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NCTC COMPREHENSIVE PROGRAM REVIEW PLAN
NCTC
COMPREHENSIVE
PROGRAM REVIEW
PLAN
A PROCESS FOR
SELF-EVALUATION
AND
CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT
July 2005/October 2006/November 2006
Rev July 08 (ajs)
1
Purposes and Procedures for Assessing Student Academic Achievement
Introduction
NCTC's Comprehensive Program Review Plan involves collecting data that
measures the achievement of program outcomes and accountability measures.
Generally, data collection will be an ongoing process for faculty. Qualifying the
data and using it to complete the Comprehensive Program Review Plan will help
faculty determine how well their graduates are efficiently and effectively
achieving the programs' stated outcomes. A Comprehensive Program Review will
be on a five-year cycle for all programs. When completed, they are submitted to
the Academic Deans of each campus for review.
Purposes
The purposes of NCTC's Comprehensive Program Review of student academic
achievement of learning outcomes are as follows:
• To demonstrate achievement of student learning outcomes within an
integrated curriculum including both technical and general education.
• To continuously improve program curriculum through review of student
assessment results, validation of outcomes with business and industry and
transfer institutions, and integration of general learning outcomes that
contribute to graduates' bases of knowledge and our Institutional Learner
Outcomes (formerly referred to as "Core Competencies").
• To demonstrate program accountability and value to the College's various
stakeholders.
• To continuously review the validity of our assessment process by
providing meaningful information and reliable data.
Philosophy
NCTC recognizes that program review must be grounded in our mission and
effective in achieving our stated purposes. The basis for our assessment efforts
lies in the curriculum, and the value of the results will be evident in the
connection of teaching and learning as a cause-and-effect process. What we do as
educators in terms of delivery methods and techniques, the various methods by
which students learn, and appropriate level and content of our curriculum are all
factors in successful student learning.
As educators, we are responsible not only for teaching students in ways that can
maximize their access to learning, but also for ensuring that we are teaching them
what they need to know and be able to do. Through our curriculum development
and review processes, we validate that we are, indeed, teaching students what they
need to know and be able to do, as validated by transfer institutions and by
business and industry employers. Through our assessment processes, NCTC will
validate that students have gained the competencies expected of entry-level
employees and transfer students as outlined by the learning outcomes of their
programs.
Rev July 08 (ajs)
2
It is the goal of NCTC to meet or exceed students' and employers' expectations.
Our process for assessing student achievement of learning outcomes and for using
the results to improve our programs, our delivery, and our services is dedicated to
that goal.
DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM REVIEW
Northland Community & Technical College strives to be a dynamic learning
community that supports collaboration, diversity, and student success through
quality programs and enthusiastic teaching, learning, and serving. The program
review process is designed to ensure excellent educational programs that address
student and community needs in an efficient and effective manner. It will be
helpful to focus on where the program is now from a variety of perspectives,
where do we want the program to be, and how and when does the program reach
that point.
The purpose for program review is to:
• Ensure that the program meets its stated mission and addresses the
strategic directions of the college.
• To demonstrate achievement of student learning outcomes within an
integrated curriculum including both technical and general education.
• To demonstrate program accountability and value to the College’s various
stakeholders.
• To continuously review the validity of our assessment process in terms of
providing meaningful information and reliable data.
• To identify and plan for future opportunities.
• To continuously improve program curriculum through review of student
assessment results, validation of outcomes with business and industry and
transfer institutions, and integration of general learning outcomes that
contribute to graduates’ bases of knowledge and our Institutional Learner
Outcomes (formerly referred to as “Core Competencies”).
Elements of the process include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Faculty leadership
Flexibility in defining areas to be assessed
Support provided by the deans and the Assessment and Program Review
committee.
Recommendations based on quantitative and qualitative data
A continuous improvement cycle whereby the recommendations and
action plan for one cycle are addressed in the next cycle
Sharing and communication of the program review summary and action
plan with others at the college
Rev July 08 (ajs)
3
A program review team may consist of:
• Program director (Team Chair)
• Program faculty
• Academic Dean
• Division chair
• Advisory committee representative(s) and /or business/ industry
representative
Examples of programs are:
• A group of courses that result in a certificate or degree (example: diploma
in Accounting, AAS in Aviation Maintenance Technology, …)
• Transfer programs, as well as sequences of courses taken for transfer to
the university (ENG1111 and 1112 sequence, business transfer courses,
…)
• Individual courses or a sequence of courses or combinations of courses
(communication courses, math sequence, performing arts program)
• Special programs (Honors, Service Learning, Learning Communities, etc.)
• Others
The process will involve the following steps:
• Establish program review team
• Hold a team meeting to review purpose, process and end product
• Collect qualitative and quantitative data and other pertinent documents
• Review the data, reflecting on the purposes for program review
• Complete the program review form
• Present summary of program review data and conclusions to the academic
dean, assessment committee, advisory committee, and other constituents
as appropriate.
Timeframes for program review will be:
• Every five years for most programs
• More often for programs where specific issues have been identified and
where interim reporting may be necessary
Timeline:
Start the program review process ............................................................... September 1
Submit draft to the Assessment Committee for feedback ............................ November 30
Presentation to deans and Assessment Committee ................................... April meeting
The report is reviewed by the Assessment and Program Review committee for
evaluation of the process and continuous improvement, program faculty are
encouraged to attend the meeting for discussion
Rev July 08 (ajs)
4
HOW TO COMPLETE AND ASSEMBLE THIS REPORT FOR
SUBMISSION
The following pages represent the Comprehensive Program Review report that
will be submitted along with supporting documentation where appropriate. Each
of the major headings/areas conclude with your (or your teams) analysis and
evaluation of the data provided. As you type in the required information each
area of the document can expand to accommodate the needed space. To maintain
an easy to read format, include a page break between each major heading/area.
Ex: Focus On Students (page break), Focus On Faculty And Staff (page break), etc.
Attached supporting documentation behind the last page of the report in the
following manner:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
PROGRAM PERFORMANCE INDICATORS
APPENDIX A
FOCUS ON STUDENTS
APPENDIX B
FOCUS ON FACULTY AND STAFF
APPENDIX C
FOCUS ON CURRICULUM
APPENDIX D
FOCUS ON FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT
APPENDIX E
FOCUS ON SUPPORT
APPENDIX F
FOCUS ON COMMUNITY
APPENDIX G
OTHER DOCUMENTATION
APPENDIX H
Separate each Appendix section with a title page
Rev July 08 (ajs)
5
NCTC COMPREHENSIVE
PROGRAM REVIEW
REPORT
2008
Please prepare and submit this document electronically if you are able:
PROGRAM NAME:
_________________________________________________________________
REPORT PREPARED AND SUBMITTED BY:
_________________________________________________________________
DATE OF THIS REPORT:
_________________________________________________________________
LAST PROGRAM REVIEW MONTH AND YEAR:
_________________________________________________________________
Rev July 08 (ajs)
6
PROGRAM OVERVIEW
State the mission of the program, describe program goals and objectives, describe
the relationship to overall college mission and goals, … Add space as needed.
Rev July 08 (ajs)
7
FOCUS ON EFFICIENCY
PROGRAM PERFORMANCE INDICATORS
1. Program FYE
2. Graduate/FTE
3. Cost Ratio
EFFICIENCY
4. FYE/FTE
5. Instructional Cost Study
6. % Full by Section
(Attach program data analysis and other supporting documentation in appendix A)
Analysis and evaluation:
(State your analysis and evaluation of the efficiency indicators here)
Rev July 08 (ajs)
8
FOCUS ON EFFECTIVENESS
FOCUS ON STUDENTS
Demographics
[Analysis or examination of the demographics of the students enrolled, special
populations being served or not being served, trends and patterns of enrollment,
comparisons to other MnSCU institutions and national trends, …]
Student Satisfaction
[Student surveys of enrollees, transfer students and/or graduates (programspecific or institution-level), qualitative measures for example focus groups or
interviews, …]
Learning Outcomes Assessments
[Documented outcomes, degree of faculty participation in regular assessment
activities, results of assessments, what has been learned from assessments, what
has changed as a result of assessments, what plans are there for changes in the
future, are there appropriate feedback loops to improve student learning, …]
Student Success
[Retention and completion rates, comparison to other MnSCU institutions and
national trends, transfer rates and/or transfer success, graduates’ perspectives,
employers’ perspectives, degree to which students succeed at next educational
level, degree to which diverse populations succeed,…]
Analysis and evaluation of Focus on Students:
Rev July 08 (ajs)
9
FOCUS ON FACULTY AND STAFF
Reflect on the faculty and staff in the program and the degree to which their needs
are met, in order for them to in turn be successful with students. Please comment
on each of the following categories. Add space as needed.
Demographics
[Demographics of faculty and staff, full-time, part-time and adjunct utilization,
support positions. Briefly describe the makeup of core faculty in the program and
how are they utilized…]
Qualifications, Degrees, and Experience
(list each instructor identified above and address these qualities)
Other Professional Activities or Affiliations for each:
[Special projects, reassigned time, professional organizations, grants,
partnerships, publications, presentations, other contributions, …]
Analysis and evaluation of Focus on Faculty and Staff:
Rev July 08 (ajs)
10
FOCUS ON CURRICULUM
Reflect on the curriculum for the program—the courses, the scope and sequence,
articulation with other institutions, teaching innovations, and other relevant issues.
Please comment on each of the following categories. Add space as needed.
Summary of Program Curriculum
[Degrees, certificates, sequences of courses]
Curricular Issues
[Articulation, program development, course development, pre reqs, scheduling,
student preparedness from high-school, dept core courses, sequencing, Mn
Transfer …]
Innovations or Changes in Last Five Years
[New issues, significant changes, improved methodologies …]
Future outlook
[Links to trends of industry, job market projections…]
Institutional Learner Outcomes
[How these tie in with course learner outcomes and program learner outcomes,…]
Analysis and evaluation of Focus on Curriculum:
Rev July 08 (ajs)
11
FOCUS ON FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT
Reflect on the equipment available at your facility or available elsewhere with
industry. Consider the age and condition as well as viability of use for future
trends.
Facility
[Location, access, security of your equipment or for your instructional area. Space
available, classroom layout, furniture, technology, concerns, needs
Equipment
Briefly describe your equipment used at the college and available in industry for
instruction. Is it adequate, updated, available, or efficient? What are the cycles
for replacement or refurbishment of the equipment. What are the future needs or
trends.
Analysis and evaluation of Focus on Facilities and Equipment:
Rev July 08 (ajs)
12
FOCUS ON SUPPORT
Reflect on the support issues related to this program. Please comment on each of
the following categories. To what degree are they met, where are there kudos to
be given, changes that have taken place, improvements to be made …?
Add space as needed.
Technology
[Hardware and software, technical issues and/or support, instructional issues
and/or support, training for faculty …]
Learning Resources
[Collection of books, databases, journals, videos; learning assistance or tutoring
…]
Marketing and Public Relations
[Brochures, print materials, website, special events, recruitment efforts …]
Support Services
[Advisement, assessment, testing, job placement, …]
Resources, Budget (past 5 years)
[Staffing, operating and capital budgets, grants, …]
Analysis and Evaluation of Focus on Support
Rev July 08 (ajs)
13
FOCUS ON COMMUNITY
Reflect on the degree to which you seek regular input from outside of the
college—the community—for this program. Please comment on each category.
Add space as needed.
Advisory Committee
[Advisory Committees’ composition and input, number of Advisory Committee
meetings, minutes of Advisory Committee meetings since last review, Other
activities/involvement of the cimmittee ]
Community Groups
[High school connections, community agency connections, other forms of
community involvement …]
Community Issues Related to Program
[Trends, employment trends or projections, transportation, funding]
External Requirements or Considerations
[Certifications, accreditations, licensures, professional organization status or
involvement …]
Analysis and Evaluation of Focus on Community
Rev July 08 (ajs)
14
SUMMARY
Add space as needed.
Program Achievements, Progress Made Since Last Review
[Major achievements, changes, implementations, progress made since the time of
the last review]
Mission/Institutional, Program and Course Outcomes
[To what degree does the program meet its mission, institutional, program and
course outcomes]
Strengths
[Unique characteristics, special capacities …]
Challenges
[Concerns, difficulties, areas for improvement …]
Celebration and Recognition
[Awards, honors, special recognitions …]
Recommendations for Change
[Internal to program, external to program, new opportunities, is additional data
needed to effectively evaluate this program? …]
Rev July 08 (ajs)
15
ACTION PLANS
Program review is a means to an end, not an end in itself. Your final task is to
develop a plan to improve the program.
[Identify 2-3 program goals and objectives for the future, improvements planned,
changes taking place, responsible parties, timeframes, resource implications,
etc.…]
Goal:
1. Objective:
Time Frame
Responsible Party(ies) Course of Action:
2. Objective:
Goal:
1. Objective
2. Objective
Goal:
1. Objective
2. Objective
Rev July 08 (ajs)
16
FOLLOW-UP ACTIVITIES
1.
Archiving Program Review Forms and Supporting Documentation
•
Electronic copies of the completed program review should be filed
with the:
(Supporting data and other accompanying documentation may be hard
copy).
o
o
o
o
Program coordinator/director
Academic dean
Chief Academic Officer
Posted to Virtual Office
NCTC MISSION, VISION AND GOALS
MISSION
Northland Community and Technical College is dedicated to creating a quality
learning environment for all learners through partnerships with students,
communities, businesses, and other educational institutions.
VISION
Northland Community and Technical College will be widely recognized as a
progressive leader in community and technical college education, responsive to
the needs of our learners through the use of partnerships, innovation, and
technology.
Rev July 08 (ajs)
17
STRATEGIC DIRECTIONS & GOALS (10/06/06)
Strategic Direction 1: Increase access and opportunity.
The campuses of Northland Community and Technical College remain committed
to serving the unique educational and training needs of the residents and the
enterprises of northwestern Minnesota, offering affordable programs and services
close to home.
Goal 1.1
Improve the “user friendly” nature of the entire admission and registration
process.
Goal 1.2
Increase access to courses, programs, and services through alternative and
innovative delivery and scheduling.
Goal 1.3
Expand, refine and improve articulation agreements with programs with four-year
colleges and universities.
Goal 1.4
Develop increased support for the unique needs of students from diverse cultural
and economic backgrounds.
Goal 1.5
Strengthen relationships and services to area school districts.
Strategic Direction 2: Promote and measure high-quality learning programs and
services.
Northland Community and Technical College will continue to be proactive in
informing potential students and clients of the breadth and quality of its programs
as measured by ever improving assessment methodologies.
Goal 2.1
Promote community understanding and appreciation of the role and mission of the
college.
Goal 2.2
Develop benchmarks for quality assessment where possible.
improve academic programs and services.
Continuously
Goal 2.3
Pursue and preserve accreditation and certification standards and other standards
of externally validated excellence.
Goal 2.4
Develop in students an improved sense of civic responsibility and cultural
awareness to achieve the benefits of working and living in multicultural societies.
Rev July 08 (ajs)
18
Strategic Direction 3: Provide programs and services integral to state and
regional economic needs.
Through continuous assessment of the education and training needs of northwestern Minnesota, Northland Community and Technical College will continue to
develop, upgrade, and assess programs and services that respond to the changing
needs of those it serves.
Goal 3.1
Reach out to communities to encourage the mutual sharing of resources and
facilities.
Goal 3.2
Maintain and strengthen college connections to communities and enterprises to
enhance economic development and quality of life.
Goal 3.3
Develop a consistent pattern for gathering and assessing demographic data from
the region.
Goal 3.4
Strengthen the use of advisory committees in the development, improvement, and
assessment of technical programs.
Strategic Direction 4: Innovate to meet current and future educational needs
efficiently.
Through collaboration with other institutions and agencies, and through effective
use of emerging technologies, Northland Community and Technical College will
accommodate a variety of learning styles and preferences in a cost effective
manner.
Goal 4.1
Use innovation and continuous improvement in operational systems and
programming designs.
Goal 4.2
Expand the uses of technology into all systems, programs, deliveries of service,
and curricula.
Goal 4.3
Develop enhanced methodologies for in-creasing income from non-traditional
sources to support scholarships, programs, and pilot projects.
Goal 4.4
Encourage professional development among all employees, including cultural
sensitivity and proficiency in instructional technology.
Rev July 08 (ajs)
19
HELPFUL TIPS
(Assessment and Program Review Committee)
 Remember that program review is not a punitive process, but intended to improve the
program.
*
Identify special data needs early during the process to allow time to generate the data
and provide it when it’s needed by the team.
*
Adjunct faculty, if selected carefully, can make excellent contributions.
*
Former and current team leaders can be helpful resources.
*
Don’t hesitate to ask questions and get clarifications.
*
Review examples of previously completed Program Reviews by other programs.
*
If some members of the team need to attend team meetings sporadically, or are
occasionally unable to attend, e-mail can be used to keep them updated and is also
useful as a means of getting a good cross-section of input.
*
Some have found it helpful to keep the committee to a manageable size.
*
Once you have started entering information on the program review form, always
make a back-up copy!
*
Be prepared for occasional miscommunications and “bumps in the road.”
*
Start early and do little pieces along the way.
*
It works well to have team members who are willing to work as a team and figure
things out together.
20
PROGRAM ASSESSMENT & PROGRAM REVIEW CHART
2008 through 2013
Program
Contact Persons
Nursing -Practical
Dorinda Sorvig
Farm Operations & Management
Jerrod Hanson
Heating, Ventilation & Air
Conditioning
Karl Krogfoss
Cardiovascular Technology
Angie Sand/Jane Kratochvil
Respiratory Care Practitioner
Tony Sorum/Al Gunderson
Architectural Technology & Design,
Kim Philipp/Rod Lahren
Cosmetology
Manicurist
Esthetician
Diane Rothschadl/Vicki
Thompson
Plumbing Technology
Ed Krogfoss
Carpentry
Loren Abel
Accounting
Deb Riley
Revised AJS 4/6/09
Date of
Assessment
Plan
Date of
Assessment
Summary
Year of
Review
2008-2009
2009-2010
Met with
Assessment
Committee.
Program
Contact Persons
Administrative Support
Sue Olson &
Kathy Olson/Marcia Sandahl
Pharmacy Technology
Joe Farrell/Danika Braaten
Welding Technology
Joel Ziegler
Farm Business Management
Ron Dvergsten, Danie
Packard/Greg Dvergsten
Thaddeus McCamant
Specialty Crops
Medical Secretary
Lori Anderson
Early Childhood & Paraprofessional
Peggy Rogers
Surgical Technology
Ruth LeTexier
Electronics Technology
Andrew Dahlen
Liberal Arts
Brian Huschle &
Linda Samuelson/Diane
Drake
Welding-EGF
Brian Suckow
Revised AJS 4/6/09
Date of
Assessment
Plan
Date of
Assessment
Summary
Year of
Review
2010-2011
Met with
Assessment
Committee.
Program
Contact Persons
Auto Body Collision Technology
Kent Wagner/Tim Reuter
Fire Technology
Dave Hoefer
Radiologic Technology
Deb King/Al Shervold
Paramedicine
Dan Sponsler/Dennis Labahn
Auto Service Technology
Dennis Wiersma/Todd
Anvinson/Norman
Halsa/Mark A. Johnson
Computer Service/Networking
Don Campbell/Don Fischer
Criminal Justice
James Jesme/Teresa Mattison
Physical Therapist Assistant
Justin Berry/Shelly Koerber
Practical Nursing – EGF
Barb Forrest
Practical Nursing – Distance Ed
Barb Forrest
Construction Electricity
Curtis Peters
Revised AJS 4/6/09
Date of
Assessment
Plan
Date of
Assessment
Summary
Year of
Review
2011-2012
2012-2013
Met with
Assessment
Committee.
Program
Contact Persons
Occupational Therapy Assistant
Cassie Hilts/Julie Grabanski
Sales, Marketing & Management
Kit Brenan
Nursing, AS
Sue Field
Revised AJS 4/6/09
Date of
Assessment
Plan
Date of
Assessment
Summary
Year of
Review
Met with
Assessment
Committee.
NCTC
COMPREHENSIVE
PROGRAM REVIEW
PLAN
A PROCESS FOR
SELF-EVALUATION
AND
CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT
CONSTRUCTION ELECTRICITY
1
Purposes and Procedures for Assessing Student Academic Achievement
Introduction
NCTC's Comprehensive Program Review Plan involves collecting data that measures the
achievement of program outcomes. Generally, data collection will be an ongoing process
for faculty. Qualifying the data and using it to complete the Comprehensive Program
Review Plan will help faculty determine how well their graduates are achieving the
programs' stated outcomes. A Comprehensive Program Review will be on a five-year
cycle for all programs. When completed, they are submitted to the Academic Deans of
each campus for review.
Purposes
The purposes of NCTC's Comprehensive Program Review of student academic
achievement of learning outcomes are as follows:
• To demonstrate achievement of student learning outcomes within an integrated
curriculum including both technical and general education.
• To continuously improve program curriculum through review of student
assessment results, validation of outcomes with business and industry and transfer
institutions, and integration of general learning outcomes that contribute to
graduates' bases of knowledge and our Institutional Learner Outcomes (formerly
referred to as "Core Competencies").
• To demonstrate accountability and value of a NCTC education to the College's
various stakeholders.
• To continuously review the validity of our assessment process by providing
meaningful information and reliable data.
Philosophy
NCTC recognizes that program review must be grounded in our mission and effective in
achieving our stated purposes. The basis for our assessment efforts lies in the curriculum,
and the value of the results will be evident in the connection of teaching and learning as a
cause-and-effect process. What we do as educators in terms of delivery methods and
techniques, the various methods by which students learn, and appropriate level and
content of our curriculum are all factors in successful student learning.
As educators, we are responsible not only for teaching students in ways that can
maximize their access to learning, but also for ensuring that we are teaching them what
they need to know and be able to do. Through our curriculum development and review
processes, we validate that we are, indeed, teaching students what they need to know and
be able to do, as validated by transfer institutions and by business and industry
employers. Through our assessment processes, NCTC will validate that students have
gained the competencies expected of entry-level employees and transfer students as
outlined by the learning outcomes of their programs.
It is the goal of NCTC to meet or exceed students' and employers' expectations. Our
process for assessing student achievement of learning outcomes and for using the results
to improve our programs, our delivery, and our services is dedicated to that goal.
2
DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM REVIEW
Northland Community & Technical College strives to be a dynamic learning community
that supports collaboration, diversity, and student success through quality programs and
enthusiastic teaching, learning, and serving. The program review process is designed to
ensure excellent educational programs that address student and community needs. It will
be helpful to focus on where the program is now from a variety of perspectives, where do
we want the program to be, and how and when does the program reach that point.
The purpose for program review is to:
• Ensure that the program meets its stated mission and addresses the strategic
directions of the college.
• To demonstrate achievement of student learning outcomes within an integrated
curriculum including both technical and general education.
• To demonstrate accountability and value of a NCTC education to the College’s
various stakeholders.
• To continuously review the validity of our assessment process in terms of
providing meaningful information and reliable data.
• To identify and plan for future opportunities.
• To continuously improve program curriculum through review of student
assessment results, validation of outcomes with business and industry and transfer
institutions, and integration of general learning outcomes that contribute to
graduates’ bases of knowledge and our Institutional Learner Outcomes (formerly
referred to as “Core Competencies”).
Elements of the process include:
• Faculty leadership
• Flexibility in defining areas to be assessed
• Support provided by the deans and the Assessment Program Review committee.
• Recommendations based on quantitative and qualitative data
• A continuous improvement cycle whereby the recommendations and action plan
for one cycle are addressed in the next cycle
• Sharing and communication of the program review summary and action plan
with others at the college
A program review team may consist of:
• Program director
• Program faculty
• Division chair
• Advisory committee representative(s) and /or business/ industry representative
• Administrative representative, ex officio
• APR committee member, ex officio
• Faculty member from another division, as appropriate
• Staff member from other areas, as appropriate
3
Examples of programs are:
• A group of courses that result in a certificate or degree (example: diploma in
Accounting, AAS in Aviation Maintenance Technology, …)
• Transfer programs, as well as sequences of courses taken for transfer to the
university (ENG1111 and 1112 sequence, business transfer courses, …)
• Individual courses or a sequence of courses or combinations of courses
(communication courses, math sequence, performing arts program)
• Special programs (Honors, Service Learning, Learning Communities, etc.)
• Others
The process will involve the following steps:
• Establish program review team
• Hold a team meeting to review purpose, process and end product
• Collect qualitative and quantitative data and other pertinent documents
• Review the data, reflecting on the purposes for program review
• Complete the program review form
• Present summary of program review data and conclusions to the academic dean,
at an AASC meeting, advisory committee meeting, and division chairs meeting.
Timeframes for program review will be:
• Every five years for most programs
• More often for programs where specific issues have been identified and where
interim reporting may be necessary
A suggested timeline for a specific program’s review is provided below. The Team Chair
may modify the number of meetings according to the needs of the program.
Identify programs to review for the academic year and identify team chairs by
......................................................................................... September 1
Orientation for team chairs........................................................................................
September 15
First team meeting to focus on process by ................................................................
September 30
Second team meeting to review standard data sets by ...................................................
October 30
Third team meeting to review data from other sources and determine if more data is
needed by.................................................................... November 30
Fourth team meeting to formulate recommendations and begin writing results by
................................................................................................ February 15
Fifth team meeting to prepare draft by ............................................................................
March 15
Final report completed by ................................................................................................
March 31
Presentation to deans by........................................................................................................
April 1
Share review with AASC mtg, advisory committee mtg, Division chairs ...................after
April 1
4
NORTHLAND COMMUNITY & TECHNICAL COLLEGE
Please prepare and submit this document electronically.
PROGRAM: CONSTRUCTION ELECTRICITY
PROGRAM REVIEW TEAM: Curtis Peters, Dan Edman, Wade Selvig, Scott Halle
DATE OF THIS REPORT: 03/31/2008
PERIOD OF YEARS BEING REVIEWED: 2007-2008
MISSION STATEMENT
We believe in providing a realistic approach to the Construction Electricity
Program, while delivering the skills and technology needed to provide our
students with the tools for a lifetime of continuous learning.
MnSCU Program Performance Indicators
Attach appropriate documentation that addresses each of the
following areas.
1. Cost Per Student:
•
EGF
$7125.97
•
TRF
$7211.07
2. Student: Faculty FTE Ratio
EFFICIENCY
•
EGF 18.72
•
TRF 13.05
3. Graduate: Faculty FTE Ratio:
•
EGF 6.85
•
TRF 4.85
4. GRADUATE CONTINUING EDUCATION RATES:
•
Not Applicable
5. GRADUATE EMPLOYMENT RATES:
EFFECTIVENESS
•
EGF
100%
•
TRF
100%
6. GRADUATE RELATED EMPLOYMENT RATES (FOR
CAREER PROGRAMS ONLY)
•
EGF
95.8%
•
TRF
92.6%
5
FOCUS ON STUDENTS
Reflect on the degree to which the program is meeting student needs. Please comment
on each category. Some suggestions are given after each category—please comment on
only those which are applicable to this program.
Demographics
Age Demographics
40
35
30
25
Number of
20
Students
15
10
5
0
18
20
22
24
26
28
Age
Ethnic Diversity
100
90
80
70
60
Number of
50
Students
40
30
20
10
0
Black
Hispanic
Indian
Unknown
Ethnic Description
White
30+
Student Satisfaction
Students enrolled are surveyed each semester. The student surveys are conducted online
through D2L. And all survey results are available to the instructors and school
administrators.
Would it be valuable to survey students who drop after any semester?
Learning Outcomes Assessments
We administer a Pre/Post test and compare the results to evaluate the degree of student
learning.
Student Success
Retention & Completion rate:
Retention and completion rates EGF Campus 2007 is 77%
Retention and completion rates TRF Campus 2007 is 67%
MnSCU Rates: NA
Transfer Rates: NA
Data Needs
It would be nice to have all data from both Campuses available.
6
FOCUS ON FACULTY AND STAFF
Demographics
Curtis Peters
• Credentials
Master Electrician in Minnesota and North Dakota
25 years experience in the electrical field
Daniel Edman
• Credentials
Wade Selvig
• Degree
Diploma, Moorhead Technical College (Refrigeration/Air Conditioning)
• Credentials
Journeyman Electrician in Minnesota and North Dakota
Scott Halle
•
•
Degree
AAS, North Dakota State College of Science (Electrical Technology)
Credentials
Master Electrician in North Dakota, Journeyman Electrician in Minnesota
Professional Activities
MEA members
All Construction Electricity faculty are MEA members: Minnesota Electrical Association
is an association of people involved in the electrical industry.
IAEI members
All Construction Electricity faculty are IAEI members: International Association of
Electrical Inspectors is an association of Contractors, Electricians and Inspectors to
promote safety in the electrical industry.
MEIC
All Construction Electricity faculty attended this conference, the conference deals with
various topics related to the Construction Electricity Programs throughout the state of
Minnesota.
Computer Technology Training
All Construction Electricity faculty attend many of the scheduled training sessions made
available.
Adjunct Faculty
Our program at the present time does not have adjunct faculty,
Staff
We do have some clerical support and also the use of work study students.
Data Needs
What additional data that is currently not available would have been helpful to effectively
evaluate this area of the program?
7
FOCUS ON CURRICULUM
Summary of Program Curriculum
See appendix A
Curricular Issues
Minnesota Department of Labor & Industry, Electrical Licensing Division.
Lead-in Courses
Our program, at the present time, does not allow transfer of any core classes for a
secondary school.
Follow-up Courses
At this time we do not offer any.
Scheduling
We currently schedule most of our classes from 8:00 AM to 4:00 PM to simulate a
normal work day for a Construction Electrician.
Innovations or Changes in Last Five Years
The National Electrical Code gets revised every 3 years with numerous changes that need
to be addressed. Also, technology changes rapidly so we must keep up with all changes
such as Solid State Electronics, Programmable Logic Controllers, Smart Relays, Variable
Frequency Drives and the associated software.
Future outlook
Most areas are looking for skilled electricians to replace electricians due to retirement
and to increase manpower.
8
Institutional Learner Outcomes
Foundation Skills:
All students are assessed to determine their reading, writing and math skills.
Developmental courses are available for students whose cut scores indicate a need for
developmental courses.
Thinking Skills:
Construction Electricity students are required to use critical thinking and problem solving
skills frequently. They use these skills to solve problems using troubleshooting methods
and Code applications in the classroom and lab.
Global & Civic Responsibility:
General education, Club activities and community service projects are used to reach this
outcome.
Applied & Informational Technology:
Construction Electricity students use computer technology daily with our Lab-Volt
software. They also use different types of meters for troubleshooting various electric
circuits.
Personal Development:
The Construction Electricity faculty encourage professional attitudes and habits by
keeping attendance records, evaluating student work quality and efficency.
Data Needs
What additional data that is currently not available would have been helpful to effectively
evaluate this area of the program?
FOCUS ON SUPPORT
Technology
We have purchased Lab-Volt LVVL software to enhance student learning.
Facilities and Equipment
Equipment: Many of the pieces of equipment are used till they are obsolete or worn out.
Equipment is purchased or replaced as funding is made available as this can place a
heavy strain on our supply budget. Other areas that we are struggling are in the raising
cost of basic materials used in the lab. For example conduit and copper wire have
increased in price by 300% over the last three years.
Classrooms: On the EGF Campus classrooms are assigned as requested by faculty. There
always seems to be a shortage of classrooms available.
Labs: We feel that on the EGF Campus it would be beneficial to the students to have
dedicated lab space that is not shared with other programs.
Learning Resources
Internet access to students, Learning Center, library.
Marketing and Public Relations
We have numerous employers from many areas that come and recruit our students and
are also active in Career Exploration Days. Our college has a specific website for our
potential students.
Support Services
Advisement: We currently feel that our advisement of students is very professionally
done by both school advisors and the Construction Electricity faculty.
Assessment: We currently feel there is plenty of assessment.
Testing: Services for students requiring special accommodations for testing is currently
being handled on an individual basis.
Job Placement: Job Placement is currently sufficient with the use of college staff and
faculty.
9
Resources, Budget (past 5 years)
Operating Budget: We feel on both campuses there are no provisions made for the rate of
inflation in our current and future budgets due to the fact that the costs of lab supplies
have increased by 300% in the past 3 years.
Data Needs
What additional data that is currently not available would have been helpful to effectively
evaluate this area of the program?
FOCUS ON COMMUNITY.
Advisory Committee
We currently have a combined advisory board for both campuses that is planned to meet
twice each year, at this time we are planning to meet in EGF in the spring.
We have attached our advisory board minutes See appendix B
Community Groups
Both campuses have career day presentations for area high school students so that they
can become aware of technical and trade programs. EGF participates with the Forx
Builders Association with a project each year. Both campuses participate in Community
Service projects through there respective Construction Electricity Clubs.
Community Issues Related to Program
Electrical contractors in all areas of the United States are in need of our graduates.
MnSCU’s enrollment caps did have an adverse impact on enrollment for the Fall of 2007
at some MnSCU affiliated campuses however many area employers are still in need of
qualified graduates.
10
External Requirements or Considerations
Our program is accredited by the Minnesota Department of Labor & Industry.
Data Needs
What additional data that is currently not available would have been helpful to effectively
evaluate this area of the program?
SUMMARY
Add space as needed.
Program Achievements, Progress Made Since Last Review
NA
Mission/Institutional, Program and Course Outcomes
NA
Strengths
TRF feels they have adequate space for their needs.
Challenges
EGF feels that sharing lab space with two other programs is a major challenge. Both
campuses feel that a decrease in Perkins funding our equipment money is causing us to
fall behind in maintaining current technology.
Celebration and Recognition
NA
Recommendations for Change
Segregated lab space on the EGF Campus for the Construction Electricity program. Move
TRF Construction Electricity program to Main Campus.
11
ACTION PLAN
Program review is a means to an end, not an end in itself. Your final task is to develop a
plan to improve the program.
[Identify 2-3 program goals and objectives for the future, improvements planned, changes
taking place, responsible parties, timeframes, resource implications, etc.…]
Goal: Obtain latest technology in equipment
Time
Responsible
Resource
1.Objective: Frame
Party(ies)
Implications
Continuous Faculty &
Budgets
Administration
2. Objective:
Goal: Improve lab space facilities
1. Objective: Continuous
Faculty, Administration Available
& Maintenance
Funding
2. Objective
Goal: Maintain individual professional development plans
1. Objective: Continuous
2. Objective
Faculty
12
FOLLOW-UP ACTIVITIES
1. Archiving Program Review Forms and Supporting Documentation
• Electronic copies of the completed program review should be filed with the:
(Supporting data and other accompanying documentation may be hard copy).
o Program coordinator/director
o Academic dean
o Institutional Research person/registrar
o Library
13
NCTC MISSION, VISION AND GOALS
MISSION
Northland Community and Technical College is dedicated to creating a quality learning
environment for all learners through partnerships with students, communities, businesses,
and other educational institutions.
VISION
Northland Community and Technical College will be widely recognized as a progressive
leader in community and technical college education, responsive to the needs of our
learners through the use of partnerships, innovation, and technology.
STRATEGIC GOALS (6/21/05)
• Expand programs and access opportunities.
• Graduate students with a greater sense of civic responsibility and cultural
awareness that will enhance working and living in multicultural societies.
• Use innovation and continuous improvement to compete through operational
systems improvement and programming designs.
• Strengthen college connections to communities.
• Improve student access and success by supporting students from diverse
backgrounds.
• Infuse technology into all systems, programs, delivery of services, and curricula.
• Strengthen Pre K-16 education through Pre K-16 relationships.
• Pursue and preserve accreditation/certification standards and other standards of
externally validated excellence.
• Increase its efforts and results in gathering resources from outside sources.
14
HELPFUL TIPS
(Assessment and Program Review Committee)
 Remember that program review is not a punitive process, but intended to improve
the program.
* Identify special data needs early during the process to allow time to generate the data
and provide it when it’s needed by the team.
* Prepare for the first team meeting by meeting in advance with those who provide
support (examples: Institutional Research, tutoring, curriculum).
* Adjunct faculty, if selected carefully, can make excellent contributions.
* Former and current team leaders can be helpful resources.
* Don’t hesitate to ask questions and get clarifications.
* Team chairs can gain insight from other program reviews.
* If some members of the team need to attend team meetings sporadically, or are
occasionally unable to attend, e-mail can be used to keep them updated and is also
useful as a means of getting a good cross-section of input.
* Some have found it helpful to keep the committee to a manageable size.
* Once you have started entering information on the program review form, always make
a back-up copy!
* Be prepared for occasional miscommunications and “bumps in the road.”
* Start early and do little pieces along the way.
* It works well to have team members who are willing to work as a team and figure
things out together.
15
NCTC
COMPREHENSIVE
PROGRAM REVIEW
PLAN
A PROCESS FOR
SELF-EVALUATION
AND
CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT
OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY
ASSISTANT PROGRAM
July 2005/October 2006/November 2006
4/29/09
1
NORTHLAND COMMUNITY & TECHNICAL COLLEGE
PROGRAM: ____Occupational Therapy Assistant Program ______________
PROGRAM REVIEW TEAM:
Cassie Hilts, MOT, OTR/L Program Director
Julie Grabanski, MSA, OTR/L, OTA Instructor
DATE OF THIS REPORT: _____April 1, 2008________________________
PERIOD OF YEARS BEING REVIEWED: _2002-2003 through 2006-2007
OVERVIEW
Occupational Therapy Assistant Program Mission Statement
The mission of the program is to prepare competent entry level occupational therapy assistants
preparing for practice environments at the Associate of Applied Science degree level. The
department provides quality occupational learning opportunities to learners in partnership with
local and regional healthcare facilities.
Occupational Therapy Assistant Program Vision Statement
Students participate in academic and experiential learning experiences which provide life-long
learning skills needed in the changing healthcare industry. Graduates are prepared to provide
quality care to clients and families and to engage in professional and ethical relationships within
the healthcare community.
The mission and vision of the program reflects the broader mission statement of Northland
Community and Technical College. The primary mission of the OTA program is to provide a
quality learning environment in partnership with local and regional facilities.
Occupational Therapy Assistant Program Student Learner Outcomes
Upon successful completion of the Occupational Therapy Assistant program, a graduate will be
able to:
1. Perform entry-level competencies, based on occupational therapy practice standards.
2. Implement occupation based interventions in collaboration with consumers, families and
other service providers.
3. Perform entry-level practice competencies safely and proficiently in traditional and
emerging areas of practice.
4. Communicate effectively with consumers, families and other service providers.
5. Demonstrate ethical and professional behavior while displaying respect for diversity of
culture, age and gender
4/29/09
2
MnSCU Program Performance Indicators
Attach appropriate documentation that addresses each of the
following areas.
1. Cost Per Student
•
•
•
2005: 0.47
2006: 0.56
2007: 0.51
2. Student FYE/Faculty FTE Ratio
EFFICIENCY
•
•
•
2005: 9.31
2006: 10.66
2007: 15.03
3. Graduate: Faculty FTE Ratio
•
•
•
2005: 4.43
2006: 7.10
2007: 6.76
4. GRADUATE CONTINUING EDUCATION RATES
•
•
•
•
•
EFFECTIVENESS
5. GRADUATE EMPLOYMENT RATES
•
•
•
•
•
4/29/09
2001: 18%
2002: 10%
2003: 0%
2004: 0%
2005: 11%
2001: 70%
2002: 43%
2003: 100%
2004: 83%
2005: 100%
3
6. GRADUATE RELATED EMPLOYMENT RATES (FOR
CAREER PROGRAMS ONLY)
FOCUS ON STUDENTS
Reflect on the degree to which the program is meeting student needs. Please comment
on each category. Add space as needed.
Demographics
The majority of students enrolled in the OTA program are Caucasian females
under the age of 24. However the demographics of the students are changing.
In 02-03 1005 of the students were Caucasian, this year 78% of the students are
Caucasian coming closer to reflecting the 2006 AOTA report on ethnicity of OTA
programs of 75% Caucasian. Native American and Hispanic students make up
19% of the students enrolled in the OTA program. The students enrolled older
than the age of 24 has increased to 30% and male enrollment has increased
from 4% to 13%.
Please see Appendix A for year by year information regarding demographics.
02-03
03-04
04-05
05-06
06-07
Applicants
16
18
16
14
25
Admitted
into program
13
18
16
14
17
Total # of
Student
Enrolled in
OTA
Program
22
27
30
25
30
Comparison
to
19
22
25
33
38
4/29/09
4
AOTA
Average
EnrollmentAccredited
OTA Schools
Comparison
to MnScu
OTA
Program
enrollment
36
35
47
--
35
Graduates
6
9
14
10
11
Retention
rate
35%
(6/17)
70%
(9/13)
77%
(14/18)
63%
(10/16)
79%
(11/14)
Placement
rate
83%
100%
92%
90%
NBCOT
exam pass
rate
64%
(2003)
50%
(2004)
88%
(2005)
83%
(2006)
100%
(2007)
For the years 2004, 2005 and 2006 of the students who are employed as a
COTA or a position related to their education, 89% are employed in North Dakota
(Grand Forks or Grafton area) or Minnesota.
Student Satisfaction
Surveys indicate that they are satisfied with the education they received from the
OTA program. Graduates rate the program as above average.
Learning Outcomes Assessments
See Appendix B for Program Evaluation results for previous five years for
• Student satisfaction
• Learner Outcomes Assessments
• Student Success
4/29/09
5
•
•
•
•
•
•
Results of assessments
What has been learned from assessments,
What has changed as a result of assessments
What plans are there for changes in the future
Employers perspective,
Graduates perspectives
Data Needs
What additional data that is currently not available would have been helpful to effectively
evaluate this area of the program?
The employment information of our graduates does not seem to come on a
regular timely basis.
FOCUS ON FACULTY AND STAFF
Reflect on the faculty and staff in the program and the degree to which their needs are
met, in order for them to in turn be successful with students. Please comment on each
of the following categories. Add space as needed.
Demographics
Full-time Core Faculty
2
Mean years in the current position for core OTA faculty
Mean age of core OTA faculty
10
45
Number of core OTA faculty who are male
Number of core faculty who are female
Number of core OTA faculty who are Caucasian
0
2
2
Highest degrees held by core OTA faculty
MSA/MS
MOT
1
1
Years of faculty experience:
Julie has 16 years of experience as an OT – in physical health, geriatric areas
and 7 years experience teaching in an OTA program.
Cassie has 28 years of experience as an OT – in mental health, adult, geriatric
adolescent and children, and acute inpatient and community mental health. She
4/29/09
6
has six years of administration and supervisory experience and 19 years
experience teaching.
Area of faculty weakness is adolescent and pediatric experience in physical and
mental health practice.
Professional Activities
Please see Appendix C
Adjunct Faculty
None
Staff
Clerical and support staff are available to provide service to the program. Work
study students may be assigned to assist with clerical duties.
The last ACOTE accreditation suggested that the college review the clerical
needs of the program to better enable the faculty to fulfill teaching and
administrative responsibilities.
Data Needs
What additional data that is currently not available would have been helpful to effectively
evaluate this area of the program.
FOCUS ON CURRICULUM
Reflect on the curriculum for the program—the courses, the scope and sequence,
articulation with other institutions, teaching innovations, and other relevant issues.
Please comment on each of the following categories. Add space as needed.
Summary of Program Curriculum
AAS in OTA 72 credits
24 Liberal Art credits
5 General Education credits
43 Occupational Therapy Assistant credits
Occupational Therapy Assistant credits include 12 credits of Level II Fieldwork
(i.e. clinicals, internships) at the completion of academic coursework.
4/29/09
7
Please see Appendix D for suggested program plan
Curricular Issues
[Articulation, program development, course development]
OTA courses are being reviewed and will be rewritten as needed to reflect the
language of the 2006 ACOTE accreditation standards for OTA education.
Lead-in Courses
[Developmental preparation, prior courses and their impact, dual enrollment or
articulation agreements with high schools, …]
Developmental courses meet the need of the program.
Follow-up Courses
[Sequential courses, connecting activities, …]
A task force is currently exploring the possibility of an articulation agreement with
the Occupational Therapy Department at the University of North Dakota.
Scheduling
[Enrollment patterns and trends, time and date issues such as day, afternoon, evening, or
weekend, format issues such as self-paced, distance, or short-term, …]
Most OTA courses are scheduled during the hours between 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. to
accommodate student’s employment and day care issues. All OTA courses are
hybrid courses with extensive use of D2L. Some of the courses are self-paced
courses with students meeting individually with the instructor for guidance in the
development of their projects.
Innovations or Changes in Last Five Years
[New issues, significant changes, improved methodologies …]
New educational standards are requiring OTA programs to teach additional skills
in emerging areas of occupational therapy practice.
Instructors have committed themselves to active learning teaching strategies.
Future outlook
[Links to trends of industry, job market projections…]
U.S. Department of Labor
4/29/09
8
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Occupational Outlook Handbook
Employment is projected to increase much faster than the average,
reflecting growth in the number of individuals with disabilities or limited
function who require therapeutic services.
Occupational therapist assistants generally must complete an associate
degree or a certificate program; in contrast, occupational therapist aides
usually receive most of their training on the job.
In an effort to control rising health care costs, third-party payers are
expected to encourage occupational therapists to delegate more hands-on
therapy work to lower-paid occupational therapist assistants and aides.
Employment of occupational therapist assistants and aides is expected to grow
much faster than average for all occupations through 2014. The impact of
proposed Federal legislation imposing limits on reimbursement for therapy
services may adversely affect the job market for occupational therapist assistants
and aides in the short run. Over the long run, however, demand for occupational
therapist assistants and aides will continue to rise because of the increasing
number of individuals with disabilities or limited function. Job growth will result
from an aging population, including the baby-boom generation, which will need
more occupational therapy services. The increased prevalence of sensory
disorders in children will increase the demand for occupational therapy services.
Increasing demand also will result from advances in medicine that allow more
people with critical problems to survive and then need rehabilitative therapy. In
an effort to control rising health care costs, third-party payers are expected to
encourage occupational therapists to delegate more hands-on therapy work to
lower-paid occupational therapist assistants and aides.
Median annual earnings of occupational therapist assistants were $38,430 in
May 2004. The middle 50 percent earned between $31,970 and $44,390. The
lowest 10 percent earned less than $25,880, and the highest 10 percent earned
more than $52,700. Median annual earnings of occupational therapist assistants
were $40,130 in offices of other health practitioners, which includes offices of
occupational therapists.
Median annual earnings of occupational therapist aides were $23,150 in May
2004. The middle 50 percent earned between $19,080 and $31,910. The lowest
10 percent earned less than $15,820, and the highest 10 percent earned more
than $41,560.
Occupational therapy workforce shortages are appearing in selected markets
and sectors. The American Hospital Association’s Commission on Workforce for
Hospitals and Health Systems found in a 2002 report
4/29/09
9
that hospitals were experiencing shortages in occupational therapy personnel.
Demand for occupational therapy services in early intervention programs and in
schools for children with disabilities served under the
federal Individuals With Disabilities Education Act remains strong. Newly
emerging areas of practice for occupational therapists related to the needs of an
aging population are increasing demand for services. These
include low-vision rehabilitation; treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, and other
forms of dementia, including caregiver training; older driver safety and
rehabilitation; assisted living; and home safety and
home modification to enable “aging in place.” Based on a June 2003 survey of
education program directors, 62% of occupational therapy and occupational
therapy assistant students were able to secure jobs before graduation or within 4
weeks of graduation, and 95% were able to secure jobs within 6–8 weeks of
graduation. About 95% of OTs are women and 5% are men; this statistic has
remained fairly steady since 1990. However, among OTAs the percentage of
males continues to decline, from 8.2% in 1990 to the current 2.9%. Fears about
future shortages of practitioners appear well founded. The median age of OTs
increased from 36 in 1990 to 42 in 2006. Among OTAs, the median age rose
from 33 in 1990 to 45 in 2006. The number of practitioners in the 50- to 59-yearold group is at its highest level ever, and the percentage of practitioners under
age 30 is now just 7.9%, compared with 23% in 1997. Should this trend continue,
the field will experience a significant shortage due to retirement, as
demands rise with the retirement of the baby boomers. As would be expected
with an aging work force, median years of professional experience is also
increasing. The median for all practitioners is now 13 years, from 9.5 years in
2000; 10% of practitioners have at least 30 years of professional experience; and
23.2% of all respondents have achieved advanced practice certification or
recognition, up from 15.4% in 2000.
Institutional Learner Outcomes
[How these tie in with course learner outcomes and program learner outcomes,…]
•
Performing entry-level competencies, based on occupational therapy
practice standards requires students to apply critical thinking and
problem solving skills.
•
Implementing occupation based interventions in collaboration with
consumers, families and other service providers requires students to
develop professional behaviors.
•
Performing entry-level practice competencies safely and proficiently in
traditional and emerging areas of practice requires the use
informational technology as student’s access information that provides
evidence for practice.
4/29/09
10
•
Communicating effectively with consumers, families and other service
providers requires that students have strong foundational skills in
reading and writing.
•
Demonstrating ethical and professional behavior while displaying
respect for diversity of culture, age and gender correlates with global
and civic responsibility by requiring cultural and political awareness
and social sensitivity.
Data Needs
What additional data that is currently not available would have been helpful to effectively
evaluate this area of the program?
FOCUS ON SUPPORT
Reflect on the support issues related to this program. Please comment on each of the
following categories. To what degree are they met, where are there kudos to be given,
changes that have taken place, improvements to be made …?
Add space as needed.
Technology
[Hardware and software, technical issues and/or support, instructional issues and/or
support, training for faculty …]
Recent equipment purchases have allowed the program to remain current with
hardware and software. Attending national conferences and workshops is difficult
as budget considerations provide roadblocks.
Facilities and Equipment
[Cycles for replacement or refurbishment of equipment, classroom spaces, labs, furniture,
concerns, needs …]
Equipment is used until they are obsolete or worn out. Equipment is replaced at
that point.
Classroom and lab space is adequate and not a concern for the program.
However, lab space does contribute to limiting the number of students in each
lab section to 12.
Learning Resources
[Collection of books, databases, journals, videos; learning assistance or tutoring …]
4/29/09
11
The program utilizes a style of teaching that requires that students have access
to a variety of books and journals. Multiple copies of books are required so that
students can work in teams to find information related to their assignments.
The program has a collection of books, many are outdated. The budget allows a
gradual replacement of those books.
The program subscribes to several journals through the library. A wider variety of
professional journals would be more desirable but is not possible at this time due
to budget constraints.
Videos are becoming worn out and gradually being replaced by DVD’s as the
budget allows.
Marketing and Public Relations
[Brochures, print materials, website, special events, recruitment efforts …]
Until this year, marketing support from the college has been relatively unheard of
for the OTA program. This year the marketing director has been a valued
resource in developing strategies and tools for promoting the program.
Support Services
[Advisement, assessment, testing, job placement, …]
Faculty are adjusting to the changes in the advising procedures.
Resources, Budget (past 5 years)
[Staffing, operating and capital budgets, grants, …]
We feel that there are no provisions made on our supply budget for the rate of
inflation. In addition the national accreditation fees continue to increase each
year. In the past few years we have absorbed the cost, but this year we have
asked for a corresponding increase in our budget and will continue to do so in
future budget requests.
Data Needs
What additional data that is currently not available would have been helpful to effectively
evaluate this area of the program?
4/29/09
12
FOCUS ON COMMUNITY
Reflect on the degree to which you seek regular input from outside of the college—the
community—for this program. Please comment on each category. Add space as
needed.
Advisory Committee
[Advisory Committees’ composition and input, number of Advisory Committee meetings
during the last two years, minutes of Advisory Committee meetings since last review,
degree to which the Advisory Committee reviews the competencies of the degree or
certificates and program courses, timeframes for last reviews, other functions or activities
of the Advisory Committee …]
The advisory committee meets twice a year, once in the fall and again in the
spring. The committee reviews changes in the program, course content or
policies of the program. In addition, the committee provides guidance in
maintaining a quality educational program.
Please see Appendix E for Advisory committee minutes.
Community Groups
[High school connections, community agency connections, other forms of community
involvement …]
The OTA program participates in the health career day, the Marketplace for kids,
local high school college fairs and individual high school presentations.
Students from the program have had service learning projects involving a local
middle school, the Northland Rescue Mission and Head Start. Students
collaborate with University of North Dakota OT students in developmental
screening of babies, learning about technology and OT/OTA role delineation.
The program has sponsored workshops for students and local occupational
therapy practitioners in sensory integration, driver training, occupational therapy
practice framework and physical agent modalities.
The occupational therapy assistant students are involvedi n the campus
community through the OTA club and volunteering to support other programs
such as Early Childhood educations childrens day
All students in the OTA program are members of the national association, AOTA,
resulting in the OTA program receiving a Gold Level in the student membership
circle.
4/29/09
13
Community Issues Related to Program
[Trends, employment trends or projections, transportation, funding]
Previously jobs in the greater Grand Forks area were difficult to obtain, but this
has changed in the past three years and more of our graduates are obtaining
employment in the ND, MN region.
External Requirements or Considerations
[Certifications, accreditations, licensures, professional organization status or involvement
…]
Both faculty maintain certification with the National Board of Certification in
Occupational Therapy and licensure through the Minnesota Department of
Health.
Cassie is a member of the North Dakota Occupational Therapy Association and
Julie is a member of the Minnesota Occupational Therapy Association.
The program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy
Education.
Data Needs
What additional data that is currently not available would have been helpful to effectively
evaluate this area of the program?
SUMMARY
Add space as needed.
Program Achievements, Progress Made Since Last Review
[Major achievements, changes, implementations, progress made since the time of the last
review]
The Occupational Therapy Assistant program received accreditation from the
Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education in 2006. Because
there were no areas of noncompliance cited, accreditation was awarded for a ten
year period.
Mission/Institutional, Program and Course Outcomes
[To what degree does the program meet its mission, institutional, program and course
outcomes]
The past five years of program assessment indicates that the OTA program is
meeting its mission, institutional, program and course outcomes.
4/29/09
14
Please see appendix B
Strengths
[Unique characteristics, special capacities …]
Major Strengths are as noted:
• The administrations ongoing commitment to the program, particularly
during the periods of low program enrollment. This support has enabled
the program to continue to meet the needs of the community partners in
providing occupational therapy personnel to this region.
•
The faculty ongoing collaboration in the creation of strong experiential
learning opportunities and hands-on experiences with a team of
professionals. This model of learning in the classroom and in the
community service projects has better prepared students for their clinical
practice.
•
The program evaluation process of both the program and the courses
within. The faculty openly and frequently solicit feedback from students
and the occupational therapy community in order to make changes that
improve the quality of the program and its graduates.
•
The flexibility of FW coordinator in accommodating the needs of the
students, considering both the challenges and circumstances that are
encountered in this rural area. She is commended for her use of
technology to provide constant support and collaboration between
students.
•
The fieldwork educators are acknowledged for their strong support of the
program. Their dedication to student growth and development is
especially noteworthy in light of the limited number of therapists in the
area and having to drive long distances to the college.
•
The graduates are supportive representatives of the college, the program
and the profession. They are recognized for their problem-solving skills
and professionalism.
•
The students demonstrate passion, initiative, motivation and willingness to
engage in the learning process.
•
Incorporation of computer technology for learning in the classroom, where
all students use a laptop. These technology-based learning methods
broaden the student’s interest in research and prepare them to
successfully meet the professional documentation methods of current
practice.
4/29/09
15
•
The collaborative relationship with UND Occupational Therapy department
affords opportunities for shared activities between OT and OTA students.
Students are provided opportunities to learn and practice role delineation,
supervision and collaboration.
The OTA program is accredited by ACOTE, has experienced faculty, and a good
relationship with the OT school at University of North Dakota. One of the OTA
faculty has experience in emerging practice areas. There is a large community
of Occupational Therapy practitioners that are available as resources for guest
lectures and to give input into content of courses. The OTA program is able to
integrate community resources into labs of various OTA courses. The OTA
program has adequate supplies, resources and budget to carry out the mission of
the program. The percentage of students passing the national certification examination
reached 100% last year, well above the national average. The OTA program has
increased enrollment over past three years.
Challenges
[Concerns, difficulties, areas for improvement …]
Weaknesses (Answers these questions: What needs to be fixed? What must be
accommodated?)
•
While the faculty are sufficient in number and expertise to teach courses
assigned, they need to enhance their knowledge base in pediatric practice
courses.
•
The professional development plans need to more closely align with the
strategic plan.
•
Although there is support staff that meets the basic needs of the program,
it is suggested that the college review the clerical needs of the program to
better enable the program to fulfill teaching and administrative
responsibilities.
•
While the students are given access to evaluative and treatment
technologies that reflect current practice, it is suggested that students be
given additional opportunities to further enhance their knowledge of
practice in pediatrics. Some methods to achieve this may include
expanding the use of guest lecturers or collaborating with other
departments on campus offering childhood education programming.
4/29/09
16
•
While there is testing of students on a regular basis, it is suggested that
the faculty explore evaluative methods that can effectively prepare
graduates for the certification process.
•
While the program recognizes that fieldwork can take place in
nontraditional and emerging areas of practice, there is currently no
mechanism in place for this to happen. It is suggested that placement
opportunities be explored to further enhance student learning in these
areas.
The OTA faculty has gained knowledge and experience with the pediatric
population but still need to consult with local OT pediatric practitioners and
continue attending pediatric educational courses. Most of the computer assistive
technologies used in labs are outdated but are in processing of being updated.
The IT department has graciously loaned the program five laptop computers on
which to load our software. The budget has been adequate but has not allowed
for increases due to inflation. Enrollment has increased but the program is still
not at full capacity. Despite availability of OTA positions within the state of MN,
students are not always willing to move to the smaller communities for
employment, thus the OTA program graduate employment rate has been low in
the past few years. The HIPAA has created additional problems in negotiating
contracts with potential and current fieldwork sites and establishing contracts
between state run facilities, particularly in mental health.
Celebration and Recognition
[Awards, honors, special recognitions …]
•
Cassie Hilts was named Instructor of the year in 2003 and 2004. In
2005 she received the Health Division Advisor of the year award.
•
Julie Grabanski was named the Instructor of the year in 2005.
•
Accreditation was awarded for a period of 10 years due to no areas
of noncompliance cited in the evaluation.
Recommendations for Change
[Internal to program, external to program, new opportunities, is additional data
needed to effectively evaluate this program? …]
1. Rewrite courses to meet 2006 ACOTE accreditation standards
2. Utilize more COTA’s in educational process as guest lecturers
3. Improve faculty pediatric knowledge
4/29/09
17
4. Collaborate with early childhood education
5. Creative scheduling to meet adult learner needs
6. Develop contracts with more facilities for Level I and Level II
Fieldwork.
ACTION PLAN
Program review is a means to an end, not an end in itself. Your final task is to
develop a plan to improve the program.
[Identify 2-3 program goals and objectives for the future, improvements planned,
changes taking place, responsible parties, timeframes, resource implications,
etc.…]
Goal:
Implement redesigned
curriculum based on
current ACOTE
standards and
current/future trends
in occupational
therapy
1. Objective:
Time Frame
Review courses to
insure incorporation of
current ACOTE
standards
2. Objective:
Rewrite courses to
reflect current ACOTE
standards
Fall semester
2008
Responsible Party(ies) Resource
Implications
Program Director
OTA Faculty
January, 2009
Program Director
OTA Faculty
4/29/09
18
Goal:
Increase faculty
knowledge in current
treatment and
techniques and
application of
occupational therapy
in area of pediatrics
1. Objective
Complete
continuing
education
opportunities in
pediatric practice
January, 2010
OTA faculty
Money for attendance at
national conferences,
workshops, and participation
of online courses
2. Objective
Goal:
Provide students with
an academic
curriculum that
emphasizes critical
thinking and problem
solving skills
1. Objective
Utilize more
COTA’s in
educational
process as guest
lecturers
in their areas of
expertise
2. Objective
June 2009
OTA faculty
ongoing
OTA faculty
Gifts as tokens of
appreciation, money to pay
practitioners for adequate
remuneration for their
services
Continue with active
4/29/09
19
learning and
collaborative projects
with other disciplines
Goal: Increase the
enrollment in the
OTA program
Web site , Sept
1. Objective
Develop marketing 08
techniques,
Media - ongoing
including web site
and media to reach
potential students
of all ages
Program Director
OTA faculty
FOLLOW-UP ACTIVITIES
1.
Archiving Program Review Forms and Supporting Documentation
•
Electronic copies of the completed program review should be filed
with the:
(Supporting data and other accompanying documentation may be hard
copy).
o
o
o
o
4/29/09
Program coordinator/director
Academic dean
Institutional Research person/registrar
Library
20
NCTC MISSION, VISION AND GOALS
MISSION
Northland Community and Technical College is dedicated to creating a quality
learning environment for all learners through partnerships with students,
communities, businesses, and other educational institutions.
VISION
Northland Community and Technical College will be widely recognized as a
progressive leader in community and technical college education, responsive to
the needs of our learners through the use of partnerships, innovation, and
technology.
STRATEGIC DIRECTIONS & GOALS (10/06/06)
Strategic Direction 1: Increase access and opportunity.
The campuses of Northland Community and Technical College remain committed
to serving the unique educational and training needs of the residents and the
enterprises of northwestern Minnesota, offering affordable programs and services
close to home.
Goal 1.1
Improve the “user friendly” nature of the entire admission and registration
process.
Goal 1.2
Increase access to courses, programs, and services through alternative and
innovative delivery and scheduling.
Goal 1.3
Expand, refine and improve articulation agreements with programs with four-year
colleges and universities.
Goal 1.4
Develop increased support for the unique needs of students from diverse cultural
and economic backgrounds.
Goal 1.5
Strengthen relationships and services to area school districts.
Strategic Direction 2: Promote and measure high-quality learning programs and
services.
4/29/09
21
Northland Community and Technical College will continue to be proactive in
informing potential students and clients of the breadth and quality of its programs
as measured by ever improving assessment methodologies.
Goal 2.1
Promote community understanding and appreciation of the role and mission of the
college.
Goal 2.2
Develop benchmarks for quality assessment where possible.
improve academic programs and services.
Continuously
Goal 2.3
Pursue and preserve accreditation and certification standards and other standards
of externally validated excellence.
Goal 2.4
Develop in students an improved sense of civic responsibility and cultural
awareness to achieve the benefits of working and living in multicultural societies.
Strategic Direction 3: Provide programs and services integral to state and
regional economic needs.
Through continuous assessment of the education and training needs of northwestern Minnesota, Northland Community and Technical College will continue to
develop, upgrade, and assess programs and services that respond to the changing
needs of those it serves.
Goal 3.1
Reach out to communities to encourage the mutual sharing of resources and
facilities.
Goal 3.2
Maintain and strengthen college connections to communities and enterprises to
enhance economic development and quality of life.
Goal 3.3
Develop a consistent pattern for gathering and assessing demographic data from
the region.
Goal 3.4
Strengthen the use of advisory committees in the development, improvement, and
assessment of technical programs.
Strategic Direction 4: Innovate to meet current and future educational needs
efficiently.
4/29/09
22
Through collaboration with other institutions and agencies, and through effective
use of emerging technologies, Northland Community and Technical College will
accommodate a variety of learning styles and preferences in a cost effective
manner.
Goal 4.1
Use innovation and continuous improvement in operational systems and
programming designs.
Goal 4.2
Expand the uses of technology into all systems, programs, deliveries of service,
and curricula.
Goal 4.3
Develop enhanced methodologies for in-creasing income from non-traditional
sources to support scholarships, programs, and pilot projects.
Goal 4.4
Encourage professional development among all employees, including cultural
sensitivity and proficiency in instructional technology.
4/29/09
23
HELPFUL TIPS
(Assessment and Program Review Committee)
 Remember that program review is not a punitive process, but intended to improve the
program.
*
Identify special data needs early during the process to allow time to generate the data
and provide it when it’s needed by the team.
*
Prepare for the first team meeting by meeting in advance with those who provide
support (examples: Institutional Research, tutoring, curriculum).
*
Adjunct faculty, if selected carefully, can make excellent contributions.
*
Former and current team leaders can be helpful resources.
*
Don’t hesitate to ask questions and get clarifications.
*
Team chairs can gain insight from other program reviews.
*
If some members of the team need to attend team meetings sporadically, or are
occasionally unable to attend, e-mail can be used to keep them updated and is also
useful as a means of getting a good cross-section of input.
*
Some have found it helpful to keep the committee to a manageable size.
*
Once you have started entering information on the program review form, always
make a back-up copy!
*
Be prepared for occasional miscommunications and “bumps in the road.”
*
Start early and do little pieces along the way.
*
It works well to have team members who are willing to work as a team and figure
things out together.
24
Appendix A
Demographics
Caucasian
Black/African
American
Hispanic
Native
American
Male
Female
% 24 or
younger
% 25 or older
02-03
100%
0%
03-04
100%
0%
04-05
97%
0%
05-06
80%
4%
06-07
78%
3%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
3%
4%
12%
6%
13%
4%
96%
68%
7%
93%
89%
6%
94%
83%
16%
84%
80%
13%
87%
70%
32%
11%
17%
20%
30%
25
APPENDIX C
Professional Activities for Cassie Hilts
Associations:
American Occupational Therapy Association
North Dakota Occupational Therapy Association
1980 - present
1994 - present
Administrative:
Student Services Appeals Committee
2007- Present
Licensure Renewal Committee
Campus Management Team
Health Division Co-Chairperson
Academic Affairs Committee
College Marketing Committee
Policy and Procedures Committee
2005- Present
2003-2004
2003-2004
2002-2003
2002-2003
2002-2003
Professional Activities for Julie Grabanski
Internships in Medical and Educational models of Practice for Pediatrics
Participation of marketing activities to promote understanding of Occupational Therapy
Member of AOTA, MOTA.
Continuing education courses in Physical Health and Pediatric
sections of occupational therapy.
Collaboration with instructors from University of North Dakota, and institutions and
practitioners in the community.
Fieldwork coordination and networking with other Occupational
Therapists in the regional area.
Co-Development and Teaching Medical Terminology online using D2L for Northland
College
Teach CPR/First Aid courses in the classroom for NCTC.
Currently:
Member of the steering committee for the Mayor’s Urban Neighborhood Initiative (MUNI)
for North Side Neighborhood in Grand Forks, ND
Collaborating with PTA program on clinical conditions case studies and physical agent
modalities instruction
Member of the Northland Community Choir
Previously:
Taught Cultural Diversity for a semester in the classroom for NCTC.
Shadowed OT personnel working with children in outpatient, school-based, and
community settings to verify classroom methods were accurate for current trends in OT
working with children.
Active on the Worship Team at Hope Covenant Church for drama and leading singing
during church services.
Active on Children’s Team Wednesday night program to teach children from ages 4-12 at
Hope Covenant Church in Grand Forks, ND
26
Appendix D
AAS in OTA 72 credits
Course #
Prerequisite
HLTH 1410
CPTR 1104
Course Title
First Aid/CPR
Intro to Computer Tech**
1
3
0/1/0
2/1/0
Required
Fall semester
BIOL 2252
ENGL 1111
OTAC 1000
HLTH 1106
PSYC 1105
HLTH 1110
Anatomy and Physiology I
Composition 1
Introduction to OT
Medical Terminology
Intro to Psychology
Introduction to Nursing in LTC
3
3
1
2
3
3
2/1/0
3/0/0
1/0/0
2/0/0
3/0/0
1/2/0
Spring Semester
OTAC 1100
Movement in context
OTAC 1110
Clinical Conditions
OTAC 1120
Occupations
PSYC 2201
Developmental psychology
BIOL 2254
A and P II
3
3
3
3
3
1/2/0
1/2/0
1/2/0
3/0/0
2/1/0
Fall Semester
PSYC 2215
OTAC 2010
OTAC 2020
OTAC 2030
SOCI 1101
3
4
4
2
3
3/0/0
1/2/1
1/2/1
1/1/0
3/0/0
3
3
2
2
1
3
1/1/1
1/1/1
1/1/0
1/1/0
0/1/0
3/0/0
Summer Semester
OTAC 2210
FW Physical Health
OTAC 2220
FW Mental Health
6
6
0/0/6
0/0/6
Optional
OTAC 2310
6
0/0/6
Abnormal Psychology
Physical Health I
Mental Health I
Evidence for practice
Sociology
Spring Semester
OTAC 2110
Physical Health II
OTAC 2120
Mental Health II
OTAC 2130
Professional issues
OTAC 2140
Community
OTAC 2150
Special Projects
HUM
Humanities elective
(areas 2,6 or 9 from MN transfer curriculum)
FW Children
Credits
Lec/Lab/OJT
27
28
APPENDIX B
Occupational Therapy
Assistant
PROCESS FOR
PROGRAM EVALUATION
1
The mission of the Occupational Therapy Assistant program is to prepare competent entry level
occupational therapy assistants preparing for emerging, non-traditional and traditional practice
environments at the Associate of Applied Science degree level. The department provides quality
occupational learning opportunities to traditional and distant learners in partnership with local and
regional healthcare facilities. Students participate in academic and experiential learning
experiences which provide life-long learning skills needed in the changing healthcare industry.
Graduates are prepared to provide quality care to clients and families and to engage in
professional and ethical relationships within the healthcare community.
Student Learner Outcomes
Upon successful completion of the Occupational Therapy Assistant program, a graduate will be
able to:
1. Perform entry-level competencies, based on occupational therapy practice standards.
2. Implement occupation based interventions in collaboration with consumers, families and
other service providers.
3. Perform entry-level practice competencies safely and proficiently in traditional and
emerging areas of practice.
4. Communicate effectively with consumers, families and other service providers.
5. Demonstrate ethical and professional behavior while displaying respect for diversity of
culture, age and gender
The OTA program evaluation process is based on internal and external measurements. The
outcome data is gathered, reviewed and analyzed by the OTA faculty and then shared with the
Dean of Academic Affairs and the OTA Program Advisory Committee.
I. PURPOSE
The Evaluation plan is utilized as an annual review to assure continuous improvement of the
program.
II. PROGRAM GOALS
The program goals provide guidance to support the mission of the program.
III. OUTCOMES
The program outcomes provide a means for measuring the achievement of program goals.
The program utilizes both quantitative and qualitative outcomes.
IV. OUTCOME DATA COLLECTION
Quantitative Outcome Data
A. Student Retention Rate
The OTA Program Director will track the number of students who enter the program in at the
start of the spring semester and compare to the number that complete Level II fieldwork the
following year. The results will be communicated to faculty during the program evaluation
process.
B. Student Performance on Level II fieldwork
The Academic Fieldwork Coordinator will review the performance evaluations of students at
the completion of Level II. The results will be communicated to faculty during the program
evaluation process.
C. NBCOT Exam Pass Rate
2
Results of the Certification Examination will be communicated to faculty during the program
evaluation process.
D. Employment Data
Information regarding employment of students six months after graduation will be obtained
from NCTC Placement Director. The results will be communicated to faculty during the
program evaluation process.
Qualitative Outcome Data
A. Advisory Committee input
The OTA Advisory Committee will provide input to the curriculum during their meetings by
sharing advancing industry changes. Modification to the curriculum, student learning
outcomes, mission statement or curriculum design will be reviewed by the Advisory
Committee prior to implementation of changes.
B. Faculty evaluation of courses
At the end of every semester, faculty will ask for input from students on the organization,
content, assignments and learning experiences of each course and suggestions for
improvement. This feedback will be used as a tool to improve and revise courses. The
instructor for each course is responsible for leading discussion of the course at the end of
the spring semester when faculty meet to review the curriculum as a whole. If changes are
recommended, a timetable for any changes will be made.
C. Alumni survey responses
Alumni questionnaires will be sent one year after graduation. The questionnaire will ask
students to rate the program on how well the student feels they were prepared to perform
the student learner outcomes for the program. The results will be communicated to faculty
during the program evaluation process.
D. Employer survey responses
Employee questionnaires will be sent one year after graduation to the employers of students
who respond to college inquiries regarding their place of employment. The questionnaire will
ask employers to rate the student on how well they feel their employee was prepared to
perform the student learner outcomes for the program. The results will be communicated to
faculty during the program evaluation process.
V. ANALYSIS OF OUTCOME DATA
Data will be analyzed annually during the program evaluation process at the end of the spring
semester and presented to the Advisory Committee. Recommendations for any needed
change, depending upon the degree and type of change, may be referred to the Academic
Affairs and Standards Committee.
3
APPENDIX B
Northland Community and Technical College
Academic Program Assessment Plan
Assessment of Student Learning and Program Effectiveness
2006-2007
Program Title: Occupational Therapy Assistant
Division: Health
Program Award: AAS # of credits: 72
Current Date: 6/1/07
Program Goal: Provide quality education that prepares entry-level Occupational Therapy Assistants
Part I: Program Effectiveness Plan
For Academic Year_2006-2007___________
Program: Occupational Therapy Assistant
Assessment Question
Answered
(Program effectiveness
goals addressed)
Have students learned?
Program effectiveness goal:
Provide quality competencybased technical education
and general education to
meet the students’ needs of
ensuring achievement of
knowledge, skills, and
professional behaviors and
attitudes required of entrylevel employees.
NOTE: At least ONE direct
post-program assessment
must be included (see
Appendix A).
Post-Program
Assessment
Measures
Performance Targets
Part II: Program Effectiveness
Report
Year of
Data
(Academic year
in which
assessments
conducted or
data collected)
(List each, including both
direct and indirect
methods)
DIRECT: Pre-test/
Post-test.
Pre/post-test results will
indicate an improvement
in average scores of 25%
Direct: Credentialing
Exam.
80% of OTA program
graduates will pass the
Certification Examination
for Occupational Therapy
Assistants prepared by
the National Board of
Certification in
Occupational Therapy
(NBCOT) on the first
attempt.
2006-2007
January –
December
2007
Findings
(Summary of
Assessment Data
collected)
Action Taken or To Be
Taken
(Use of results to improve
instructional program)
25% improvement
in scores from
pre-test to posttest. Average
score for pre-test
was 52%, average
score for 2007
grads for post test
was 71%.
Action Plan: Goal met.
No action plan needed.
100% pass rate
Action Plan: Goal met.
No action plan requied.
Continue with active learning
stratigies.
Twelve new grads took
the exam withal twelve
passing.
Indirect: Alumni
Surveys
(Survey sent out 6
months postgraduation)
OTA Graduates will rank
NCTC OTA program
above average in each of
the Program Outcomes
areas, using the OTA
Program Graduate
Survey.
2004-2005
Indirect: Employer
Surveys
(Survey sent out 6
months postgraduation)
Employers will rank
NCTC OTA graduates as
demonstrating above
average competencies in
each of the Program
Outcome areas, using the
OTA Program Employer
Survey.
2004-2005
2005 grads 5 returned
Average rating was a
4.1 which is above
average. Student
rated us highest in
ability to participate as
a team member and
lowest in ability to
prioritize.
Grads suggested more
emphasis placed SI,
questioning
productivity guidelines,
and resume writing.
Action Plan: No action
plan required.
Five employers were
contacted by
telephone. Average
score was 4.9.
All employers rated us
above average or
superior in all areas.
Employers rated us
highest (5) in quality of
work, work
efficiency/productivity,
level of initiative,
communicating
effectively with
consumers, families
and other service
providers, and
demonstrating ethical
and professional
behavior while
displaying respect for
diversity of culture,
age and gender.
Action Plan: No action
plan required.
Explore the possibility of
having the assessment
form available
electronically so that grads
could be contacted by email and take the survey
online.
Indirect: Level II
Fieldwork
100% of OTA graduates
will have passed Level II
Fieldwork placements.
2006-2007
100% pass rate for 2006
graduates. There were
21 Level II fieldwork
placements with 20
passes and one
withdrawal. One student
chose to withdraw from a
Mental Health placement
and successfully
completed their MH
placement in another
setting.
Strengths:
Students
demonstrated
excellent safety skills,
documentation skills,
and ability to plan and
implement occupationbased tasks that fit the
needs of their clients.
Professional skills
such as time
management,
establishing rapport
with client, family and
team members and
organization skills
were also
demonstrated well.
Have students
graduated?
Program effectiveness goal:
Contribute to workplace
capacity and college
competitive advantage by
enrolling and graduating a
sufficient number of students
within a reasonable time
frame to make the program
economically and
academically feasible.
Graduation
Meet or exceed previous
year’s number of OTA
Program graduates of 14.
2005-2006
(class of
2006)
10 graduates
Action plan: Goal Met.
- Continue with case studies,
role playing, and assignments
with various populations to assist
with students in applying learned
concepts to practice.
-Continue to utilize case studies
in context while in class,
incorporating questions
regarding medications
particularly with clients in mental
health.
- Continue to disperse the
fieldwork manual for Level II
fieldwork during Professional
Issues class.
-Continue with working in the
community with populations that
they would see in occupational
therapy.
-Continue to utilize experts in the
community for sharing of their
expertise with the class, roleplaying, and Level I fieldwork
settings that provide experience
working with children and
adolescents.
-Consider having former
students come and talk with
students regarding expectations
during Level II fieldwork.
-Continue with use of a D2L
discussion groups, with a longer
time window on the course
discussions.
Action plan: Continue with
community demonstration
day, continue with OTA
student inservices to
hometown high schools,
continue with Career Day
demonstrations, work with
marketing program to
develop marketing plan for
OTA program
Have students gotten
jobs?
Program performance goal:
Respond to the human
resource needs of employers
by providing competent
entry-level employees.
Placement Rates
100% of OTA program
graduates will obtain
related employment
within 6 months of
graduation.
2006-2007
(class of
2006)
No data available
Action Plan: No action plan
required.
Assessment Question
Answered
(Program effectiveness
goals addressed)
Source
(List all)
Summary of Feedback
Year of
Data
(Academic year
in which data
collected)
Action Taken or To Be Taken
(Use of feedback to improve instructional program)
What changes have you
made in regards to
feedback received from
stakeholders?
Program performance goal:
Provide industry validated
education.
Student evaluation of
courses
OTAC 1000 Introduction to
OT: Students expressed
satisfaction with the course but
suggested adding more
examples of OT treatment. Also
expressed some dissatisfaction
with outdated book.
OTAC 2010 Physical Health I:
Students expressed satisfaction
with this course.
OTAC 2020 Mental Health I:
Students experienced
difficulty with organization
and meeting deadlines.
OTAC 1120 Occupations:
Students were generally
satisfied with this course.
Expressed frustration with
absent classmates.
OTAC 2120 Mental Health I:
Students recommended
working in small groups on
case studies rather than
individually and more
discussions regarding the case
studies.
OTAC 2110 Physical Health II:
Students expressed
dissatisfaction with promptness
of feedback on assignment.
OTAC 2140 Community:
Students were generally
satisfied with the course but
suggested exploring alternative
sites for the service learning
project.
2006-2007
Action Plan:
OTAC 1000 Introduction to OT: Change the weekends
students do time studies. Add treatment examples. Explore
new textbook options.
OTAC 1120 Occupations: Explore giving points to
students who give peer feedback for projects.
OTAC 1100 Movement: Assignments are to be due before
lecture.
OTAC 2020 Mental Health I: Provide due dates on drop in
boxes, and provide an assignment sheet with due dates.
OTAC 2110 Physical Health II: Review all assignments
and determine which ones can be combined to meet
objectives to try to reduce number of assignments.
OTAC 2140 Community: Explore alternative sites for
service learning project.
Advisory Committee
Evaluation of OTA
Program
Reviewed the current policy
requiring all students to have a
laptop.
The college has a policy that
accepts science, math and other
credits from a number of years
ago. However, individual
programs can decide on a limit of
the years since taking the course
that will be allowed. Discussed
time limit for acceptance of
general education courses.
Reviewed content to meet ACOTE
2008 standards.
2005-2006
Action Plan:
Committee recommended that the Program continue to require
purchase of laptop.
Agreed that a seven year limitation for accepting general
education credits would be the most feasible.
Need to include swallowing and feeding content, contact ALTRU
for continuing ed, also Cindy Jansen for guest lecturing; physical
agent modalities –
Pay4Performance, Outcome measures identified by Medicarenew measurement tool with Medicare (specific tests that can be
used to measure performance) APTA has an outcome tool as
well. Check with Ron Meyers. FIMS in rehab inpatient only.
Marsha Waind will forward any more information on outcome
measures
Continue to incorporate PAMS usage. Have utilized Axis
therapies in the past, and will now be collaborating with PTA
program to provide modalities for both programs as well as
training.
Pre-screening for Driving , ADL assessment tools that have
driving incorporated could be used in the classroom. Must check
with Marsha and Tracy regarding these ideas. UND would like to
co-sponsor workshops to address driving issues as well as other
OT emerging practice areas. Check with Jan Stube about this
content area.
Discussed co-sponsoring workshops on a state level to bring in
keynote speakers.
Had a discussion of setting up either a collaboration day, or a
skill set of case studies to implement between the OT and OTA
student for greater understanding of roles and how to collaborate.
It may be done in online, in a workshop or a combination of the
two.
Faculty Evaluation of
courses
OTAC 1000: Try to reflect the
work of an OT during each class
either through an activity or
linking assignments.
OTAC 2020 Mental Health I:
Students need more support in
their initial attempts at group
leadership. Case studies need to
link theory to practice. Book is
outdated.
OTAC 2010 Physical Health I:
The group assignment that uses a
case study from fieldwork for
treatment interventions worked
very well in place of the Final
Case study assignment in previous
years. Continue with the students
completing fieldwork experiences
with children and adolescents,
continue with the collaboration day
and baby lab assignments with
UND students as well as the
adaptive technology collaboration
with UND. Continue to use guest
speakers for the therapy ball and
school systems.
OTAC 2030 Evidence for
Practice:The students took part in
two different research models and
critiques on both qualitative and
quantitative research. Students
took some quizzes both on the
computer and in take home format
for this course. Students also had
time to develop their papers and
write them during the class lab
times. This year’s class did not
take advantage of the writing labs
for the most part.
OTAC 2110 Physical Health II:
Continue with case studies, and
use more role plays of therapist to
client situations. Students
completed more SOAP notes for
this course, but seemed to have
difficulty with the assessment
portion. Students seem to have a
good understanding of preparatory,
purposeful, occupation-based
treatments. The Ergonomics
fieldtrip went well. Splinting lab
went well, students completed
resting hand splints, neoprene
splints and noodle splints.
2006-2007
Action Plan:
OTAC 1000 Introduction to OT
Spend more time doing activities that an OT would do on the job
and less time lecturing. Students really liked interviewing each
other about their context and then introducing them to the class.
(Tie that in with having to interview for occupational profile).
Draw posters to represent OT process (tie that in with having to
represent emotional self in drawing in a mental health setting).
Maybe start each class with an ice breaker.
.
OTAC 2020 Mental Health I: Have students review their
Occupations leadership tape before they lead their group as a
refresher. Re-write case studies to reflect adult learning
principles, clinical reasoning development and application of
theory. Consider case-based learning format for the case studies.
Explore new textbook options.
OTAC 2010 Physical Health I: The headstart assignments
might be better utilized by ensuring that both labs have an
opportunity to go there in the mornings of either Tuesday or
Thursday to ensure that they have more time with the age groups.
May need to look for a guest speaker on w/c positioning (Don
Olson from Grafton in collaboration with the PTA department?)
and perhaps on pediatric splinting.
OTAC 2030 Evidence for Practice: Utilize the OT practice
magazine’s continuing education articles for quizzes and related
topics to research. The students will be taking the quizzes during
classtime in order to receive credit. Smaller writing assignments
related to the paper, or a faculty review session date may be
utilized to reduce procrastination and better time management
during lab times. (I may look at how we could as a class research
a topic and work on that topic paper to be utilized later then in
special projects).
OTAC 2110 Physical Health II: Continue with performance lab
tests and use of IF-AT forms for testing. May want to begin
some pop quizzes on readings due to tardy and absent students.
Every student should role play techniques they need to do with
common diagnoses such as CVA, and hip clients. The individual
treatment plan overall went pretty well, but allow more time for
students to role play out portions of their treatment plans during
the semester. See if there would be a guest speaker available for
physical agent modalities and also in swallowing/dysphagia.
May consider having the students research P4Performance,
Medicare, and Medicaid billing further and present in class.
OTAC 2140 Community:
Possibly discontinue the service learning project at Schroeder
Middle School as attendance by middle school students was
minimal. Explore the possibility of students working with an
elementary school with PTO program to plan spring carnival and
other projects or Northland Rescue Mission (focusing on
population planning and wellness).
Indirect: External
Evaluation by ACOTE
Biennial Report: Please refer
to the Biennial report Binder for
specifics in this section of the
Program Evaluation. The
Biennial report was reviewed
and no changes or action was
required by ACOTE based on
this review.
20006-2007
Action Plan: No action required
Northland Community and Technical College
Academic Program Assessment Plan
Assessment of Student Learning and Program Effectiveness
2005-2006
Program Title: Occupational Therapy Assistant
Division: Health
Program Award: AAS # of credits: 72
Current Date: 6/1/06
Program Goal: Provide quality education that prepares entry-level Occupational Therapy Assistants
Part I: Program Effectiveness Plan
For Academic Year_2005-2006___________
Program: Occupational Therapy Assistant
Assessment Question
Answered
(Program effectiveness
goals addressed)
Have students learned?
Program effectiveness goal:
Provide quality competencybased technical education
and general education to
meet the students’ needs of
ensuring achievement of
knowledge, skills, and
professional behaviors and
attitudes required of entrylevel employees.
NOTE: At least ONE direct
post-program assessment
must be included (see
Appendix A).
Post-Program
Assessment
Measures
Performance Targets
Part II: Program Effectiveness
Report
Year of
Data
(Academic year
in which
assessments
conducted or
data collected)
(List each, including both
direct and indirect
methods)
DIRECT: Pre-test/
Post-test.
Pre/post-test results will
indicate an improvement
in average scores of 25%
Direct: Credentialing
Exam.
80% of OTA program
graduates will pass the
Certification Examination
for Occupational Therapy
Assistants prepared by
the National Board of
Certification in
Occupational Therapy
(NBCOT) on the first
attempt.
2005-2006
January –
December
2006
Findings
(Summary of
Assessment Data
collected)
Action Taken or To Be
Taken
(Use of results to improve
instructional program)
40% improvement
in scores from
pre-test to posttest. Average
score for pre-test
was 51%, average
score for 2006
grads for post test
was 84%.
Action Plan: No action
plan needed.
83% pass rate
Action Plan:
No action plan requied.
Continue with active learning
stratigies.
Six new grads took the
exam with five passing
and one failing.
One test taker repeated
the exam and passed, for
a total of six test takers
passing the exam this
year.
Indirect: Alumni
Surveys
(Survey sent out 6
months postgraduation)
OTA Graduates will rank
NCTC OTA program
above average in each of
the Program Outcomes
areas, using the OTA
Program Graduate
Survey.
2004-2005
Indirect: Employer
Surveys
(Survey sent out 6
months postgraduation)
Employers will rank
NCTC OTA graduates as
demonstrating above
average competencies in
each of the Program
Outcome areas, using the
OTA Program Employer
Survey.
2004-2005
2005 grads 5 returned
Average rating was a
4.1 which is above
average. Student
rated us highest in
ability to participate as
a team member and
lowest in ability to
prioritize.
Grads suggested more
emphasis placed SI,
questioning
productivity guidelines,
and resume writing.
Action Plan: No action
plan required.
Five employers were
contacted by
telephone. Average
score was 4.9.
All employers rated us
above average or
superior in all areas.
Employers rated us
highest (5) in quality of
work, work
efficiency/productivity,
level of initiative,
communicating
effectively with
consumers, families
and other service
providers, and
demonstrating ethical
and professional
behavior while
displaying respect for
diversity of culture,
age and gender.
Action Plan: No action
plan required.
Explore the possibility of
having the assessment
form available
electronically so that grads
could be contacted by email and take the survey
online.
Indirect: Level II
Fieldwork
100% of OTA graduates
will have passed Level II
Fieldwork placements.
2004-2005
There was a 100% pass
rate for the Class of
2005. There were 11
students who completed
their fieldwork in both
mental health and
physical health
successfully for a total of
22 placements. One
student also successfully
completed a FW with
children. (One student
from the Class of 2004
completed her 2nd
fieldwork placement
from Jan-March of 2005,
which was a repeat
experience).
Strengths:
The students
demonstrated a strong
understanding and use of
the Occupational
Therapy Framework
during treatment
implementation and
documentation. The
areas on the evaluation
form that were especially
high were safety,
intervention,
professional behavior,
and communication
categories. Students had
strong documentation
skills, and the ability to
assist in providing
occupation based client
centered treatment.
Students also showed a
high ability to access
research online to assist
in the research process at
facilities. The students
tended to check in on a
regular basis with the
fieldwork coordinator for
weekly feedback along
with their clinical
supervisor.
Action plan:
-Provide students even more
opportunities to collaborate with
other disciplines during their
academic education, particularly
with OT students during the
evaluation and treatment
implementation process. ---Have
students complete an assignment
researching and presenting
information on how to vary
treatment strategies.
-A simple assignment regarding
research of PPS system and
reimbursement by Medicare and
Medicaid could be implemented.
-In physical health, the need to lead
various groups with TBI clients,
educational groups, cognitive
groups, and life skills groups could
be explored and developed further
using case studies and problembased learning approach.
-Continue to utilize case studies in
context while in class, incorporating
questions regarding medications
particularly with clients in mental
health.
-Continue with working in the
community with populations that
they would see in occupational
therapy.
-Invite former students to talk with
students regarding expectations
during Level II fieldwork
-Continue with use of a D2L
discussion groups, with a longer
time window on the course
discussions.
-resume having students write a
summary letter to next year’s
students on what to expect at
fieldwork site.
Have students
graduated?
Program effectiveness goal:
Contribute to workplace
capacity and college
competitive advantage by
enrolling and graduating a
sufficient number of students
within a reasonable time
frame to make the program
economically and
academically feasible.
Graduation
Meet or exceed previous
year’s number of OTA
Program graduates of 9.
2004-2005
(class of
2005)
14 graduates
Action plan: Even though the
goal has been exceeded, the
program capacity is 24.
Continue with community
demonstration day, continue
with OTA student inservices to
hometown high schools,
continue with Career Day
demonstrations, work with
marketing program to develop
marketing plan for OTA
program
Have students gotten
jobs?
Program performance goal:
Respond to the human
resource needs of employers
by providing competent
entry-level employees.
Placement Rates
100% of OTA program
graduates will obtain
related employment
within 6 months of
graduation.
2005-2006
(class of
2005)
No data available
Action Plan: No action plan
required.
Assessment Question
Answered
Source
Summary of Feedback
(List all)
(Program effectiveness
goals addressed)
What changes have you
made in regards to
feedback received from
stakeholders?
Year of
Data
Action Taken or To Be Taken
(Use of feedback to improve instructional program)
(Academic year
in which data
collected)
Student evaluation of
courses
OTAC 1000 Introduction to
OT: Students expressed
satisfaction with the course.
OTAC 2010 Physical Health I:
Students thought the course
was chaotic but the instructor
was awesome.
OTAC 2020: Feedback
indicated that case studies
were not varied enough and did
not provide enough focus on
the treatment of individuals with
mental illness. Students
expressed difficulty in learning
to write treatment goals.
OTAC 1120 Occupations:
Students were generally
satisfied with this course.
OTAC 2120 Mental Health I:
Students recommended
working in small groups on
case studies rather than
individually and more
discussions regarding the case
studies.
OTAC 2130 Professional
Issues: Students were
generally satisfied with this
course but suggested
presentations were not helpful
to the learning process.
OTAC 2140 Community:
Students were generally
satisfied with this course but
expressed some dissatisfaction
with the organization of the
service learning project.
2005-2006
Action Plan:
OTAC 2020: Expand the lab time devoted to writing
goals, re-write case studies to provide more focus on
case studies.
OTAC 2010: Expand the time spent with UND
students, explore UND graduates students presenting
information on assistive technology.
OTAC 2130: Discontinue student presentations, find
an alternative to learning the content such as
continuing education articles.
OTAC 2140: Provide more direction for service
learning project.
Advisory Committee
Evaluation of OTA
Program
Committee contributed to the
self study process for ACOTE
accreditation.
2005-2006
Action Plan: No action plan required.
Program performance goal:
Provide industry validated
education.
Faculty Evaluation of
courses
2005-2006
OTAC 1000: The students
have difficulty differentiating
occupation from occupational
roles.
OTAC 2020 Mental Health I:
Students need more support in
their initial attempts at group
leadership. Documentation
continues to be a difficult
concept for students to master.
OTAC 2130 Professional
Issues: Increase difficulty of
student learning assessment
tools.
OTAC 2140 Community:
Implementation of a club as
part of a service learning
project was successful but
needs some reworking.
Program development project
needs more structure.
.
Action Plan:
OTAC 1000 Introduction to OT: Next year don’t talk
about occupational roles until after they have learned about
occupation. Wait until they have completed their
presentation on occupation and had their first test on where
they have to define occupation. Then talk about
occupational roles, probably do it when they complete their
second time study. Try to find a more up to date book.
OTAC 2020 Mental Health I: Provide students with more
case studies. Place more emphasis on writing progress
notes. More lab time devoted to practice writing progress
note. Have students prepare a professional development
plan in lab after they come back from first Level I, at the
end of the semester have the students reflect on their
progress toward their goals and develop a new plan for
spring semester. Don’t participate as a group member
during treatment implementation; act as a coach to the
group leader. Let the students choose an activity from their
case studies in addition to an activity from their ARA for
treatment implementation.
OTAC 2130 Professional Issues: Find continuing
education articles in OT practice that relate to the course
objective and have students take the quiz on D2L.
OTAC 2140 Community: Have the students plan out each
week of the entire semester of the club meetings ahead of
time. Assign two students to be in charge each week. Get
a permission slip for transportation assigned for the entire
semester for the club members
Re-examine the program development project. Assign
students to work in groups. Come up with a list of
populations for them to choose from. Have exact dates that
each step of the project is due. Re-examine assignment for
relevant data for the project.
Indirect: External
Evaluation by ACOTE
On-Site evaluation by ACOTE
April, 2006. The program was
granted accreditation for a 10
year period due to no areas of
noncompliance.
Major Strengths were noted as
-administrators support,
-program director dedication,
-ongoing collaboration in
experiential learning,
community service projects,
program evaluation process,
-flexibility of FW coordinator,
-FW educators support, positive
-influence of OTA graduates,
student’s passion for learning
and participation in courses,
campus and college,
-incorporation of computer
technology,
-and our collaborative
relationship with UND OT
department.
Suggestions to enhance the
program include:
-faculty enhance pediatric
knowledge,
-professional development
plans need congruency with
strategic plan,
-clerical support needs to be
increased,
- utilize additional community
resources to enhance pediatric
content,
-explore articulation agreement
with UND OT department,
-strengthen scholarship of
examinations,
-separate mission statement
and vision statement,
-and develop nontraditional and
emerging areas of practice
fieldwork placements.
1998-2006
Action Plan: No action required
Northland Community and Technical College
Academic Program Assessment Plan
Assessment of Student Learning and Program Effectiveness
2004-2005
Program Title: Occupational Therapy Assistant
Division: Health
Program Award: AAS # of credits: 72
Current Date: 6/1/05
Program Goal: Provide quality education that prepares entry-level Occupational Therapy Assistants
Part I: Program Effectiveness Plan
For Academic Year_2004-2005___________
Program: Occupational Therapy Assistant
Assessment Question
Answered
(Program effectiveness
goals addressed)
Have students learned?
Program effectiveness goal:
Provide quality competencybased technical education
and general education to
meet the students’ needs of
ensuring achievement of
knowledge, skills, and
professional behaviors and
attitudes required of entrylevel employees.
NOTE: At least ONE direct
post-program assessment
must be included (see
Appendix A).
Post-Program
Assessment
Measures
Performance Targets
Part II: Program Effectiveness
Report
Year of
Data
(Academic year
in which
assessments
conducted or
data collected)
(List each, including both
direct and indirect
methods)
DIRECT: Pre-test/
Post-test.
Pre/post-test results will
indicate an improvement
in average scores of 25%
Direct: Credentialing
Exam.
80% of OTA program
graduates will pass the
Certification Examination
for Occupational Therapy
Assistants prepared by
the National Board of
Certification in
Occupational Therapy
(NBCOT) on the first
attempt.
2004-2005
2004-2005
Findings
(Summary of
Assessment Data
collected)
Action Taken or To Be
Taken
(Use of results to improve
instructional program)
46% improvement
in scores from
pre-test to posttest. Average
score for pre-test
was 51%, average
score for 2005
grads for post test
was 96%.
Action Plan: No action
plan needed.
88% pass rate
Action Plan:
No action plan requied.
Continue with active learning
stratigies.
Nine grads took the exam
with 8 passing, with no
repeat takes.
The group as whole
average passing score
was higher than the
national average.
Average score across the
domain areas were at or
higher than the national
average.
Indirect: Alumni
Surveys
(Survey sent out 6
months postgraduation)
OTA Graduates will rank
NCTC OTA program
above average in each of
the Program Outcomes
areas, using the OTA
Program Graduate
Survey.
2003-2004
2004 grads 7 returned
Average rating was a
3.75 which is between
average and above
average. Student
rated us high in Ability
to participate as team
member, ability to
adapt to routine
situation, demonstrate
ethical and
professional behavior
while displaying
respect for diversity of
culture, age and
gender, and lowest in
the areas of Perform
entry-level
competencies, based
on occupational
therapy practice
standards.
Grads suggested more
emphasis placed on
PAM’s.
Action Plan: No action
plan required.
Explore the possibility of
having the assessment
form available
electronically so that grads
could be contacted by email and take the survey
online.
Indirect: Employer
Surveys
(Survey sent out 6
months postgraduation)
Employers will rank
NCTC OTA graduates as
demonstrating above
average competencies in
each of the Program
Outcome areas, using the
OTA Program Employer
Survey.
2002-2003
Seven employers were
contacted. Average
score was 4.9.
Employers rated us
highest (5) in
communicating
effectively with
consumers, families
and other service
providers, displaying
respect for diversity
and ethical and
professional behavior.
Lowest rating (4.6)
was in implementing
occupation based
interventions in
collaboration with
consumers, families
and other service
providers. One
employer suggested
more hands on
exposure to range of
motion and manual
muscle testing.
Action Plan: No action
plan required.
Indirect: Level II
Fieldwork
100% of OTA graduates
will have passed Level II
Fieldwork placements.
2004-2005
95% pass rate for
2004 graduates.
There were 19 Level II
fieldwork placements
(18 MH and PH
placements and one
FW with Children) with
18 passes and one
withdrawal.
Strengths:
There were 20 Level II
fieldwork placements
with 19 passes and
one failure.
Strengths:
The students
demonstrated an
excellent understanding
and utilization of the
Occupational Therapy
Framework during
application of skills in
the clinic. The students
also demonstrated an
excellent understanding
of the OTA versus the
OT role. Areas of
strength continue to be in
documentation,
observation skills,
treatment
implementation,
professional behaviors,
and working in a team
atmosphere.
Action plan:
-Continue to place students at the
same or similar facilities for a Level
I fieldwork that they will be doing
for their Level II fieldwork, if
possible.
-Continue with two- five day
treatments adding a physical health
fieldwork in the Fall semester with
children and adolescents and a
mental health fieldwork in the fall
with a similar population.
-Continue with the community lab
experiences to expose the students
to more populations and settings. Consider adding lab performance
tests that have case scenarios in
which the students must choose a
treatment method, demonstrate it,
and provide rationale for their
choices.
-Continue with the use of personal
and professional development plans,
use of expert speakers and
community-based experiences, and
case studies and application in the
classroom. .
Explore the possibility of using the
internet as a method of educating
FW supervisor regarding program
curriculum design.
Have students
graduated?
Program effectiveness goal:
Contribute to workplace
capacity and college
competitive advantage by
enrolling and graduating a
sufficient number of students
within a reasonable time
frame to make the program
economically and
academically feasible.
Graduation
Meet or exceed previous
year’s number of OTA
Program graduates of 7.
2003-2004
(Class of
2004)
9 graduates
Action plan: Even though the
goal has been exceeded, the
program capacity is 24.
Continue with community
demonstration day, continue
with OTA student inservices to
hometown high schools,
continue with Career Day
demonstrations, work with
marketing program to develop
marketing plan for OTA
program
Have students gotten
jobs?
Program performance goal:
Respond to the human
resource needs of employers
by providing competent
entry-level employees.
Placement Rates
100% of OTA program
graduates will obtain
related employment
within 6 months of
graduation.
2004-2005
(Class of
2004)
100% placement.
One student is
continuing her
education.
Action Plan: No action plan
required.
Assessment Question
Answered
Source
Summary of Feedback
(List all)
(Program effectiveness
goals addressed)
What changes have you
made in regards to
feedback received from
stakeholders?
Program performance goal:
Provide industry validated
education.
Year of
Data
Action Taken or To Be Taken
(Use of feedback to improve instructional program)
(Academic year
in which data
collected)
Student evaluation of
courses
OTAC 1000: More examples of
nontraditional OT/OTA settings.
Students wanted study guides
for tests. Students suggested
that they go to a practice
setting and see an OT at work
or provide more movies with
this information. The time
study. More time for class, 1
hour isn’t enough time.
OTAC 2010: Students liked the
hands on experience and
working with UND students.
OTAC 2020: Liked learning by
experiencing the situation.
Students indicated that they
would like a review of medical
terminology and abbreviations
prior to going out on fieldwork.
There were some students who
would like more information on
pharmacology with individuals
with mental illnesses.
OTAC 2110: Some students
would like more information on
Medicare A and B
reimbursement. One student
would like more information on
TBI groups and other types of
treatments in physical health
2004-2005
Action Plan:
OTAC 1000: Assign the second year students a
presentation to the Introduction class regarding
OT/OTA employment in traditional and non-traditional
settings and sharing of their experience on Level I
placements.
OTAC 2010: Expand the time spent with UND
students, explore UND graduates students presenting
information on assistive technology.
OTAC 2020: Cover psychiatric medications for
children and adolescents in the beginning of the
semester. Explore bringing in a guest speaker on
medications. Incorporate medications into the case
studies.
Advisory Committee
Evaluation of OTA
Program
Committee expressed concerns
about FW contract issues and
resolving them.
Recommend we explore the
possibility of hiring an OTR to
supervise a student and bill for
services in a non-traditional
mental health setting. Pediatric
placements possibilities and
contacts were discussed.
Collaboration activities with
UND was discussed. Input
given on use of funds received
for assistive technology.
Review of policies for program
and admission procedures to OTA
program. Will need to add a policy
in the handbook about Child
Abuse and Neglect database list
Graduation requirements.
Development of fieldwork manual
for the student that relates to just
for fieldwork.
2004-2005
Action Plan:
Contact pediatric FW placements.
Contact Gail Bass, UND Faculty regarding assistive
technology projects.
Develop a student Level II Fieldwork manual.
Faculty Evaluation of
courses
OTAC 2010: Physical Health
I: Would like to be able to use
community expert to give more
background and personal
experiences to cerebral palsy.
Students experienced difficulty
with Head Start scheduling.
OTAC 2020 Mental Health I:
The application of clinical
condition was a good idea and
provided a focus for tx
intervention, but weren’t able
to focus as much time on tx
interventions.
OTAC 2140 Community:
The population assignment was
successful but should be
broken down into segments and
more structure given to it. It is
difficult to control the
experience students are
receiving at lab placements.
OTAC 2110 Physical Health
II: The video evaluation,
home evaluation, treatment
plan, mock treatment session,
progress note and discharge
summary were fragmented.
Need to explore a way to
integrate them to enhance the
learning experience.
2004-2005
Indirect: External
Evaluation by ACOTE
Biennial report: Please refer to
the Biennial report Binder for
specifics in this section of the
Program Evaluation. The
Biennial report was reviewed
and no changes or action was
required by ACOTE based on
this review.
Self Study Analysis Process:
The process is on-going in
preparation for reaccredidation
next year.
2004-2005
Action Plan:
OTAC 2010 Physical Health I: Purchase assistive
technology for the program. Bring in a guest speaker to
discuss cerebral palsy, teach handling techniques and use
of therapy ball for treatment. Test on these techniques to
assess learning of concepts. Head start placement will be
scheduled during lab time.
OTAC 2020 Mental Health I: Students planned the
OT/OTA collaboration day for next year as an example of
planning for populations. Focus more on planning and
implementing group treatment as group dynamics and
basic therapeutic interaction are being covered in the first
year. Provide more case studies incorporating
pharmacology. Expand the time spent on writing goals and
progress notes.
OTAC 2140 Community: Break the population program
planning assignment into segments; give each segment a
due date. Simplify the assignment. Explore implementing a
club at a local middle school as the community lab
placement.
OTAC 1110 Clinical Conditions: Move the clinical
conditions diagnostic paper from Mental Health I to this
course. Integrate the paper to reflect information from
OTAC 1100 Movement in Context. Students will be
required to implement a group treatment in OTAC 1120
Occupations based on the diagnostic paper.
OTAC 2110 Physical Health II: Integrate assignments;
video evaluation, home evaluation, treatment plan, mock
treatment session, progress note and discharge summary.
All of these assignments will be implemented on the same
case study throughout the semester. Every student will
have a different case study. After the evaluation process is
completed and treatment plan begins, have peer review
presentations. Throughout the lab refer concepts to the
case study in context as a way of doing smaller lab tests
throughout the semester as an assessment method.
- Improve communication with students in all courses by
utilizing the various components of D2L.
Action Plan: No action required
Northland Community and Technical College
Academic Program Assessment Plan
Assessment of Student Learning and Program Effectiveness
2003-2004
Program Title: Occupational Therapy Assistant
Division: Health
Program Award: AAS # of credits: 72
Current Date: 6/1/04
ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES MATRIX
Program Name: Occupational Therapy Assistant
Date Submitted: 6/1/04
Campus location(s): East Grand Forks
Program Contact Person: Cassie Hilts
Academic Award: AAS
Number of required credits: 72
ASLOM 1.0
Process:
List all Student Learning Outcomes in the first column. Then using the rubrics shown, identify the level at which each Student Learning Outcome is assessed in each course included in
the program. If an outcome is NOT assessed in a particular course, write 0 rather than leaving the box blank. Then for each post-program assessment administered for the program,
also rate the assessed level of each outcome. Each program must include at least one comprehensive, direct post-program assessment. (NOTE: If the post-program assessment is a
capstone course already rated previously, include the same ratings in the Post-Program column.) In the final column, rate the overall assessment emphasis for each outcome for the
entire program, based on all identified course and post-program levels shown for that outcome. (NOTE: All aspects of the rubric must be true to select that level.)
Rubrics:
1 = minimal, informal assessment at Learning Level 1 (i.e., fact, imitate, identify);
2 = assessed through a minimum of at least one formally evaluated activity or 3-4 minor activities at Learning Level 2 (i.e, explain, practice, distinguish);
3 = assessed formally through more than one major activity as well as through other informal and formal assessments at Learning Level 3 (i.e., application, habit, integrate).
Course: *COMP110 Composition I-NTC (3)
Course: *PSYC110 General Psychology-NTC (3)
Course: *PSYC122 Developmental Psychology-NTC
Course: *PSYC130 Abnormal Psychology-NTC (3)
Course: CPTR104 Intro to Computer Tech (3)
Course: HLTH106 Medical Terminology (2)
Course: HLTH134 Cultural Diversity (1)
Course: NSCI110 First Aid / CPR (1)
Course: OTAC100 Intro to Occup Therapy (2)
Course: OTAC104 Clinical Kinesiology (3)
Course: OTAC204 Clinical Conditions (2)
Course: OTAC212 Psychosocial Dysfunction OT (4)
Course: OTAC220 Play & Leisure in OT (2)
Course: OTAC224 Therapeutic Media (3)
Course: OTAC228 Contemporary Issues in OT (1)
Course: OTAC232 Supervisory Mgmt Skills in OT
Course: OTAC236 Community Occup Therapy (2)
Course: OTAC244 Orientation to Fieldwork (1)
Course: OTAC248 Physical Dysfunction Fieldwork
Course: OTAC252 Psychosocial Dysfunction Fldwrk
Course: OTAC260 Physical Dysfunction I (2)
Course: OTAC264 Physical Dysfunction II (4)
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
2
2
3
3
2
2
3
3
2
3
3
3
3
2. Implement occupation-based
interventions in collaboration with
consumers, families and other service
providers.
0 0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
2
3
3
1
2
3
3
0
3
3
3
3
3. Perform entry-level practice
competencies safely and proficiently in
traditional and emerging areas of practice.
0 0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
1
1
1
3
3
1
3
3
3
0
3
3
3
3
Course: *BIOL1464 Anatomy & Physiology I-UMC
1 1
Course: #GEE3 *General Education Elective (3)
1. Perform entry-level competencies,
based on occupational therapy practice
standards.
List all Student Learning
Outcomes established for
this program. Asterisk those
outcomes that include
foundation general
education. Level of
assessment of these
outcomes must be indicated
in appropriate general
education courses, in
addition to (not in lieu of)
any technical courses in
which these outcomes are
assessed. Add rows as
needed.
Program Courses:
List by course number and credits.
Add columns as needed.
Course: *BIOL1474 Anatomy & Physiology II-UMC
Student Learning
Outcomes:
4. Communicate effectively with
consumers, families and other service
providers.
1 0
0
2
1
1
1
2
2
2
0
1
0
2
3
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
5. Demonstrate ethical and professional
behavior while displaying respect for
diversity of culture, age and gender.
1 1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
0
3
3
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
6.
7.
Credit is given to Madison Area Technical College for this format.
CONTINUED
Program Name: Occupational Therapy Assistant
Date Submitted: 6/1/04
Campus location(s): East Grand Forks
Program Contact Person: Cassie Hilts
Academic Award: AAS
Number of required credits: 72
Process:
List all Student Learning Outcomes in the first column. Then using the rubrics shown, identify the level at which each Student Learning Outcome is assessed in each course included in
the program. If an outcome is NOT assessed in a particular course, write 0 rather than leaving the box blank. Then for each post-program assessment administered for the program,
also rate the assessed level of each outcome. Each program must include at least one comprehensive, direct post-program assessment. (NOTE: If the post-program assessment is a
capstone course already rated previously, include the same ratings in the Post-Program column.) In the final column, rate the overall assessment emphasis for each outcome for the
entire program, based on all identified course and post-program levels shown for that outcome. (NOTE: All aspects of the rubric must be true to select that level.)
Rubrics:
1 = minimal, informal assessment at Learning Level 1 (i.e., fact, imitate, identify);
2 = assessed through a minimum of at least one formally evaluated activity or 3-4 minor activities at Learning Level 2 (i.e, explain, practice, distinguish);
3 = assessed formally through more than one major activity as well as through other informal and formal assessments at Learning Level 3 (i.e., application, habit, integrate).
Portfolio:
Capstone Internship
Capstone Course
Certification/Licensure Exam
Overall Assessment Emphasis
(including courses and post
program assessments)
Comprehensive Project
1. Perform entry-level competencies,
based on occupational therapy practice
standards.
1
2
0
3
0
3
3
2. Implement occupation-based
interventions in collaboration with
consumers, families and other service
providers.
0
0
0
3
0
3
3
3. Perform entry-level practice
competencies safely and proficiently in
traditional and emerging areas of practice.
1
2
0
3
0
3
3
Other Post Program Assessment
Pre/Post Test (Commercial/Local)
Post-Program Direct Assessment:
List all Student Learning
Outcomes established for
this program. Asterisk those
outcomes that include
foundation general
education. Level of
assessment of these
outcomes must be indicated
in appropriate general
education courses, in
addition to (not in lieu of)
any technical courses in
which these outcomes are
assessed. Add rows as
needed.
Program Courses:
List by course number and credits.
Add columns as needed.
Student Learning
Outcomes:
4. Communicate effectively with
consumers, families and other service
providers.
0
3
0
3
0
3
3
5. Demonstrate ethical and professional
behavior while displaying respect for
diversity of culture, age and gender.
0
2
0
3
0
3
3
6
7
Program Goal: Provide quality education that prepares entry-level Occupational Therapy Assistants
Part I: Program Effectiveness Plan
For Academic Year_2003-2004___________
Program: Occupational Therapy Assistant
Assessment Question
Answered
(Program effectiveness
goals addressed)
Have students learned?
Program effectiveness goal:
Provide quality competencybased technical education
and general education to
meet the students’ needs of
ensuring achievement of
knowledge, skills, and
professional behaviors and
attitudes required of entry-
Post-Program
Assessment
Measures
Performance Targets
Year of
Data
(Academic year
in which
assessments
conducted or
data collected)
(List each, including both
direct and indirect
methods)
DIRECT: Pre-test/
Post-test.
Part II: Program Effectiveness
Report
Pre/post-test results will
indicate an improvement
in average scores of 25%
2003-2004
Findings
(Summary of
Assessment Data
collected)
42% improvement
in scores from
pre-test to post –
test. Average
percent for pretest was 45.6%,
average score for
2004 grads for
post test was 79%
Action Taken or To Be
Taken
(Use of results to improve
instructional program)
Action Plan: No Action Plan
required.
level employees.
NOTE: At least ONE direct
post-program assessment
must be included (see
Appendix A).
Direct: Credentialing
Exam.
Indirect: Alumni
Surveys
(Survey sent out 6
months postgraduation)
80% of OTA program
graduates will pass the
Certification Examination
for Occupational Therapy
Assistants prepared by
the National Board of
Certification in
Occupational Therapy
(NBCOT) on the first
attempt.
2003-2004
OTA Graduates will rank
NCTC OTA program
above average in each of
the Program Outcomes
areas, using the OTA
Program Graduate
Survey.
2002-2003
50% pass rate for
combined campuses
Action Plan:
33% of EGF grads
passed the exam, three
grads took the exam,
one passed, one repeat
taker
-Administer the NBCOT
practice exam at the end of the
spring semester.
-Buy a NBCOT study guide for
the students.
-Provide students with an
academic curriculum that
emphasizes critical thinking and
problem sovlng skills that
transition from the classroom
into the occupational therapy
practice setting.
-Utilize case studies and
exercises that employ critical
thinkging skills and application
-Utilize community resources
for classroom labs to increase
knowledge of application skill
-Incorporate follow-through
with fieldwork sites on newest
trends in OT treatment areas
-Network with other health
division faculty, dvelop
problem-based case studies in
team approach
-Improve teaching techniques
through mentoring with Activie
Learning Coordinator
New curriculum design
implemented beginning next
year
100% pass rate on the
Bemidji campus, 1 grad
took the exam and
passed.
2003 grads
Three returned
Students rated us at a
4 which is above
average. Students
gave highest ratings in
the areas of work
performance, and 3.66
ratings in all of the
learner outcomes.
-attend NBCOT practice analysis
workshop.
Action Plan: No action
required
Indirect: Employer
Surveys
(Survey sent out 6
months postgraduation)
Employers will rank
NCTC OTA graduates as
demonstrating above
average competencies in
each of the Program
Outcome areas, using the
OTA Program Employer
Survey.
2002-20043
Two employers of
2003 grads returned
the survey. The
employers rated us 5
in all areas, with an
average score of 5.
Action Plan: No action
required.
Indirect: Level II
Fieldwork
100% of OTA graduates
will have passed Level II
Fieldwork placements.
Class of
2004
95% pass rate for
2004 graduates.
There were 19 Level II
fieldwork placements
(18 MH and PH
placements and one
FW with Children) with
18 passes and one
withdrawal.
-Continue to place students at the
same or similar facilities for a Level
I fieldwork that they will be doing
for their Level II fieldwork, if
possible.
-Continue with two- five day
treatments adding a physical health
fieldwork in the Fall semester with
children and adolescents and a
mental health fieldwork in the fall
with a similar population.
-Continue with the community lab
experiences to expose the students
to more populations and settings. Consider adding lab performance
tests that have case scenarios in
which the students must choose a
treatment method, demonstrate it,
and provide rationale for their
choices.
-Continue with the use of personal
and professional development plans,
use of expert speakers and
community-based experiences, and
case studies and application in the
classroom. .
Explore the possibility of using the
internet as a method of educating
FW supervisor regarding program
curriculum design.
Strengths:
The students
demonstrated an
excellent understanding
and utilization of the
Occupational Therapy
Framework during
application of skills in
the clinic. The students
also demonstrated an
excellent understanding
of the OTA versus the
OT role. Areas of
strength continue to be in
documentation,
observation skills,
treatment
implementation,
professional behaviors,
and working in a team
atmosphere.
Have students
graduated?
Graduation
Meet or exceed previous
year’s number of OTA
Program graduates of 5.
2002-2003
6 graduates EGF
1 graduate Bemidji
Placement Rates
100% of OTA program
graduates will obtain
related employment
within 6 months of
graduation.
2003-2004
Action Plan: No action plan
83% employment
required.
rate. Five out of
six graduates.
One graduate has
chosen to work in
an unrelated field
to earn money to
take the NBCOT
exam.
Action Taken or To Be Taken
Program effectiveness goal:
Contribute to workplace
capacity and college
competitive advantage by
enrolling and graduating a
sufficient number of students
within a reasonable time
frame to make the program
economically and
academically feasible.
Have students gotten
jobs?
Program performance goal:
Respond to the human
resource needs of employers
by providing competent
entry-level employees.
Assessment Question
Answered
Source
Summary of Feedback
(List all)
(Program effectiveness
goals addressed)
What changes have you
made in regards to
feedback received from
stakeholders?
Program performance goal:
Provide industry validated
education.
Year of
Data
Action plan: Even though the
goal has been exceeded, the
program capacity is 24.
Continue with community
demonstration day, continue
with OTA student inservices to
hometown high schools,
continue with Career Day
demonstrations, work with
marketing program to develop
marketing plan for OTA
program
(Use of feedback to improve instructional program)
(Academic year
in which data
collected)
Student evaluation of
courses
Some areas of need as cited by the
students were more time to
practice group leadership skills,
more lab performance tests and
case scenarios where they are
tested to “think on their feet,” and
more hands on time with specific
positioning and handling skills to
work with neurological diagnoses.
Students felt rushed and
overwhelmed with assignments.
First year students felt that not
enough time was spent on the
Models of practice or the OTPF.
Students are unsure of their role in
baby lab and suggest a meeting
with the UND students prior to the
lab.
2003-2004
Action Plan: Implement the redesigned curriculum.
Students will be given more time to practice group
leadership skills with the new curriculum. Models of
practice will be spread though out the first year
courses so more time will be spent on them.
Plan an OT/OTA student collaboration day prior to
the baby lab.
Advisory Committee
Evaluation of OTA
Program
Program needs to teach
students how to read or
understand the information that
comes out about coding, ICD-9
and document. Students need
to understand reimbursement
issues. Mission statement
revision, Philosophy statement,
curriculum design and
curriculum plan approved.
2003-2004
Action Plan:
Bring in OT practitioner to explain ICD-9, coding and
documentation
Implement curriculum plan
Faculty Evaluation of
courses
Curriculum has been
redesigned and will be
implemented in the
coming year.
2003-2004
Action Plan:
Implement redesigned curriculum.
It appears that students do well with video assignments,
mock treatments, practice in group leadership, immediate
feedback sheets and problem-solving through case
scenarios through role-play. Continue with these
assignments and integration of classes as course schedules
allow
When completing case studies, use it as an opportunity for
the student to practice more “hands on skills” beginning in
the first full semester of the program- i.e. classes such as
movement in context, clinical conditions, and occupations
Indirect: External
Evaluation by ACOTE
Biennial report: Please refer to
the Biennial report Binder for
specifics in this section of the
Program Evaluation. The
Biennial report was reviewed
and no changes or action was
required by ACOTE based on
this review.
Self Study Analysis Process:
Not applicable at this time
2003-2004
Action Plan: No action required
Northwest Technical College
Academic Program Assessment Plan
Assessment of Student Learning and Program Effectiveness
2002-2003
Program Title: Occupational Therapy Assistant
CIP Code: 51.080300
Program Award: AAS
Division:
Health
# of credits: 72
ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES MATRIX
Program Name: Occupational Therapy Assistant
Date Submitted: 6/1/03
Campus location(s): East Grand Forks
Program Contact Person: Cassie Hilts
Academic Award: AAS
Number of required credits: 72
ASLOM 1.0
Process:
List all Student Learning Outcomes in the first column. Then using the rubrics shown, identify the level at which each Student Learning Outcome is assessed in each course included in
the program. If an outcome is NOT assessed in a particular course, write 0 rather than leaving the box blank. Then for each post-program assessment administered for the program,
also rate the assessed level of each outcome. Each program must include at least one comprehensive, direct post-program assessment. (NOTE: If the post-program assessment is a
capstone course already rated previously, include the same ratings in the Post-Program column.) In the final column, rate the overall assessment emphasis for each outcome for the
entire program, based on all identified course and post-program levels shown for that outcome. (NOTE: All aspects of the rubric must be true to select that level.)
Rubrics:
1 = minimal, informal assessment at Learning Level 1 (i.e., fact, imitate, identify);
2 = assessed through a minimum of at least one formally evaluated activity or 3-4 minor activities at Learning Level 2 (i.e, explain, practice, distinguish);
3 = assessed formally through more than one major activity as well as through other informal and formal assessments at Learning Level 3 (i.e., application, habit, integrate).
Course: *PSYC110 General Psychology-NTC (3)
Course: *PSYC122 Developmental Psychology-NTC
Course: *PSYC130 Abnormal Psychology-NTC (3)
Course: CPTR104 Intro to Computer Tech (3)
Course: HLTH106 Medical Terminology (2)
Course: HLTH134 Cultural Diversity (1)
Course: NSCI110 First Aid / CPR (1)
Course: OTAC100 Intro to Occup Therapy (2)
Course: OTAC104 Clinical Kinesiology (3)
Course: OTAC204 Clinical Conditions (2)
Course: OTAC212 Psychosocial Dysfunction OT (4)
Course: OTAC220 Play & Leisure in OT (2)
Course: OTAC224 Therapeutic Media (3)
Course: OTAC228 Contemporary Issues in OT (1)
Course: OTAC232 Supervisory Mgmt Skills in OT
Course: OTAC236 Community Occup Therapy (2)
Course: OTAC244 Orientation to Fieldwork (1)
Course: OTAC248 Physical Dysfunction Fieldwork
Course: OTAC252 Psychosocial Dysfunction Fldwrk
Course: OTAC260 Physical Dysfunction I (2)
Course: OTAC264 Physical Dysfunction II (4)
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
2
2
3
3
2
2
3
3
2
3
3
3
3
2. Implement occupation-based
interventions in collaboration with
consumers, families and other service
providers.
0 0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
2
3
3
1
2
3
3
0
3
3
3
3
3. Perform entry-level practice
competencies safely and proficiently in
traditional and emerging areas of practice.
0 0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
1
1
1
3
3
1
3
3
3
0
3
3
3
3
4. Communicate effectively with
consumers, families and other service
providers.
1 0
0
2
1
1
1
2
2
2
0
1
0
2
3
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Course: *BIOL1464 Anatomy & Physiology I-UMC
( )
Course: *BIOL1474 Anatomy & Physiology II-UMC
1 1
Course: #GEE3 *General Education Elective (3)
1. Perform entry-level competencies,
based on occupational therapy practice
standards.
List all Student Learning
Outcomes established for
this program. Asterisk those
outcomes that include
foundation general
education. Level of
assessment of these
outcomes must be indicated
in appropriate general
education courses, in
addition to (not in lieu of)
any technical courses in
which these outcomes are
assessed. Add rows as
needed.
Program Courses:
List by course number and credits.
Add columns as needed.
Course: *COMP110 Composition I-NTC (3)
Student Learning
Outcomes:
5. Demonstrate ethical and professional
behavior while displaying respect for
diversity of culture, age and gender.
1 1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
0
3
3
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
6.
7.
Credit is given to Madison Area Technical College for this format.
CONTINUED
Program Name: Occupational Therapy Assistant
Date Submitted: 6/1/03
Campus location(s): East Grand Forks
Program Contact Person: Cassie Hilts
Academic Award: AAS
Number of required credits: 72
Process:
List all Student Learning Outcomes in the first column. Then using the rubrics shown, identify the level at which each Student Learning Outcome is assessed in each course included in
the program. If an outcome is NOT assessed in a particular course, write 0 rather than leaving the box blank. Then for each post-program assessment administered for the program,
also rate the assessed level of each outcome. Each program must include at least one comprehensive, direct post-program assessment. (NOTE: If the post-program assessment is a
capstone course already rated previously, include the same ratings in the Post-Program column.) In the final column, rate the overall assessment emphasis for each outcome for the
entire program, based on all identified course and post-program levels shown for that outcome. (NOTE: All aspects of the rubric must be true to select that level.)
Rubrics:
1 = minimal, informal assessment at Learning Level 1 (i.e., fact, imitate, identify);
2 = assessed through a minimum of at least one formally evaluated activity or 3-4 minor activities at Learning Level 2 (i.e, explain, practice, distinguish);
3 = assessed formally through more than one major activity as well as through other informal and formal assessments at Learning Level 3 (i.e., application, habit, integrate).
Portfolio:
Capstone Internship
Capstone Course
Certification/Licensure Exam
Overall Assessment Emphasis
(including courses and post
program assessments)
Comprehensive Project
1. Perform entry-level competencies,
based on occupational therapy practice
standards.
1
2
0
3
0
3
3
2. Implement occupation-based
interventions in collaboration with
consumers, families and other service
providers.
0
0
0
3
0
3
3
3. Perform entry-level practice
competencies safely and proficiently in
traditional and emerging areas of practice.
1
2
0
3
0
3
3
4. Communicate effectively with
consumers, families and other service
providers.
0
3
0
3
0
3
3
Other Post Program Assessment
Pre/Post Test (Commercial/Local)
Post-Program Direct Assessment:
List all Student Learning
Outcomes established for
this program. Asterisk those
outcomes that include
foundation general
education. Level of
assessment of these
outcomes must be indicated
in appropriate general
education courses, in
addition to (not in lieu of)
any technical courses in
which these outcomes are
assessed. Add rows as
needed.
Program Courses:
List by course number and credits.
Add columns as needed.
Student Learning
Outcomes:
5. Demonstrate ethical and professional
behavior while displaying respect for
diversity of culture, age and gender.
6
7
0
2
0
3
0
3
3
Program Goal: Provide quality education that prepares entry-level Occupational Therapy Assistants
Part I: Program Effectiveness Plan
For Academic Year_2002-2003___________
Program: Occupational Therapy Assistant
Assessment Question
Answered
(Program effectiveness
goals addressed)
Have students learned?
Program effectiveness goal:
Provide quality competencybased technical education
and general education to
meet the students’ needs of
ensuring achievement of
knowledge, skills, and
Post-Program
Assessment
Measures
Performance Targets
Year of
Data
(Academic year
in which
assessments
conducted or
data collected)
(List each, including both
direct and indirect
methods)
DIRECT: Pre-test/
Post-test.
Part II: Program Effectiveness
Report
Pre/post-test results will
indicate an improvement
in average scores of 25%
2002-2003
Findings
(Summary of
Assessment Data
collected)
30% improvement
in score. Average
pre-test score was
55%, average
post-test score for
2003 grads was
82%.
Action Taken or To Be
Taken
(Use of results to improve
instructional program)
Action Plan:
No action plan required
professional behaviors and
attitudes required of entrylevel employees.
NOTE: At least ONE direct
post-program assessment
must be included (see
Appendix A).
Direct: Credentialing
Exam.
80% of OTA program
graduates will pass the
Certification Examination
for Occupational Therapy
Assistants prepared by
the National Board of
Certification in
Occupational Therapy
(NBCOT) on the first
attempt.
2002-2003
64 % pass rate
EGF
grads
11 took the test, 7
passed, five repeat
takers, no data
available
0% pass rate
Bemidji grads,
three takers, three
failed, two repeat
takers, no data
available
It is noted that the
2002 graduates
from East Grand
Forks had a 100%
pass rate.
Action Plan:
-Administer the NBCOT
practice exam at the end of the
spring semester.
-Buy a NBCOT study guide for
the students.
-Provide students with an
academic curriculum that
emphasizes critical thinking and
problem sovlng skills that
transition from the classroom
into the occupational therapy
practice setting.
-Utilize case studies and
exercises that employ critical
thinkging skills and application
-Utilize community resources
for classroom labs to increase
knowledge of application skill
-Incorporate follow-through
with fieldwork sites on newest
trends in OT treatment areas
-Network with other health
division faculty, dvelop
problem-based case studies in
team approach
-Improve teaching techniques
through mentoring with Activie
Learning Coordinator
-Faculty will be able to devote
time to teaching on EGF campus
as the OTA program on the
Bemidji campus will be closed
Indirect: Alumni
Surveys
(Survey sent out 6
months postgraduation)
OTA Graduates will rank
NCTC OTA program
above average in each of
the Program Outcomes
areas, using the OTA
Program Graduate
Survey.
2001-2002
4.41 out of 5.
Surveys were sent to 4
out of 5 2002 grads.
Three were returned.
Grads rated us above
average in all areas.
Graduates scored us
highest in the areas of
ability to participate as
a team member,
performing the role of
entry-level OTA.
Lowest scores were in
use of modalities and
recognize emergency
patient conditions and
initiate first aid.
Action Plan:
Explore the role of OTA in
physical agent modalities
and determine what can
be taught in the Physical
Dysfunction courses.
Indirect: Employer
Surveys
(Survey sent out 6
months postgraduation)
Employers will rank
NCTC OTA graduates as
demonstrating above
average competencies in
each of the Program
Outcome areas, using the
OTA Program Employer
Survey.
2001-2002
Sent out to employers
of 2002 grads. Four
sent out and three
returned. Highest
scores were in:
-Demonstrate
knowledge and skills
related to verbal,
nonverbal and written
communication in both
medical and
professional
relationship
-Ability to participate
as team member
Lowest score:
-Perform the specific
uses of equipment,
supplies, and specified
modalities used by the
Occupational Therapy
Assistant for
occupational therapy
services,
-Perform proficiently
as an entry level
occupational therapy
assistant generalist
-Exhibit computer
literacy in order to
facilitate present and
future adaptations of
technology
Action Plan:
Require students to utilize
computers in the classroom for
research, written papers and
presentations. Continue to
require computerized test taking.
It is felt by faculty that knowledge
and skills required for performing
as entry level occupational
therapy assistant and improving
the NBCOT pass rate should
continue to be the focus of the
program and the faculty
professional development.
Exploration of guest speakers on
PAM’s will be explored.
Have students
graduated?
Indirect: Level II
Fieldwork
100% of OTA graduates
will have passed Level II
Fieldwork placements.
Graduation
Meet or exceed previous
year’s number of OTA
Program graduates of 15.
2001-2002
100% of OTA program
graduates will obtain
related employment
within 6 months of
graduation.
2002-2003
Program effectiveness goal:
Contribute to workplace
capacity and college
competitive advantage by
enrolling and graduating a
sufficient number of students
within a reasonable time
frame to make the program
economically and
academically feasible.
Have students gotten
jobs?
Program performance goal:
Respond to the human
resource needs of employers
by providing competent
entry-level employees.
Placement Rates
2002-2003
90% Level II Fieldwork
pass rate by 2002
graduates. Ten Level
II placements with 9
passes and 1 failure.
Action Plan:
Students who are currently
enrolled with learning disabilities
must sign a disclosure statement
that will be provided to the FW
site, if the student chooses not to
disclose they will have to sign a
document that states that they
have chosen not to disclose their
disability and will risk failing their
Level II fieldwork.
5 grads from East
Grand Forks, 0 from
Bemidji
Action plan: Continue with
100% employment
rate
Five EGF 2002
grads. Four
employed in
related field, 1
unavailable for the
survey
1 Bemidji 2002
grad employed in
related field, for
100% placement
rate.
Action Plan: No action
required.
community demonstration
day, continue with OTA
student inservices to
hometown high schools,
continue with Career Day
demonstrations, work with
marketing program to
develop marketing plan for
OTA program
Assessment Question
Answered
Source
Summary of Feedback
(List all)
(Program effectiveness
goals addressed)
What changes have you
made in regards to
feedback received from
stakeholders?
Year of
Data
Action Taken or To Be Taken
(Use of feedback to improve instructional program)
(Academic year
in which data
collected)
OTAC 232 Supervisory
Management: Students felt
that the Activity Director
assignment was overwhelming.
They suggested that it be
broken into steps.
OTAC 236 Community:
Students suggested that we not
use LISTEN Day services as a
lab placement.
OTAC 228: Contemporary
Issues: students felt that the
literature review assignment
was overwhelming. They
suggested that the process get
broken down and that we
proceed slower.
2002-2003
Advisory Committee
Evaluation of OTA
Program
Gave feedback on proposed
mission statement, philosophy
statement, curriculum design,
and curriculum plan. Approved
the program assessment
format. Approved program
outcomes. Gave input into
development of strategic plan.
2002-2003
Action Plan: Rewrite mission statement, philosophy
statement, curriculum design and curriculum plan
incorporating suggestions from committee. Submit
forms to AASC requesting curriculum change.
Faculty Evaluation of
courses
OTAC 264 and OTAC 212:
It has been noted by Level I
FW supervisors that
students who are CNA’s or
have completed OBRA 100
Introduction to Nursing prior
to Level I are more
comfortable interacting with
patients and displayed more
initiation and independence.
OTAC 260: Experts in the
community were brought in
for specific treatment
applications lecture, headstart was used for
integration of normal
development and foundation
principles of OT.
2002-2003
Action Plan:
OTAC 264 and OTAC 212: Follow through with
advisory committee recommendations re: OBRA 100
and bring to Academic Affairs.
OTAC 260: Complete a field trip to the State
Developmental Center to get an overview of the
different treatment interventions available for the
pediatric population. Explore the use of video tapes
of real OT treatment sessions with children with
specific diagnosis and build case studies around the
context of the situation shown to assist in treatment
planning and implementation.
Student evaluation of
courses
Program performance goal:
Provide industry validated
education.
Action Plan:
OTAC 232: Do one part of each assignment in class
with the students. Have them turn this in for
feedback. After going through each step of the AD
process this way, have the students do the rest, first
one in a group, then the next three alone.
OTAC 236: LISTEN Day services will be dropped
from the lab placement possibilities.
OTAC 228: Break the assignment into sections.
Introduce each section, provide the students an opportunity
to do a rough draft, receive feedback and redo before
proceeding to the next section.
Indirect: External
Evaluation by ACOTE
Biennial report: Please refer to
the Biennial report Binder for
specifics in this section of the
Program Evaluation. The
Biennial report was reviewed
and no changes or action was
required by ACOTE based on
this review.
Self Study Analysis Process:
Not applicable at this time
2002-2003
Action Plan: No action required
APPENDIX E
Northland Community & Technical College - EGF
OTA Advisory Committee Agenda
9/27/07
11-1
East Grand Forks
Room 316
Membership: Judy Godfread, Tracy Cameron, LaVonne Fox, Mike Normandine, Tammy Olson, Joni Armstrong, Cassie Hilts, Julie Grabanski, Tina Chaput, Janet
Jedlicka and Marsha Waind
Members Present: Judy Godfread, Tracy Cameron, LaVonne Fox, Joni Armstrong, Cassie Hilts, Julie Grabanski, Janet Jedlicka
Topic
1. Call to order
2. Review of Minutes
3. Update on
a. Enrollment
b. Graduates
c. Fieldwork
)
Responsible
Party
Judy Godfread
Judy Godfread
Cassie Hilts
Julie Grabanski
Discussion/Outcome
Members present: Judy Godfread, LaVonne Fox, Joni Armstrong, Cassie Hilts, Julie Grabanski,
Janet Jedlicka, Tracy Cameron
Minutes were approved from April 04/07
Enrollment: 10 applicants for OTA program for 2008: Last year had 25 applicants and 17
completed their first semester in 2007- Now we are down to 13 students for the 2nd year.
Graduates: 11 students graduated: 79% retention rate with graduates. They went through
graduation and are completing their fieldwork now. Of the 11 students, three students already
have jobs as of Sept 14, 2007. NBCOT Pass Rate: 100%; Employment: 90% employed, 1
unemployed for personal reasons. Fieldwork: Placement is more difficult in mental health
settings and at this time we do not have non-traditional placements for Level II fieldwork. The
Community Behavioral hospitals that recently opened in MN is helping a lot, but some do not
have programs developed or staff available to take students just yet. There are some nontraditional placements for Level I in mental health. Brief discussion on need for UND and NCTC
to collaborate on establishment of non-traditional fieldwork sites. Recently secured three new
contracts for fieldwork. When a local FW site had to cancel due to downsizing of the program,
that affected many adult learners that could not relocate for their fieldwork placement. This past
Spring, NCTC was able to secure a FW placement in a military hospital and now know the
procedure for establishing contracts for fieldwork in that setting. Another military fieldwork site
4. NCTC
Administrative Review
5. Discussion on the
direction of the
profession
)
Judy Godfread
Cassie Hilts
contract is in process.
College closed two programs on the EGF campus and 2 programs on the TRF campus. This
year they are not closing programs but administration met with two programs on EGF campusParamedicine and OTA. What is the procedure regarding closing of a program by the college?
There isn’t anything specific that administration is telling us regarding what needs to be done to
avoid closing of the program. Marketing of the OTA program: Currently we participate in the
H.S. career expos, back-pack weigh in on campus for education of current students on campus,
poster contest with marketing program and put it in the Pioneer Press. Students also put up
promotional posters in Commons for OT month and we track prospective students interested in
the OTA program Plan: Have students complete 2 sessions in community on educating others
about the OT profession and OTA program. We are doing joint orientation sessions with PTA to
catch more students twice a month. Planning to disburse brochures to students at Universities
that may not have all components completed for professional OT programs, co-sponsoring the
MOTA conference. Possibly having a booth at the LTC conference in Bismarck this spring,
sending brochures to developmental homes, REM, DHI. Posters to Nursing facilities, health
occupations classes, counselors at high schools. Brainstorming of ideas for marketing: Career
Fair at Alerus, Vocational Rehab for those that are downsizing, Work with Job service, Career
Fair at UND; Keep an ongoing contact with prospective students- tracking long term to entice
students does make a difference. Job shadowing and mentoring from OT’s in the region… Put
feelers at MOTA to see who would be interested in having students shadow them on a regular
day; setting up therapists in the region with health occupations courses to assist them in making
decisions about profession. Contact more local H.S. counselors such as Kristi Lenz at
Community High school. Teach students how to market themselves to the area that they would
want to be; Stop telling students that there aren’t jobs in this area, because there are. Need to
put tons of information on the internet and website!!! Great student project…College wants us to
find “articulate graduates” to put on the college radio station. Also talking about TV marketing
segment.
Looking at putting Intro to OT online or at some point more classes- Concern about the need for
face-to-face components… Do we have the faculty necessary to do the work involved for an
online course? Concern about really “knowing” students and developing the relationships with
them, and the ability of “hooking” the student into OT without the face-to-face relationship.
Recommendation is not to pursue the online format at this time, but to concentrate on marketing
the OTA program. Collaboration of OTA program and PTA program projects. Met with PTA
program instructors for collaboration on roles and responsibilities. Developed case studies to be
completed together as well as ideas for the respective clubs to collaborate on. Is it possible to
work out a program for those students who would like to be able to do both professions?
6. Program Review
Cassie Hilts
7. MNSCU proposed
changes
Cassie Hilts
8. Other
9. Adjourn
Judy Godfread
Judy Godfread
)
Discussion regarding what would need to be done for an OTA student or PTA student to
complete both degree programs in shorter amount of time for greater marketability for those
living in rural areas. Discussed the need for a possible articulation agreement between OTA
program and UND OT program. Cassie to meet with Janet Jedlicka to discuss further. Explored
how to collaborate more in classroom between OTA and OT students. Plan for Cassie to meet
with Janet Jedlicka and Cindy Johnson to collaborate in Spring semester. Trends: Joni brought
up the fact that the hospital in Bemidji is looking at outsourcing management to Rehab Care,
push on productivity and reimbursement needs may affect quality of care of patient- Where does
that put therapists in the “whole picture” (Need to strengthen advocacy skills and continue to
promote students in joining professional associations and truly understanding reimbursement as
a student and how that would affect their position as a therapist). Students need to understand
the complexity of the reimbursement system, documentation needs, what each payer source
may be looking for in documentation, and the importance of the establishment of rapport with
client and their understanding in why they need to come back for more therapy.
Report on components of our program and develop a strategic plan of sorts. Cassie is still
learning what all the report entails.
Requested volunteers for help in feedback on report; Lavonne and Janet volunteered to provide
feedback on the report.
Legislative mandate that by Jan 1, 2009, the maximum number of associate degree credits
should be 60. The maximum amount of bachelor degree credits are 120… Currently
administration is looking at the number of OTAC credits that the program “sells.” There are 24
credits of general education credits in the current program. These credits count “against” us
when looking at budgeting of full time faculty for the OTA program.
Next meeting Tuesday, April 1st from 11-1
Motion to adjourn by Janet Jedlicka; seconded by Tracy Cameron
Northland Community & Technical College - EGF
OTA Advisory Committee Agenda
4/4/07
11-1
East Grand Forks
Room 316
Membership: Judy Godfread, Tracy Cameron, LaVonne Fox, Mike Normandine, Tammy Olson, Joni Armstrong, Cassie Hilts, Julie Grabanski, Tina Chaput, Janet
Jedlicka and Marsha Waind
Members Present: Marsha Waind, Janet Jedlicka, Tracy Cameron, LaVonne Fox, Cassie Hilts, Julie Grabanski, Mike Normandin
Topic
1. Call to order
2. Introduction of new
committee members
3. Review of Minutes
)
Responsible
Party
LaVonne Fox
LaVonne Fox
Discussion/Outcome
New members of the committee were introduced: Marsha Waind, program specialist in outreach
services at Altru, Janet Jedlicka, Chair of the OT department at UND
A& P Issue: Mike Normandine gave input regarding A& P I and II classes going to 4 credits.
This change will most likely not happen for at least a year or more. This will be quite a process
due to the fact that NCTC teaches many classes for other colleges through distance education
that are still offering these courses as 3 credit courses.
Issue regarding laptop policy for OTA program discussed. Laptops: At this point the OTA
program is a “laptop” program. Discussed whether this would be changed. There isn’t any
leasing available, and most students do purchase computers via laptop. Recommend that the
program stay a “laptop” program.
PTA Program: Discussed concerns regarding the start of the PTA program at NCTC and the
affect on OTA enrollment during the first couple of years. The PTA program may actually
complement OTA for enrollment after the PTA program gets going.
Surcharge for Technical Credits: The healthcare program directors receives 8 credit hours a
year for administration. Because of this every technical credit in the healthcare programs,
including OTA, have an additional $20 surcharge for each credit taken. Two programs were
closed this year, Medical assisting, and Medical Lab Assistant.
4.Update on
a. Enrollment
b. Graduates
c. Fieldwork
Cassie Hilts
Julie Grabanski
5. Discussion on the
direction of the
profession
LaVonne Fox
6. Up date on course
content
Julie Grabanski
7. Membership of OTA
advisory committee
8. Date for fall and spring
meeting
9. Other
Cassie Hilts
)
Cassie Hilts
LaVonne Fox
Enrollment: 25 applications, 18 were eligible, one withdrew their application so 17 students in the
first year. Twelve students in the second year, started out with 14 students in this class but two
withdrew for personal reasons.
Ten students graduated in 2006. Four students have taken their NBCOT exam and passed for
100% pass rate, four students have jobs as COTA’s.
Graduates:
Fieldwork: NCTC recently obtained a contract with MN Community Behavioral Health hospitals.
This contract is good for 10 facilities in MN that are housed with an OT/OTA. Little Miracles, and
some more school districts also are now on board taking FW students. Contracts with ND state
facilities cannot be obtained due to the disagreement between state legislatures.
Pay4Performance, Outcome measures identified by Medicare- new measurement tool with
Medicare (specific tests that can be used to measure performance) APTA has an outcome tool
as well. Check with Ron Meyers- whose going to write the weekly summary. FIMS in rehab
inpatient only. Marsha Waind is planning on forwarding any more information on outcome
measures
Continue to incorporate PAMS usage. Have utilized Axis therapies in the past, and will now be
collaborating with PTA program to provide modalities for both programs as well as training.
Update on Special Projects: Each month students are focusing a areas of emerging practice in
OT. In January the focus was on Ergonomics, February was a collaborative project with
marketing students to market OT within the campus community. This will be topped off with
posters for OT month, promotional events in April, and the Career Expo for High school
students. In March students completed a unit on assistive technologies, including seating and
positioning. They presented low assistive and high assistive technology to the 1st year students
the end of March. During April, the plan is to examine driving and the role of the OT generalist.
In future years, we will plan to have an event such as Carfit, Drive Well, or another workshop
concerning driving. In May, students will present their individual projects of interest for their
“capstone project.”
Lavonne Fox and Tracy Cameron plan to continue serving on the advisory committee. Other
members present were new members.
The next OTA advisory meeting will be Thursday, Sept 27th at 11 AM.
Pre-screening for Driving , ADL assessment tools that have driving incorporated could be used
in the classroom. Julie will check with Marsha and Tracy regarding these ideas. UND would like
to co-sponsor workshops to address driving issues as well as other OT emerging practice areas.
Also talked about how we could co-sponsor workshops on a state level to bring in keynote
speakers and some of the barriers that need to be worked out in order to do this. Schools need
to work on collaboration and an understanding of the roles of each profession (OT and OTA).
Had a discussion of setting up either a collaboration day, or a skill set of case studies to
implement between the OT and OTA student for greater understanding of roles and how to
collaborate. It may be done in online, in a workshop or a combination of the two. It’s possible
that late in the Fall of 2007 it could work for both OT and OTA student curriculums.
10. Adjourn
)
LaVonne Fox
Northland Community & Technical College - EGF
OTA Advisory Committee Agenda
11/16/05
12-2
East Grand Forks
Room 316
Membership: LaVonne Fox, Tammy Olson, Cassie Hilts, Julie Grabanski, Tina Chaput,
Members Present
Topic
1. Call to order
2. Review of Minutes
3.Update on
a. Enrollment
b. Graduates
c. Accreditation
d. Fieldwork
5. Discussion on the
direction of the
profession
)
Responsible
Party
Judy Godfread
Cassie Hilts
Julie Grabanski
Judy Godfread
Discussion/Outcome
Lavonne called the meeting to order.
Julie motioned to approve the minutes, Lavonne seconded.
Enrollment: 25 applications for enrollment for 1st year in spring, quite a jump from previous years
where enrollment was 16 at the most in last 6 years. 2nd year class 15 enrolled and 12 are still
with us this Fall. Graduates were 16 that enrolled in spring of 05 and have 9 graduates. One
student who would have graduated from OTA but decided to pursue Master’s Degree instead.
NBCOT pass rate: 2005 88% pass rate, average score was above national average, no repeat
test-takers 9 of 9 graduates took the exam. Jan-May, 2006: 4 students took exam and 4 passed.
Employment Rate: Receiving several notifications for OTA positions; many are offering sign-on
bonuses. 2003-2004: Employment rate was at 83%. 6 People who graduated in Nov 10, 2006 3
of those persons already have jobs. Fieldwork: 100% pass rate in 2005; Brainstormed how to
access mental health fieldwork sites particularly for children and adolescents in the area.
Accreditation: Have received a new 10 year re-accreditation from ACOTE. Went over the
strengths of the program and suggestions to enhance the program. Could write a grant for
service learning in community that would involve non-traditional fieldwork sites.
Need to include swallowing and feeding, contact ALTRU for continuing ed, also Cindy Jansen for
guest lecturing; physical agent modalities – working with Justin Berry from OTA program to get
competency and licensure hours for physical agent modalities- received Perkins grant for
purchase of ultrasound units; Will be incorporating driving into the curriculum- Will also contact
6. Possible new
committee members
Judy Godfread
7. Possible changes in A
& P credits
a. impact on OTA
program
Cassie Hilts
8. Timeframe for
acceptance of credits
Cassie Hilts
9. Date for spring
meeting
10. News
a. collaboration with
marketing program
Cassie Hilts
11. Other
Judy Godfread
)
Julie Grabanski
Jan Stube for collaboration on this project as she is working on a grant for a driving simulator
with psychology at UND.
Janet Jedlicka, Chair of UND OT department, Marsha Waind from Altru Outreach Services as
she is a primary employer graduates… Bonnie Johnson-Setness from HDR as she is a COTA in
a director position in the region. Ask all members if they would like to renew time on the OTA
advisory committee next meeting to decide how to proceed with membership
A&P I and A&P II will increase to 4 credits each to align it with the rest of the Minnesota states
universities and colleges for easier transfer of credits. The ACOTE on-site committee suggested
that we make intro to nursing a pre-requisite for the program as a majority of the applicants
come with a license to be a certified nursing assistant. Cassie further explained the reasons
why the credits have been increased for the A&P classes. Computer class pre-requisite: There
is now a course called Computer Basics for one credit for those students who are unfamiliar with
computers. Previously there was a course called Intro to Computer Tech for 3 credits.
Discussed that we have students purchase laptop for the program and that they complete all
tests on-line, utilize dropboxes, complete powerpoint presentations, use of CD’s and videos
throughout the duration of the OTA courses, so the students learn by doing…Do we need to
continue making the computer class a pre-requisite, and if so, should it be one credit or three
credit? Other options: We could use the computer competency test to see if the student needs
to take computer course; if so the student would be advised to either take the one credit course
or the 3 credit course. Other: Should we continue with the requirement of students having a
laptop? Tabled for further discussion.
The college has a policy that accepts science, math and other credits from a number of years
ago. However, individual programs can decide on a limit of the years since taking the course
that will be allowed- For example a seven year limitation to make sure that skills are up to par to
be current in the field. What does ACOTE or NBCOT or certification/license standards
regarding currency in classes to help back up need for limitation on acceptance of credits.
Agreed that a seven year limitation for accepting credits would be the most feasible. Discussed
current changes in ND licensure
Set next date of meeting for Wednesday, April 4th from 11AM-1PM.
OTA program and Marketing will be collaborating on a project to promote OT on campus.
Students in marketing will be developing marketing plans in conjunction with OTA students input.
OTA students will then implement marketing plans in the Spring on campus. Students currently
present to community organizations about OT, but we would like to focus on promoting OT on
campus for future referrals, and requests of OT as a consumer.
12. Adjourn
)
Judy Godfread
Lavonne motioned to adjourn the meeting.
Northland Community and Technical College
Comprehensive Program Review
For
Sales, Marketing & Management
April 1, 2008
Index
Overview ………………………………………..
1
Program Focus on Students …………………... 2
Learning Outcome Assessment …………………. 3
Student Success …………………………………. 3
Program Focus on Faculty and Staff
Professional Activities …………………………… 3
Adjunct Faculty ………………………………….. 4
Staff ……………………………………………… 4
Program Focus on Curriculum
Curricular Issues …………………………………..
Lead-In Courses …………………………………...
Scheduling ………………………………………..
Innovations ………………………………………..
Future Outlook ……………………………………
Institutional Learner Outcomes and Assessment …
4
5
5
5
5
6
Program Focus on Support …………………….
Facilities and Equipment …………………………
Marketing and Public Relations ………………….
Resources and Budget for Last 5 Years ………….
7
7
7
8
Program Focus on Community
Current Advisory Committee ……………………. 8
Community Issues ……………………………….. 9
External Requirements or Considerations ……….. 9
Summary
Program Progress Since Last Review …………… 9
Mission/Institutional Program/Course Outcomes... 9
Strengths..………………………………………… 9
Challenges ……………………………………….. 10
Recommendations for Change/Action Plan ……... 10
References ……………………………………….. 10
Appendix
A Program FYE………………………………….. 11
B Graduation Exit Survey………………………… 12
C Program Assessment Data……………………… 14
D NOCTI Written…………………………………. 15
E NOCTI Performance…………………………… 17
F Demographics…………………………………... 18
G Program Curriculum……………………………. 20
H Wage Statistics………………………………….. 21
I Wage Statistics…………………………………... 22
J Learner Outcomes………………………………... 23
K Learner Outcomes……………………………….. 24
L Learner Outcomes……………………………….. 25
M 2003 Budget ……………………………………. 26
N 2004 Budget …………………………………….. 27
O 2005 Budget …………………………………….. 28
P 2006 Budget ……………………………………... 29
Q 2007 Budget …………………………………….. 30
Northland Community and Technical College
Comprehensive Program Review Plan
Program:
Period Reviewed:
Sales, Marketing & Management
Kit Brenan, BS, MM, Program Director
2005 through 2007
Overview
The Sales, Marketing and Management AAS degree provided at NCTC offers textbook
theory along with intense hands-on training, by allowing students to showcase their
abilities beyond business terminology memorization and standardized testing. The
program hones students’ writing and communication skills, utilizes critical and creative
thinking for problem solving, and requires effective research methodology through the
use of mass media, computer technology and personal survey of the marketing
environment. The program prepares students for entry level and management level career
employment, along with providing a proper foundation for those with plans of continuing
to a 4 year institution and beyond.
I believe that the Sales, Marketing and Management program fits well with the general
philosophy of NCTC.
Northland College Mission Statement
Northland Community and Technical College is dedicated to creating a quality
learning environment for all learners through partnerships with students,
communities, businesses, and other educational institutions.
Examples of providing dynamic learning situations for students include the utilization of
service learning projects, the creation and compilation and administration of marketing
research surveys, the writing of a marketing plan for actual use by an area/regional
business, participating in MarketPlace for Kids, and a variety of other projects that
require active participation and provide exposure to our community and a “real life” work
setting.
1
Program Focus on Students
Based on the head count numbers provided on the MnSCU Performance Indicators
(Appendix A), the program fits with the national trend in Sales, Marketing and Management
occupational growth trends. According to US Department of Labor statistics
Management Occupations between 2004 and 2014 will increase 11.3% and Sales and
related occupations during the same time period will increase 9.6%. (Appendix H)
Current numbers reflect that in management, business, and financial operations
occupations in June 2006 were 20,892 and 21,352 in June of 2007 and in sales and office
occupations were 36,397 in June 2006 and 36,518 in June of 2007, and sales and related
occupations were ranked 16,895 in June 2006 and 17,037 on June 2007. (Appendix I)
These numbers reflect good growth in the program area for graduates, even if national
manufacturing rates decline. Materials, even those manufactured elsewhere, still need to
be sold, marketed and managed in their respective regional areas which translates into
jobs! Our graduation numbers have been rising, moving from 14 program completers in
2005 to 32 in 2007, factor this in with a 100% placement/continuing education ratio, and
we are moving forward.
Student satisfaction with the program is high, as per the marks received in the Graduation
Exit Survey. (Appendix B) The majority of our students rated their satisfaction as Excellent
upon their graduation, and follow-up surveys will be conducted with as many NCTC
Alumni as possible, at intervals of one year or more, to assure that the education/learning
experience has successfully translated to their future career or educational choices. This
will assure that the program remains vital and the learning proficiency high enough for
students to begin their careers and/or continue with their educational experience after
graduation.
The lowest Excellent percentage scored (43.8) was in relation to the graduates’ belief in
their ability to apply bookkeeping and mathematical processes. Although 31.3% rated
their skills in this area as Proficient it may bear watching in the future, as more students
are wishing to transfer to 4 year universities and will need to demonstrate their skills in
this area for a successful continuing business education.
Due to current fiscal conditions on campus, the Program needs to remain lean and mean
and consideration of reducing the number of class sections for single class offerings with
a larger student count is advisable. While NCTC stresses smaller class sizes,
functionality and fiscal responsibility must be considered a priority to assure that
increases in tuition can remain such that attending our college doesn’t become
prohibitive. Caps of 40 in a class are feasible and preferable to lesser caps and more
sections, which are not as fiscally responsible given the current economic climate. In
2006, we averaged 72% capacity by section and 71% in 2007 with lower enrollment
caps of 30 to 35 students and multiple sections.(A) These statistics show we have room to
fiscally tighten the program and that the 40 enrollment cap also provides a more dynamic
learning environment where there can be more student interaction and team building
exercises that more adequately reflect a truer corporate model.
2
Learning Outcome Assessment – (Program Assessment Data Appendix C)
After consulting with Division Chair, Deb Riely, it was decided to add the National
Occupational Competency Testing Institute Job Ready Assessment Blueprint for Retail
Sales (8) as the assessment tool of choice for the program. The NOCTI assessment offers
a written and performance piece and ranks NCTC graduates based on the performance of
other students in the state of Minnesota and on a National level. Specific competencies
and skills that will be tested in the written component will include:
Advertising/Promotion, Communications, Visual Merchandising,
Marketing/Merchandising, Electronic Marketing, Economics, Sales and Selling, Human
Relations, Entrepreneurship, Related Mathematics, Employability Skills and Career
Development. (Appendix D) Competencies tested in the Performance assessment are:
Completing a Sale and Handling Money, Handling Customer Complaints, Product
Knowledge and Selling, Math Computations and Employment/Job Interview. (Appendix E)
The NOCTI components cover the length and breadth of the program curriculum and
assessment will be complete and summary data important in structuring program
curriculum for the future. Add to this comments and suggestions from the Advisory
Board along with data from the Employer Survey and Graduate Survey, and we should be
able to truly ascertain the viability and effectiveness of the program in both written and
practical application.
Student Success – Program completers are increasing. We had 15 graduates in 2004,
compared to 30 graduates in 2007 and headcount was listed as 141 in 2004 and 155 in
2007. This shows that more students are graduating from the program before going on to
careers or further education. That said we need to do more with retention. I believe we
need to look closely at the classroom Student Satisfaction surveys and do more to adapt
to what the students’ (I translate this as the customer) want in their education. While
statistically the program is currently doing a fine job of academic delivery, there is
always room for improvement. Utilizing new teaching techniques, listening to student
input, and the utilization of a variety of new technological advances, should allow us to
make sure we are adequately serving the customer (more often read in this review as
student) today and in the future thus helping to assure their success whether they decide
to immediately enter the workforce or continue their education. Currently we have a
100% placement/continuing education rates, but we need to be doing more to see that our
graduation numbers rise. (A)
Program Focus on Faculty and Staff
Current full-time faculty consists of Kit Brenan, with over 30 years experience in sales,
marketing and management in a wide variety of industries. Background includes retail,
territory sales, wholesale sales, detail sales, public relations, advertising, marketing and
marketing management, etc. An instructor since fall semester of 2000, I hold a Master’s
degree from the University of Mary.
3
Professional Activities – Brenan completed a web design course through MN State
Community & Technical College in Moorhead, Spring semester of 2006, learning the
DreamWeaver system. I am currently the Web Master for USA Wrestling of North
Dakota, having designed that site and recently wrote the copy for the web site of Tom
Fischer & Associates, a corporate trainer located in Bismarck, North Dakota. I try to
remain active in my field through operating my own business, Brenmoe LLC and by
being available for freelance work and public speaking.
Adjunct Faculty – None at this time, but depending upon program growth or fluctuation,
it is advisable that we consider the use of adjunct faculty to be sure to remain fiscally
responsible. It is also nice to have a wide range of business backgrounds available to
assist in introducing students to a wider variety of career environments.
Staff – None at this time, but utilization of Rita Lealos and other NCTC staff is not a
problem, as well as the use of work study individuals.
Program Focus on Curriculum
Current consideration for 2 year colleges in the MN Legislature is to confine degrees to
60 credits. This would involve the following changes to the current 70 credit curriculum
structure: (Appendix G)
MKTG 1106 Customer Service, MKTG 2306 Small Business Management and
MKTG 2300 Marketing Research would become technical elective courses. This would
bring the program into compliance with the 60 credit limit, should this Legislative
decision prevail. The credit reduction involving these courses should result in little to no
change in the Program Learner Outcomes, especially with the ability to utilize them as
electives. Through proper advising, students can be directed to the electives that would
most benefit their career and continuing education plans.
I also suggest that we consider developing a basic 60 credit Sales, Marketing and
Management Program degree to be supplemented with optional emphasis courses that
will add additional elective classes to a student’s curriculum by their choice. For
example: create a Sales, Marketing and Management degree – Accounting emphasis, or
possibly with a Small Business emphasis. These degrees will be optional, and will
involve a higher credit count and more in-depth involvement from the student for
graduation.
Curricular Issues – Currently we are offering only an AAS on the East Grand Forks
campus. We should be looking at the potential to expand by also offering an AS degree
and the possibility of adding Hybrid and/or Distance courses through D2L. Adding these
options would encourage program growth as an increasing number of students are
currently continuing their education after NCTC by transferring to 4 year institutions, or
moving just prior to graduation and yet wish to complete their education with our
campus, or living farther out in the region than makes a daily commute feasible.
4
Mayville State University has a relatively new program, a Bachelor of Applied Science in
Business Administration, which will allow all credits earned within the AAS degree to
transfer as a block and be applied toward the 120 BAS. This option, added to the
development of our own AS degree in conjunction with a Minnesota based 4 year
campus, would expand Northland’s educational offerings and make our department more
appealing to students. An articulation agreement could be pursued with Mayville for the
AS Degree option as well.
Lead-in Courses –There are only 2 lead-in courses in the NCTC Sales, Marketing &
Management AAS major. Students must take Principals of Sales (MKTG 2201) before
Applied Sales (MKTG 2304), and Principals of Marketing (MKTG 2200) before attempting
Marketing Management (MKTG 2320). All other core courses can be entered immediately,
unless the student places below standards on the Accuplacer Assessment at application.
Scheduling – The Business Division attempts to utilize the entire day in scheduling
classes, but it should be noted, that our strength remains in scheduling classes between
the hours of 10 am and 2 pm. These are the optimum hours to assure high attendance, as
most of our students are employed full-time (40+) hours per week, and many have family
obligations (including small children) that preclude evening and late afternoon class
schedules. Students have also been surveyed and have expressed a preference for taking
classes back-to-back with little or no breaks, as this allows them the ability to better
schedule work and less chance to “skip” a class because they have left the building for an
extended period of time. (Appendix F)
Innovations or Changes in past 5 Years – The utilization of D2L, in addition to
classroom contact, to enhance the ability to interact with students after traditional class
hours has proved a plus. Students benefit from the ability to receive immediate feedback
from the instructor, even on weekends. They also enjoy being able to complete
assignments and do group work outside of traditional classroom hours. D2L has moved
the classroom and instructor into the student’s home! The addition of a Distance Learning
component would enable us to look to serve a more regional student, in addition to those
currently being served. I have received numerous requests from students to provide a
portion of the curriculum via Distance Education, and the current utilization of D2L
should allow us to provide this option, hopefully by Fall of 2008.
Future Outlook – The strong use of D2L inside and outside of the classroom provides
the opportunity to construct more Hybrid learning classes (a combination of distance and
traditional classroom styles) and the possibility of offering some virtual seats to students
completely through Distance Education in the future. This change will provide us with
the ability of expanding our enrollment potential farther into the region than is currently
available, as students are often hindered by long drive times, classroom time conflicts,
etc.
5
In the past, requests have been received for a sales and marketing major that is offered
with a greater concentration of on-line classes, but until recently technology was such
that this would have been more difficult to achieve.
With the advent of a successful conversion to D2L and the increase in Distance education
acceptance, it is time to review this situation. We also need to look to the future needs of
students who wish to be able to transfer more/all of their credits to 4 year institutions.
Creation of an AS degree would enhance the viability of our program in a world where a
continuing education is more the norm than the exception.
It should also be noted that the development of an AS Degree would be advantageous and
would allow greater transferability of credits to 4 year Liberal Arts institutions. Classes
would need to be adapted to coincide with Liberal Arts outcomes and standard Liberal
Arts syllabi, but I believe this adaptation would greatly compliment the program, as we
are seeing a larger contingent of students who are preparing to continue their education
after their experience at NCTC.
Careers in the field remain plentiful and a sample of wages that can be expected found in
Appendix G with occupational data located in Appendix H. As can be seen from the data,
the program is preparing students for viable employment options with the opportunity for
substantial pay. I have graduates who are happily and successfully employed throughout
the United States, and this indicates that they have skills that can be applied locally,
regionally, and even farther. I see no reason to expect the program to not continue to
grow, as long as we remain aware that the students are our customers and that their
educational needs are what should be driving the Program.
Due to current fiscal conditions on campus, the Sales, Marketing and Management
Program needs to remain lean and operating in an efficient manner. Considerations of
reducing the number of class sections to single section offerings with a larger student
enrollment cap is advisable. The ability to be proactive rather than reactive will ensure
that the program survives the fluctuations of student enrollment and continues to be
profitable for NCTC, while still serving the students efficiently.
The addition of Distance and Hybrid course options will also allow the program to
attract students from farther away and help protect enrollment in leaner times as the
program goes through typical life cycle ebbs and flows.
Institutional Learner Outcomes and Assessment Matrix
At this time, our Program Learner Outcomes have yet to be officially approved by the
Academics Committee. However, I am listing a few in (Appendices J, K and L) to allow for
easy viewing and consideration. I have chosen to work with the following rubric
evaluation methods for the core courses in the sales, marketing and management
program:
6
Rubric:
1 = Minimal, informal assessment at Learning Level 1 (ie. fact, imitate, identify)
2 = Assessed through at least one formally evaluated activity, or 3-4 minor activities
at Learning Level 2 (explains, practice, distinguish)
3 = Assessed formally through more than one major activity as well as through other
informal and formal assessments at Learning Level 3 (Application, habit, integrate)
I believe concentration in these Learning Level areas will produce a well rounded student
and outcomes that can be easily assessed and modified as changes in the business
environment dictate.
Program Focus on Support
Technology – Classes are offered utilizing a variety of D2L options; power points and
lecture notes are often posted (or/in addition to in-class note takers are used via Ellen
Brehmer), discussion threads are used, e-mail alerts, etc. The students have a variety of
ways to access classroom materials (electronically and by physically attending class), to
do research (internet, library research journals, news organizations, etc.), to submit
assignments, and contact instructors with questions. If Mp3 access to lectures is also
provided, this would not only assist Distance students, but also provide more
access/assistance to who might require note takers or other learning services support.
Facilities and Equipment – It would be beneficial for the program (or at least the
campus) to have a digital video camera that is capable of using DVD technology instead
of VCR tapes. I video each student’s sales presentations several times during Applied
Sales MKTG 2304 so they can see what how they appear to others when performing a
presentation. I present these to each student (they provide their own tapes) after each
class so they can have a library of their progress and can see what they have to work to
correct. This is a very powerful way to showcase speech pattern errors, (the ahs, ers,
uhms, likes and ya knows) that disrupt a meaningful dialogue, and which many students’
don’t realize pervade their conversation. This use of technology has opened many
students’ eyes to their speech errors and the distracting physical habits they possess
without the need of calling attention to them in a classroom setting. It also allows the
student to see their progress and to keep a video journal of specific presentations that
might also be used in the future during a job interview.
With the expansion into Hybrid and Distance Learning for the program, I would
investigate the ability to Podcast lectures for student download and possibly streaming
video applications that would enhance the D2L experience for the students.
Marketing and Public Relations – The program (and college) would benefit from
greater public relations coverage of some of our projects, especially the Marketing Plans
completed in MKTG 2320. Showcasing these projects to the community through the
media will help establish NCTC as a viable contributor to the community and region,
highlight our hands-on approach to learning, allow prospective employers to see the
validity of our educational curriculum, enhance the credibility of our graduates to
employers, attract potential students and allow for greater interaction in the business
community in our region.
7
Past projects have included marketing plans developed for the Grand Forks YMCA, Soy
Boyz Soybean Snacks, SunButter bread spread,
Hobby Town USA and others. The concept utilizes NCTC students who take the entire
semester to concentrate on a single regional business and conduct a marketing audit,
write a strategic plan and make business recommendations all compiled into the final
marketing plan. Confidentiality and ethical conduct is mandatory and the “real world”
application is not lost on the students, as they discover unexpected problems and use
critical thinking skills to develop solutions, conduct research and write the final report for
the company.
In Spring of 2006, the Greater Grand Forks YMCA utilized the plan developed in MKTG
2320 to create billboards that were viewed throughout the city of Grand Forks. These
billboards showcased the promotional campaign designed to promote the image and
athletic/educational offering of this non-profit institution.
Resources, Budget (past 5 years)
Budget for fiscal 2008 should see a significant decline as we will be reduced to one fulltime instructor. The plan is to utilize adjunct instructors for teaching only one or two
courses during fall and spring semesters. 2003 showed a budget expense of $75,393.44.
The budget in 2004 was $87,557.84 and we have had constant expense increases,
reaching $139,806.32 in 2007. With the reduction of staff and the pending 60 credit
maximum AAS degree offering being legislated, we should be able to experience a
significant budget decrease in the future. However, we need to maintain enough budget to
allow for field trips, possible travel expenses to allow for utilization of the Thief River
Falls media facilities, and other supply budget expenses for projects and other curriculum
needs due to expansion to Distance education. (Appendices M, N, O, P and Q)
Program Focus on Community
Current Advisory Committee –
Current Marketing Advisory Board members include:
Tom Hagness
Cass Clay Creamery
Lisa Breidenback
Command Center
Tim Greer
BBI International
Joe Deck
Tri Steel Mfg Co
Rick Brenaman
University of Mary
David Vaaler
Vaaler Insurance Inc
These current members make up a diverse mix of business backgrounds in our
community and help provide insight into exactly what issues employers are encountering
with personnel and in their industry. Their suggestions and comments are invaluable and
we hope to continue to cultivate a close working relationship with these, and other
industry leaders. Relocations, time constraints, and other issues often require committee
members to be replaced, but the current number of 6 to 8 members, including program
alumni seems to offer the best results.
8
Community Issues Related to Program – NCTC students have been very active in
assisting area businesses that have limited marketing knowledge by providing a variety of
resources at no cost. A great example of this is the YMCA marketing plan developed in
MKTG 2320 during spring semester 2006. This class also participates in Market Place for
Kids at the Alerus, and has often completed marketing research and other marketing
duties for the NCTC Marketing Director for campus programs that request our input
(OTA in 2006). Marketing students have also helped create an on campus Alcohol
Awareness fair that incorporated a variety of displays and activities to draw awareness to
binge drinking and underage consumption within the college community.
As we graduate more qualified students, and they take their place in the workforce in the
Grand Forks community and region, we will build a stronger image for the entire NCTC
campus. Community surveys in the past have indicated that NCTC often runs a poor
second to UND and Crookston in the top-of-mind awareness of people in our community.
Placement of Sales and Marketing students is currently ongoing in local financial, retail,
industrial and management and service sectors. These students will provide a network for
the hiring of later graduates, will assist with the recognition of the local business sector
that NCTC produces a quality workforce, and will strengthen the overall image of the
campus.
External Requirements or Considerations – On occasion it is helpful for the students
to be able to take a bus trip to complete research. Gas prices can make this expensive, but
I feel that the opportunity and advantages outweigh the price factor, as having the
opportunity to do field work outside the classroom has always been very rewarding to the
participants.
Summary
Program Achievements and Progress since last review - This is our first review
Mission/Institutional Program and Course Outcomes
My personal mission is: “To provide the most up-to-date educational environment
utilizing past, present and projected business trends by utilizing enhanced lectures,
practical work applications and hands-on projects that will assure students can enter the
workforce feeling confident with their achievements and education.”
Strengths
I believe one of the program’s strengths is the ability to immerse students in an
environment that mirrors situations they will probably encounter in their careers. The
students feel the lessons are relevant and can see how they may be applied in the future.
The program strives to challenge students to move beyond their “imagined”
self limitations and to push creative barriers by accomplishing tasks many originally
believed they couldn’t complete. By asking students to be creative and think critically on
a variety of topics, and providing them with the proper tools to be successful, I believe
we have created a curriculum that transfers easily to the business world or higher
academia.
9
Challenges
Declining fiscal revenues and low regional high school graduation numbers will require
constant monitoring and proactive vigilance to make sure the program remains
competitive. Doing business in an environment with made up of less budget, more
competition for students, and higher tuition costs will demand creativity in designing and
delivering curriculum. A “business as usual” model with not be workable in the future, as
we will need to remain flexible and constantly changing to deliver our product to the
customer in a manner they desire.
Recommendations for Change – Action Plan:
Goal: Creation of a
Time Frame
Sales, Marketing &
Management AAS
Degree option available
entirely through
Distance Ed
Responsible Party(ies) Resource
Implications
1. Objective:
MKTG 2201
MKTG 2200
MKTG 2900
MKTG 2920
MKTG 2205
BUSN 2210
Available via
Kit Brenan
Distance Fall of
2008 for a
moderate number
(5) of virtual
seats
Approval of Academic Dean
and creation of distance shell
2. Objective:
MKTG 2116
MKTG 2320
MKTG 2304
MKTG 2120
Available
Kit Brenan
Distance Spring
of 2009 for a
moderate number
(5) of virtual
seats
Approval of Academic Dean
and creation of distance shell
Goal: Creation of an
AS Degree in Sales,
Marketing and
Management
Time Frame
Responsible Party(ies
Resource
Implications
Fall 2010
Kit Brenan
Coordination/partnership
agreement needed with a
Minnesota four year
institution and approval of
1. Objective
Creation of
curriculum,
partnership
agreement and
approval of AS
curriculum by
Academic Affairs
Committee
2. Objective
Launch of AS
Degree
academic curriculum
Fall of 2011
Kit Brenan
Ability to easily blend with
Liberal Arts program
objectives and match up with
curriculum that is currently
being offered.
Fall of 2008 for
mid term
graduates and
Spring 2009
Kit Brenan
Mary Bydal
Mary Jo has been trained to
administer Accounting
NOCTI and the testing
facilities have been
previously established by Deb
Riely.
Goal: Establish a
NOCTI post test for
graduates.
1. Objective
Have first graduating
class take NOCTI exit
exam
2. Objective
References
1. Dean Dalen, Director of Learning Center and Assessment Center,
NCTC Thief River Falls
2. US Department of Labor - http://www/bls.gov/news.release/ecopro.t02.htm
3. US Department of Labor - http:// www/bls.gov/news.release/empsit.t10.htm
4. National Compensation Survey: Occupational Wages in the East North Central
Division, July 2006 - http://www.bls.gov/ncs/ocs/sp/ncbl0952.pdf
5. US Department of Labor Occupational Employment Statistics
http://data.bls.gov/oes/occupation.do
6. US Department of Labor Occupational Employment Statistics
http://data.bls.gov/oes/areatype.do
7. NCTC statistics provided by Dave Dembeck, MnSCU
http://reports.minnesota.edu
8. National Occupational Competency Testing Institute - Retail Trade
http://www.nocti.org/PDFs/JobReady/3053_Retail_Trades.pdf.
10
Appendix
A
Sales, Marketing & Mgmt/EGF
Program FYE
Total FYE by Major
Completion Ratio (1st yr-2nd yr-Grad)
Graduate/FTE
Total Instruction Cost *
Cost Ratio (FYE x $4000/Instructional
Total Cost) Greater than 1.0 means revenue
FY2005
FY2006
FY2007
52.00
56.10
35 to 34 = 14
5.45
$151,432.00
67 to 53 = 23
9.13
$177,431.00
56.60
98.26
59 to 57 = 32
14.95
$148,579.00
1.50
1.26
1.52
22.17
22.24
26.48
0.92
1.02
32
17.78
31
18.10
72.00%
64.00%
2.52
$224,400.00
exceeds expenditures.
Student FYE to Faculty FTE
Instructional Cost Study (College
Avg/MnSCU Avg, # greater than 1 indicates more
expensive than MnSCU average)
# of Sections
Average Section Size
Percent Full by Section
College % Full
Faculty FTE
Total Tuition Received (FYE x $4000)
Assessment & Review Plan is Current
(Y/N)
Employment Placement Rate/Continuing
Education
64.00%
2.57
$227,600.00
Y
100.00%
Job Demand (Resource: ISEEK):
Nationally jobs are expected to increase
faster than avg. thru 2014. 19.7%
increase in job growth from 2002-2012.
*NOTE: Does not include facility costs.
8/17/2007
11
24
23.58
71.00%
70.00%
2.14
$226,400.00
Appendix
B
Student Satisfaction:
Graduation Survey
Sales, Marketing, and Management AAS
Spring 2007
Questions
Q1. I can apply communication strategies to various audiences and contexts.
Mean:
Standard Deviation:
Responses
4 - Excellent
3 - Proficient
2 - Adequate
1 - Poor
0 - Not Applicable
Q2. I can select and apply technology to meet business objectives.
Mean:
Standard Deviation:
Responses
4 - Excellent
3 - Proficient
2 - Adequate
1 - Poor
0 - Not Applicable
Q3. I can apply fundamental sales techniques.
Mean:
Standard Deviation:
Responses
4 - Excellent
3 - Proficient
2 - Adequate
1 - Poor
0 - Not Applicable
Q4. I can demonstrate essential elements of business management.
Mean:
Standard Deviation:
Responses
4 - Excellent
3 - Proficient
2 - Adequate
1 - Poor
0 - Not Applicable
12
Count
9
7
0
0
0
1.4
0.5
Percent
56.3%
43.8%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
Count
9
7
0
0
0
1.4
0.5
Percent
56.3%
43.8%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
Count
11
5
0
0
0
1.3
0.5
Percent
68.8%
31.3%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
Count
9
7
0
0
0
1.4
0.5
Percent
56.3%
43.8%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
Q5. I can apply fundamental marketing techniques.
Mean:
Standard Deviation:
Responses
4 - Excellent
3 - Proficient
2 - Adequate
1 - Poor
0 - Not Applicable
Q6. I can demonstrate professionalism in a business environment.
Mean:
Standard Deviation:
Responses
4 - Excellent
3 - Proficient
2 - Adequate
1 - Poor
0 - Not Applicable
Q7. I can demonstrate interpersonal skills.
Mean:
Standard Deviation:
Responses
4 - Excellent
3 - Proficient
2 - Adequate
1 - Poor
0 - Not Applicable
Q8. I can apply bookkeeping and mathematical processes.
Mean:
Standard Deviation:
Responses
4 - Excellent
3 - Proficient
2 - Adequate
1 - Poor
0 - Not Applicable
Q9. I can apply critical thinking in a business environment.
Mean:
Standard Deviation:
Responses
4 - Excellent
3 - Proficient
2 - Adequate
1 - Poor
0 - Not Applicable
13
Count
9
7
0
0
0
1.4
0.5
Percent
56.3%
43.8%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
Count
13
3
0
0
0
1.2
0.4
Percent
81.3%
18.8%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
Count
13
3
0
0
0
1.2
0.4
Percent
81.3%
18.8%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
Count
7
5
4
0
0
1.8
0.8
Percent
43.8%
31.3%
25.0%
0.0%
0.0%
Count
12
4
0
0
0
1.3
0.4
Percent
75.0%
25.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
Q10. I can understand the economic, financial, social, legal, and cultural forces affecting the business
environment.
Mean:
Standard Deviation:
Responses
Count
4 - Excellent
6
3 - Proficient
9
2 - Adequate
1
1 - Poor
0
0 - Not Applicable
0
Q11. Any Additional Comments:
Great program to go through. I recommend it to everybody that is wondering what to do with their
lives. Great school, and great faculty and staff. Students are helpfull and fun to be in classes with.
Kit has provided me with the insight to the real world I have been begging for during my years of
education. She has given me the opportunities to practice and fine tune skills that really will
applied to situations that each and every one of us will someday be faced with. For this, I thank
you!
Sales, Marketing, and Marketing is a very good program, and I'm glad I did it.
I learned a great deal of information in my classes with Jackie Cleveland, Linda Simmons, and Kit
Brennan.
Most of these skills were learned by Kit
This was a very exciting and rewarding program. I would suggest it to anyone who loves working
with people, especially if you need help coming out of your shell.
had fun, I'd do it again
14
1.7
0.6
Percent
37.5%
56.3%
6.3%
0.0%
0.0%
Appendix
C
Part I: Program Assessment Plan
Part II: Program Effectiveness
Report
for Academic Year:
Program:
Assessment
Question
Answered
(Program effectiveness
goals addressed)
A. Have students learned?
Provide quality competencybased technical education
and general education to
meet the
e students’ needs of ensuing
achievement of knowledge,
skills, and professional
behaviors and attitudes
required of entry-level
employees.
NOTE: At least ONE direct
post-program assessment
must be included.
Post- Program
Assessment
Measures
(List each, including both
direct and indirect methods)
Year of Data
(Academic year in which
assessments conducted
or data collected)
To have a minimum of
70% of graduates equal
or surpass the State and
National average for
students taking this
assessment inventory
April 2008 and ongoing for
graduating students
INDIRECT:
Graduate Exit Survey
Mean rating of 3.0 on a
4.0 scale
April 2007 and on-going
INDIRECT:
Survey to Employers – Utilize the
Exit Survey Forms for comparison
and contrast to Alumni and
Graduate exit data..
Mean rating of 3.0 on a
4.0 scale
August 2007
DIRECT:
National Occupational Competency
Testing Institute – Retail Trades Job
Ready Assessment Blue
Findings
(Summary of
Assessment Data
collected)
DIRECT:
B. Have students
graduated?
Graduation Rates –
C. Are students
employed/continuing education?
Placement Rates –
Contribute to workplace
capacity and college
competitive advantage by
enrolling and graduating a
sufficient number of students
within a reasonable time
frame to make the program
economically and
academically feasible.
Performance
Targets
August 2007
2005 -5.45 FTE
2006 – 9.13 FTE
2007 – 14.95 FTE
Placement rate
100%
Respond to the human
resource needs of employers
by providing competent
entry-level employees.
.
15
No survey results received
from Michelle Thomas or
Suzy Dowers
Action Taken or To
Be Taken
(Use of results to improve
instructional program)
Appendix
D
Written Assessment:
Administration Time: 3 hours
Number of Questions: 191
Areas Covered:
http://www.nocti.org/PDFs/JobReady/3053_Retail_Trades.pdf
16
Appendix
E
Performance Assessment:
Administration Time: 2 hours and 50 minutes
Number of Jobs: 5
30% Completing a Sale and Handling Money
15% Handling Customer Complaints
25% Product Knowledge and Selling
6% Math Computations
24% Employment/Job Interview
17
Appendix
F
Age Demographics
FALL 2006
Northland Community and Technical College
AS OF 11-Feb-08 08:44:22 AM
17 and under
18-20
21-24
25-29
30-39
40 and over
UNKN
Count Percent Count Percent Count Percent Count Percent Count Percent Count Percent Count P
East
Grand
Forks
1
0%
373
22%
733
43%
289
17%
157
9%
114
6%
4
Marital Demographics
FALL 2006
Northland Community and Technical College
AS OF 11-Feb-08 08:46:48 AM
Divorced
Married
Separated
Single
Widowed
Unknown
Count Percent Count Percent Count Percent Count Percent Count Percent Count Percent
East
Grand
Forks
0
0%
179
12%
20
1% 1262
86%
0
0%
2
0%
TOTAL
1463
Age Demographics
SPRING 2007
Northland Community and Technical College
AS OF 11-Feb-08 08:47:54 AM
17 and under
18-20
21-24
25-29
30-39
40 and over
UNKN
Count Percent Count Percent Count Percent Count Percent Count Percent Count Percent Count P
East
Grand
Forks
3
0%
363
21%
726
18
43%
289
17%
161
9%
113
6%
10
Marital Demographics
SPRING 2007
Northland Community and Technical College
AS OF 11-Feb-08 08:49:09 AM
Divorced
Married
Separated
Single
Widowed
Unknown
Count Percent Count Percent Count Percent Count Percent Count Percent Count Percent
East
Grand
Forks
2
0%
176
12%
24
1% 1256
86%
0
0%
2
0%
TOTAL
1460
Age Demographics
FALL 2007
Northland Community and Technical College
AS OF 11-Feb-08 08:50:42 AM
17 and under
18-20
21-24
25-29
30-39
40 and over
UNKN
Count Percent Count Percent Count Percent Count Percent Count Percent Count Percent Count P
East
Grand
Forks
19
1%
635
36%
589
33%
253
14%
147
8%
93
5%
16
Marital Demographics
FALL 2007
Northland Community and Technical College
AS OF 11-Feb-08 08:54:04 AM
Divorced
Married
Separated
Single
Widowed
Unknown
Count Percent Count Percent Count Percent Count Percent Count Percent Count Percent
East
Grand
Forks
2
0%
159
10%
21
1% 1309
7
NCTC statistics provided by Dave Dembeck, MnSCU
http://reports.minnesota.edu
19
87%
0
0%
2
0%
TOTAL
1493
Appendix
G
Summary of Program Curriculum –
Course #
Required
ACCT 1100
ACCT 1108
BUSN 2210
BUSN 2218
CPTR 1104
MKTG 1108
MKTG 2116
MKTG 2200
MKTG 2201
MKTG 2205
MKTG 2300
MKTG 2304
MKTG 2306
MKTG 2320
ECON 1110
ENGL 1111
SPCH 1101
Course Name
Credits
Prin of Bookkeeping
Busn Math/Calculators
Prin of Management
Legal Environment Busn
Intro to Computer Tech
Customer Relations Mgmt
Advertising
Prin of Marketing
Prin of Sales
Prin of Retailing
Marketing Research
Applied Sales Techniques
Small Business Mgmt
Marketing Management
Prin of Economics
Composition I
Intro to Public Speaking
MN Transfer Curriculum Electives
Electives
TOTAL CREDITS:
Electives must be selected from the following list:
MKTG 2120
Supervisory Leadership
MKTG 2900
Internship I
MKTG 2920
Internship II
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
12
7
70
3
3
3
PROGRAM LEARNER OUTCOMES
1. Student will apply effective and professional communication strategies for various audiences and
contexts.
2. Student will select and apply appropriate technology to meet business objectives.
3. Student will apply fundamental sales techniques to a variety of sales, marketing and
management projects.
4. Student will demonstrate essential elements of business management.
5. Student will apply fundamental marketing techniques to a variety of sales, marketing and
management projects.
6. Student will exhibit professional characteristics, behaviors, and attitudes appropriate to the sales,
marketing and management industry.
7. Student will select and apply appropriate technology to meet business objectives.
8. Student will apply fundamental sales techniques to a variety of sales, marketing and
management projects.
9. Student will demonstrate interpersonal skills through effective listening, written and oral
communications in diverse situations, and self-evaluation.
10. Student will select and apply appropriate technology to meet business objectives.
11. Student will apply fundamental sales techniques to a variety of sales, marketing and
management projects.
12. Student will apply principles of bookkeeping and mathematical processes to a variety of sales,
marketing, and management projects.
13. Student will apply critical thinking and problem-solving skills in a variety of business situations
and projects.
14. Student will complete assigned tasks and duties with regard to the economic, financial, social,
legal, and cultural factors that affect the business environment.
15. Student will complete assigned tasks and duties within the legal and ethical standards of the
business industry.
20
Appendix
H
Area: National
Period: May 2006
Occupation (SOC code)
Employment(1)
Hourly mean
wage
Annual mean
wage(2)
Hourl
w
Advertising and Promotions
Managers(112011)
38130
40.93
85140
Marketing Managers(112021)
159950
51.74
107610
Sales Managers(112022)
307960
49.39
102730
Public Relations Managers(112031)
44010
44.35
92250
Footnotes:
(1) Estimates for detailed occupations do not sum to the totals because the totals include occupations not shown sepa
employed workers.
(2) Annual wages have been calculated by multiplying the hourly mean wage by 2,080 hours; where an hourly mean w
has been directly calculated from the reported survey data.
SOC code: Standard Occupational Classification code -- see http://www.bls.gov/soc/home.htm
Data extracted on November 13, 2007
4
National Compensation Survey: Occupational Wages in the East North Central Division,
July 2006 - http://www.bls.gov/ncs/ocs/sp/ncbl0952.pdf
21
Appendix
I
Area: National
Period: May 2006
Occupation (SOC code)
Employment(1)
First-Line Supervisors/Managers of
Retail Sales Workers(411011)
First-Line Supervisors/Managers of
Non-Retail Sales Workers(411012)
Parts Salespersons(412022)
Retail Salespersons(412031)
Advertising Sales Agents(413011)
Insurance Sales Agents(413021)
Sales Representatives, Services, All
Other(413099)
Sales Representatives, Wholesale
and Manufacturing, Technical and
Scientific Products(414011)
Sales Representatives, Wholesale
and Manufacturing, Except Technical
and Scientific Products(414012)
Hourly mean
wage
Annual mean
wage(2)
1111740
18.67
38830
285690
234770
4374230
159640
311380
36.94
14.43
11.51
24.7
28.1
76840
30010
23940
51370
58450
501850
27.13
56420
390280
34.95
72700
1488990
28.14
58540
Hourl
w
Footnotes:
(1) Estimates for detailed occupations do not sum to the totals because the totals include occupations not shown sepa
employed workers.
(2) Annual wages have been calculated by multiplying the hourly mean wage by 2,080 hours; where an hourly mean w
has been directly calculated from the reported survey data.
SOC code: Standard Occupational Classification code -- see http://www.bls.gov/soc/home.htm
Data extracted on November 13, 2007
6
US Department of Labor Occupational Employment Statistics
http://data.bls.gov/oes/areatype.do
22
Appendix
J
Advertising
MKTG 2116
Institutional Learner Outcomes addressed:
X
X
x
X
X
Foundation Skills
Thinking Skills
Applied & Information Technology
Civic Responsibility
Personal Development
Rubric:
1 = Minimal, informal assessment at Learning Level 1 (ie. fact, imitate, identify)
2 = Assessed through at least one formally evaluated activity, or 3-4 minor activities
at Learning Level 2 (explains, practice, distinguish)
3 = Assessed formally through more than one major activity as well as through other
informal and formal assessments at Learning Level 3 (Application, habit, integrate)
Suggested methods of Institutional Learner Outcomes assessment:
1
Completion of assigned work in conjunction with class syllabus
through proper following of directions and meeting deadlines, testing
and assignments.
2
Creation of ad campaign designed to promote a specific
product/service/idea to effectively reach the proper target audience.
3
Creation of an ad campaign (which will include a minimum of 3
different types/examples of media usage) and a 10 minute infomercial
video/DVD.
1
Adherence to community ethical standards and moral
standard/norms while creating ad messages.
3
Working alone and in a team environment to complete projects
and assignments that include self-grading and grading of counterparts.
23
Appendix
K
Applied Sales Techniques
MKTG 2304
Institutional Learner Outcomes addressed:
x
x
x
x
Foundation Skills
Thinking Skills
Applied & Information Technology
Personal Development
Rubric:
1 = Minimal, informal assessment at Learning Level 1 (ie. fact, imitate, identify)
2 = Assessed through at least one formally evaluated activity, or 3-4 minor activities
at Learning Level 2 (explains, practice, distinguish)
3 = Assessed formally through more than one major activity as well as through other
informal and formal assessments at Learning Level 3 (Application, habit, integrate)
Suggested methods of Institutional Learner Outcomes Assessment:
Rubric Rank:
1
Ability to read, write and communicate one-on-one and in front
of groups, and completion of assigned work on time.
2
Creation and performance of a 10 minute sales demonstration
involving research of a product, idea or service that will appeal to a
specific target market and utilizes a variety of information processing
techniques
3
Completion of an oral job interview in a single and group format.
2
Creation of a complete resume, cover letter and portfolio that
highlights personal and professional strengths, and assets.
3
Self-evaluation and evaluation of peers during group
assignments
2
Display proper ethical and professional behavior
24
Appendix
L
Marketing Management
MKTG 2320
Institutional Learner Outcomes addressed:
x
x
x
x
Foundation Skills
Thinking Skills
Applied & Information Technology
Personal Development
Rubric:
1 = Minimal, informal assessment at Learning Level 1 (ie. fact, imitate, identify)
2 = Assessed through at least one formally evaluated activity, or 3-4 minor activities
at Learning Level 2 (explains, practice, distinguish)
3 = Assessed formally through more than one major activity as well as through other
informal and formal assessments at Learning Level 3 (Application, habit, integrate)
Suggested methods of Institutional Learner Outcomes assessment:
Rubric Rank:
1
Ability to read, write and communicate one-on-one and in front
of groups, and completion of assigned work on time.
3
Creation of a comprehensive marketing plan for a regional
business that includes short term and long range market analysis and
planning for the business, target market and regional impact.
2
Utilize software and research technology to create a marketing
audit and identify the proper marketing mix needed in a dynamic
business environment.
2
Self-evaluation and evaluation of peers on presentations and
group projects, demonstrate the ability to work on teams and in
situations that require the ability to communicate in a diverse manner
with multiple communication styles.
25
Appendix
M
26
Appendix
N
27
Appendix
O
28
Appendix
P
29
Appendix
Q
30
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