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R oar Adopt-a-Family Maga
R
oar
Magazine
Helping out
for the
holidays
Adopt-a-Family
Winter 2009
Vol. 22 Issue 2
Roar Magazine
Roar Magazine Readers,
PHOTO BY VALERIE NUNEZ
PHOTO BY VALERIE
As Arizona residents, many
NUNEZ
of us have been waiting months
for the weather to finally cool, so
we can don our comfy jackets and
celebrate the holidays. As much
as I love relaxing in the sun during summer, there is always some
magical quality about winter.
PHOTO BY LORRAINE LONGHI
Maybe it’s extra time spent with
Jun
family and friends during Winter lookior Steven Mortlock and senior Joel Blood
cool outside of the 300
building.
Break or being able to bundle up and sip hot chocolate.
Whatever positive feelings I may be feeling during this
PHOTO BY VALERIE NUNEZ
time, it’s important to keep in mind those less fortunate.
For every happy family eating a luxurious holiday dinner
together, there is another that is not so lucky. They may
be without jackets, blankets, food, a home. There may be
someone without a loving family to spend time with, or a
child with no gifts to open on Christmas morning.
People experience these struggles every single day of
the year, but it’s especially important to give back during
this season, which tends to be about gift-receiving. Examples of students and staff giving back are abundant around
Red Mountain. We have our annual Canned Food Drive,
junior Shelby
Senior Carissa Ferguson and
and classes can participate
ta.”
“gangs
in Adopt-A-Family. There Lewis try to be
is also Meals On Wheels, a
program that delivers meals
to the elderly. There are
countless more options for
helping people out, but it’s
up to you to do something
about it.
Sincerely,
Valerie Nunez
Editor in Chief
PHOTO BY
Mrs. Saquella will only be photographed if chocolate is involved.
PHOTO
BY VALERIE NUNEZ
VALERIE NUNE
Z
Senior Taylor Ho
uts and junior Sh
elby
Madson enjoy co
llaborating on art
icles.
PHOTO BY VALERIE NUNEZ
ity
wski, sophomore Seren
Senior Amanda Szpako
a pose for Roar
ke
stri
n
rso
Tho
gan
Seniors Alexis Green and Lorraine Longhi and junior
Lane and senior Me
write for.
Danielle Grobmeier appreciate vending machines.
Magazine, which they
2
Winter 2009
Roar Magazine
R
oar
Magazine
Vol. 22 Issue 2
Principal: Dr. Slemmer
Adviser: Jan Saquella
Editor-In-Chief: Valerie Nunez
Editors: Shelby Lewis,
Megan Thorson
Photo Editor: Alexis Green
Staff: Joel Blood, Carissa
Ferguson, Danielle Grobmeier,
Taylor Houts, Serenity Lane,
Lorraine Longhi, Shelby Madson, Steven Mortlock, Amanda
Szpakowski
Cover photo by: Valerie Nunez
Roar Magazine is a publication
of :
Red Mountain High School
7301 E. Brown Rd.
Mesa AZ 85207
For information concerning
advertising, call (480) 472-8228
and leave a message for the
magazine staff. Opinions
expressed do not necessarily
reflect the view or official
policies of the school.
Roar Magazine encourages
letters to the editor on any
topics of interest to the student
body. All letters must be signed
and may be edited for grammar
and space.
For more articles by Red
Mountain’s Journalistic Writing
class, visit our website at www2.
mpsaz.org or www2.mpsaz.org/
rmhs/staff/jxsaquella/class3/
journalistic_writing_news_
feed/ or www2.mpsaz.org/
rmhs.
Contents
News
Feature
15 Meals on Wheels
16 Spanish Club
From the cover
4&5
Another holiday service project for
students to participate in
Adopt-A-Family
Canned Food
Drive
Find out what this club did
for Dia De Los Muertos
PHOTO BY VALERIE NUNEZ
7
PHOTO BY MR. WALSH
Just dance
A&E
Get all the details on the
dance concert, in case
you missed it.
9 Yay, hot dogs
10 Yearbook wins
FFA’s Hot Dog Days are
finally back!
See which spread from last
year won an award.
HOSA
What is HOSA?
Find out now!
PHOTO BY ALEXANDER COLEMAN
18 Caroling
19 Invisible Children Concert
20 London Caught Fire
PHOTO COURTESY OF EMILY NISSEN
PHOTO BY
LAURA FREAR
Opinion
11 Wikipedia
Could the popular online
source be reliable?
14 The “C” word
Is “Merry Christmas”
really so bad?
Safety first
Stay safe this holiday
season
PHOTO COURTESY OF AWALL
PHOTOGRAPHY
Corrections from Issue 1:
17
From “Tailgate” on page 4, Kelsey Meeks is a senior, not a
junior.
From “Who’s doing what?” on page 4, Invisible Children did
darts and balloons, not water balloons, along with a ring toss
and Rockband and Guitar Hero.
From “Coffee House” on page 7 and “H.O.M.E.” on page 12,
senior Cory Hernandez, not Corey.
RM’s choir carolers are back again this winter season
The annual fundraising concert was a success this year
No, the city isn’t burning to the ground; it’s
Red Mountain’s newest band
Sports
22 Sports Medicine
21 Wrestling
23 Girls Golf
Learn about the class that helps our athletes
They’re off to a good start
this season
Can the girls make it to
state this year?
23
Boys Golf
Congrats to the boys for
taking fourth in state
PHOTO COURTESY OF YEARBOOK
Roar Magazine
Winter 2009
3
News
Another successful
PHOTO BY MR. WALSH
Canned Food Drive
Block students competed with Kuss’ students to bring in the most cans for the canned food drive.
By Danielle Grobmeier
This fall included a variety
of service-related activities,
including Student Council’s annual holiday canned food drive.
The drive specifically targeted
families who are financially unable to feed themselves for the
holidays and allowed students
to give food to those who are
less fortunate. The canned
food drive consisted mainly of
open competition between the
homerooms, all of which were
attempting to contribute the
most cans to the drive.
“The students bring in
cans to their homerooms,
and then [the cans are]
collected and put in boxes
in the auditorium,” said
senior Daniel Horner,
student body vice president. “Then the boxes are
picked up by the United
Food Bank and distributed
however they see fit.”
Though the competition can
be tough, the reward provided to
the homeroom that collects the
most cans is well worth it.
“The top three homerooms
that bring in the most cans get
a pizza party or a doughnut
party,” said junior Jessica Hartman, Student Council service
commissioner. “That’s not
including Kuss or Block, they
have their own competition. If
they bring in more than 4,000
cans they get a pizza party.”
Not only were Red Mountain
students able to partake in the
competition, but they received
an experience with volunteer
service that allows
them to aid their
community.
PHOTO BY MR. WALSH
Mr. Kuss’ homeroom succeeded in donating the most cans to the food drive.
4
Winter 2009
“[The canned food drive] is
really good for the community,
because it gets food out there
and helps people that can’t
afford it,” said senior Alexis
Bramhall, student body president. “There’s something about
giving that’s really rewarding,
and when you do give back
without having any ulterior
motives, it’s great.”
Red Mountain
students
reached out
to many families by participating in the canned food
drive and giving back
to their community.
“It’s for such a
great cause,” said
Bramhall. When families can’t afford food,
it’s a good way to help
them out.”
Roar Magazine
News
Adopt-A-Family
Bringing happiness to everyone
PHOTO BY VALERIE NUNEZ
Mrs. Dilbeck, the Student
Council co-advisor. “There
are families who we have
helped when the older siblings were here eight years
ago, and now the younger
brothers or sisters are going
through.”
PHOTO BY VALERIE NUNEZ
But what is Adopt-AFamily and how does it help
By Serenity Lane
those in need?
It is that time of the year again for
“Adopt-A-Family is one
fundraising to help the needy of our
of Red Mountain Student
community. One of the longest standing
Council’s service projects,
projects is Adopt-A-Family. Groups such as but it’s also something the
PHOTO BY VALERIE NUNEZ
Orchestra, Drama, Band, Youth Alive, Best
whole school does,” says
Seniors Madeline Cypert, Emily West, and Gina Nicoletti sorted
items for Adopt-A-Family.
Buddies, Block, study hall, NHS, baseball,
Mrs. Dilbeck. “We buy
and many more have all contributed to the
items for children of families
It is a really good cause for those looking
Adopt-A-Family project. These groups
such as clothes or an item they want. We
to help out this holiday season. Student
have adopted whole families to purchase
try to get families things they need such as
Council is looking to start handing out items
new and unwrapped items. They have over
towels, pots, and pans or maybe a Christmas needed right around Thanksgiving break. If
tree.”
anybody is interested, they can get a gift tag
The focus for
with an item that they can buy for a family,
this project is on
then they can stop by Ms. Gates (237) or
providing children
Mrs. Dilbeck’s room (242).
with items they
“Each tag is only one item, so it is an
need and want.
affordable option for everyone. We request
“Each child gets
that the items are new, unwrapped and
shoes, two shirts,
returned to the room. Student Council will
a jacket, jeans and
then wrap the items and deliver them to the
a few fun items,”
families for the holidays,” said Ms. Gates.
said Ms. Gates, the
The efforts for the Adopt-A-Family all
Student Council co- go to help our community.
advisor.
“[The people helped] are families at
Student Council
Red Mountain or families in Mesa. In the
finds local families
past, we have helped families in Chandler
who need their holi- or Phoenix, but because the economy is so
days brightened.
bad and there are a lot more needy people,
“Usually we
we’re trying to focus on Mesa,” said Mrs.
go to the nurses
Dilbeck. “Last year we raised clothes and
of surrounding
toys and other items for 65 kids, and this
elementary schools
year we’re looking at about 75.”
Senior Gina Nicoletti helped with the Adopt-A-Family program.
and the nurse here.
Student Council appreciates all students
School nurses know who contributed to this important project.
150 kids to take care of this year.
the neediest families. We also get informaFor more information on helping out Adopt“This has probably been going back as
tion from teachers here at school as to who
A-Family, see Mrs. Dilbeck in room 242 or
far as the school has been opened,” says
needs help, said Mrs. Dilbeck.
Ms. Gates in room 237.
Roar Magazine
Winter 2009
5
News
Congrats to
Speech & Debate
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By Carissa Fe
6
Winter 2009
Roar Magazine
At the Dobson Invitational, senior Brianna Pantilione receicved third place
in Student Congress House 3. Senior
Cory Hernandez received third place
in Student Congress House 3. Senior
Kaci Jensen advanced to semi-finals
in Humorous Interpretation. Junior
Preston Bickle advanced to octa-finals
in Public Forum Debate.
FFA
Red Mountain FFA students made
and installed garden boxes for the
students at Salk Elementary School on
Oct. 6 and 7.
Members of the Red Mountain
FFA Chapter were one of 46 teams
participating in the 2009 National
FFA Floriculture Career Development
Event (CDE) on Oct. 21-24. All the
team members; Julio Rivera, Tori
Payne, Brandon Walker, and Jesus
Lopez received bronze medals and
were awarded a bronze award for the
team overall.
At the National FFA Convention
in Indianapolis on Oct. 20-25, Red
Mountain’s FFA received national
recognition as a 2-star chapter. The
Florticulture team, which consisted
of senior Ashley Meyer, junior Holly
Bennett and senior Laura Frear,
earned a Silver Award. Meyer and
Clark received individual silver medals while Bennett and Frear earned
bronze medals.
Do you have..
Dance fever?
By Valerie Nunez
Year after year, Red Mountain has been blown away by the
dance concert, and this year is
no different. The concert, titled
“When in Doubt, Dance It Out,”
was performed Dec. 3-5 in the
auditorium. With a positive
image and good teamwork, the
dance classes came together to
create entertainment for students, staff and parents.
“The groups of girls that I
have this year are so much more
compatible with each other
[than in previous years],” said
Ms. Fox, who has taught dance
at Red Mountain since 1991.
“It’s more of a family. I’m
really proud of the way we’re
working this year.”
While the beginning and
intermediate classes’ dances are
choreographed by Ms. Fox, the
higher level classes have a little
more leeway with creating their
own dances. Advanced dance
is partially choreographed by
Ms. Fox with the rest by the
students. Dance Production,
which includes Dance Force,
Red Mountain’s elite dance
company, choreographs all on
their own.
“[Senior] Crista Procopio’s
Requiem is my favorite dance,
because it’s really powerful and
when I’m done dancing I want
to go fight
crime,” said senior Sarah Sakai,
who is in Advanced dance.
All of the classes worked
very hard to put this concert
together. Unfortunately, in the
past audiences sometimes took
offense to
the dancers’
costumes
and dances,
but Ms. Fox
has her own
method of
making sure
the concert
stays school
appropriate.
“On the
first dress
rehearsal,
I have a parent review board
and there’s usually about seven
parents that come on the dress
rehearsal night. They’ll see
all the different dances with
the music and
Run, Walk,
and Roll
By Amanda Szpakowski
Mesa Association for Disabled Sports
(MASD) is having their first annual 5/10
K Run, Walk and Roll at the Tempe Town
Lake Beach Park on Saturday, January 9, to
raise money for the disabled sports programs throughout the valley.
In the upcoming Run, Rock and Roll
PHOTO COURTESY OF SPORTSILLUSTRATED.CNN.COM
Sara Rosati, 9, sprinted to a gold medal in the 25meter dash at the Summer Games in New Jersey.
event, the Mesa Association of Sports for
the Disabled is seeking out high school
clubs and groups that would be willing to
participate in the fundraiser by sponsoring
Special Olympic athletes.
“I know there is a lot of demands put
on clubs to sponsor various organizations,”
said Gregg Baumgarten, the principal of
SHARP school. “But, this would be a great
opportunity to sponsor a group that impacts
kids at every school in MPS.”
Special Olympics hopes to recognize
high school clubs that garner the most
participants, raise the most funds and other
recognitions.
Just like the Special Olympics slogan
depicts, “Let me win, but if I cannot win let
me be brave in the attempt,” Red Mountain
students have a tremendous opportunity to
help those who cannot always help themselves.
The sports programs have grown tremendously over the last 25 years and now
include almost 1,000 participants involved
in year round Special Olympics.
Roar Magazine
News
the costumes,” said Ms. Fox.
“Out of the four years I’ve been
doing that, I’ve never had any
problems.”
The dance concert, a night
of entertainment
for Red
Mountain,
came after
hours of
practice for
the dance
groups.
“The
one thing
I consistently try to
demonstrate
through
teaching is
that if you
respect yourself and you respect
others, you will get respect in
return and you get results that
way,” said Ms. Fox. “High
expectations, high output.”
“Disabilities are yet another manifestation of global diversity,” said SecretaryGeneral of the United Nations. “Let us
always be committed to the fundamental
principles of dignity and equality for all human beings.”
Special Olympics provides the disabled
with a variety of activities from wheelchair
basketball, power soccer and quad rugby, to
wheelchair track and field and many other
sports events.
The athletes in the program take their
sport very seriously and ask for your support, not pity.
“A rewarding life is filled with challenge,
so don’t pity me. Give me a chance,” said
Special Olympics athlete, Thomas Gatu.
More information on this event is available at www.mesadisabledsports.com or
www.runwalkrollaz.com or by contacting Lane Jeppensen, executive director of
MASD.
This is a great chance for Red Mountain’s
clubs to get involved and help those who
strive to do what comes so easy to the rest.
Winter 2009
7
News
Prevent
H1N1
A Nobel
Peace Prize
for
Follow these tips from the World
Health Organization (WHO) to help
prevent getting the H1N1 virus
(swine flu).
Obama
PHOTO COURTESY OF MSNBC.COM
President Obama is the third leading
American Democrat to win the Nobel Peace
Barack Obama is one of the nation’s
Prize this decade. The last sitting United
youngest presidents and has made history
States president to win the peace prize was
by becoming the first African-American
Theodore Roosevelt in 1906. Woodrow Wilpresident. He was recently awarded the
son won in 1919 and Jimmy Carter in 2002.
Nobel Peace Prize nine months into his
Many are pleased with Obama winning
presidency for his “extraordinary efforts
the award.
to strengthen international diplomacy and
“Obama, as president, created a new
cooperation between people.”
climate in international politics,” the Nobel
Nominations for the prize had to be
Peace Prize Committee wrote.
postmarked by Feb. 1, only 12 days after
People say that Obama winning the NoObama took office. The Nobel Peace Prize
bel Peace Prize is ironic due to the fact that
committee sent out its petition for nominahe has not accomplished anything
tions last September, two
“Obama, as yet. Some students here at Red
months before Obama was
Mountain also have negative
elected president.
president,
opinions on Obama winning the
Americans are asking,
award.
created
a
new
“What has President Obama
“I’m against Obama winning
climate in
really accomplished?”
the Nobel Peace Prize, because he
President Obama’s only real
international hasn’t done anything. He’s only
accomplishment so far has
politics,” the promoted peace,” said sophomore
been to change the direction
Casey Jaber. “If he actually did
and tone of American foreign
Nobel Peace create peace and all that other
policy from one-sided to
stuff you win it for, then I’d be
Prize
many-sided. So, should he
fine with it, but he hasn’t accomCommittee
have won this award?
plished anything. That’s why I’m
“Republicans say that
wrote.
against it.”
Obama won this award more
Other students on Red Mounfor his ‘star power’ than his actual achievetain’s campus share the same opinion.
ments,” said Walter Gibbs, of The New
“I’m against it as well, because he actuYork.
ally needs to do something. I mean, yes,
One the other hand, major Obama suphe can say ‘I’m for peace,’ but that doesn’t
porters, celebrate.
warrant him winning the Nobel Peace
“I am for Obama winning the Nobel
Prize,” said junior Colton Lauer.
Peace Prize, because he has helped people
You can argue the point both ways, but
get their jobs back,” said sophomore Patrick
what already happened cannot be changed.
Montegrosso. “He’s also the first black
By Taylor Houts
president, that’s something to be proud of.”
8
Winter 2009
Roar Magazine
The main route of transmission of
the new influenza A(H1N1) virus seems
to be similar to seasonal influenza, via
droplets that are expelled by speaking,
sneezing or coughing. You can prevent getting infected by avoiding close
contact with people who show influenza-like symptoms (trying to maintain a
distance of about 1 metre if possible)
and taking the following measures:
• Avoid touching your mouth and nose.
• Clean hands thoroughly with soap
and water, or cleanse them with an
alcohol-based hand rub on a regular
basis.
• Avoid close contact with people who
might be ill.
• Reduce the time spent in crowded
settings if possible.
• Practice good health habits including
adequate sleep, eating nutritious food,
and keeping physically active.
If you feel unwell, have high fever,
cough or sore throat:
• Stay at home and keep away from
work, school or crowds.
• Rest and take plenty of fluids.
• Cover your nose and mouth when
coughing and sneezing and, if using
tissues, make sure you dispose of
them carefully.
• Inform family and friends about your
illness and try to avoid contact with
other people.
For more information on the H1N1
virus, contact Red Mountain’s nurse or
a healthcare professional.
FFA grills up a good time
Opinion
Hot Dog Days have begun
Gless, the AgriScience teacher,
students enrolled in the FFA
For 20 years, Red Mounprogram set up tables in the Agtain’s FFA has been hosting
ricultural building and sell hot
Hot Dog Days and feeding
dogs, chips, and drinks for an
hungry students. Started by Mr.
affordable price. Hot
Dog Days are held in
the Ag building from
first through fifth hour.
Hot dogs cost $1 and
chips and drinks cost
50 cents.
“Part of Ag is that
we teach the kids
about food science,”
said FFA advisor Mr.
Sorenson. “This is
one way that they can
apply what they learn
in the classroom to a
real-life setting.”
Hot Dog Days are
a treat for Red Mountain, as they only occur
three or four times a
year.
PHOTO BY LAURA FREAR
Senior Jenna Schulte served Ms. Holcombe a
“We like to do it on
By Lorraine Longhi
plate full of fun.
early release days
when a lot of the
kids aren’t going to
get lunch during the
day, because they
leave,” said Mr.
Sorenson.
However,
students can enjoy
these delicious hot
dogs on days other
PHOTO BY LAURA FREAR
than early release.
Junior Holly Bennett, senior Kassi Williamson and se“Our big one is
nior Alissa Rivenburgh are ready to grill up some
the auto show,” said excitment for Hot Dog Days.
Mr. Sorenson. “We
are allowed to handle food.
sell hot dogs while
“Usually we pull from kids
everyone is outside looking at
who
have food handlers cards to
cars.”
handle
the food, and the officers
All of the money earned
can
help
work with not handling
from selling hot dogs is depositthe
food,”
said Sorenson.
ed in the school’s FFA account.
Hot
Dog
Days are popular
“We use [the account] for
with
students
across campus and
different trips that we go on and
hope
that
it
continues.
different activities throughout
“It’s fun more than anythe year,” said Mr. Sorenson.
thing,”
said Sorenson. “People
Students enrolled in FFA are
from
around
campus can come
allowed to work, but only a few
out and enjoy a hot dog.”
Silent Solidarity: supporting pro-life
By Alexis Green
On Tuesday, Oct. 20, you
might have seen various students around campus wearing
red armbands and refusing to
talk. These students were participating in Silent Solidarity, a
day in which those who support
pro-life express their opinion
on the matter. The event was
hosted by Youth Alive, a Christian club at Red Mountain.
“We decided to take part
in [Silent Solidarity] because
we believe pro-life is morally
right,” said junior Nicholas
Derry. “Youth Alive allows
Christians to share fellowship
with each other and support
each other.”
Silent Solidarity began at
PHOTO BY LORRAINE LONGHI
Junior Amber McGertt and junior
Addriana Castaway showed their
support for pro-life
Red Mountain when the club
president, Nicholas Derry, came
across a website describing how
to get involved with pro-life
awareness.
“We just want to spread the
word,” said junior Addriana
Castaway, vice president of
Youth Alive.
All participants in the event
wore red armbands and wore
red shirts that read “pro-life.”
In addition, many of the participants agreed to stay silent the
entire day.
“We stay silent in order to
honor those who never got a
chance to use their voice,” said
Roar Magazine
Derry.
If you missed your chance to
participate in this event, there
are other ways you can support
pro-life by talking to a Youth
Alive member.
“We have a lot of information on how to get involved,”
said Castaway.
If you would like to join the
club, talk to either Nicholas
Derry, Adrianna Castaway, or
Ms. Hombach for further information in room 274. Meetings
are in room 274 every Friday
during lunch.
Winter 2009
9
News
RM will not forget
the Johnsons
Yearbook
wins big
By Megan Thorson
By Valerie Nunez
After Nate’s death, the family pulled through, thanks to
For years, Red Mountain
the strength they found in one
and the surrounding commuanother and from community
nity have been impacted by the
support.
works of one family—the John“They were much more
sons. Around Red Mountain,
appreciative of life,” said Mr.
staff and students know Dani
Karatinos.
and Ken for their work with the
Nate and Royce Johnson
school, where Dani worked as
both participated in Red Mounthe student store (Catty Shack)
tain’s wrestling program, so
manager
after Nate’s
and Ken
death, the
works as the
wrestling
equipment
team
manager.
started a
“Dani
scholarneeded a
ship in his
job that was
name.
around kids,
“[The
because she
Nate
was so good
Johnson
with kids,”
Memorial
said teacher
Scholarship
Mr. Karatiwas] started
nos, who has
by the
PHOTO COURTESY OF YEARBOOK
known the
wrestling
Royce Johnson was Homecoming King
family for
his senior year at Red Mountain.
program
many years.
to honor
“The Catty
students that showed academic
Shack was one of those jobs that
excellence, citizenship and
satisfied her needs.”
strong spirit—the characteristics
However, this much-loved
that Nate emulated,” said Mr.
family has been plagued with
Karatinos.
tragedy. In 1990, their oldest
There is no doubt that the
son Nate was killed in a car
Johnsons have greatly affected
accident on the way to school.
Red Mountain over the years.
Dani was diagnosed with breast
“The Johnsons were always
cancer in 2006, and passed
a giving, generous, upstandaway early September of this
ing family, successful, yet very
year. Now Ken has started his
humble,” said Mr. DiDomenico,
own battle with cancer.
who knows the family through
“He had a tumor in his throat
working with Ken at the Arizothat turned out to be cancerous,”
na Boys Ranch in the early 90s.
said Ms. DeAnda, who knows
“They cared for everyone, and
the family through their work at
took everyone into their home.
Red Mountain. “He’s still the
The community, of course when
equipment manager, but it’s on
you lose someone like that,
a very part time basis.”
misses them.”
Married for over 30 years,
Dani and Ken had three children, Jenny, Nate and Royce.
10
Winter 2009
Being on the yearbook crew at Red Mountain High School
doesn’t only mean countless hours of hard work, being at every
event that goes on at school, and staying after school to do layout, it
means winning awards.
“I won second place in the national Josten’s 2008-2009 Yeartech
Online Yearbook Spread Contest for my fashion spread,” said Michael Bryce, a former Red Mountain student. “ I won a brand new
iTouch 16 gig.”
The entire yearbook class put their ideas into the page and
helped out.
“Robert Ranes, our Photoshop master, helped me with the cut
outs and pulled my whole smoke idea together. Mrs. Saquella, our
advisor, also edited the pages a ton for me. I couldn’t have done
it without Portraits By Reg photographers who helped us with our
shoot,” said Bryce.
The yearbook staff plans the yearbook layout and theme the year
before the book comes out.
“Since the beginning of the year, we had huge plans in mind for
the fashion spread. When I was given the page to work on, I wanted it to have something different about it that set it apart from the
rest of the book but still went along with the theme,” said Bryce. “I
thought of our smoke background idea one day when I was working
with Robert and thought it would look so cool if it looked like the
page had come out of smoke, like old-timey flashes when you took
a picture with an old camera.”
Pictures were taken all over Red Mountain’s campus.
“We took the pictures around our campus at locations that we
thought weren’t necessarily known to the students,” said Bryce.
This award is a milestone for the Red Mountain yearbook staff.
“I don’t know of any past yearbook awards. This is a huge accomplishment for the yearbook staff,” said Mrs. Saquella.
If you want to join yearbook, talk to Ms. Saquella in room 313.
Roar Magazine
Opinion
Is
really so bad?
By Shelby Madson
Google can easily be considered the number one
search engine used around the world. When you
Google something, most of the time Wikipedia is
in the top five links. With over three million articles available in 48 languages, Wikipedia has a
vast knowledge of anything from historical figures
to favorite bands. Despite its huge popularity, its
reliability is controversial. Yes, anyone can add or
change information on any topic on Wikipedia. Users
can even create new articles for topics that have yet to
be explored. Many people claim that information posted
on the site is not reliable, and I disagree.
People should have the opportunity to change and add their
knowledge on a subject for the whole world to see. Without people
who know more than us, we would never gain new knowledge.
In the case that someone has nothing better to do than to post
something false in an article, the site is monitored. False facts are
removed.
People who have read articles on Wikipedia may have seen
[need citation] at the end of a sentence. This flashing neon sign
alerts readers that information may not be accurate. A number may
follow the statements that are not followed by this “sign;” this number corresponds to a link at the bottom of the article. If you still
aren’t convinced that Wikipedia is completely reliable, a reader can
click on the links and read the same facts on a different site. Reading material on Wikipedia is the same as reading it on any other
Internet site. Workers on a site can change anything in their articles
just like people can go in and change something on Wikipedia.
PHOTO BY TAYLOR HOUTS
Senior Austin Houts is one of many Red Mountain students who uses Wikipedia for information.
Senior Kelsey Meeks uses Wikipedia’s sources to
do her research.
“I use Wikipedia,” said Meeks. “I go to the
bottom of the page [to see] the sources and check
out the sites the writer used.”
Senior Austin Houts has the same opinion.
“I use Wikipedia, and I think it is reliable
because of the sources listed at the bottom of
the page,” said Houts. “Even if someone makes
something up, it’s deleted the next day.”
When reading information or researching a topic,
reliability is always an issue, especially reading information on the Internet. You can never be 100 percent sure if what
you’re reading is completely true, or a twist of
the truth to get people to
read it. Most of the time,
the more times you see that
information, the more accurate it is.
We cannot neglect the
fact that the Internet is
not only creating boundless opportunities for the
world to connect, but is
slowly taking over every
aspect of our lives as well.
Look at all the things that
the Internet has changed.
E-mail has now taken over
communication. Internet
is now becoming a part of
schools. At Red Mountain,
for instance, our parents
can now see our grades at
any moment throughout the year. The Internet is even supplying
jobs; there are many writers and computer experts whose office is
in their own home. For this reason, people are going to turn to the
Internet when they need information fast.
Wikipedia is used in our house and reliability isn’t an issue.
With so many users, it protects articles from forming a biased opinion, which is more than we can say about other sources. Don’t be
afraid to read articles off of Wikipedia because of reliability. Hard
core researchers post information on Wikipedia that you might
not have read. There is a reason why Wikipedia has become so
popular, and I don’t think it’s because the information isn’t reliable.
Next time you feel like Wikipedia is not worthy of the attention,
just think about it as any other news site on the Internet.
“You can never
be 100 percent
sure if what
you’re reading
is completely
true, or a twist
of the truth to
get people to
read it.”
Roar Magazine
WIKIPEDIA LOGO AND HEADER COURTESY OF WIKIPEDIA.ORG
Winter 2009
11
Opinion
By Amanda Szpakowski
“A person is a person no matter how
small,” this quote by the infamous Dr. Seuss
is becoming more and more relevant as
the abortion issue intensifies. An abortion
is the termination of a pregnancy by the
removal or expulsion of a fetus or embryo
from the uterus, resulting in death. Many
ill-informed people
believe that because
the baby has not yet
been born, it is not
alive. They’re dead
wrong.
In the earliest
stages of pregnancy,
18-25 days, the
baby’s heart starts
beating.
Electrical brainwaves have been
recorded as early
as 43 days after
conception on EEG
(electroencephalogram) tests and at
only eight weeks the infant will wake and
sleep, make a fist, suck his/her thumb and
even get hiccups. All of the brain and body
systems are present and will function no
more than a month later.
Along with sensitivity to heat, touch,
light and noise, a baby has his/her own
unique fingerprint in the first 9-12 weeks.
Many teenage girls have made the tough
decision to have an abortion and later
regretted it.
“I didn’t want my life to end; I wasn’t
ready, so I had an abortion,” said an anonymous senior student at Red Mountain. “It
is something I am going to have to live with
for the rest of my life. Looking back on it,
that was my baby, it was my job to protect
Pro-life
...because everyone deserves a voice.
her.”
Not only do women suffer from emotional distress and regret later in life, but
there are also a long list of side effects that
cause more dangerous issues to arise later in
life after an abortion.
Women who have abortions have a
significantly higher
chance of getting breast cancer.
Breast cancer has
risen 50 percent
since abortion was
legalized in America
in 1973.
Bowel injury,
bladder injury, complications in later
pregnancies or an
inability to get pregnant again are other
abortion risks.
Some students,
however, recognize
the risks of an abortion, as well as the maternal and emotional
stance.
“I knew my life would change, but I was
the only one who could speak for my baby.
It wasn’t her fault. It was my decision,
and she deserved all the same opportunities I had,” said an anonymous
senior Red Mountain student who
decided to keep her child.
Many argue that if an event
such as rape or incest occurs it is
morally wrong to force a woman
to “re-live” that traumatic event
by carrying the child to term,
but recent studies indicate less
than one percent of abortions are
derived from such causes.
“I knew my life would
change, but I was the
only one who could
speak for my baby. It
wasn’t her fault. It was
my decision and she deserved all the same opportunities I had.”
12
Winter 2009
Roar Magazine
In today’s society, technology provides
for new methods of pregnancy prevention
that may work up to a few days after intercourse, leaving no room for excuses.
These medicines do not terminate a
pregnancy, but instead prevent conception.
Therefore, there are no arguments that a
woman has “no other choice” than abortion.
Everyone who supported slavery was
free, everyone who supports abortion was
born. It’s always the same “they’re not really people”-but we’ve all heard that before.
The slaves were lacking someone to
speak for them when they could not do so
for themselves. We can not change our negligence to stand up for what was right then,
but we still have that opportunity in regards
to abortion.
The unborn babies are lacking one thing,
a voice. Without it, who knows how many
more abortions may be carried through and
how many more lives may be wasted.
Be a voice for those whose can’t be
heard, but whose spirit is still very much
alive.
Much like Dr. Seuss and Horton did, it is
our turn to save a life, no matter how new,
or “how small.”
For questions or concerns regarding this
issue, see your school counselor.
PHOTOS COURTESY OF PROLIFE.COM
Opinion
...it’s a woman’s right to choose.
Pro-choice
By Megan Thorson
On January 22, 1973, a historic Supreme Court decision was made overturning
a Texas abortion law and making abortion
legal in the United States. The Roe v. Wade
court decision made it legal for a woman to
have an abortion legal as long as it’s in the
earlier months of her pregnancy.
Abortion has been a controversial issue
for hundreds of years. In the U.S., abortion
laws began to appear in the 1820s. Today a
woman who is pregnant can either terminate
her pregnancy (abortion) or choose to give
birth to the child. Some people believe that
having an abortion is wrong and is murder. But the fact remains, it’s the woman’s
choice.
For many teenagers, abortion is an option. Teenagers make mistakes daily, and
they should have to deal with them and
learn from them. Having an abortion is
learning from your mistake, not just ignoring it, or trying to avoid it.
“Abortion was my only option. I was
fifteen. I knew I made a mistake and should
have used protection, but I didn’t,” said
an anonymous Red Mountain senior. “I
learned from my mistake to be more careful.
I know I can’t take care of a child any time
soon. I just never thought it (pregnancy)
would really happen to me.”
for nine months as well as deciding what
to do with her rapist’s child after she gives
birth. If abortion was illegal, the women
that are raped or make a stupid decision and
have unprotected sex have to live with it for
the rest of their life.
A woman should have control of her own
body. If abortions are made illegal, there
would be thousands of women who have
“back alley” abortions. This would put
A fetus may be alive, but it’s just a part
of the women’s body, just like her tonsils or
her appendix, which both can be taken out
without affecting her health. Being inside
something and being a part of something are
two different things. Pregnancy will change
the woman’s life forever.
“When I found out I was pregnant, I was
scared to death. I couldn’t tell my parents,
and there’s no way I could keep the child,”
said an anonymous
Red Mountain junior. “I didn’t have
any other choice but
to have an abortion.”
If a woman is
raped, why should
she have to carry the
baby to term? She
should not have to
remember that horrible time in her life
PHOTOS COURTESY OF PROCHOICE.ORG
Roar Magazine
“I learned from my mistake to be more careful,
because I know I can’t
take care of a child any
time soon. I just never
thought it [pregnancy]
would really happen to
me.”
numerous women at risk, and they could die
from the procedure that was done at home
or done by someone else. They could take
it into their own hands and do it themselves,
knowing that they could not take care of the
child and didn’t want to carry the child to
term.
Every woman should have the choice of
what to do with her body. She should be
able to have the choice of having a child
or not, especially when it comes to rape or
incest. A woman should not have to carry
her baby to term if she doesn’t want to.
For questions or concerns regarding this
issue, see your school counselor.
Winter 2009
13
Opinion
HOLIDAY GREETINGS
How do you wish someone a happy holiday in such a
By Valerie Nunez
politically correct world?
Gone are the days when
people could walk around the
mall during December and
hear or see the words “Merry
Christmas” without instant
backlash from someone in our
politically correct society. Over
the past few years, many have
noticed, be it with agreement
or disgust, that displays stating
“Christmas” have been replaced
with a generic and inoffensive
“holiday.”
Let me state right off the bat
that I am not a Christian, nor
do I practice Judaism, Islam,
Paganism, or any other religion
for that matter. My family and
I celebrate Christmas, but that
doesn’t mean I get horribly
offended if someone offers up a
“Happy Hanukkah.”
We all need to face the
fact that there are quite a few
holiday celebrations, and just
because someone wants to wish
you a happy one doesn’t mean
they are trying to demean your
faith or force theirs on you.
Retailers have tried to
remain secular in their advertising, but it’s a little unnecessary
when consumers are looking for a Christmas tree. The
holiday season has reached its
limit with political correctness
when lots selling pine trees
state “Holiday trees” instead
of “Christmas trees.” Is it really so offensive for people to
openly celebrate?
However, on the other end
of the spectrum is the American
Family Association (AFA), a
non-profit organization that
aims to protect traditional
Christian values. The AFA is
quick to criticize companies for
not using “Christmas” in their
holiday advertising, as they did
to Costco Wholesale and The
Home Depot last year.
This holiday ridiculousness
could be gone if retailers and
consumers alike could find a
middle ground, where people
of one faith agree not to be offended by the words of another.
It’s the holiday season, and we
should all be able to celebrate,
advertise or shop in peace.
Being
safe
around
the
holidays
Staying aware even around the happiest time of the year.
By Amanda Szpakowski
At its best, the holidays can be an
enchanting time of selflessness, family togetherness, spiritual renewal and harmony.
Too often though, the lack of awarness can
change what should be a joyful time into a
disaster.
Naturally, gifts under trees, in cars, and
on the arms of frantic mothers are a common theme of the winter season, but now
more than any other time crime is at a high.
“Close and lock all doors,” said AAA
specialist Holly Nelson, a Red Mountain
alumni. “This simple measure is added
security, yet one that criminals count on you
not doing.”
Christmas shopping is a consistently
hectic time for all. Phone calls, wish lists
and the rat race to the limited sales and
newest game systems leave many people
with cell phones glued to their ears or fingertips fastened to keyboards. This leaves
the distracted holiday shopper extremely
vulnerable.
“Honestly, sometimes it looks like
people are so distracted by their phones they
might just walk into a wall,” says sophomore Gloria Mann. “On a serious note, it
really is unsafe, especially when crossing
the street or walking to your car alone.”
14
Winter 2009
Teenagers as a whole have a false sense
of comfort in less than desirable situations.
Luckily, other precautions may be made
to keep a positive outlook and ensure a
happy holiday.
Park in a well lit area; thieves are less
likely to break into a vehicle when they
can easily be seen by others. Do not leave
valuables inside your vehicle, by simply
placing them into the trunk or bringing them
along with you, you terminate a criminal’s
initiative.
PHOTO COURTESY OF AMANDA SZPAKOWSKI
A sign on Power Road warns holiday shoppers
about recent theft from cars.
Other than stealing, household dangers
occur around the holidays as well. Christmas trees, cooking, fireplaces and candles
all present hazards.
Roar Magazine
A well-watered, trimmed tree is less
likely to catch fire. When placed away from
doorways and heat sources, a Christmas tree
is easily maintained and adds to the holiday
spirit.
Distractions are abundant, so be sure to
never leave a pot, candle or fireplace unattended.
“Safety is really important,” said junior
Connor Bearse. “You want to be there for
everyone you love and you can’t do that if
anything goes wrong.”
Aside from Christmas trees and “Deck
the Halls” style neighborly competition,
the holidays hold many opportunities for
disaster. Guns and other harmful items now
overpower kid’s holiday wish lists. Just
don’t be a Ralphy or “you’ll shoot your eye
out, kid,” precautions can be made to make
sure you enjoy your gifts and stay out of the
hospital.
The holidays should be a time of joy
and appreciation, but one mishap can turn
the season into a disaster. No bubble wrap
necessary, just be aware of your surroundings and keep the good times rolling. Taking a few easy precautions, Red Mountain
students can expect a rewarding, memorable
and stress-free Holiday Break.
Feature
!
S
N
O
I
RMHS HOLIDAY
TRADIT
By Serenity Lane
PHOTO COURTESY OF AWALL PHOTOGRAPHY
Senior Leisha Wallace decorating her tree.
When it comes to the holidays, every
family has different ways of celebrating and
bringing joy to their home. Many students
have beliefs, which dictate what holidays
are to be celebrated in their houses and most
have at least one favorite thing about the
holiday that they love and enjoy.
“My favorite holiday is Christmas because of the whole general feeling.” says
sophomore Rachel Schmitzer.
Many families like to make the holidays
special by bringing friends and relatives
together to share the events.
“My favorite thing to do during the
holiday is spend time with my family that
I never get to see,” says junior Cameron
Marvin.
There are lots of traditions practiced by
a number of students during the holiday
season, including individuals from foreign
countries who are spending this year at Red
Mountain as a foreign exchange students.
“For the holidays back home in my
country of Serbia, I do the normal things,
like be with family,” says senior Isidora
Meals On Wheels
By Alexis Green
During the holiday season,
many people are enjoying delicious meals with their families
and friends. However, there are
many seniors that are unable to
leave their houses and provide
meals for themselves. It is
for that reason that Meals On
Wheels was born.
“Meals on Wheels’ main
mission is to provide a nutritious meal to older adults,” said
Dan Taylor, president and CEO
of East Valley Adult Resources.
Meals on Wheels has been
serving the community for the
past 30 years. They collaborate
with a system that identifies
people who may qualify for
their services and then gives
them an assessment.
Perisic.
Some traditions are based on the
location, and that can make it unique and
special.
“My tradition is going to the beach back
home in my country of Brazil with my family for Christmas.” says sophomore Lucas
Affonso.
Whether your family tradition is having a turkey dinner, decorating your house
or exchanging gifts, the fact remains that
families become closer when sharing.
“The holidays make me feel happy,” says
Marvin. “I’m always in a good mood and
always smiling.”
Cherish and keep these family traditions
alive by celebrating your holiday with your
family and friends. Remember to have fun,
bake cookies, wrap gifts, or set the table for
turkey dinner. Do whatever it takes. These
are some of the most precious holiday moments you can share with your family and
friends.
HELPING O
UT THE
MESA COM
MUNITY
“If they qualify for meals, we
Around the holiday season,
put them on a route and begin
help is always wanted. If you
delivering hot, nutritious meals
wish to assist the cause, volunto them five days a week,” said
teering is an appreciated option.
Taylor.
For the
holiday season, Meals
On Wheels
encourages
the people
in the community to
give a $5
donation
PHOTO COURTESY OF HTTP://WWW.EVARESOURCES.ORG
towards
meals for
homebound seniors.
They accept 16-year-olds and
“I definitely think I am going over, though there are a few
to donate,” said senior Gideon
jobs which require individuals
Wagner. “It’s just $5, and it’s a
over the age of 18. Volunteers
good cause.”
can sign up on their website at
Roar Magazine
www.evadultresources.org.
“Volunteering for Meals On
Wheels is probably the most
eye-opening experience you can
have,” said Taylor.
East Valley Adult Resources
has three commercial kitchens
used for their meal delivery
services. One is located in
downtown Mesa, another in
the Red Mountain Active Adult
Center, and the last in Apache
Junction.
“For both home delivered
meals and meals we serve on
site, we prepare about 1,500
meals a day,” said Taylor. “We
serve about 1,300 people every
year, which is about 120,000
meals.”
Winter 2009
15
Feature
EVIT’s hair-raising event
By Danielle Grobmeier
In December, the East Valley
Institute of Technology will be
hosting its annual winter hair
show. A variety of EVIT students will be working to put the
show together, and the cosmetology students will be exhibiting their creative abilities. This
event will provide an outlet
for the cosmetology students
to display what they have been
learning. The students will be
required to work in teams to
produce an appealing “look”
involving hair, make-up and
ensemble.
“My favorite part about last
year’s show was seeing how
creative the students were,” said
Ms. Brabb, an EVIT cosmetology instructor. “Seeing them up
on stage was amazing.”
Not only do the cosmetology
students get the opportunity to
show off their newly learned
techniques and skills, but they
get the chance to use their
creativity to make a completely
unique style pertaining to their
class theme.
“[The hair show] is comprised of different decades that
people are doing,” said junior
Jennifer Kirby, a first-year cosmetology student. “My class is
doing the 50s.”
Though the first-year cosmetology students will be the only
ones participating in the eras
theme, the second-year students
will be granted creative license
to choose their own theme.
“The second year [students]
don’t really have a theme, we
can basically do whatever we
want,” said senior Monica
Leftwich, a second-year cosmetology student. “My group’s
theme is going to
be seahorses.”
The hair
show allows the
students to express
themselves
and gives
them a unique
experience
that won’t
soon be forgotten.
“I think
each student
doesn’t realize how
much creativity they have in
them until they start working
on something as a group project
and as a team,” said Ms. Brabb.
“To see their final project is
amazing to the students, and
I think it gives them a lot of motivation to keep progressing in
their education.”
PHOTO BY DANIELLE
GROBMEIER
Español es divertido
By Shelby Lewis
The Spanish Club has been a part of Red
Mountain’s culture since the school first
opened. The club studies the traditions and
history of the Hispanic culture.
“It was a charter club,” said Spanish
Club advisor, Ms. Casillas. “When the
school was founded, the club was founded.”
Contrary to what most people may think,
absolutely anyone with an interest in the
Hispanic culture is welcome to join the
club.
“It’s just a small place to get to know
people that are interested in Hispanic culture, and you don’t have to speak Spanish,”
said Ms. Casillas.
This club has influenced many of the
member’s high school lifestyles and also
their future plans.
“It’s better to be bilingual,” said junior
16
Winter 2009
Spanish is fun!
Heather Miller. “I’ll have a better opportunity for a job over someone who isn’t
bilingual.
Students in the club do a
variety of activities to make the
club fun and also a success.
“The best part about Spanish Club is the way the students
work together as a team,”
said Ms. Casillas. “We
do culture activities, and we raise
money together for our functions.”
You can find this club appearing at many
of the school’s largest functions.
“We always do Relay for Life,” said Ms.
Casillas. “We’ll also do some fundraisers.”
Current members are in charge of creating activities to generate interest in the club.
“We ask them to join and tell them how
exciting it is,” said club vice president,
junior Brittany Ward. “We also advertise on RMTV.”
Spanish club can be found every
Monday in room 270, and
they are always
looking for new
members.
PHOTO BY ALEXANDER COLEMAN
Ms. Casilla explained her display for Spanish Club ofrenda.
Roar Magazine
HOSA
Feature
Where the healing starts
and dental terminology, medical
math, and medical and dental
Are you interested in a career
spelling.”
in the medical field? If so, then
Being offered for the first
HOSA is the place for you.
time
at Red Mountain, Mrs.
HOSA stands for Health OcKupferer
is HOSA’s advisor and
cupation Students of America.
keeps
a
positive
attitude when it
You can learn about
comes
to competing.
all different careers
“I
believe
that
from nursing to vetwe
can
take
some
of
erinary assistance.
the
state
competiHOSA can also help
tions,” said Mrs.
you develop the
Kupferer.
skills you need for
You are not
your career.
required
to join
“This organibiotechnology
to be
zation will allow
in
HOSA.
career exploration,”
“Anyone can join
said Mrs. Kupferer.
HOSA,”
said Mrs.
“You will also gain
Kupferer.
“You can
the lab and leaderPHOTO BY KIRSTEN CORRAL
join
if
you
want to
ship skills necessary
Red
Mountain
students
attend
the
HOSA
Leadership
pursue
a
career
in
to succeed.”
By Joel Blood
The students participate in
a competition in April that is
broken up into different events.
“We study in many areas
depending on what career
you want to go in,” said Mrs.
Kupferer. “We have medical
Conference.
the medical field or even just to
have fun.”
Even students interested in
related fields should join the
organization.
“I am taking this class,
because I want to have a career
in criminology,” said junior
Kirsten Corral.
“Scholarships vary from $50
to $1,000,” said Mrs. Kupferer.
With that opportunity, it
gives good reason to learn about
what you want to do. Being its first year, it seems like
things are running smoothly.
They meet on Tuesdays during
lunch. To get more information
about HOSA, you can visit the
website at www.azhosa.org or
contact Mrs. Kupferer in room
722A.
Fashion Club RM struts its stuff
“We look at the fashion
trends from last year and deFor the past two years,
cide which trends are still
the Fashion Club has
in,” said senior Gideon
helped bring fashion
Wagner, vice president of
trends to the forefront
Fashion Club.
of every Red Mountain
Fashion Club already
student.
had its first runway show
“I think that people
this year. After only startare given the
ing last year, Fashion
chance to express
Club already has three
themselves, and
fashion shows under
the Fashion
their belt.
Club is going to
“It went really well,”
help them,” said
said Olvera. “ I didn’t
junior Mariana
know so many people
Olvera, president
were interested in our
of Fashion Club.
club.”
Fashion Club
The members will
isn’t just about
be strutting down the
discussing the
runway in the latlatest trends, they
est apparel in an
PHOTO BY ASSISTANT
decide which ones
PRINCIPAL WALSH upcoming fashion
are hot and which Senior Gideon Wagner
show.
participated in Fashion
are not.
“Our next fashClub’s fashion show.
By Carissa Ferguson
ion show will be sometime in
December,” said Olvera. “I’m
excited for the models. Their
make-up is going to be totally
awesome.”
Anyone interested in the
club, or modeling for a fashion
show, is always welcome.
re given
people a
t
a
h
t
k
ss them“I thin
to expre Club is
e
c
n
a
h
c
the
ashion
nd the F them.”
selves, a
help
going to
“All you
have to do is show up here
on Thursday at lunch in room
100,” said Fashion Club advisor, Ms. Lange. “Were always
looking for models for upcoming fashion shows.”
New members are always
welcome and Fashion Club is a
great way to meet new people
with similar interests.
Roar Magazine
“It varies sometimes. There
are about 15-20 kids in here at
lunch, sometimes more, sometimes less,” said Ms. Lange.
There are various reasons to
join Fashion Club, but interests
change throughout the year.
“I wanted to model in the
fashion shows,” said Olvera.
“I became more involved with
fashion throughout the year.”
Members agree Fashion
Club helps encourage students
to express themselves through
clothing.
“If you look good and know
it, then you’ll feel better about
yourself,” said junior Jessica
Baker.
For more information on the
Fashion Club and to check out
the hottest trends, go by room
100 during lunch on Thursdays.
Winter 2009
17
A&E
The Canadian sensation
Justin Bieber
PHOTO COURTESY OF WWW.JUSTINBIEBERMUSIC.COM
Justin Bieber in his “One Last Lonely Girl” photo shoot.
By Taylor Houts and Shelby Madson
With the Internet becoming increasingly
popular, it is opening up a number of opportunities for every aspect of life. YouTube,
a video site, has made it possible for the
world to connect with one another. Anyone can post their videos showing off their
talent and making it possible for anyone to
recognize you. This is what happened to
15-year-old Canadian native and self-taught
musician Justin Bieber. He posted videos of
himself singing in a local vocal competition
in 2007. Bieber soon started posting more
videos singing his favorite songs. By word
of mouth, Bieber’s YouTube page quickly
reached one million views. Two years
later, at age 15, he is now signed to Island
Records and is Usher’s young protégé.
Bieber, just a kid from a small town in
Canada, was suddenly in a bidding war
between the most popular men in the music
industry, Usher and Justin Timberlake.
Bieber and his team ultimately decided to
sign with Usher and Island Records. Just
a year after being signed, Bieber has three
hit singles and a debut album, “My World,”
which came out Nov 17.
Bieber posted the music video to “One
Time,” his first single, on June 13, 2009,
and it has been viewed over 15 million
times. His first single reached number 16
on the Billboard Hot 100 chart and has
certified gold in the United States.
Bieber’s second single, “One Less
Lonely Girl,” was released on Oct. 6, 2009,
exclusively on iTunes. Unlike “One Time,”
“One Less Lonely Girl” is a mid-tempo ballad that shows off more of Bieber’s unique
voice.
The highly anticipated music video for
“One Less Lonely Girl” was posted on
Bieber’s YouTube page on Oct 13, 2009. It
has since gained Bieber over three million
views.
Bieber’s third single, “Love Me,” hit
iTunes on Oct 26, 2009.
“Love Me” gives Bieber another uptempo song that adds more of a hip hop
flare to the young talent’s sound. It quickly
made its way into the Top 20 singles chart
on iTunes after its release.
Only time can tell if Bieber’s success
will continue to grow, but if the past couple
of months is any indication, Bieber is sure
to take over the world and capture every
teenage girl’s heart along the way. Bieber’s
highly anticipated debut album hit shelves
on Nov 17, 2009. His current singles on are
iTunes now. For more information on the
15-year-old YouTube sensation visit www.
justinbiebermusic.com
Check out these concerts
Saosin
Toby Mac
Sonic Youth
Weezer
Alice Cooper & More
Joel McHale
Jason Alexander
Supercross
Marquee Theater
Tempe, AZ
Dec. 18, 6:30 p.m.
$50 - $75
Dodge Theatre
Phoenix, AZ
Dec. 18, 7:30 p.m.
$22-$47
18
Winter 2009
U.S Airways Center
Phoenix, AZ
Dec. 20, 6 p.m.
$100 - $125
Dodge Theatre
Phoenix, AZ
Dec. 31, 8 p.m.
$34-$62
Marquee Theater
Tempe, AZ
Jan. 1, 7 p. m.
$25 -$75
Celebrity Theater
Phoenix, AZ
Jan. 9, 8 p.m.
$150-$200
Roar Magazine
Dodge Theatre
Phoenix, AZ
Jan. 15, 8 p.m.
$36-$48
Chase Field
Pheonix, AZ
Jan. 16, 7 p.m.
$10 - $2,500
RM Caroling
By Taylor Houts and Shelby Madson
As the holidays start to approach,
Red Mountain starts to share their holiday
spirit. Every year choir students spread
their holiday joy in a timeless way. Caroling has been a holiday tradition for many
years and a tradition here at Red Mountain
for 12 years.
The students who carol on behalf of
Red Mountain are an elite group of choir
students.
“It’s the A hour class [who participates],”
said the choir student teacher, Mr. Wimmlet.
The Red Mountain Carolers sing all
kinds of places during the holiday season.
“We go everywhere,” said junior Mariah
Hatch. “We sometimes go to Tempe Marketplace and other companies that want to
A&E
get into the holiday spirit.”
During the holiday season there is so
much one can do to spread spirit. That is
why the Red Mountain students carol.
“It brings a lot of joy to the season,” said
Mr. Wimmlet. “A lot of people don’t have
spirit, and I think caroling brings that out of
them,”
The Red Mountain Carolers believe that
caroling is important to Red Mountain and
the community.
“There are numerous opportunities to
perform, which brings our group close
together,” said Mr. Johnston, the choir director. “It’s a great way to connect with our
community.”
With caroling being a part of Red
Mountain’s past, there have been some great
memories for choir director Mr. Johnston.
“One of my fondest memories was performing for a three-year-old little girl who
had just had surgery on her ears,” said Mr.
Johnston. “We were the first singing she
ever heard.”
There are many challenges when it
comes to organizing the carolers.
“[One of the largest challenges is]
commitment, because it’s after school and
before,” said junior Robert Ballard.
Mr. Johnston knows there are other difficult parts to organizing the carolers.
“[I think the hardest part is] scheduling
caroling gigs,” Mr. Johnston said.
The students are anxious for the season to start so they can spread their joy of
holiday spirit.
This year’s Red Mountain Carolers have
been hard at work to put on a show that is
sure to bring harmony to peoples’ ears and
warmth in their hearts.
If you would like to request the Red
Mountain Carolers, contact Mr. Johnston
through his website at www2.mpsaz.org/
rmhs/staff/jwjohnston.
Last year, Red Mountain’s Carolers performed during the holidays at Stonebridge Manor.
PHOTO COURTESY OF EMILY NISSEN
Invisible Children’s Benefit Concert
By Alexis Green
At 6 p.m. on Nov. 20, Red
Mountain’s amphitheater was
taken over by local bands and
musicians who came together
in order to support a cause. The
Invisible Children Club started
as a way to raise money for the
children of Uganda. The club
held an annual benefit concert
for the school and the community around them as one of their
fundraising strategies.
“It’s a tradition,” said senior
Cory Hernandez, president of
Invisible Children. “We’ve kept
it going, because it raises a lot
of money.”
The money that they raised
goes towards an organization
called Schools For Schools, a
program which supports the
building of schools in Uganda.
The organization uses the
money earned to build schools
for the children of the country.
“They actually go to Uganda
PHOTO COURTESY OF ALEXIS GREEN
The band, Hello the Mind Control, practiced before their performance in Red
Mountain’s amphitheatre.
Roar Magazine
themselves and help build
schools for [the children],” said
Hernandez.
The club posted flyers
around, school, created a
RMTV commercial, and also
used social networking sites to
spread the word and promote
the event.
“I created a Facebook event
and invited all of my friends,”
said Hernandez.
If you would like further information on Invisible Children,
you can visit the official website
at www.invisiblechildren.com.
For more information on the
club, talk to Mr. Kaufman in
room 282.
Winter 2009
19
A&E
Honor Society
By Taylor Houts and Shelby Madson
On October 14, 2009, while enjoying October Break, a handful of girls and their moms were anxiously waiting outside Martini
Ranch in Scottsdale to see Honor Society on their Fashionably Late
tour. As a new band, the number of devoted fans are limited, but
Honor Society fans have created a small community to help them
rise to the top. Their first album “Fashionably Late” debuted at number 18 on
the Billboard Top 200 chart.
In July of 2009, Honor Society
was signed to Jonas Records, which is
founded by the Jonas Brothers as well
as Hollywood Records. However,
that band has been together making
music independently since 2007.
TESY OF
PHOTO COUR
HALL
Senior Alana Bramhall has been a
ALANA BRAM
fan of the band since July of 2009.
“I would say that Honor Society’s music is
alternative meets pop for the most part,” said Bramhall.
Before being signed, the members worked multiple jobs in order to put out two EPs (a CD only containing a few songs). One of
these EP’s landed in the hands of the Jonas Brothers. Soon Honor
Society found themselves as an opening act on the Jonas Brothers
World Tour 2009, as well as holding their own tour simultaneously,
the Full Moon Crazy Tour.
By Lorraine Longhi
Winter 2009
PHO
B
London Caught Fire
Over the years, Red Mountain High School has amassed
a number of talented young artists. This year, London Caught
Fire, a group of four Red Mountain boys, can add themselves to
that list.
“We’ve been together since
the beginning of last summer,
towards the end of the school
year,” said guitarist and senior
Cameron Duncan.
The band, consisting of
screaming vocals and guitar
driven rhythms, formed from
the group formerly known as
20
The line waiting outside the venue consisted of homemade
t-shirts, signs, and even decorative supplies such as glow sticks.
With the amount of excitement waiting outside two hours prior to
the show, the concert was sure to be nothing less than the best.
Once inside, the stage was swarmed by intense, impatient and
loving fans. Fifteen minutes in, Esmee Denters
was on stage to warm up
the crowd.
She performed four songs
off of her
upcoming album and left
the crowd
wanting more.
After what seemed
like forever,
Honor Society showed
up “fashionably late” ready to
rock the show.
Opening with the
always up beat
PHOTO
dance song, “Full
Moon Crazy,”
COUR
SHELB TESY OF
Y MAD
the crowd roared and
the
party began.
SON
Honor Society worked
hard to make the
audience a part of the show. For the finale,
they played one
of their most popular songs, “See U In The Dark.” Besides singing
along, the whole crowd participated in the dance, the Honor Roll,
that Honor Society created to go along with the song.
If an audience member purchased $15 or more worth of merchandise, they received a wristband that allowed them to attend a meet and greet
with the band.
If you are interested in being a part of
the growing Honor Society community, check
out the band’s website at
www.honorsocietymusic.
A
OF ALAN
com.
URTESY AMHALL
TOS CO
R
Fear Theory and two other individuals in bands outside of Red
Mountain.
“The vocalist for my old
band was going to be out of
town for a big show of ours,”
said Duncan. “I asked Robbie
[Christy] to do guest vocals, and
afterwards we decided to start
our own band, one that was going somewhere.”
The four members take their
personal musical inspiration
from friends and other local
bands who attend Red Mountain.
“The person I’ve learned the
most from on the guitar is John
start selling them.”
Ziolanka,” said Duncan. “He’s
For more information on
probably the best guitarist I
London Caught Fire, go to
know.”
www.myspace.com/londonThough they have only been
caughtfireaz.
a band for roughly six
months, London Caught
Fire is recording next month
with Matt In The Box and
hopes to release a full EP of
their music to Red Mountain shortly afterwards.
“We’re going to record
PHOTO CURTESY OF LORRAINE LONGHI
five songs on this first EP,”
Band members from left to right: junior
said Duncan. “We’ll give
Zachary Koehnlein, senior Cameron Dunout some free ones at our
can, junior David Mills and senior Robert
shows to people before we Christie.
Roar Magazine
Sports
RMHS WRESTLING
Watch your back
time spent together.
“It really is like a
family,” said ChanThe 2009-2010 varsity
dler. “You spend
wrestling team promises to be a
almost more time
legendary one for many reasons,
with the team during
from their colorful athletes to
season than you do
the intense daily training and
with your family.
competition.
After what is going
“We have more than a
on years of wreschance to take state,” said senior
tling, I can’t think of
Joshua Chandler. “I realize that
Coach DiDomenico
every team says that, but we
as anything but famhave numerous factors working
ily. He has always
for us.”
been there for me.”
The wrestling team continues
Along with the
to work hard in prepateam’s recordration for the season
breaking reputation
and reap the benefits.
and comradeship, it
“Honor, pride and
has its cookie-cutter
self-respect are just a
PHOTO COURTESY OF JOEY KUANG
point of ridicule,
few of the rewards of
Matthew DeRosa, 11, takes
just like any other
wrestling,” said senior
Coach DiDomenico’s advice on
sport. For them, it’s
Patrick Oskvarek, who
reversing an opponent.
the uniforms, the
has been wrestling for
infamous singlets.
five years now.
that they may
“It’s just a uniform,” says
Last year the team
encounter.
Oskvarek. “A uniform I happen
had the highest win per“We’ve
to look good in.”
centage in the state and
improved a
The wrestlers view the sinhas high hopes to suclot since last
PHOTO COURTESY OF AMANDA SZPAKOWSKI
ceed this year as well.
season, so we’ll glets as any other uniform such
as cheerleaders’ skirts or vol“I joined wrestling
Joshua Chandler, 12, takes down his opponent using an ankle
give any team
leyball players’ spandex; It is
because of my brother,
pick.
a run for their
complementary to their sport’s
Jason DeRosa, who was a
money,” said
moves and techniques.
state champion here,” said
team,” said Chandler. “I have
DeRosa. “Our
“Our uniforms help us
junior Matthew DeRosa, who
no doubt I will be proud to say
toughest competition will probhopes to follow in his brother’s
I was a part of what our team
ably be Corona Del Sol or Mesa to avoid injury during more
footsteps by taking his own title. accomplishes this year.”
High. They seem to be the only intense moves,” said Chandler.
“They also help us execute the
Senior Kalu Ukaku also
Every year the varsity team
other teams with as much heart
moves much more smoothly.”
looks up to the veteran wrestakes a trip to Lake Havasu for
as us.”
The uniforms, muscular
tlers.
a two-day tournament in the
In addition to the team’s
“The seniors last year were
beginning of December. The
confidence comes an abundance boys, a confident attitude and
team alliance all contribute to
my favorite part of being on the
tournament is a great predicof comical characters.
what makes Red Mountain’s
team,” said Ukaku. “They were tor of the success of the of the
“Before a match, I’m scared
varsity wrestling team so
fun to be around and helped the
upcoming season.
for my life,” says Ukaku,” and
younger wrestlers a lot.”
“The Havasu trip is a great
after I’m still scared, but at least renowned. Support the Red
Mountain wrestlers in their upOther than intense practices
way for our team to get a feel
I won.”
and lifelong friendships, the
for our potential for the season,”
The wrestling team is known coming tournament Dec. 18-19
at McClintock High School and
team has a positive outlook on
said Chandler.
for its charismatic personalitheir next match at Desert Vista
the upcoming season.
As for competition, the wres- ties, as well as, the bonds that
Jan. 6.
“My goal is to be one of
tlers have their eyes on the win
can only be made by such close
many state placers on our
and are aware of the obstacles
quarters and vast amounts of
By Amanda Szpakowski
Roar Magazine
Winter 2009
21
Sports
Exercise &
nutrition
MYTHS
By Coach Wood
1. Exercise burns a ton of calories
This statement shows the importance of diet
with exercise. You could break out into a dead
run from here to a place half a mile away and
then run back. You will have likely burned off
about 200 calories; that is half a bagel.
People have a preconceived notion that if
they just exercise, they will lose weight. The
truth is that exercise is only part of the key to
success. Science indicates that aerobic exercise
is best done at a moderate level to burn fat.
The primary result of doing aerobic exercise
three to four times per week for at least 30
minutes is a decrease in Cortisol. Researchers
have found that high Cortisol levels and weight
gain are closely related.
2. Skipping meals helps with
weight loss
Individuals who eat a few meals per day
have extremely slow metabolisms. When you
don’t eat frequently, your caloric intake occurs
infrequently and your body gears itself towards
converting almost everything you eat into fat.
Over a period of time your body will produce
millions of enzymes that will be gearing your
body towards fat storage. Once you do this, it
will take several months to reverse.
Eating six to eight small meals every day
is the best diet modification that you can make
to lose weight. You will also absorb more
nutrients with every meal, so you can get away
with eating smaller amounts. In summary,
buy some Tupperware, prepare meals the night
before, and eat between classes.
3. Only doing cardio to lose
weight
Our bodies naturally lose muscle mass and
our metabolisms slow as we age. While doing
cardiovascular exercise is better than doing
nothing, lifting weights and building muscle,
even to a small degree, results in significant
changes and improvements in fat storage. It
takes 15-50 percent more cardio to make up for
low amounts of muscle mass, with respect to
burning calories. This simple fact means that
the muscular guy on the treadmill is burning
two to three times more calories than an obese
person while doing the same amount of work.
It is important to realize that muscle weighs
more than fat. It is better to focus on how
you look in the mirror, your clothing size and
inches lost.
22
Winter 2009
Emergency?
Call Sports Medicine
junior Sharayah Hawley. “We go to every
after school practice.”
Everyone knows that injuries happen in
Many of the staff are using this class as a
sports. Whether an athlete is four or 40,
jumpstart to their careers.
sports put people’s bodies at risk, especial“I’m thinking about going into the nursly in high school. Red Mountain’s Sports
ing program at ASU,” said Hawley.
Medicine helps to care for the school’s
Every member has specific sports to
athletes and their sports-related injuries.
cover and jobs that go along with it.
“Starting this year, every one of my staff
“Seniors get to pick first, then they
is required to have already taken Prevendecide who does the sports with them,” said
tion and Care of Sports Injuries,” said Ms.
Vazquez Ramirez. “Then whatever’s left,
Trulove-Mellor A.T.C. (T.M.) “That means you choose.”
no sophomores.”
Sports Medicine is far from being a walk
Not only does the staff have to have
in the park. Each staff member faces chalknowledge of
lenges that they
every part of
have to overthe body, they
come in order
also have to
to excel in their
learn to diagwork.
nose and treat
“[The most
injuries on the
challenging part
spot.
is] knowing
“I get
what to do with
really nerserious injuries,
vous at first,”
like knowing
said junior
when an injury
Keyla Vazquez
is too serious for
Ramirez.
you to handle by
PHOTO COURTESY OF SPORTS MED
“Then, I ask
yourself,” said
what’s wrong Senior Sabrina Auge wrapped junior Xavier Parsons’ ankle
Hawley.
before a game.
and go from
Sports and
there.”
injuries seem
Sports Medicine is time consuming and
to go hand in hand. Red Mountain Sports
requires dedication. For every minute the
Medicine is the first group athletes turn to
athletes are on the field, these dedicated
when an injury happens, and Sports Medistudents are on the sidelines ready to procine will continue making a huge difference
vide aid to an injured athlete.
to the school’s athletes for years to come.
“We started going to football practices
two weeks before school started,” said
By Shelby Lewis
Roar Magazine
Sports
Girls golf swings
into action
By Steven Mortlock
The girls golf team has high hopes of
winning state this year. So far they have
played four tournaments and have done
well. As a second year coach, Coach Kirkpatrick thinks her team has done well and
can continue their success.
“We are doing well, we have definitely improved our basics as a team,” said
Coach Kirkpatrick. “We are working on
fine-tuning our individual swings and also
have improved in the areas of fitness, rules
knowledge and mental toughness.”
Coach Kirkpatrick sees a difference in
this year’s team from past years.
“I think we’re a bit more solid this year,”
said Coach Kirkpatrick. “We’re getting
more competitive amongst each other,
which is driving the girls to work harder.”
Sophomore Halana Perkins takes a swing at Atla Mesa
Golf Course.
Dedication and focus are key to the
team’s success this year.
“We’re really dedicated, and we try
to stay focused,” said junior Dorothy
Randall. “Our scores are really constant.
They don’t go up and down a lot, because
we’re focused on what to do.”
The spirit of the competition has made
the team come closer together.
“We all focus together, it’s an individual sport but it makes us feel a lot closer,”
said Randall. “We’ve become sort of a
family over the season.”
Co-Captain junior Kamio Espindola
thinks the team has a chance to do fine at
state even with the tough competition they
will face.
“I think we can come in the top part of
the competition,” said Espindola, “considering Corona, Hamilton, and Xavier are
all good teams.”
For more information on the golf team,
contact Coach Kirkpatrick at her website
www.sherikirkpatrickgolf.com.
PHOTO BY PORTRAITS BY REG
Boys golf heads to victory
By Steven Mortlock
The boys golf team placed
fourth in state finishing up there
terrific season. They played in
several tournaments before state
to help them prepare.
“We’ve played four tournaments,” said Coach Hamilton.
“We’ve placed
second in three of
the tournaments
and fourth in one
of them.”
This was Coach
Hamiltons first
year as head coach
of the golf team he
believed to have
lots of talent.
“We have four
or five good players,” said
Coach Hamilton. “The team
keeps it in the fairway and
makes good shots.”
Despite the good season the
team still has room for improvement.
“We need to keep a good attitude and just keep practicing,”
said sophomore Brett Wilson.
The players believe that they
a part of one of the top-ranked
teams in Arizona.
“Right now we’re at least
second or third,”
said senior Bobbie
Lee Robinson. “The
team hasn’t reached
its full potential yet,
but we’ve come back
from starting off
pretty bad and coming back strong.”
If you are looking
to join the golf team,
Robinson has some
advice for you.
“If you’re going to join this
team, don’t just do it because
you want to get out of fifth
hour,” said Robinson. “If you
really want to play golf, you
need to do it because you really
want to.”
To find out how to join golf
or find out when the golf team
has a golf tournament, see
Coach Hamilton in Room 263.
“The team
keeps it in
the fairway
and makes
good
shots.”
PHOTO BY PORTRAITS BY REG
Senior Alexander Argos lining up his shot at Atla Mesa golf course.
Roar Magazine
Winter 2009
23
What better way to spend your holiday season
than curled up by the fire with a good book?!
Ask Rylee Erdman-Kennelly (sophomore) for a
copy of Rowen Bay's newest novel for only
$5.00 and the author will sign it for you!
Fly UP