books Goleman,D.(1995)Emotional Intelligence,New York: Bantam books Good, T.L & Brophy, J.E.(1990). Educational Psychology‐A Realistic Approach. New York: Longman Publishers. Guilford, J.P. (1967). Nature of Human Intelligence, New York: McGraw Hill. Hall,C.S.&Lindzey,G.(1970)Theories of personality John Wiley &sons Kagan, J.& Lang, C.(1978). Psychology and Education An Introduction. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich,Inc. Kakkar S.B (1992), Advanced Educational Psychology New Delhi : Oxford & IBH Publishing Co. Kincheloe, L. & Horn Jr, R. A.(2007). The Praeger Handbook of Education and Psychology. New Delhi: Atlantic Publishers & Distributers(p)Ltd. Klausmeier, H.J (1985). Educational Psychology. Harper and Row, Pub. New York. Lingren, H.C. (1980). Educational Psychology in the Classroom (Sixth ed.) New York: Oxford University Press. Mangal, S.K (1997) Advanced Educational Psychology New Delhi Prentica Hall of India Patterson, C.H. (1971). An Introduction to Counselling in Schools.Harper & Row, Rao S.N (1981) Counselling PsychologyTata Mc Graw Hills, New Delhi Ryckman, R.M (1978). Theories Of Personality. New York: Van Nostrand Company. Sivarajan,K. & Musthafa (2013).Psychology of the Learner and Learning. Calicut University Central Co‐operative Stores. Calicut University. Skinner, C.E. (Ed) (1974). Educational Psychology. New Delhi: Prentice‐Hall of India Private Limited. Sprinthall, R. C., Sprinthall, N. A., & Oja, S. N. (1981). Educational psychology: A developmental approach. Addison‐Wesley Sternberg, R.G.(1985). Beyond IQ:A Triarchic Theory of Human IntelligenceNew york: Cambridge University Press Woolfolk, A. (2004) Educational Psychology. New Delhi:Pearson Education (Singapore) PVt Ltd. 107
MED 203
Core Course – VI ADVANCED EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH AND STATISTICS (Instructional Hours ‐ 90) Course Objectives On completion of this course, the students will be able to: 1. explain a sampling design appropriate for a research study 2. explain tool, design and procedure for collection of data 3. select and explain the method appropriate for a research study 4. estimate the characteristics of populations based on their sample data 5. test specific hypotheses about populations based on their sample data 6. use appropriate procedures to analyse qualitative data Course Content Part ‐ A MOULE ‐ I : Sampling i)
Concept of population and sample in Qualitative, Quantitative and Mixed research ii)
Techniques of sampling‐ Probability and Non probability sampling‐Different types. (8 hours) MODULE – II : Techniques and Tools for Data Collection i)
Interview, Observation, Sociometry, Self reporting techniques: Concept and Applicability ii) Tests, Questionnaire, Inventories, Scales, Checklist, Schedule‐Types, uses , construction and Standardization (10 hours) MOULE ‐ III : Methods of Educational Research (i) Historical Research‐ need and significance, types, sources and collection of data; establishing validity and interpretation of data (ii) Descriptive Research‐ surveys, case study, developmental and correlation studies – nature, use and steps . Ex‐ Post Facto Research. (iii) Experimental Research – need and significance‐ nature and steps‐ validity; internal and external, use and limitations of different types of experimental designs: Pre‐experimental, Quasi‐ experimental, True‐ experimental. (iv) Qualitative research: meaning, steps and characteristics‐Qualitative research approaches :phenomenology, ethnography, naturalistic enquiry and grounded theory (v) Mixed Research‐meaning, fundamental principles, types , strengths and weaknesses (20 hours) MODULE ‐ IV : Research Report i) Preparation of a research report, Criteria for a good research report, Evaluation of a report. ii) Ethical issues in educational research. iii) American Psychological Association Style Manual. (7 hours) 108
Part ‐B MODULE ‐ I : Linear regression analysis Concept of regression, regression equations, prediction in relation to correlation ( 8 hours) MODULE ‐ II : Inferential statistics Concept of parameter and statistic, sampling error, sampling distribution, calculation of standard error of mean, percentage, correlation, standard deviation‐ Point and interval estimation – Introduction to data analysis using computer (SPSS) (12 hours) MODULE – III : Testing of hypotheses Types of errors, levels of significance, testing the significance of difference between means, standard deviations , product moment coefficients of correlation and percentages (12hours) MODULE ‐ IV : Non parametric tests Chi‐square test‐ as test of goodness of fit and test of independence, Mann Whitney test, Wilcoxon test and Sign test ( 8 hours) MOULE – V : Analysis of variance Basic concept, assumptions and uses‐analysis in a one way classification problem. (5 hours) Assignments 1. A comparison on various types of research with reference to design, sample, tools, analysis and results 2. Choose a topic of your choice and state Directional , Non Directional and Null hypotheses. Indicate the type of statistical analysis required for testing the statistical hypotheses References Research Methodology 1.
Best J.W. (1999). Research in Education, New Delhi: Prentice Hall of India Pvt.Ltd. 2.
Borg, W.R. and Gall, M.D. (1983). Educational Research – An Introduction, NewYork: Longman, Inc. 3.
Christensen, L. (2007). Experimental Methodology. Boston: Allyn & Bacon. 4.
Clive Opie (2004). Doing Educational Research‐ A Guide for First timeresearchers. New Delhi: Vistar Publications. 5.
Cohen, Lewis and Manion Lawrence (1994) Research Methods in Education New York : Holt Rinchart and Winston Inc. 6.
Fraenkel, J.R., Wallen, N.E. (1996). How to Design and Evaluate Research in Education. New York: McGraw Hill. 109
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Flick, Uwe (1996): An Introduction to Qualitative Research . London sage publication Kaul, Lokesh (1984). Methodology of Educational Research. New Delhi: Vikas Publications. Keeves, John. P (ed)(1990) Educational Research Methodology and Measurement: An International Handbook. New York : Pergamo Press Kerlinger, F.N. (1986). Foundations of Behavioural Research. Fort Worth, TX: Harcourt Bmce Jovanovich. Kirkapatrick, D.L. (2005). Evaluating training Programmes: The four Levels. San Francisco: Brrett‐Kochler. Jill Porter & Penny Lacey (2005). Researching Learning Difficulties‐ A Guide for Practitioners. Paul Chapman Publishing. Pamela Maykut & Richard Morehouse (1994). Beginning Qualitative Research‐ A Philosophic and Practical Guide. The Falmer Press London. Washington D.C. Patton. M.Q. (2002). Qualitative Research and Evaluation Methods. Thousand Oaks: C.A: Sage. Reason, P. & Bradbury, H. (Eds) (2006). Handbook of action research: Concise paperback edition: Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. Scott, David & Usher, Robin (1996). Understanding Educational Research. New York: Rout ledge. Shank, G.D. (2002). Qualitative Research. Columbus, ott: Merill, Prentice Hall. Sharma, Bharti (2004). Methodology of Educational Research. New Delhi: Vohra Publishers and Distributors. Sharma, S.R. (2003). Problems of Educational Research. New Delhi: Anmol Publications Pvt. Ltd. Stake, Robert E. (1995). The Art of Case Study Research. Thousand Oaks: C.A:Sage. Travers, Robert M.W. (1978). An Introduction to Educational research (4th edition). London: MacMillan. Van Dalen, Debonald, B. and Meyer, William J. (1979)Understanding Educational Research: An Introduction. New York: McGraw Hill. Statistics 1. Cononver, W.J. (1971). Practical Non‐Parametric Statistics. New York: John Wiley & Sons Inc. 2. Ferguson, G. (1981). A Statistical Analysis in Psychology and Education, New York: McGraw Hill. 3. Garrett , H.E & Woodworth , R,S.( 1961) Statistics in Psychology and Education. New York: Longman Greens & Co. 4. Gibbons, J.D. (1971). Non‐Parametric Statistical Inference. New York: McGraw Hill. 5. Glan, G.V., & Hopkins, K.D. (1996). Statistical Methods in Education and Psychology, (3rd edition). Boston: Allyn & Bacon. 6. Guilford, J.P., and B. Fruchter. (1987). Fundamental Statistics in Education and Psychology. Tokyo: McGraw Hill (Student‐Sixth edition). 7. Henry, G.T. (1995). Graphing data: Techniques for display and analysis. Thousand oaks, CA: Sage. 8. Howell, D.C. (1997). Statistical Methods for Psychology. Belmont, CA: Duxbury Press. 9. Huck, S.W. (2007). Reading Statistics and research. Boston: Allyn & Bacon. 110
10. Popham and Sirohic (1993). Educational Statistics‐Use and Interpretation, New York: Harper and Row. 11. Siegal, S. (1956). Non‐parametric Statistics for Behavioural Science, New York: McGraw Hill. 12. Miles, M.B., & Huberman, A.M. (1994). Qualitative Data Analysis: An expanded Sourcebook. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. 13. VanLeeuwen, T., & Jewitt, C. (Eds). (2001). Handbook of Visual analysis. London: Sage. 111
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Specialization Course III (i) GUIDANCE AND COUNSELLING (Instructional hours ‐90) Course Objectives On completion of this course the prospective teacher educators will be able to 1. Handle the subject area ‘guidance and couselling’ for student teachers. 2. Offer educational, vocational, personal guidance and counseling to prospective teachers. 3. Offer basic counseling to needy students. 4. Equip student teachers with the skills to impart guidance to students at secondary and higher secondary level. 5. Develop interest among student teachers to enter into the field of guidance and counseling 6. Take initiative in planning and organizing various guidance services in educational institutions. 7. Recognize the impact of new technology in guidance and counseling MODULE – I : Introduction to Guidance Programme in Schools Objectives • To understand the meaning, nature, need, principles and scope of guidance • To recognize the role of guidance in attaining the goals of education. • To analyze the sociological and philosophical bases of guidance. • To understand the need for guidance at various levels of education. • To understand in what ways guidance is related to education. • To plan and organize need based guidance programme in Educational Institutions. • To get acquainted with the tools and techniques of guidance. Course Content ƒ Concept and definition of guidance. ƒ Scope and principles of guidance. ƒ General, individual and social needs of guidance . ƒ Common misconceptions about guidance. ƒ Objectives of guidance. ƒ Sociological and philosophical bases of guidance. ƒ Ethical considerations in guidance . ƒ Need for guidance at various levels education. ƒ Guidance as an integral part of Education. ƒ Integrating guidance with curriculum. ƒ School guidance : a team approach of school and community. ƒ Planning of guidance programme in schools – steps. ƒ Standardized and non‐standardized techniques in guidance. Standardized – intelligence tests, aptitude tests, personality tests, interest inventory, achievement tests. 112
Non – Standardized – questionnaire, observation, sociometry, rating scale, anecdotal records, cumulative record, case study, interviews. (20 hours) MODULE – II : Guidance and its Dimensions Objectives • To understand various types of guidance. • To understand the need, scope and functions of various types of guidance. • To understand how to impart educational, vocational and personal guidance. • To understand the concept of individual and group guidance. • To get acquainted with various techniques of group guidance. • To understand the concept and theories of career development. • To understand the factors affecting career development. Course Content ƒ Types of guidance: Educational, vocational/career and personal guidance. ƒ Nature ,need, scope and functions of Educational, vocational/career and personal guidance. ƒ How to impart Educational, vocational/career and personal guidance. ƒ Individual vs. group guidance : concept, advantages and limitations. ƒ Group guidance activities – class talks, career talks, career conferences, career‐ fair, socio drama, psycho drama and role play. ƒ Career development: concept, theories – Ginzberg and Super. ƒ Career development needs of students. ƒ Factors affecting career development. (15 hours) MODULE – III : Essential Services in Guidance Programme Objectives • To understand the essential services included in the guidance programme. • To understand the objectives of various guidance services. • To get acquainted with the sources, methods of collection, classification and dissemination of occupational information. • To understand the role of guidance personnel involved in the guidance programme. • To get familiarized with implementation models of guidance programme. • To understand the different approaches to evaluation of guidance programme. • To familiarize with recent research trends in the area of guidance . Course Content ƒ Types of guidance services: ( brief description) orientation service, pupil inventory service, placement service, counseling service, follow up service . 113
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Information service: sources, methods of collection, classification and dissemination. Objectives of various guidance services Resources required for organizing guidance services. Activities of guidance Services for different levels of education. Roles of personnel involved in the guidance programme. Implementation models of guidance programme: specialist model, career teacher model, teacher counselor model. Evaluation of guidance programme: Need for evaluation, Steps of evaluation. Approaches or methods of evaluation. National and State level guidance services: national employment services, state employment services. Need for research in guidance and counseling. Recent research trends and issues in the area of guidance. (20 hours) MODULE – IV : Understanding Counselling Objectives • To understand the meaning, nature and scope of counseling. • To distinguish the concepts of counseling from other related concepts. • To understand the goals of counseling. • To compare various approaches to counseling. • To understand various stages involved in the process of counseling. • To understand the theories and techniques of counseling. • To understand the process of counseling in group situation. • To understand the specialized areas of counseling. • To understand the personality characteristics of an effective counselor. • To get familiarized with various counseling skills. • To understand the roles of personnel involved in counseling. • To familiarize with new technology in guidance and counseling Course Content ƒ Meaning, nature and scope of counseling. ƒ Basic principles of counseling. ƒ Counseling and related fields: psycho therapy, advice, instruction, guidance etc. ƒ Objectives of counseling. ƒ Approaches to Counselling: directive, non‐directive and eclectic ƒ Counseling theories : behaviouristic, psycho analytic, humanistic, trait, factor. ƒ Individual vs. group counseling: concept, advantages and limitations. ƒ Stages of counseling process. ƒ Counseling techniques: Relaxation technique, Assertion training ( social skills training) , Rational Emotive Behaviour Therapy, Systematic Desensitization. 114
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Roles and functions of Personnel involved in the counselling programme: in‐school resources and out of school resources. Skills and qualities of an effective counselor. Specialized areas of counseling: family counseling, career counseling, adolescent counseling, educational counseling, parental counseling, peer counseling. Counseling and Technology: tele counseling, internet counseling. Recent researches in the area of counseling. (30 hours) MODULE – V : Guidance and Counselling for Children with Special Needs Objectives • To identify students with special needs. • To understand the problems and needs of students with special needs. • To understand the role of guidance personnel in dealing students with special needs. (5 hours ) Course Content ƒ Concept of children with special needs. ƒ Guidance and Counselling for gifted, creative, MR, LD, Slow learner, Socially disadvantaged children and problem children. ƒ Role of teacher in dealing students with special needs. Assignments 1. Conduct a survey of the problem that are most prevalent in schools which need immediate attention of a guidance worker and prepare a brief report. 2. Prepare a detailed out line of career talk in any institution. 3. Construct a questionnaire to students for evaluating the guidance services of their school. 4. Prepare a plan for any career information activity for secondary or higher secondary school students. 5. Conduct a mock counseling and prepare report. 6. Identify children with special needs in any two schools and prepare report. References 1. Anastasi Anne (1982). Psychological testing, New York, Mac Millan 2. Bhatnagar, Asha and Gupta, Nirmala (Eds)(1999) Guidance and Counselling A theoretical perspective, (Vol.I:) New Delhi: Vikas. 3. Bhatnagar, Asha and Gupta, Nirmala (Eds)(1999) Guidance and Counselling (Vol.II) A practical approach, New Delhi: Vikas. 4. Borders (1975)Counselling Programmes, London; Sage publications 5. Corel,G.(2000). Theory and Practice of Group Counselling. 6. Devu Indu (1984). The Basic Essentials of Counselling. New Delhi: Sterling Pvt. Ltd. 7. Govt. of India, (1986).: National Policy on education. MHRD 8. Govt. of India, (1992). Programme of Action. MHRD 115
9. George, R.L. and Christiani, T.H.(1990). Counselling theory and practice (3rd edn.). New Jersy: Prentice Hall. 10. Gibson, R.L.(2005). Introduction to Counselling and Guidance (6th edn.)New Delhi: Prentice hall of India. 11. Jones, J.A.(1979). Principles of Guidance, New York:Mc Graw Hill. 12. Kennedy ,E. and Charles, SC.(1997). On becoming a Counsellor: a basic guide for non professional counselors, New York: The Cross road Pub.Co. 13. Kochar, S.K.(1980). Educational and Vocational Guidance in Secondary School. New Delhi: Sterling Pvt. Ltd. 14. Mannuel for Guidance Counsellor,NCERT,New Delhi. 15. Mathewson, R.H.(1962). Guidance, policy and practice. 16. Mohan, S. (1985). Readings for Career Teachers. 17. Mohan, V.(1983). Counselling its concept its, principles and methods, Chandigarh: Common wealth youth programme. 18. Nanda, S.K. and Sharma,S.(1992). Fundamentals of Guidance, Chandigarh. 19. Nugent, Frank A.(1990). An introduction to the Profession of Counselling, Columbus: Merril publishing co. 20. Rao,S.N.919810. Counselling Psychology, New Delhi; Tata Mc Graw Hill. 21. Rogers, Carl (1951). Client Centered therapy. 116
MED 212
Specialization Course III (ii) EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY (Instructional hours – 90) Course Objectives 1. To understand the meaning, scope and concept of Educational Technology and Effective Communication. 2. To understand different approaches to educational technology. 3. To understand the concept, theories and models of communication 4. To understand the usage of audio visual media in education. 5. 5. To develop necessary skills in the use of media and its application in the teaching‐learning process. 6. To enable the students to develop necessary skills in the use of selected Multimedia in the teaching‐learning process. 7. To understand the basics of e‐learning. 8. To develop skills in production, selection and evaluation of e‐learning materials 9. To acquaint the students with modern technological development in the field of education. Course Content MODULE ‐ I : Concept & Principles of Educational Technology Educational Technology: Concept, Meaning and Definition. Foundations of Educational Technology: Psychology, Sociology, Communication technology and Management ‐ Scope‐ Learning Technology, Instructional Technology, Teaching Technology, Classroom Communication, Technology of Teacher Education, Open and Distance Education ‐ Approaches to Educational Technology‐ hardware, software and system approaches ‐ Technology of Education & Technology in Education ‐ Functions of Educational Technology. (12 hours) MODULE ‐ II : Communication & Educational Technology Communication: Definition, Meaning and Importance – Communication Process ‐ Theories and Models of Communication: Shannon’s Model, Westley and MacLean’s Model, Leagan’s Model and Berlo’s Model. Limitations of classroom communication. ‐ Types of Communication: Interpersonal and Mass communication, Verbal and Non‐verbal communication– Communication and Language – Communication and Culture – Creative Communication – Noise Factor and Communication ‐ Media & Society –Mass Communication Concept, Meaning and Characteristics of Mass communication – Types of Mass Communication Media: Traditional, Print, Electronic Media. (15 hours) MODULE ‐ III : Audio & Visual Communication Sound as Mode of communication – Development and Importance – Types of Sound and Audio communication ‐ Uses of Audio Communication – strength and weaknesses. Meaning, Forms, 117
Development and Uses of Visual Communication – Visual Communication through Print, Slides, Films & Filmstrips, TV, Video and Computers – strength and weaknesses‐ Role of Audio in Visual Communication ‐ Audio‐Visual Aids in Education ‐ Meaning, significance and advantages of AV Aids ‐ Types of Audio Visual aids ‐ Projected Aids: LCD projector, Films, Filmstrips, OHP & slides.‐ Non‐projected Aids: Graphic, display, smart boards, interactive boards and 3‐D, Audio aids viz., Radio, TV, CCTV and Activity aids. ‐ Criteria for selection of appropriate AV aids ‐ Practical experience with smart boards, interactive boards and LCD projector (18 hours) MODULE – IV : New Information and Communication Technology in education Concept and development of telecommunication ‐ Types of telecommunications: Optical fiber and Satellite communication – Edusat – Low‐tech and High‐tech Telecommunications: Multimedia, Interactive TV, Telebridge, WWW and Internet – Virtual teaching and learning ‐ Educational Television: Strengths and Limitations – Use of Television and CCTV in Education and Training – SITE, COUNTRYWIDE CLASSROOM – EDUSAT: Implications, ETV Network, Role of EMMRC, CITEE, EMPC – IGNOU, UGC‐CEC. Educational Video: Concept, Strengths and Limitations, ‐ Educational Video Programme Development‐ Stages and Scriptwriting – Use of Documentaries in Animation Films ‐ E‐Learning: Definition, Advantages, Characteristics, Barriers, Future and Careers – Components of e‐learning: CBT, WBT and Virtual Classroom ‐ E‐Learning Tools, online e‐learning repositories or e‐platform for learning ‐ Learning Management Systems: Definition – Components – LMS Vs LCMS – LMS Products (12 hours) MODULE ‐ V: Individualized Instructional Techniques Meaning, significance and importance of individualized instruction – need for individualizing instruction‐ Tutorials, mastery learning and Keller plan‐ Programmed instruction: nature, types and development ‐ Computer assisted instruction: characteristics, types and development of CAI materials ‐ Language Laboratory (8 hours) MODULE ‐ VI: Technology in Teacher Education Microteaching: meaning, significance and practice and descriptive analysis of the components of different teaching skills ‐ Interaction analysis: meaning, need and significance, tools and methods of interaction analysis ‐ Models of teaching: analysis of different teaching models (15 hours) MOULE – VII : Technology of open and distance learning Distance Education: A conceptual framework ‐ structure and characteristics of distance education ‐ Open Universities, Schools and virtual universities – distance education through print media, radio, TV, multimedia and Internet. Experiments and projects in Educational Television ‐ Development of self‐instructional materials‐ importance of SIM in distance education. (10 hours) 118
Assignments a. Prepare a branching programmed learning material with atleast ten frames. b. Construct a self learning material of your choice, based on school subject c. Write a script for video lesson of 20 minutes d. Prepare a shooting script for e‐content on a topic of your choice References 1. Bruner J.S, (1963). The Process of Education. Vintage Books, 2. Dececo, John. (1964) Educational Technology: Holt Rinebert Winston 3. Skinner B.T (1968). The Technology of Teaching, Applenton Century Crofts, 4. Freed P and Hency E, Kogam (1984). Handbook of Educational Technology, Page 5. 5. Rowntree D, (1982). Educational Technology in Curriculum Development, Harper & Row, 6. Kulkarni S.S(1986). Introduction to Educational Technology, Oxford & IBH, 7. Kumar, K.L, (1997) Educational Technology, New Age International (P) Ltd, 8. 8 Vedanayagam E.G,. (1989)Teaching Technology for College Teachers, Sterling Publishers (P) Ltd, 9. Aggarwal, J.C (1995). Essential of Educational Technology: Teaching Learning Innovations in Education, Vikas Publishing House (P) Ltd, 119
MED 213
Specialization Course III (iii) EDUCATIONAL MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION (Instructional hours – 90) Course Objectives 1. To familiarize the students with theoretical background of educational measurement and evaluation 2. To help the students to understand different types and models of evaluation 3. To develop competence in construction and standardization of various measuring instruments 4. To make the future teacher educators aware about major reforms in educational testing and assessment Course Content MODULE ‐ I: Introduction to Measurement and Evaluation •
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Concept of measurement and evaluation – meaning, definitions, historical background , limitations of measurement in behavioral sciences ‐ scales of measurement ( nominal, ordinal, interval & ratio) Distinction among measurement, assessment, testing , examination and evaluation Functions of evaluation‐placement, classification, feedback and motivation, prognosis, diagnosis, certification, assessment Role of assessment in learning ‐ Assessment for learning, as learning, of learning Types of evaluation‐ formative Vs summative; diagnostic Vs prognostic ;Criterion referenced Vs norm referenced ; ipsative evaluation (15 hours) MODULE ‐ II: Models of evaluation in education •
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Concept of models of evaluation Need for evaluation models Goal attainment model , Goal free model Kirkpatrick Model (Advanced level of evaluation‐ Results level, Performance Level; Basic level of evaluation ‐Training level, Reaction level) CIRO Model (Context evaluation , Input evaluation , Reaction evaluation, Outcome evaluation) Stufflebeam’s CIPP Model (Context evaluation, Input evaluation, Process evaluation, Product evaluation) (15hours) 120
MODULE ‐ III: Techniques and Tools of Evaluation •
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Techniques of evaluation‐ interview, observation, self reporting, projective technique, sociometry‐ meaning and uses Tools of evaluation‐ tests, rating scales(different types), check list, anecdotal record, cumulative record, inventory, questionnaire, rubrics‐ meaning and uses Classification of Tests ( based on purpose of evaluation , nature of responses, type of administration)‐ achievement Vs diagnostic tests ,standardized Vs non‐standardized tests ; verbal Vs non‐verbal tests, descriptive, objective and performance type tests; oral Vs written tests; individual Vs group test; speed Vs power test. (15hours) MODULE ‐ IV: Meaning of standardization • Characteristics of a good measuring instrument‐ reliability‐methods for finding reliability, factors affecting reliability ,validity‐ methods for finding validity, factors affecting validity, comprehensiveness, discriminating power‐methods for finding discriminating power, practicability • Meaning of standardization‐steps in the development of standardized measuring instruments (planning, designing, item analysis, establishing reliability, validity and norms‐age, sex, locale, grade norms). ( 13 hours) MODULE ‐ V : Developing Scholastic and Non‐scholastic instruments •
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Developing achievement tests‐Test items‐ different types( objective & descriptive); objective type‐supply & selection type; descriptive type‐ short answer & essay types Guidelines for preparing various type of items Merits and demerits of each type of test item standardization of Achievement tests( for objective and descriptive test ) Construction and standardization of ‐ Intelligence/ Aptitude tests ‐ Inventories ‐ Attitude scales‐Likert, Thurston, Osgood & Guttman Preparation of other instruments‐ Questionnaire, check list, rating scales, schedule (20 hours) MODULE ‐ VI: Reforms in Educational Testing and Assessment • Grading‐ concept , types , merits and demerits • Semester system‐ concept, merits and demerits 121
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Credit system‐Concept, merits and demerits Question bank‐ steps for preparation, merits and demerits Continuous and comprehensive evaluation‐ concept, merits, problems in continuous and comprehensive evaluation Open book examination‐ merits and demerits Online and on demand examination‐ concept and merits Use of computers in various phases of evaluation Recent researches in Educational Testing and Assessment (12 hours) Assignments 1. Prepare an evaluation tool for any of the variables related to cognitive domain 2. Prepare an evaluation tool for any of the variables related to affective domain 3. Make a survey on problems in continuous and comprehensive evaluation References 1. Alkin, M.C.(2004). Evaluation roots: Tracing theorists’ views and influences. New Delhi: Sage Publications 2. Bloom, S.B. Hastings, J.T. and Madans, G.F. (1971). Handbook on Formative and Summative Evaluation of student Learning. New York: McGraw – Hill Book Co. 3. Cronbach, L. J. ( 1970). Essentials of Psychological Testing (3rd edition), New York, Harper & Row publishers 4. Ebel, R and Frisible, D.(2003). Essentials of Educational Measurements. New Delhi : Prentice Hall of India. 5. Edwards A. L.(1975). Techniques of Attitude Scale Construction. Bombay, Feiffer & Simens private Ltd. 6. Freeman, F. (1962). Psychological Testing (Theory and Practice ).New York:Holt, Rinehort and Winston 7. Gronlund, E.N. (1965) .Measurement and Evaluation in Teaching. London: Collier – Macmillan Ltd. 8. Harper (Jr.) A. E. & Harper E.S. (1990). Preparing Objective Examination, A Handbook for Teachers, Students and Examiners. New Delhi: Prentice Hall, 9. Linn ,R. L. & Gronlund ,N.E.(2003). Measurement and Assessment in Teaching. Pearson Education Pvt. Ltd. Delhi . 10. Nunally, J.C. (1964). Educational Measurement and Evaluation. New York: McGraw‐Hill Book Company. 11. Popham, W. J. (1975). Educational Evaluation. New Jersey: Prentice – Hall, Inc., 12. Throndike, R. L. and Hagen, E. (1970). Measurement and Evaluation in Psychology and Education. New Delhi: Wiley Easter Pvt Ltd. 122
MED 214
Specialization Course III (iv) EDUCATIONAL MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION (Instructional hours – 90) Course Objectives 1. To develop in the learners the knowledge, understanding and skills required for enhancing the effectiveness and efficiency of administration both at School and Higher Education levels. 2. To enable them to have an advance understanding of the management concepts and their application in education environment. 3. To improve the individual performance as educational managers and leaders 4. To help them upgrade their skills in such areas as interpersonal relationship, leadership and team building, strategic planning and decision‐making, necessary for effective management. 5. To acquaint them with the concept, theories, models and styles of Leadership 6. To have deeper insights into Planning, Institutional Building and Supervision in the context of Education. 7. To help them understand the system of educational administration in India and the Central and State machinery for educational administration and management. MODULE – I : Basics of Educational Administration and Management Educational Administration and Management – Meaning, Nature, Scope, Functions – Difference between Management and Administration – Management: Need, Significance and Characteristics – Administration: Need, Significance and Characteristics Centralized and Decentralized Administration: Merits and Demerits – Dual Administration: Problems involved ‐ Educational Administration at Central and State Government Levels, Current practices of administration in educational institutions in India. Head of the Institution as the Manager, Institutional Leader, Disciplinarian, Human Relations Facilitator, Conflict Moderator and Change Agent. (15 hours) MODULE – II : Management and Administration: Theoretical Background Popular theories of administration and Management in the context of education – Theory of Gullick –
POSDCORB – Scientific principles of management ‐ Roles of Motivation, Interpersonal Relations and Communication in effective administration – Role Expectation and Role Performance. Autonomy and Accountability in Educational Management and Administration. Managerial Skills: Planning, Organizing, Leading, Controlling, Decision Making, Delegation and Inter‐departmental Co‐ordination – Team Building and Negotiation. (20 hours) 123
MODULE – III : Leadership in Education Leadership – Definitions, Concept, Meaning, Need, Nature and Scope – Theories and Models of Leadership – Styles of Leadership – Role of Leadership in Educational Management and Administration – Chief characteristics of effective leadership ‐ Leading and managing educational change and improvement ‐ Developing leadership and management skills and insights in educational leadership ‐ Theories and models of educational leadership (including curriculum, professional, academic, instructional and student‐centered leadership) ‐ Leadership Behavior – Measuring Leadership Behavior. (12 hours) MODULE – IV : Educational Planning, Institutional Building and Supervision Educational Planning: Need, Meaning, Nature, Objectives, Characteristics, Dimensions and Principles – Types of Planning: Micro – Macro, Strategic – Operational Perspective, Institutional and Manpower Planning – Approaches to Educational Planning: Social Demand Approach, Man‐power Approach, Return of Investment Approach. Institutional Building: Definition, Focus and Functions –– Developing Participative Culture – Organizational Climate: Definition, Importance, Types and Dimensions. Supervision: Concept, Meaning, Nature and Objectives of Educational Supervision – Difference between Supervision and Inspection – Supervision as a service activity and as a process – New trends and techniques in planning and controlling – In‐service Training – Current System of Supervision: Problems and Remedies. (20 hours) MODULE – V : Management and Administration of Educational Institutional in India Education in the Indian Constitution ‐ Educational Administration in India – Roles of Central, State and Local authorities – Different Agencies involved in School Education (NCERT, SCERTs, SIEMATs, District Level Authorities, SSA RMSA Authorities) and Higher Education (UGC, AICTE, NCTE, RCI, NUEPA, NAAC etc.) (10 hours) MODULE – VI : Trends and Issues in Educational Management and Administration Issues of Quantity, Quality and Equity in Indian Education – Institutional Assessment and SWOT Analysis – Assessment and Accreditation: Criteria and Benchmarks – Quality Enhancement and Sustenance. Total Quality Management (TQM) in Education – Knowledge Economy – Use of ICT in Educational Administration: Methods, Advantages and Problems involved ‐ E‐Governance: Concept, Features, Practice and Problems involved – E‐Governance in the context of education. (13 hours) 124
Assignments 1. Visit to a school, analysis of the organizational structure and functions of it and and preparation of a School Development Plan (SDP) based on RTE Act. 2. Visit to a Higher Education / Teacher Education Institution, observation and analysis of the organizational structure, methods of administration, organizational climate and leadership style and behavior. References 1.
Agarwal , V.Bhatnagar, R.P,( 1997) : Supervision, Planning and Financing, Meerut: Surya Publication. 2.
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Bush, Tony (1986): Theories of Educational Management. London: Harper & Row Publishers. Bush, Tony & Les, Bell (2002): The Principles & Practice of Educational Management. London: Paul Chapman Publishing. 4.
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Chandrasekaran, P., (1994): Educational Planning and Management, New Delhi: Sterling Publishers Chau, Ta‐Ngoc (2003): Demographic Aspects of Educational Planning. Paris: International Institute for Educational Planning. Griffiths, V. L. (1963). Educational Planning. London: Oxford University Press Hallack, J. (1977): Planning the Location of Schools: An Instrument of Educational Policy. Paris: International Institute for Educational Planning. Greene, J.F., (1975): School Personnel Administration, Pennysylvania: Chilton Book Company Khan, N. Sharif & Khan, M. Saleem,(1980): Educational Administration, New Delhi : Ashish Publishing House. Kuldip Kaur, Education in India (1985) : Policies, Planning and Implementation, Chandigarh: Arun and Rajiv Pvt. Ltd. Lulla, B.P. & Murthy, S.K., (1976): Essential of Educational Administration, Chandigarh: Mohindra Capital Publishing. Mahajan, Baldev and Khullar, K.K. (2002): Educational administration in Central government: structures, processes, and future prospects. New Delhi: Vikas Publication House Pvt. Ltd.. 125
13.
Manju, Bala, (1990) : Leadership Behaviour and Educational Administration, New Delhi : Deep & Deep Publications. 14.
Mathur, S.S., Educational Administration and Management, Ambala: Indian Publications. 15.
Mukhopadhyay, M. (2005): Total Quality Management in Education. New Delhi: Sage Publications. 16.
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Mukherji, S.N., (1970).: Administration and Educational Planning and Finance, Baroda : Acharya Book Depot. Musaazi, J.C.S. (1982): The Theory & Practice of educational administration. London: The Macmillan Press. Philip H. Coomba, (1985).The World Crisis in Education, London: Oxford University Press. Ronald, Cambell F., et al; (1987): A History of thought and Practice in educational administration. New York: Teachers College Press. Tara Chand and Ravi Prakash, (1996).: Advanced Educational Administration, New Delhi : Kanishka Publishers. Thakur D. & Thakur, D.N., (1996): Educational Planning and Administration, New Delhi: Deep and Deep Publications. Thomas I Sergiovanni, (1980):Educational Governance and Administration, New York : Prentice Hall 23.
Trivedi, P.R. & Sudershan, K.N., (1996 ): Management Education, New Delhi : Discovery Publishing House. 126
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Specialzation Course IV (i) EDUCATION FOR HUMAN RIGHTS AND VALUES (Instructional hours – 90) Course Objectives 1. To promote awareness of human rights 2. To understand the national significance of human rights 3. To recognize the violation of human rights and ways to protect our rights 4. To encourage activities to protect human rights 5. To understand the need and significance of value education 6. To understand the concept of values, and classification of values 7. To understand and analyse various approaches for value education 8. To generate knowledge in value education through research 9. To recognize the relevance of value education in teacher education 10. To help the teacher educator to practice and propagate values among students 11. To understand the importance of values in life and in education Course content MODULE ‐ I : Human Rights Meaning, Rights andDuties, General conditions underlying the idea of Human Rights. Human Rights Guaranteed in main international Treaties. (10 hours) MODULE ‐ II : Human Rights in Indian Condition Indian Constitution and Human Rights, Constitutional Provisions, Implementation of Human Rights in India. Agencies Promoting Human Rights in India (National and State levels). (9 hours) MODULE ‐ III : Human Rights Education Need, Framework of educational policies in India for elementary, secondary, and higher secondary level. Methods of teaching Human Rights. (role play, brain storming, projects, pictures…) (14 hours) MODULE ‐ IV : Human Rights – New Trends. Rights of child, women, Right to Information, consumer rights Human Rights violation in India. Role of teacher in protecting Human Rights. (12hours) MODULE ‐ V : Need and significance of Value Education‐ Definition, meaning, need and importance of value education in the present Indian and global contexts. Classification‐ Values of Ancient Indian culture, classification by NCERT. Sources of values‐ Philosophy, Curriculum, Community, Culture, Religion, science, literarure..etc. Direct , Indirect, incidental approaches (10 hours) 127
MODULE ‐ VI : Commissions and committees on value education University Education Commission( 1948), Sri Prakasa committee on Religious and moral Education (1959), The committee on Emotional Integration(1961), The Indian Education Communication(1964‐66), Report of UNESCO(1972), suggestions of The first National Moral Educational Conference(1981), National Policy on education(1986). (7 hours) MODULE – VII : Agencies of value inculcation Home, School , Peer group, community, society , media.. How all these agencies contribute for the inculcation of values among students Type of activities in school for inculcation of values (prayer, assembly…) Role of curriculum, hidden curriculum etc.. (9 hours) MODULE ‐ VIII : Value education and teacher education programme Professional ethics , Professionalism and love towards teaching profession Teacher as a model New trends in value education ( various approaches and methods ,use of ICT for effective value education programmes, life skills, prevention of manmade disasters, role of a counsellor..training to practice different strategies) (12 hours) MODULE – IX : Evaluation in Value Education Evaluation in moral education – a difficult task. Some tools and techniques to measure moral traits are, observation, tests, checklists, rating scale, attitude scale. (7 hours) Assignments 1. Content Analysis of school curriculum for identification of values and assessment of moral content 2. Review of recent research studies on value education 3. Analysis of life history of 5 well known personalities/interview with spiritual leaders. 4. Construction and evaluation of any tool in moral education. 5. Action research in value education 6. Review of researches in Human rights ,women studies,and other marginalised 7. Discussion of issues of Human Right violations 8. An interview with people who protect Human Rights References 1.Rao, R.K. (1986). Moral Education – A practical Approach . Mysore: RIMSE. 2.Venkataiah, N. (1998). Value Education. New Delhi: APH. 3. Bull, N.J. (1969). Moral Education. London: Routledge&Kegan Paul. 4. Goleman, D. (1998). Working with emotional intelligence. New York: Bentam Books. 5. Joyce, B. ,& Weil, M. (1978). Models of Teaching. New Delhi: Prentice Hall. 6. Kay, W. (1975). Moral Education: a Sociological study of the influence of society, home, and school. London: Allen &Unwin Ltd. 128
7. Luther. M. (2001).Values and ethics in school education. New Delhi: McGraw Hill. 8. Mukhopadhyay, M. (Eds.). (2004). Value development in higher education. New Delhi: 9. Piaget, J. (1932). The moral judgement of the child. London: Routledge&Kegan Paul. 10. Ruhela, S. P. (1986). Human values and education. New Delhi: Sterling. 11.Ruhela, S. P. (2000). Values in modern Indian educational thought. New Delhi: Indian Publishers and Distributers. 12. Saraf, M. (1999).Education in human values. New Delhi: Vikas. 13. Sharma (1997). Value education in action. New Delhi: University Book House. 14. Wilson, J. (1967). Introduction to moral education.Middlessex: Penguin Books. 15. Kohlberg, L., &Turiel, E. (1971). Moral development and moral education. In G. Lesser (Eds.),Psychology and Educational Practice. Scott Foresman. 16. NCERT.http://www.ncert.nic.in/sites/valueeducation. 17. Shadri,C. ,Khader, M.A., &Adhya, G.L. (1992). Education in values: a source book. New Delhi: NCERT. 18. Patil, V. T. (2008). Value education and human rights education. New Delhi: Virgo. 19. Klein, Rev. Peter. (2007). The Catholic Source book. Orland: Harcourt Religion 129
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Specialization Course IV (ii) CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT AND TRANSACTION (Instructional hours – 90) Course Objectives On completion of this course the students will be able to; 1. Define curriculum and to identify the components of curriculum 2. Describe the various principles of curriculum development and analyse various approaches to curriculum development 3. Describe various guiding principles for selection and organisation of learning experiences. 4. Discuss various issues in curriculum development 5. Define meaning of curriculum transaction and to describe various methods/media for transaction. 6. Define process of curriculum evaluation and to explain various tools used in curriculum evaluation 7. Describe issues in curriculum evaluation MODULE ‐ I : Nature, Principles and Determinants of Curriculum Meaning and concept of curriculum; Curriculum as a body of organized knowledge, inert and live curriculum. ‐ Components of Curriculum: Objectives, content, transaction mode and evaluation ‐ Philosophical and ideological basis of curriculum ‐ Principles of integration ‐ Theories of curriculum development‐Curriculum as a Product‐(Franklin Bobbitt and Ralf .W.Tyler‐1928&1949)‐Curriculum as aProcess( Robin Barrow‐1984), Stenhouse Model Theory( Stenhouse 1975), Curriculum as a Praxis(Grundy‐1987) Preservation of Culture Relevance, flexibility, quality, contexuality and plurality Determinants of Curriculum ( 10 hours) MODULE – II : Approaches and types to Curriculum Development Subject centred Core curriculum Learner centred Community centred. Curriculum Frameworks of School Education and Teacher Education Humanistic Curriculum: characteristics, purpose, role of the teacher, psychological basis of humanistic curriculum Social reconstructionist curriculum: characteristics, purpose, role of the teacher in reconstructionist curriculum ( 10 hours) 130
Module – III : Models of Curriculum Development Tylers‐1949 model Hilda Taba 1962 model Nicholls and Nicholls‐1972 model Willes and Bondi‐1989 model Need assessment model Futuristic model Vocational/Training model (With special reference to analysis of needs, selection of objectives, selection and organisation of content/learning experiences and evaluation). (15 hours) MOULE – IV : Selection and Organisation of learning experiences Principles and criteria for developing learning experiences Points to be considered while selecting learning experiences Designing integrated and interdisciplinary learning experiences. Integration of learning experience related to work experience, sensitivity to gender parity, peace oriented values, health and needs of children with disabilities, arts and India’s heritage of crafts , Infusion of environment related knowledge and concerns in all subjects and levels. Learning to draw upon resources other than text books including local history and geography (10 hours) MODULE ‐ V: Issues in Curriculum Development Centralized vs. decentralized curriculum Diversity among teachers in their competence. Problem of curriculum load Participation of functionary and beneficiaries in curriculum development (5 hours) MODULE – VI : Approaches and Methods of Curriculum Transaction Meaning of Curriculum transaction. Minimum requirement for transaction of curriculum : (Duration, in‐
take, eligibility of students, content, qualification of teaching staff, infrastructure facilities institutional facilities, (classroom climate) Curricular materials: Textbooks ‐ presentation of content, language, illustrations, episode, stories and practice exercise etc. Teacher’s guide: its role in transaction. Collaborative/cooperative learning‐meaning and its role in curriculum transaction Use of various methods & media in transaction of curriculum. Issues related to transaction‐gender and values education. ICT in transaction of curriculum, its importance and role, various modes of ICT (PLM, CAL, CAI) for transaction with their strengths and limitation. (30 hours) MODULE – VII : Tools and Techniques of Curriculum evaluation Observation; classroom interaction (with teacher and in peer group, group work) Oral : pretesting, diagnostic questions, Interview: consulting users of curriculum An opinonnaire Maintaining daily by the 131
children as well as teachers. Project work, Peer evaluation Maintaining portfolio of the work and their presentation. (5 hours ) MODULE ‐ VIII : Programme evaluation Stages of programme evaluation, Identifying decision makers. Studying purpose and objectives of the programme Deciding indicators of success, Develop data gathering material, Collect data, Analyse data Solicit feedback, Make revisions, How far goals/objectives of curriculum have been achieved? Is the content appropriate according to needs and interests of learners? Assess the experiences related to life of students? (5 hours) . Transaction Mode 1. Panel discussion 2. Seminar 3. Lectures, discussions, demonstration Assignments 1. Identify various criteria to evaluate textbook / programme /course. Based on the criteria, evaluate any course/programme/curriculum 2. Prepare an observation schedule for curriculum transaction in any one‐school subject. 3. Identify various issues in transacting Curriculum in Teacher Education Institute 4. Critically appraise /analyse existing syllabi and textbooks on teacher education developed by various agencies at national/state/local levels. 5. Evaluate a teacher education syllabus of any state/university either at elementary or at secondary level. Essential Readings 1. NCERT (1984). Curriculum and Evaluation, NCERT, New Delhi. 2. NCERT (2006): Systematic reforms for Curriculum change. New Delhi. 3. Dewey, John (1966). The Child and the Curriculum. The University of Chicago Press. 4. NCTE (2009) National Curriculum Framework for Teacher Education. 5. NCERT (2000). National Curriculum Framework for School Education, NCERT, New Delhi. 6. NCERT (2005). National Curriculum Framework‐2005, NCERT, Sri Aurobindo Marg, New Delhi. 7. Wiles, J.W. & Joseph Bondi (2006): Curriculum Development: A Guide to Practice. Pearson Publication 132
References 1. Aggarwal, Deepak (2007): Curriculum development: Concept, Methods and Techniques. New Delhi. Book Enclave. 2. Aggarwal, J.C (1990). Curriculum Reform in India‐ World overviews, Doaba World Education Series‐3 Delhi, Doaba House, Book seller and Publisher. 3. Arora, G.L. (1984): Reflections on Curriculum. NCERT. 4. CIET (2006) The Process of Making National Curriculum Framework‐2005: A Video documentary both in Hindi and English, CIET, NCERT, New Delhi. 5. CIET (2007) Curriculum Syllabus and Textbook: An Audio Interview with Sh. Rohit Dhankar, Chairperson of the National Focus Group set up under NCF‐2005 Process, CIET, NCERT, New Delhi. 6. Corsion Press, INC (A Sage Publication Company) Thousand Oaks: California. 7. Dewey, John (1966). The Child and the Curriculum. The University of Chicago Press. 8. Diamond Robert M. (1986) Designing and Improving Courses in Higher Education: A Systematic Approach, California, Jossey‐Bass Inc. Publication. 9. Doll Ronald C. (1986) Curriculum Improvement: Decision Making Process, London, Allyon and Bacon Inc. 10. Erickson, H.L (2002) Concept Based Curriculum and Instruction: Teaching beyond the facts 11. Joseph, P.B. et al; (2000): Cultures of Curriculum (studies in Curriculum Theory). New York. Teacher College Press. 12. McKernan, James (2007): Curriculum and Imagination: Process, Theory, Pedagogy and Action Research. Routledge. U.K. 13. NCERT (2000). National Curriculum Framework for School Education, NCERT, New Delhi. 14. NCERT (2005). National Curriculum Framework‐2005, NCERT, Sri Aurobindo Marg, New Delhi. 15. Oliva, Peter F. (1988) Developing the Curriculum. Scott, and Foresman and Co. 16. Reddy, B. (2007): Principles of curriculum planning and development. 17. Taba Hilda (1962) Curriculum Development: Theory and Practice, New York, Harcourt Brace, Jovanovich Inc. 18. Taba Hilda (1962) Curriculum Development: Theory and Practice, New York, Harcourt Brace, Jovanovich Inc. 19. UNESCO (1981) Curriculum and Life Long Education, UNESCO, Paris. 20. Verduin J.R. (1967) Cooperative Curriculum Improvement, Prentice Hall Audio‐Video CDs 133
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Specialization Course IV (iii) ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION (Instructional hours – 90) Course Objectives 1. To understand the concept, importance, scope and aims of environmental education 2. To familiarize the emerging terminologies and concepts in the field of environmental education 3. To acquaint the student with possible environmental hazards enabling them to combat with the negative effects of the programmes of environmental erosion and pollution at various stages of education. 4. To orient student with various components of environmental concerns for preparing a curriculum for environmental education. 5. To enable the students to develop various strategies for realizing the objectives of environmental education with special emphasis at local level 6. To enable the students to understand about various projects in the areas of environmental studies. Course Content MODULE – I : Introduction to Environmental Education 1. Origin and development of the concept. 2. Need and Significance, Psychological Perspectives of EE, Need of a “Green Curriculum” 3. Methods and Strategies for EE at primary, secondary and Higher Education. 4. Environmental Sensitivity, Concept of Environmental sensitivity index 5. Environmental action and environmental action plan 6. Difference Between Ecology and Environmental Education (12 hours) MODULE – II : Eco concepts on Environmental Education • Meaning, Concept and Role of teacher in cultivating the following: o Eco literacy – Fritjof Capra. water literacy and it’s growing concern in the present scenario. Strategies to promote water literacy through collaboration of various agencies. o Ecological Intelligence‐ Daniel Goleman o Naturalistic Intelligence –Howard Gardner • Eco tourism: Meaning and Relevance • Eco pedagogy‐ Meaning and Importance ( 15 hours) MODULE ‐ III: Sustainable Development • Sustainable Development‐ Meaning and Importance • Concept of education for sustainable development‐ESD (Ecological, Economical, Socio – Cultural). Strategies for rendering ESD. • Symptoms of Non Sustainability. Criticism on the concept of Sustainable Development (5 hours) MODULE ‐ IV: Environmental Heritages and culture • Western Ghats: Meaning of the term ‘Ghat’ • It’s relevance as UNESCO world heritage site 134
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Bio diversity of Western Ghats Its role in controlling climate of Kerala Threats to Western Ghats (All the Five subtitles must be sensitized using appropriate strategies) Other environmental Heritages Environment friendly culture of Kerala‐ A Rethinking (15 hours) MODULE ‐ V: Environmental issues • Concept of Homeostasis • Degradation in the quality of Environment • Role of individuals in the Prevention of Pollution, Climate change, Global Warming, Acid Rain , Ozone Depletion (Emphasis is to be given to the role of Individuals) • Solid Waste management • Meaning • Role and Responsibility of Individuals and Institutions in the management of E waste, Nuclear waste, Medical Waste, Plastic Waste. Waste management‐ Public‐private participation. (20 hours) MODULE ‐ VI: Disaster Management 1. Meaning and concept of disaster management. Emergency management principles 2. Types of Disasters, their cause and impact 3. Need and importance of Disaster management training 4. Indian scenario with Special reference to Kerala in Disaster Management Training 5. Role of teachers and educational Institutions in Disaster Management (15 hours) MODULE ‐ VII: Public Participation in Conservation of Nature 1. Importance 2. Measures to ensure public participation‐ Role of Media, Governmental and non‐ governmental agencies. 3. Contributions of environmental activists in bringing public participation 4. Planetary citizenship or world citizenship‐ importance in the era of globalization. Environmental Citizenship as the ultimate goal of Environmental education (8 hours) Assignments 1. Field Experience on a Polluted Environmental area 2. Day celebrations/observation on different environmentally important Days 3. Conduct Camps on Environmental awareness 4. Project on Environmental assets or heritages 5. Conduct programs to develop eco‐literacy among prospective secondary teachers 6. Conduct a study on Environment friendly behavior among prospective secondary teachers References 1. Capra, F.(1999). Eco‐literacy : The challenge for next century. Liver pool Schumacher Lectures. 2. Orr, D (1992) . Ecological Literacy : Education and transition to a post modern worlds. Albany: State University Press, New York. 3. Goleman, D.( 2010) Ecological Intelligence, Penguin Books, London 135
4. Odum , E.P. (1971) Fundamentals of Ecology WB Saunders 5. Speth & James,G. (2006) Global Environmental challenges: Transition to a sustainable world, Orient Longmann 6. Firor, John & Judith E ,J. (2003) Crowded Green House, University Press 7. Brown , Lester R (2002) Eco Economy : Building an economy for earth , Orient Longmann 8. Gardner HS( 2006) Frames of Mind. Harvard university Press 9. Bharucha E (2005) , Text book of Environmental Studies, University Press 10. Dani, H.M. (1986), Environmental Education, Chandigarh : Publication Bureau, Panjab University. 11. Bhall, S.C. &Khanna, H. (2007), Environmental Education, New Delhi : Regal 12. Publication. 13. Nagra, V. (2006), Environmental Education, Jalandhar : Sharma Publications. 14. Nanda, K.V. (1997), Environmental Education, New Delhi : APH Publishing Corp. 15. Nasrin (2007). Education, Environment and Society, New Delhi: APH Publishing Corp. 16. Saxena, A.B. (1986), Environnemental Education, Agra: National Psychological Corp. 17. Sharma, R.C. (1981), Environmental Education, New Delhi : Metropolitan Book Co. 18. Shrivastva, K.A. (2007), Global Warming, New Delhi : APH Publishing Corp. 19. Shukla, K.S. and Srivastva, R.P. (1992). Emerging pattern of Environmental Structure, New Delhi : Commonwealth Publishers. 20. Singh, K.Y. (2005). Teaching of Environmental Science, New Delhi : Charman 21. Enterprises. 22. Sudhir, A.M. and Masillamani, M. (2003), Environmental Issues, New Delhi : Reliance Publishing House. 23. Kumar, V.K. (1982). A Study of Environmental Pollution, Varanasi : Tara Book Agency. 24. Vyas,H. (1995), Paryavaran Shiksha, New Delhi : Vidya Mandir. Web site or Email 1. Bharaty Vidya Peeth Institute of environment education and research ( BVIEER email [email protected] 2. Bombay Natural History Society ( BNHS) web: www.bhns.org. email: [email protected] 3. Botanical survey of Indai(BSI) . web: www.nic.in. email: [email protected] 4. Centre for Environmental Education (CEE). web: www.educationvsnl.com/cee/index.html. email: [email protected] 136
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Specialization Course III (iv) INCLUSIVE EDUCATION (Instructional hours – 90) Course Objectives After studying the course the students are expected to: 1. Examine critically the concept , nature and characteristics of students with various special needs 2. Understand the national and international initiatives towards the education of students with diverse needs 3. Develop critical understanding of the policies and legislations related to inclusive education 4. Develop an understanding of the challenges faced by students with diverse needs 5. Develop knowledge and skill to address the diverse needs of the students in inclusive education 6. Identify the various aspects of teacher preparation and research priorities in Inclusive education Course Content MODULE – I : Introduction to Inclusive Education Objectives 1. To define inclusive education 2. To comprehend the meaning of Inclusion of children with Diverse Needs 3. To analyze special education, integrated education, mainstream and inclusive education practices 4. To appreciate the value of Inclusion in effective education system •
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Definition, concept and importance of inclusive education. Psychological and sociological approaches to inclusive education Historical perspectives on education of children with diverse needs. Concept of special education, integrated education and inclusive education Inclusive schools as effective schools (8hrs) MODULE – II : National & International initiatives to respond to diversity Objectives 1. To understand the global and national commitments towards Inclusive Education diverse needs 2. To develop critical understanding of the recommendations of various commissions and committees towards Inclusive Education 3. To develop an understanding of the needs and magnitude of the challenges faced by children and persons with diverse needs, 4. Appreciating the need for promoting Inclusive Education and understanding the roles and responsibilities of all concerned, 137
International initiatives: • The Convention on the Rights of the Child (Article 23, 28, 29 a2, 3, 6 and 10 &12). • The World Declaration on Education for all and its Framework for Action to meet Basic ‐
Learning needs, 1990(Article 3 Clause 5). • The World Declaration on the Survival, Protection and Development of Children and the Plans of action (Outcome of the UNICEF World Summit for Children, (1990). • The Asian and Pacific decade of Disabled Persons, 1993‐2002. • International Year of the disabled persons (IYDP, 1981) • International perspectives Dakar framework of action (2000), • Millennium development goals (2000). National Initiatives: • National institutes for various disabilities • District primary education programme (dpep). • Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan. • Initiatives for the gifted and talented children. • National curriculum framework, 2005 NCERT • Girls; education initiatives ‐Mahila samakshya, kasturba gandhi balika vidyalaya. (12hrs) MODULE ‐ III : Current Laws and Policy Perspectives supporting Inclusive Education Objectives : 1. To develop critical understanding of the policies and legislations related to inclusive education 2. To develop a positive attitude and sense of commitment towards actualizing the right to education of all learners Content outline: • The Mental Health Act 1987. • Rehabilitation Council of India Act, 1992 • National policy on Education(NPE) • The Persons with Disabilities Act (Equal opportunities, Protection of rights and full participation, 1995). • The National Trust for the Welfare of Persons with autism, cerebral palsy, mental retardation and Multiple Disabilities Act 1999. • Right to education act 2009 and afterwards (8 hrs) MODULE – IV:Children with Diverse Needs Objectives 1. To define persons with diverse needs 2. To classify persons with diverse needs by nature and scope 3. To classify Students with Learning Disabilities 4. To identify different types of persons with diverse needs 138
5. To appreciate need for better inclusion of socially disadvantaged and women in socio‐educational milieu. Content outline: • Concept and meaning of diverse needs, Definition , • concept and challenges children with sensory impairments (hearing, visual and physically challenged) • Intellectually challenged (gifted, talented and mentally challenged) • Developmental disabilities (Autism, Cerebral palsy, Learning Disabilities) • Social and emotional problems • Scholastic backwardness • Under achievement • Slow learners • Children with health problems • Environmental /Ecological difficulties and children belonging to other marginal group. • Socially disadvantaged childrer • Gender Equality (25 hrs) MODULE ‐ V : Inclusive education strategies and addressing diversity in class rooms Objectives : 1. To have understanding of Inclusive Strategies for children with Diverse Needs 2. To acquaint with curriculum adaptations around the globe to cater to exceptional learners 3. To identify and utilize existing resources for promoting inclusive practice. 4. To create and suggest steps for Inclusive environment in the school and classroom for all learners 5. To adapt curriculum for Inclusive Education Content outline: • Steps to becoming a culturally inclusive school • Developing inclusive knowledge in science , language, maths ‐ • Effectiveness of inclusive strategies such as enrichment, cluster grouping, mixed ability grouping, multilevel teaching, cooperative learning, peer tutoring in the context of constructivism. • Multicultural education, multigrade teaching in rural context. , Mid‐Day Meal Scheme • Adaptations in instructional objectives , curriculum and co‐curricular activities for meeting diverse needs of children from sensory, intellectual, learning disabled, rural, tribal, girls, SC /ST and linguistic and other minority groups. • Role of technology for meeting diverse needs of learners 139
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Role of parents and other community members for supporting inclusion of children with diverse needs (25hrs) MODULE ‐ VI: Training and Research in Inclusive education Objectives 1. To equip for inculcating future teachers with skills and competencies required for Inclusive Education 2. To identify research priorities and conduct researches in the area of education of socially disadvantaged groups. Teacher preparation: • Skills and competencies of teachers and teacher educators for elementary and secondary education with inclusive settings. • N.C.F 2005 and curriculum for teacher preparation and transaction modes. • Roles, responsibilities and professional ethics of teachers in inclusive settings Research Priorities In Inclusive Education: • Areas of research needed for enhancement of learning. ‐Evaluation of centrally sponsored schemes of education of SCs, STs, and Minorities. • Priority areas of research on girls’ education • Study of teaching learning practices and social inclusion. • Least Restrictive Environment • Community Based Rehabilitation Assignments 1. Prepare a parallel summary of the international and national initiatives to cater to learners with diverse needs , demonstrating the evolution towards IE 2. Prepare a table / graphic comparing the various approaches to learners with diverse needs 3. Summarize the contemporary policy towards IE in India 4. Interview a parent & teacher of any two categories of children with diverse needs and make report on the perceived causes, difficulties, developmental patterns, strategies for enabling the learner. 5. Visit/interview a teacher/ head teacher of nearby school to make a report of the steps taken to turn it into an inclusive school and comment. 6. Prepare lesson plan on topic of your choice that cater to diverse learners, and highlight the strategies and emphasizes made to cater to each category (12hrs) References: 1. Dubbey.S.M (2001), Educational scenario In India. Authors 140
2. Gardener William I (1977) Learning & Behavioural characteristics of Exceptional children and youth ; Allyn & Bacon 3. Hallahan & Kauffman, J.M (1978) Exceptional Children ; An Introduction to special education, Englewood Cliff ; Prentice hall 4. Kirk A & ,Gallauger , J.J (1979) Educating Exceptional Children , Hoffton and Mifflin 5. Lewis B.R & Doorlag H.D Teaching special students in general education classroom (6th edition) Merril Prentice Hall. 6. Pande R.S & Advani .L (1995) Perspectives of Disability and Rehabilitation, New Delhi , Vikas Publishing House 7. Stephen C.M et.al (1983) Teaching Mainstream students Newyork : John Wiley 141
APPENDIX 142
Appendix i BOARD OF STUDIES IN EDUCATION (PG) 1. Prof. (Dr) K. Sivarajan Chief Co‐ordinator University Teacher Education Centres Tagore Nikethan, Calicut University (Chairman) 2. Prof. (Dr.)P.Kelu Professor (Retd.) ‘Sukanya’, Kattayamkottummal P.O.Kodenchery via Puraneri Vatakara‐673503. 3. Prof. A Faziluddin Principlal Farook Training College Calicut Chairman, UG Board (Ex‐Officio) 4. Dr. K.P.Meera Associate Professor Dept. of Education University of Calicut. 5. Dr. B. H. Helen Joy Principal Govt. Training College Kozhikode. 6. Dr. K.Abdul Gafoor Associate Professor Dept. of Education University of Calicut 7. Dr. K.Rajagopalan Associate Professor NSS Training College Ottappalam 143
8. Dr. N.S.Mumthas Associate Professor Farook Training College Kozhikode 9. Sri. K.P.Anil Kumar Associate Professor NSS Training College Ottappalam. 10. Dr. S. Senthil Nathan Assistant Professor Deputy Co‐ordinator UGC‐SAP, Dept. of Educational Technology, Bharadhidasan University, Trichirappally 11. Dr. Hassan Koya.M.P Assistant Professor Farook Training College Kozhikode. 144
Appendix ii WORKING GROUP 1. Prof. (Dr) K Sivarajan (Chairman) Chief Coordinater University Teacher Education Centres Tagore Niketan Calicut University P O 2. Prof. (Dr) P Kelu Professor M.Ed Course University Teacher Education Centre Puthuppanam Vatakara 3. Prof. A. Faziluddeen Principal Farook Training College Calicut 4. Dr. K. Abdul Gafoor Associate Professor Department of Education University of Calicut 5. Dr. K. Rajagopalan Associate Professor NSS Training College Ottappalam 145
Appendix iii LIST OF EXPERT COMMITTEE MEMBERS REVISED THE CURRICULUM CC.I & II CC .III & IV Advanced Philosophy of Education & Education and Society 1
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Prof. (Dr.) P. Kelu (Chairman) Professor of M. Ed UTEC, Vadakara Mob: 9447884575 Dr. P.P. Noushad Assistant Professor Farook Training College Farook College (PO) Mob: 9447675755 Dr. Baiju K. Nath Assistant Professor Department of Education Calicut University (PO) Mob: 9846076068 Psychology of Human Development and Learning 1 Dr. C. N. Balakrishnan Nambiar & (Chairman) Principal Psychology of Individual Differences Devaki Amma Memorial College of Teacher Education, Chelembra Mob: 9447109729 2 Dr. K. Abdul Gafoor Associate Professor Department of Education Calicut University (PO) Mob: 9447247627 3 Dr. Muhammedunni Alias Mustafa Associate Professor Department of Education Calicut University (PO) Mob: 9447596952 146
CC.V & VI SC. I 4 Dr. Ambili Aravind Associate Professor NSS Training College, Ottappalam Mob: 9447455051 Introduction to Educational Research and 1 Prof. (Dr.) C. Naseema (Chairperson) Statistics& Professor Advanced Educational Research and Statistics Department of Education Calicut University (PO) Mob: 9447675682 2 Dr. N. S. Mumthas Associate Professor Farook Training College Farook College (PO) Mob: 9496283212 3 Dr.P. Usha Associate Professor Department of Education Calicut University (PO) Mob: 9446260126 i. Advance Methodology of Teaching Arabic 1 Dr. Abdul Khadar (Chairman) Associate Professor Govt. College of Teacher Education Calicut Mob: 9495075673 2 Dr. Rasheed Assistant Professor Govt. College of Teacher Education Calicut Mob: 9495094896 3 Mr. M.P. Abdul Salam Principal MCT Training College Melmuri, Malappuram Mob: 9447353382 ii. Advance Methodology of Teaching English 1 Dr. K. P. Meera (Chairperson) Associate Professor & Head Dept. of Education Calicut University (PO) Mob: 9447011539 2 Dr. M. Jesa Associate Professor 147
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iii. Advance Methodology of Teaching Malayalam 1
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iv. Advance Methodology of Teaching Hindi 1
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Farook Training College Farook College (PO) Mob: 9447908842 Mrs. K. Mridula Assistant Professor NSS Training College, Ottappalam Mob: 9495341550 Dr. Omanaseelan Assistant Professor IASE, Trichur Mob:9495440560 Dr. C. M. Bindu (Chairperson) Associate Professor Farook Training College Farook College (PO) Mob: 9447636182 Sri. Anilkumar Assistant Professor NSS Training College Ottappalam Mob: 9447393593 Dr. Ramakrishnan Associate Professor Govt. College of Teacher Education Calicut Mob: 9447408422 Mrs. Anila B. Nair Assistant Professor IASE, Trichur Mob: 9447349816 Mrs. Baby Pushpalatha (Chairperson) Associate Professor Keyi Sahib Training College Taliparamba Mob: 9496016188 Mr. Ramesan Officer on Special Duty Lakshadweep Office Indira Gandhi Road Wellington Island 3
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v. Advance Methodology of Teaching Urdu 1
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vi. Advance Methodology of Teaching Tamil 1
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vii. Advance Methodology of Teaching Sanskrit 1
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Cochin – 3 Mob: 9447610920 Mrs. Chandrika Lecturer in Hindi UTEC, Vadakara Mob: 9496532274 Mrs. Hicky Devadas Asst. Professor Govt. College of Teacher Education Calicut Mob: 9526266873 Mr. N. Moideenkutty (Chairman) Lecturer in Urdu UTEC, Cherani , (PO) Karuvambram Manjeri, Malappuram – 676 123 Mob: 9847206410 Dr. Muhammed Kutty Velloor, Athanickal (PO) Malappuram Mob: 9895312334 Mr. Aboobacker Associate Professor Govt. College, Malappuram Mob: 9744003002 Mr. Ramesan (Chairman) Lecturer in Tamil UTEC, Koduvayoor Palakkad Mob: 9495670473 Mr. Ramalingam Govt. Girls HSS Chittor, Palakkad Mob: 9446945635 Mrs. Bhanumathy Eruchenpathy Sree Vidya. HS Palakkad Mob: 9447377484 Dr. Harinarayanan (Chairman) Assistant Professor IASE, Trissur Mob: 9446030082 2
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viii. Advance Mathematics Methodology of Teaching 1
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ix. Advance Methodology of Teaching Physical Science 150
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Dr. Unnikrishnan Assistant Professor IASE, Trissur Mob: 9495289978 Dr. Subramanian Principal KPPM College of Teacher Education Anakkayam, Malappuram Dist. Mob: 9447220520 Dr.K.S. Viswanathan (Chairman) Principal NSS Training College Ottappalam Mob: 9447963690 Dr. N. S. Mumthas Associate Professor Farook Training College Farook College (PO) Mob: 9496283212 Dr. M.B.Syamala Devi Assistant Professor Govt. College of Teacher Education, Calicut Mob: 9249310694 Dr. Indira (Chairperson) Associate Professor Govt. College of Teacher Education Calicut Mob. 9446733364 Dr. G. Manoj Praveen Associate Professor Farook Training College, Farook College(PO) Mob: 9446645939 Mrs. Smitha Assistant Professor NSS Training College, Ottappalam Mob: 9446945894 4. Anees Muhammed. C Assistant Professor Farook Training College Calicut x. Advance Methodology of Teaching Natural 1
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Prof. A.Faziluddin (Chairman) Principal Farook Training College, Farook College(PO) Mob: 9447229990 Dr.P.K. Aruna Associate Professor Department of Education Calicut University (PO) Mob: 9495657594 Dr.M. P. Hassankoya Associate Professor Farook Training College, Farook College(PO) Mob: 9847781500 4. Revathi Assistant Professor NSS Training College Ottappalam xi. Advance Methodology of Teaching Commerce Mrs. K. P. Niranjana (Chairperson) Assistant Professor Farook Training College Farook College (PO) Mob: 9447335854 Mr. Isac Paul Assistant Professor Govt. College of Teacher Education Thycaud, Trivandrum Mob: 9447588913 1
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xii. Advance Methodology of Teaching Social 1
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Prof. C. Abdul Salam(Chairman) Principal Jamia Nadvia College of Teacher Education, Edavanna Mob: 9847722540 Dr. A. Hameed Assistant Professor Department of Education Calicut University (PO) xiii. Advance Methodology of Teaching Computer Science SC II i. Teacher Education Mob: 9447539069 3 Dr. Happy Asst. Professor, IASE, Trissur Mob: 9446870670 1 Dr. Lajeesh (Chairman) Head of the Department of Computer Science, University of Calicut Calicut University (PO) 2 Mob: 9495793094 Mr. K.Shanavas Shanavas House Kaipuram (PO) Palakkad ‐ 679308 3 Mob: 9447392607 Mrs. R. S. Soumya R. S. Bhavan, Malanchutta Parasuvackal . P.O, Trivandrum Mob: 9447329364 ii. Non formal education 152
1. Prof. A. Faziluddin (Chairman) Principal Farook Training College Farook College (PO) Mob: 9447229990 2. Dr. K.Abdul Gafoor Associate Professor Department of Education Calicut University (PO) Mob: 9447247627 3. Sri. Sankaranarayanan Paleeri Assistant Professor NSS Training College Ottappalam Mob: 9447843559 1.Dr.P. Usha (Chairperson) Associate Professor Department of Education Calicut University (PO) Mob: 9446260126 2.Prof. (Dr.) K. Sivarajan Chief Co‐ordinator iii. Early Childhood Care and Education iv. Elementary and Secondary Educvation UTECs, Calicut University Calicut University (PO) Mob: 9847741786 3.Dr. Pavithran Principal Mother Theresa College of Teacher Edn. Perambra Ph: 9447538261 4. Dr. T. P. Ravi Principal Mahatha College of Teacher Education, Neeleswaram Mob: 9447953485
1.Dr.P.K. Aruna (Chairperson) Associate Professor Department of Education Calicut University (PO) Mob: 9495657594 2.Prof. (Dr.) P.Kelu Professor of M. Ed UTEC, Vadakara Mob: 9447884575 3.Dr. N. K. Vijayan Principal Rims International School, Varamkadavu Varam (PO), Kannur Mob: 9447648039 1.Dr. Deepa (Chairperson) Principal Sree Narayana College of Teacher Edn Chelannur Mob: 9446258552 2.Dr. I.M. Indira
Principal AWH College of Education Cheruvannur Kozhikode Mob: 9446281026 3.Mr. Jawahar Munaveer 153
SC. III i. Guidance and Counselling 1
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ii. Educational Technology 1
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iii. Educational Measurement and Evaluation 1
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Assistant Professor Farook Training College Farook College (PO) Mob: 9847154767 Mr. Abdul Basheer Uzhunnan (Chairman) Associate Professor Farook Training College Farook College (PO) Mob: 9961856215 Dr. K. Rajagopalan Associate Professor NSS Training College Ottappalam Mob: 9447514666 Dr. Abdul Hameed Muktar Mahal Associate Professor Farook Training College, Farook College(PO) Mob: 9847337505 Dr.T.Vasumathi Asst. Professor Department of Education Calicut University (PO) Mob: 9048204206 Dr. B. H. Helen Joy (Chairperson) Principal Govt. College of Teacher Education Calicut Mob: 9447009032 Mr. Ummer Farook Assistant Professor Farook Training College Mob: 9447346817 Dr. Usha Assistant Professor Govt. College of Teacher Education Calicut Mob: 9895425919 Dr. N. S. Mumthas (Chairperson) Associate Professor 2
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SC. IV iv. Educational Management and Administration 1
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i. Education for Human Rights and Values 1
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Farook Training College Farook College (PO) Mob: 9496283212 Dr. K. Vijayakumari Associate Professor Farook Training College Farook College (PO) Mob: 9447228049 Dr. Krishnakumari Assistant Professor Govt. College of Teacher Education Calicut Mob: 9447637180 Dr. S. Senthil Nathan (Chairman) Assistant Professor Dept. of Educational Technology Bharatheedasan University Thiruchirappally Mob: 09842292244 Mr. Sunil Kumar Assistant Professor NSS Training College Ottappalam Mob: 9496360138 Dr. M.S.Salim Asst. Professor Farook Training College Farook College (PO) Mob: 9496363353 Dr. Anilkumar (Chairman) Associate Professor NSS Training College, Ottappalam Mob: 9447393593 Dr. T. Vasumati Assistant Professor Department of Education Calicut University (PO) Mob: 9048204206 Dr. Rekha Assistant Professor Farook Training College ii. Curriculum Development and Transaction 1
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iii. Environmental Education 1
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iv. Inclusive Education 1
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Farook Colleg (PO) Mob: 9447269224 Dr. K. Rajagopalan (Chairman) Associate Professor NSS Training College Ottappalam Mob: 9447514666 Dr. G. Manoj Praveen Associate Professor Farook Training College Farook college (PO) Mob: 9446645939 Dr.Devika Assistant Professor NSS Training College Ottappalam Mob: 9447204962 Dr. Hassan Koya (Chairman) Assistant Professor Farook Training College Farook college (PO) Mob: 9847781500 Mr. Afeef Tharavattath Assistant Professor Farook Training College Farook College (PO) Mob: 9447754318 Dr. Sajan Assistant Professor NSS Training College Ottappalam Mob: 9496354916 Dr. K. Abdul Gafoor (Chairman) Associate Professor Department of Education Calicut University (PO) Mob: 9447247627 Dr. B.Suresh Principal IASE, Trissur Mob: 9447709132 3 Dr. Muhammed Musthafa Assistant professor School of Behavioural Sciences M. G. University Kottayam Mob: 9946226638 157
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