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UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT CHICAGO COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING RESEARCH REPORT
UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT CHICAGO
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
RESEARCH REPORT
2007 - 2008
Credits
Copy Editors:
Graphics Support:
Cover Design and Printing:
Sol Shatz and Johnette Foster
Ray Matthes, Engineering Media Services
UIC Office of Publications Services
UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT CHICAGO
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
RESEARCH REPORT
2007 - 2008
Preface
The UIC College of Engineering (www.eng.uic.edu) is recognized for its academic excellence with undergraduate
and graduate programs in six academic departments: Bioengineering, Chemical Engineering, Civil and Materials
Engineering, Computer Science, Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Mechanical and Industrial Engineering.
The College has 1781 undergraduate students and 948 graduate students (404 M.S., 414 Ph.D., 110 MEng, and 20
MEE). During 2007-2008 we produced 345 B.S. graduates, 184 M.S. graduates, 68 Ph.D. graduates, and 13 MEng
graduates.
The College of Engineering has 115 outstanding faculty including 16 women. Two of our faculty are members of
the National Academy of Engineering. In addition, 44 of our faculty are Fellows of societies such as IEEE, ACM,
ASME, AAAS, and ASCE; and 22 are National Science Foundation CAREER or Presidential Young Investigator
award winners.
The research programs in the UIC College of Engineering have been growing rapidly over the years and are
conducted in all academic departments and in specific interdisciplinary centers. Our college is actively involved in
interdisciplinary research in the areas of bio-technology, nano-technology, information technology, and
infrastructure and environmental technology. We are committed to performing and disseminating first-rate research
that includes both fundamental engineering scholarship and applied technologies.
During the 2007 – 2008 term of this report, our faculty members have been extremely productive in research. This
activity can be summarized by the following general statistics:
•
•
•
•
More than $22 million dollars in research expenditures
71 book and chapter publications
397 journal publications and 458 conference publications
68 PhDs awarded
This report provides a snap-shot view of our dynamic research, including specific information on multidisciplinary
research thrust areas and projects, research grants, scientific publications, PhD production, and research awards and
honors.
I invite you to visit our college and department websites to meet our fine faculty, learn about our academic and
support programs and explore the range of cutting-edge engineering research at the UIC College of Engineering.
Please feel free to direct any questions or comments about the college to my staff or me.
Warm regards and thank you for your interest.
Peter Nelson, Dean of Engineering
(Fall 2008)
UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT CHICAGO
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
Administration
Departments
Peter Nelson, Dean
Phone: (312) 996-2400; Fax: (312) 996-8664
E-Mail: [email protected]
Bioengineering
Sol M. Shatz
Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Studies
Phone: (312) 355-3317; Fax: (312) 996-8664
E-Mail: [email protected]
Mike McNallan
Associate Dean for Undergraduate Administration
Phone: (312) 996-3463; Fax: (312) 413-3365
E-Mail: [email protected]
Piergiorgio L. E. Uslenghi
Associate Dean for International and Internet Programs
Phone: (312) 996-6059; Fax: (312) 996-8664
E-Mail: [email protected]
Ralph Pini
Associate Dean for Corporate Relations and Career
Placement
Phone: (312) 996-5843: Fax: (312) 413-8664
E-Mail: [email protected]
Rich Alpern
Associate Dean for Administration
Phone: (312) 413-9125; Fax: (312) 413-8664
E-Mail: [email protected]
Denise Hayman
Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Recruitment
Phone: (312) 996-6065; Fax: (312) 413-3365
E-Mail: [email protected]
Arnaud Buttin
Director for Advancement
Phone: (312) 413-1387; Fax: (312) 413-8664
E-Mail: [email protected]
Nancy Cohen
Director of Development
Phone: (312) 996-2168; Fax: (312) 413-8664
E-Mail: [email protected]
Richard L. Magin, Head
851 S. Morgan (MC 063)
Chicago, IL 60607
Phone: (312) 996-2335
Fax:
(312) 996-5921
Email: [email protected]
Chemical Engineering
Sohail Murad, Head
810 S. Clinton (MC 110)
Chicago, IL 60607
Phone: (312) 996-5993
Fax:
(312) 996-0808
Email: [email protected]
Civil and Materials Engineering
Farhad Ansari, Head
842 W. Taylor (MC 246)
Chicago, IL 60607
Phone: (312) 996-3428
Fax:
(312) 996-2426
Email: [email protected]
Computer Science
Robert Sloan, Acting Head
851 S. Morgan (MC 152)
Chicago, IL 60607
Phone: (312) 996-3422
Fax:
(312) 413-0024
Email: [email protected]
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Mitra Dutta, Head
851 S. Morgan (MC 154)
Chicago, IL 60607
Phone: (312) 996-3423
Fax:
(312) 996-6465
Email: [email protected]
Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
William M. Worek, Head
842 W. Taylor (MC 251)
Chicago, IL 60607
Phone: (312) 996-5317
Fax:
(312) 413-0447
Email: [email protected]
UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT CHICAGO
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
Research Centers and Laboratories
Electronic Visualization Laboratory (EVL)
Jason Leigh, Co-Director
842 W. Taylor, 2032 ERF (MC 152)
Chicago, IL 60607
Phone: (312) 996-3002
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.evl.uic.edu
Center for Research and Instruction in
Technologies for Electronic Security (RITES)
Jon Solworth, Director
851 S. Morgan, 1120 SEO (MC 152)
Chicago, IL 60607
Phone: (312) 996-0955
Email:
[email protected]
Website: www.rites.uic.edu
Energy Resources Center (ERC)
William M. Worek, Director
851 S. Morgan, 1227 SEO (MC 156)
Chicago, IL 60607
Phone: (312) 996-5610
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.erc.uic.edu
Manufacturing Research Center (MRC)
Sabri Cetinkunt, Director
842 W. Taylor, 3003 ERF (MC 251)
Chicago, IL 60607
Phone: (312) 996-9611
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.uic.edu/orgs/mrc/
Nanotechnology Core Facility (NCF)
Vitali Metlushko, Director
842 W. Taylor, 3064 ERF (MC 251)
Chicago, IL 60607
Phone: (312) 413-7574
Email:
[email protected]
Website: www.ncf.uic.edu
Mobile Information Systems Center (MOBIS)
Ouri Wolfson, Director
851 S. Morgan, 1137 SEO (MC 152)
Chicago, IL 60607
Phone: (312) 996-6770
Email: [email protected]
Center for Smart Infrastructure
Farhad Ansari, Director
842 W. Taylor, 2095 ERF (M/C 246)
Chicago, IL 60607
Phone: (312) 996-3428
Email: [email protected]
Center for Integrated Networks of Nanoscale
Sensors for Biomedical Applications
Michael A. Stroscio, Director
851 S. Morgan, 808 SEO (MC 154)
Chicago, IL 60607
Phone: (312) 413-5968
Email: [email protected]
Website: nanotechcenter.uic.edu
Center for Medical Simulation
Pat Banerjee, Director
842 W. Taylor, 3029 ERF (MC 251)
Chicago, IL 60607
Phone: (312) 996-5599
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.mie.uic.edu/faculty/banerjee.htm
Advancement of Smart Infrastructure Sensor
Technology (ASIST)
Subrata Chakrabarti, Director
842 W. Taylor, 3073 ERF (MC 246)
Chicago, IL 60607
Phone: (312) 996-3073
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.uic.edu/depts/asist/
UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT CHICAGO
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
Advisory Board
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD
JOHN E. MAJOR
President, Founder
MTSG
Rancho Santa Fe, CA 92067
ILESANMI ADESIDA
Dean, College of Engineering
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Urbana, IL 61801
PRAKASH C. AGARWAL
iKoa Corporation
Menlo Park, CA 94025
PRITH BANERJEE
Sr. Vice President of Research and Director
HP Labs Worldwide
Hewlett Packard Company
Palo Alto, CA 94301
JOHN E. BANTA
CEO and Managing Director
IllinoisVentures, LLC
Chicago, IL 60606-2901
MICHAEL J. BARBER
Chief Technology Officer
GE Healthcare
Waukesha, WI 53188
JOSEPH B. BARRETT
Senior Director Business Development
Baxter Healthcare Corporation
Deerfield, IL 60015
HARDIK BHATT
Chief Information Officer Innovation
And Technology (DoIT)
City of Chicago
JOHN L. BLUMENSHINE
Vice President, Facilities
S&C Electric Company
Chicago, IL 60626
CHRISTOPHER B. BURKE
President and CEO
Christopher Burke Engineering, Ltd.
Rosemont, IL 60018
DENNIS DEMOSS
Senior Vice President
Sargent & Lundy
Chicago, IL 60603
PAUL FINEGAN
Divisional Vice President
Global Energy Strategy Management
Abbott Laboratories
Abbott Park, IL 60064
RAJEEV GAUTAM
Vice President and Chief Technology Officer
Specialty Materials
Honeywell International, Inc.
Morristown, NJ 07962
CHRISTOPHER GLYNN
Director of Engagement, Talent and Aviation
Human Services Division
Caterpillar, Inc.
Peoria, IL 61629-4185
ARUP GUPTA
Director, Wireless Solutions
AdvancedTechnology & Wireless Mobility Group
Intel Corp.
Santa Clara, CA 95054
PHIL HANEGRAAF
Vice President
HNTB Corporation
Chicago, IL 60606
JOHN HARDIN
President & Chief Operating Officer
La-Co Industries, Inc.
Elk Grove Village, IL 60007
RICHARD HILL
Chairman and CEO
Novellus Systems, Inc.
San Jose, CA 95134-1568
AUDRONE KARALIUS
Vice President, Environment and Safety
Sara Lee Corporation
Downers Grove, IL 60515
Advisory Board Continued
MUTHIAH KASI
COO and Executive Vice President
Alfred Benesch & Company
Chicago, IL 60601
PAUL S. PEERCY
Dean, College of Engineering
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Madison, WI 52706
TONY KOBRINETZ
Vice President, 802.16 Systems
Motorola, Inc.
Arlington Heights, IL 60004
LEE A. SHERIDAN
Vice President, Research & Development
Illinois Tool Works Inc.
Glenview, IL 60025
NORMAN N. LI
President
NL Chemical Technology, Inc.
Mount Prospect, IL 60056
MARK P. SLIVINSKI
Strategy Lead for Vigilant Eagle
Raytheon Missile Systems
Tucson, AZ 85706
JYOTI MAHURKAR-THOMBRE
Vice President of Soft Switch R&D
Lucent Technologies
Naperville, IL 60566
WILLIAM D. UNGER
Partner Emeritus
Mayfield
Menlo Park, CA 94025-5206
LEE MAKOWSKI
Director, Bioscience Division
Argonne National Laboratory
Argonne, IL 60439
DENNIS D. VACCARO
Northop Grumman Corporation
Rolling Meadows, IL 60008-1098
PETER L. WEXLER
JEFFREY T. MILLER
Senior Research Scientist
BP Chemicals
Naperville, IL 60563
WILLIAM E. MORROW
Integrys Energy Group
Chicago, IL 60601
JOSEPH P. MULVEY
Senior Principal
Stantec Corportation
Lombard, IL 60148
GLENN NELAND
Austin, TX 78735-1613
KENNETH E. NELSON
President and CEO
Clark Dietz, Inc.
Chicago, IL 60661-5767
DIANE O’KEEFE
District One Regional Engineer
Illinois Department of Transportation
WILLIAM PASCHAL
Chief Engineer
Sargent & Lundy Engineers
Chicago, IL 60603
Vice President of Engineering
Copivia Inc.
Palo Alto, CA 94301
BRUCE SCOTT WIDMANN
Consulting Engineer
Northrop Grumman Corporation
Rolling Meadows, IL 60008
DAVID ZAVATTERO
Deputy Director, IT & Planning
Chicago Office of Emergency Management and
Communications
Chicago, IL 60608
Table of Contents
MULTIDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH THRUST AREAS
BIOTECHNOLOGY
MATERIALS AND NANO-TECHNOLOGY
COMPUTING AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
INFRASTRUCTURE AND ENERGY/ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY
1
2
19
34
69
RESEARCH GRANTS
BIOENGINEERING
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
CIVIL AND MATERIALS ENGINEERING
COMPUTER SCIENCE
ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING
MECHANICAL AND INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING
97
101
104
107
113
117
RESEARCH PUBLICATIONS
Book and Chapter Publications
BIOENGINEERING
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
CIVIL AND MATERIALS ENGINEERING
COMPUTER SCIENCE
ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING
MECHANICAL AND INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING
121
122
123
125
127
129
Journal Publications
BIOENGINEERING
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
CIVIL AND MATERIALS ENGINEERING
COMPUTER SCIENCE
ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING
MECHANICAL AND INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING
131
137
141
145
149
157
Conference Publications
BIOENGINEERING
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
CIVIL AND MATERIALS ENGINEERING
COMPUTER SCIENCE
ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING
MECHANICAL AND INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING
164
167
168
173
184
198
PhD GRADUATES
BIOENGINEERING
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
CIVIL AND MATERIALS ENGINEERING
COMPUTER SCIENCE
ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING
MECHANICAL AND INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING
203
205
206
206
207
209
FACULTY AWARDS AND HONORS
BIOENGINEERING
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
CIVIL AND MATERIALS ENGINEERING
COMPUTER SCIENCE
ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING
MECHANICAL AND INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING
210
210
210
211
212
213
MULTIDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH THRUST AREAS
Research in the College of Engineering is undertaken in 6 departments. While each of the departments has
its own research strengths, there is a college-wide focus on the following four research thrust areas:
•
•
•
•
BioTechnology
Materials and Nano-Technology
Computing and Information Technology
Infrastructure and Energy/Environmental Technology
The following pages provide a quick view of some of the key research projects associated with these thrust
areas. Each project is presented in the form of a “quad-chart” that highlights the project’s motivation,
technical approach, and key achievements. For a full, interactive view of current quad-charts organized by
thrust area and by academic department, visit the College of Engineering’s research web page at the
following URL:
www.engr.uic.edu/research/research.htm
and click on the “Research Thrust Areas” link.
1
BIOTECHNOLOGY
Research projects in BioTechnology include activities such as neural engineering, tissue
engineering, and bioinformatics. This research thrust area is populated by faculty from
many departments, including bioengineering, chemical engineering, computer science,
electrical and computer engineering, and mechanical and industrial engineering.
For an on-line view of the quad-charts in the BioTechnology area, visit the College of
Engineering’s research web page at the following URL:
www.engr.uic.edu/research/slides/ThrustAreas/BioTech_show/
2
LargeLarge-scale Fluid Structure Interaction Modeling of the Human Brain
Laboratory for Product and Process Design, Director A. A. LINNINGER
College of Engineering, University of Illinois,
Chicago, IL, 60607, U.S.A.
Prime Grand Support: NSF, Susman and Asher Foundation
Problem Statement
• Prediction of large deformations of the brain
parenchyma based on Fluid-Structure Interaction
modeling.
Vascular System (I)
• Coupling of the brain parenchyma, vascular and
ventricular system in the human brain.
Parenchyma (II)
Computer Simulation
Live patient MRI
HYDROCEPHALUS
DRUG DELIVERY
Motivation
Ventricular System (III)
• The therapeutic approach for hydrocephalus
treatment is very brutal (shunting) and many
revisions are needed.
Cortex
Catheter
TECHNICAL APPROACH: MOVING GRID CODE
MR
Imaging
Image
Grid
Reconstruction Generation
Solvers
Post –
Processing
• Ultimate goal: precise model of human brain
dynamics to design treatments without in vivo test.
Key Achievements
• 3D geometric reconstruction of patient-specific brain dimensions based on
MRI data
• 3D patient-specific dynamic analysis of CSF flow in the human brain
Novel Moving
Grid Code
+ FLUENT
• Data from Magnetic Resonance Imaging.
• Use of MRI reconstruction tools for generation of 3D patient
specific brain geometry.
• Introduction of the geometry to Finite Volumes or Finite
Elements advanced solvers.
• Post processing of the obtained results.
3-D model of the ventricular system
and half of the subarachnoid space.
3-D model of the solid brain
(white and gray matter).
Velocity magnitude (m/sec)
Future Goals
• Optimal Drug Delivery to the Human Brain.
• Feedback control systems to better treat Hydrocephalus.
Computational Fluid Dynamics of Ferrofluids
Lewis E. Wedgewood, Chemical Engineering Department
Prime Grant Support: National Science Foundation, 3M Company
Problem Statement and Motivation
Brownian
Dynamics
Simulation of
a Ferrofluid
in Shear
H = Hey
Technical Approach
• Brownian Dynamics Simulations For Spherical And
Slender Particles Is Used To Model The Microstructure
Of Ferrofluids
• LaGrange Multiplier Method Used To Satisfy Local
Magnetic Field Effects
• Computer Animation And Statistical Analysis To
Characterize Particle Dynamics
• Continuum Theory And Hindered Rotation Models To
Model Mechanical Behavior
3
• Establish The Mechanical Properties And
Microstructure of Ferrofluids Under Flow Conditions
• Use Ferrofluids To Test New Theories Of Complex
Fluids And The Relation Between Mircostructure And
Flow Behavior
• Use The Resulting Models And Understanding To
Develop Improved Ferrofluids And New Applications
Such Targeted Drug Delivery
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Improved Understanding Of The Behavior Of
Ferrofluids Near Solid Boundaries And The Application
Of Boundary Conditions
• Established Relation Between Applied Magnetic Fields
And Ferrofluid Microstructure
• Development Of Constitutive Relations Suitable For
Design Of New Applications
• Verification Of Hindered Rotation Theory And The
Transport Of Angular Momentum In Complex Fluids
Integrating Nanostructures with Biological Structures
Investigators: M. Stroscio, ECE and BioE; M. Dutta, ECE
Prime Grant Support: ARO, NSF, AFOSR, SRC, DARPA, DHS
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Coupling manmade nanostructures with biological
structures to monitor and control biological
processes.
• For underlying concepts see Biological
Nanostructures and Applications of Nanostructures
in Biology: Electrical, Mechanical, & Optical
Properties, edited by Michael A. Stroscio and Mitra
Dutta (Kluwer, New York, 2004).
Technical Approach
• Synthesis of nanostructures
• Binding nanostructures to manmade structures
• Modeling electrical, optical and mechanical
properties of nanostructures
• Experimental characterization of intergated manmade
nanostructure-biological structures
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Numerous manmade nanostructures have been
functionalized with biomolecules
• Nanostructure-biomolecule complexes have been used
to study a variety of biological structures including cells
• Interactions between nanostructures with biomolecules
and with biological environments have been modeled for
a wide variety of systems
• Ultimate goal is controlling biological systems at the
nanoscale
First Responder Pathogen Detection System (FiRPaDS)
Investigator: Bhaskar DasGupta, Computer Science, UIC with other investigators outside UIC
Prime Grant Support: NSF CAREER IIS-0643973 and DBI-0543365
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Need to identify unknown virus sequences during
events such as epidemic or biological warfare
• We only have a database of known virus sequences
• Few complications of the real-world problem:
• Sequence has mutated (possibly maliciously)
• Impossibility to obtain entire DNA sequence
• Sample may be contaminated and/or contains
mixture of sequences.
Technical Approach
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Rapid amplification of the collected genetic material,
e.g., via degenerate oligonucleotide primer based
multiplex PCR
• Developed efficient barcoding algorithms using
combinatorial techniques
• A pathogen fingerprinting and/or barcoding component
built around universal DNA tag arrays
http://www.cs.uic.edu/~dasgupta/professional/software.html
• Rapid and robust computational procedures to compute
barcodes that produces short signatures of sequences
• Two possible approaches to design FiRPaDS:
• Target based FiRPaDS
• Primer based FiRPaDS
Software available from
• Will extend barcoding approaches for more complicated
scenarios such as mixture of samples
• Will generate an efficient solution for a combinatorial or
graph-theoretic formulation for the degenerate
multiplexed PCR minimization problem
• Will investigate applications of universal DNA tag arrays
for helpful coordination with barcoding or fingerprinting
steps
4
Virtual Reality and Robots in Stroke Recovery
Investigators: Robert V. Kenyon, Computer Science; James L. Patton, RIC
Prime Grant Support: NIH, NIDRR
Mission:
PROJECT:
To evaluate the utility of simple robotic
devices for providing rehabilitation
therapy after hemispheric stroke. The
integration of virtual reality and robot
technology increases flexibility in
training for patients recovering from
stroke. Promoting innovative
techniques to train the nervous system
for the recovery of functional
movement.
Development Of A
Robotic System
With An
Augmented Reality
Interface For
Rehabilitation Of
Brain Injured
Individuals
Key Achievements and Future Goals:
Technical Approach:
• Personal Augmented Reality Immersive System (PARIS):
•Virtual and physical objects seen by user.
• Robotic systems: PHANToM, Haptic Master, WAM:
•These back-drivable robots provide force to the subject
only when commanded to do so.
• Software integration:
•This system provides a platform for exploring how
the nervous system controls movements, teaches
new movements, explores novel strategies for
training and rehabilitation, assesses and tracks
functional recovery, and tests and challenges
existing theories of rehabilitation.
•Real-time interactivity requires rapid communication
between the different components of the rehabilitation
system and must contain consistent representations of
what the user should feel and see.
•Such a system will determine the necessary levels
of quality for future design cycles and related
technology.
•The robot’s control must quickly communicate with the
display control so that graphics are synchronized with
the robot’s state.
•Future designs will lead the way to new modes of
clinical practice and to the commercialization of
such systems.
Multimode Sonic & Ultrasonic Diagnostic Imaging
Investigators: Thomas J. Royston & Francis Loth, Mechanical & Industrial Engineering
Prime Grant Support: NIH
Problem Statement and Motivation
Artery
Bimodal image.
Fluid
flow
Noise generation
Approximate location
of constriction
• Geometric changes may indicate disease or injury
• Sonic imaging provides unique functional information
Blood vessel with constriction in soft tissue phantom
• Sounds associated with disease are sonic, not US
Grayscale of geometry from US imaging
• Merge US and Sonics to harness strengths of each
Color overlay of acoustic field generated by turbulence
downstream of the constriction
• Initial application: peripheral vascular pathologies –
vessel constrictions (plaque and intimal hyperplasia)
Key Achievements and Future Goals
Technical Approach
• Sonic wave propagation
in biological tissue is more
complex than US.
• Prototype US/Sonic system has been developed
- conventional US system retrofitted with
- electromagnetic position device for true 3D imaging
• Requires new acoustic
modeling developments
• Inverse modeling to
extract acoustic image from
array
Prototype 15 sensor sonic
array pad on arm
• Novel acoustic sensor
development
• Merging multiple imaging modalities on same platform
5
• Ultrasonic (US) imaging provides detailed geometry
- acoustic sensor array pad that is transparent to US
so US imaging can be conducted with the pad in place
• Calibration of system on phantom models in progress
• Turbulence imaged downstream of vessel constriction
• Future plans: Human subject studies, improved
prototype, better sensor array, improved imaging
software
Biomedical & Biotechnology
Biomimetic MEMS Technology for a Novel Retinal Prosthesis
PI: Laxman Saggere, Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
Collaborator: David Schneeweis, BioEngineering
Prime Grant Support: National Science Foundation
Problem Statement and Motivation
Array of light-powered
microactutor prototypes
• Motivation: Photoreceptor degeneration in diseases such as
ARMD and RP is the leading cause of blindness in the world. No
cures or therapies are available for these diseases, but a retinalbased prosthesis offers a promising treatment option. Most
current retinal prostheses rely on the concept of electrical
stimulation of neurons, which is conceptually simple, but faced
with many challenges
• Objective: To develop a biomimetic technology enabling a
fundamentally different and technically superior approach to a
retinal prosthesis. This approach, in principle, mimics a natural
photoreceptor’s function of transducing visual stimuli into
chemical signals that stimulate the surviving retinal neurons.
Technical Approach
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Approach: A microdispenser unit integrated with a miniaturized
solar cell and a thin-film piezo actuator on one side and several
micron-scale ports on the other side contains liquid chemical
(neurotransmitter). An array of such microdispenser units
constitutes the core of a prosthesis.
• Challenges: i) Low intensity light at the retina; ii) Integration of
array components and microfluidics; iii) Chemical dispensing rate,
mechanism, long-term operation; iv) Biocompatible packaging.
• Principle of Operation: Light falling on the retina irradiates the
solar cell, which generates voltage across the piezo actuator. The
actuator pressurizes the liquid and dispenses it through the micro
ports. The liquid diffuses through micro-capillaries in a soft
encapsulation and stimulates retinal cells.
• Technologies: MEMS, microfluidics, thin-film piezoelectric
actuators, solid-sate solar cells, chemical cellular signaling.
• Key Achievements: i) Completed preliminary system design and
established the concept feasibility; ii) Established a technique to
chemically stimulate neuronal cells and record the cellular
response; iii) Fabricated and characterized the light powered
actuator; iv) Established techniques to quantify nanoliter flow
• Future Goals: i) To fabricate and test an in-vitro proof of the
concept device; ii) To lead the technology developed towards
clinical relevancy through interdisciplinary collaborations with
neuroscientists and retina specialists.
MIE – Biotechnology and Micro/Nano Emphasis Areas
Neurotronic Communication: Electronic Prostheses
To Treat Degenerative Eye Disease
Investigators: John R. Hetling, Bioengineering
Prime Grant Support: The Whitaker Foundation
Problem Statement and Motivation
F
C
• Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) is a potentially blinding
disease for which there are no cures; one in 4000
people are diagnosed with RP
A
D
B
• Microelectronic prostheses represent a potential
treatment option for RP
E
Technical Approach
• The response of the retina to electrical stimulation is
studied in vivo
• Microelectrode arrays, 12 um thick (above, right), are
fabricated in the UIC MAL and surgically placed beneath
the retina in the eye (above, left)
• The response of the retina to electrical stimulation is
recorded and compared to the response to natural light
stimuli
• We use a unique transgenic rat model of retinal
degenerative disease developed in our laboratory
• Our objective is to learn to stimulate the diseased
retina with microelectrodes such that useful information
is conveyed to the mind’s eye of the blind patient
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• This novel approach is the only means to study
electrical stimulation of the retina at the cellular level, in
vivo, in a clinically-relevant animal model
• Using pharmacological dissection, we have begun to
identify the types of retinal neurons targeted by electrical
stimulation
• Ultimate Goal: To communicate the visual scene to
the diseased retina with the highest resolution possible
• The Goal will be achieved by optimizing the design of
the microelectrode array and the stimulus parameters
6
Microscopic Magnetic Resonance Elastography
Investigators: Richard L. Magin, Bioengineering; Shadi F. Othman, Bioengineering; Thomas J.
Royston, Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
Prime Grant Support: NIH R21 EB004885-01
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Disease changes the mechanical properties of tissues
• Palpation by physician requires physical contact
• Propose a noninvasive way (MRI) to measure the
stiffness of biological tissues (elastography)
• Use the elastography system to measure the
mechanical properties of regenerating tissue
Three dimensional shear wave through agarose gel
• Extend the technique to high magnetic field systems to
allow micoroscopic resolution
Key Achievements and Future Goals
Technical Approach
• Generate shear waves in the tissue
• Apply magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to capture
shear wave motion
• Improving elastography resolution to 34 μm x 34 μm for
a 500 μm slice
• Measure the shear wavelength through the sample
• Monitoring the growth of osteogenic tissue engineered
constructs
• Convert the shear wavelength to shear stiffness
• Applying high resolution microelatography in vivo
Biological Signal Detection for Protein Function Prediction
Sequences
Investigators: Yang Dai
Prime Grant Support: NSF
Text File of
Protein
description
Problem Statement and Motivation
Coding
Coding
Vectors
Vectors
MASVQLY ... …HKEPGV
• High-throughput experiments generate new protein
sequences with unknown function prediction
•In silico protein function prediction is in need
Machine Learner
specific subcellular
and subnuclear localization
Technical Approach
• Use Fast Fourier Transform to capture long range
correlation in protein sequence
• Design a class of new kernels to capture subtle
similarity between sequences
•Use domains and motifs of proteins as coding vectors
•Use multi-classification system based on deterministic
machine learning approach, such as support vector
machine
• Use Bayesian probabilistic model
7
•Protein subcellular localization is a key element in
understanding function
•Such a prediction can be made based on protein
sequences with machine learners
•Feature extraction and scalability of learner are keys.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
•Developed highly sophisticated sequence coding
methods
•Developed an integrated multi-classification system for
protein subcellular localization
•Developed a preliminary multi-classification system for
subnuclear localization
• Will incorporate various knowledge from other
databases into the current framework
• Will design an integrative system for protein function
prediction based on information of protein localizations,
gene expression, and protein-protein interactions
Computational Protein Topographics for Health Improvement
Jie Liang, Ph.D. Bioengineering
Prime Grant Support: National Science Foundation Career Award, National Institutes of Health R01,
Office of Naval Research, and the Whitaker Foundation.
Protein surface matching
Problem Statement and Motivation
• The structure of proteins provide rich information about
how cells work. With the success of structural genomics,
soon we will have all human proteins mapped to
structures.
• However, we need to develop computational tools to
extract information from these structures to understand
how cell works and how new diseases can be treated.
Technical Approach
Evolution of
function
•Therefore, the development of computational tools for
surface matching and for function prediction will open the
door for many new development for health improvement.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• We use geometric models and fast algorithm to
characterize surface properties of over thirty protein
structures.
• We have developed a web server CASTP (cast.engr.
uic.edu) that identify and measures protein surfaces. It
has been used by thousands of scientists world wide.
• We develop evolutionary models to understand how
proteins overall evolve to acquire different functions
using different combination of surface textures.
• We have built a protein surface library for >10,000
proteins, and have developed models to characterize
cross reactivities of enzymes.
• Efficient search methods and statistical models allow us
to identify very similar surfaces on totally different
proteins
• We also developed methods for designing phage library
for discovery of peptide drugs.
• Probablistc models and sampling techniques help us to
understand how protein works to perform their functions.
• We have developed methods for predicting structures
of beta-barrel membrane proteins.
• Future: Understand how protein fold and assemble, and
designing method for engineering better proteins and
drugs.
Structural Bioinformatics Study of Protein Interaction Network
Investigators: Hui Lu, Bioengineering
Prime Grant Support: NIH, DOL
Protein-DNA complex:
gene regulation
DNA repair
cancer treatment
drug design
gene therapy
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Protein interacts with other biomolecules to perform a
function: DNA/RNA, ligands, drugs, membranes, and other
proteins.
• A high accuracy prediction of the protein interaction
network will provide a global understanding of gene
regulation, protein function annotation, and the signaling
process.
• The understanding and computation of protein-ligand
binding have direct impact on drug design.
Technical Approach
• Data mining protein structures
• Molecular Dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations
• Machine learning
• Phylogenetic analysis of interaction networks
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Developed the DNA binding protein and binding site
prediction protocols that have the best accuracy
available.
• Developed transcription factor binding site prediction.
• Gene expression data analysis using clustering
• Developed the only protocol that predicts the protein
membrane binding behavior.
• Binding affinity calculation using statistical physics
• Will work on drug design based on structural binding.
• Will work on the signaling protein binding mechanism.
• Will build complete protein-DNA interaction prediction
package and a Web server.
8
Carcinogenic Potential of Wireless Communication Radiation
Investigators: James C. Lin, PhD, Electrical and Computer Engineering; and Bioengineering
Prime Grant Support: Magnetic Health Science Foundation
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Wide Spread Use of Cell Phone Technology
• Concerns about Health and Safety
• Plectin is A High Molecular Weight Protein
• Plectin Immunoreactivity Follows Brain Injury
• Mutation of Plectin Identified With Signs of
Neurodegenerative Disorder
Immunolabeling of Irradiated Rat Brain
Using Monoclonal Antibody, Pletin.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
Technical Approach
• Irradiate Young Adult Rats (300 g) in Plexiglass Holder
• Produce Power Deposition Patterns in Rat Brains
Comparable to Those in Humans
• Brains Were Removed and Incubated
• Floating Sections Were Used for Immunocytochemistry
• Use Monoclonal Antibody - plectin - Labeling
• Examination by Light Microscopy
• Immunolabeling of Irradiated Rat Brain Showed
Increased Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein
(IFAP)
• GFAP Plays An Important Role in Glial Reactions After
Lesions
• Preliminary Results Indicate There is No Difference in
Expression Pattern of Plectin Among the
Brains Tested at Peak SAR levels of 0, 1.6
and 16 W/kg in the brain.
• Additional Experiments to Establish Statistical Validity
Engineering Better Brain Implants for the Future of Medicine
Patrick J. Rousche, Ph.D. Bioengineering, and co-PI Laxman Saggere, Ph.D. Mechancial Engineering
Prime Grant Support: National Science Foundation Career Award and National Institutes of Health R21…>
Microneurosurgery
Problem Statement and Motivation
Device Manufacture
• The complex neural tissue of the brain is the source or
destination for almost all motor and sensory information
in the human body
1
2
3
Animal Behavior
4
5
Technical Approach
• Therefore, multi-channel electrode interfaces with the
brain hold great potential as a therapeutic tool for a
number of clinical conditions such as paralysis,
blindness, and deafness
Electrophysiology
6
• Bio-inspired design. By incorporating biocompatible
materials and biological surface coatings, brain implants
capable of long-term survival and function may be
possible. ?
• Mechanically-compatible design. Further
improvements to implant performance may come from
the novel use of flexible implant materials.
•Flexible, biocompatible, electrode arrays are developed
in the MAL and tested in a rat model.
• Neural cell culture is also used in the initial design
phase to better understand the interactions at the
neuron-device interface.
9
• The architecture of the brain presents an incredible
biological, chemical and mechanical design challenge for
engineers designing such interfaces
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Development of a cell-culture test chamber
• Demonstration of sensory and motor brain signal
recording in awake and behaving rats
• Beginning of a related study to study stroke in
collaboration with the UIC Department of Neurosurgery
• Extension of the animal work into bio-robotics
• Presentations at IEEE-EMBS (Engineering in Medicine
and Biology) conferences
• Future: Engineering analysis and design study for
optimization of an electrode design suitable for human
auditory cortex to treat deafness in humans
Development of a Functional Optical Imaging (FOI)
Technique for Studying Retina
A.
20 µm
C.
B.
D.
Investigators: David M. Schneeweis,BioE
Prime Grant Support: Pending
Problem Statement and Motivation
Multi-photon
microscopy images of
isolated rat retina.
Each image is at a
different layer. Cell
membranes are labeled
with a fluorescent VSD,
and appear bright.
• A noninvasive, high throughput method is required to
study the patterns of electrical activity in large numbers
of nerve cells in the retina
• This is critical for understanding retinal function in
normal and diseased retina, and for evaluating retinal
prostheses and other therapies for treating blindness
• Optical methods offer certain key advantages over
classical electrode recording techniques that are labor
intensive, invasive, and yield information about only one
or a small number of cells at a time
Key Achievements and Future Goals
Technical Approach
Key elements in Functional Optical Imaging (FOI):
• Voltage sensitive dyes (VSDs) are fluorescent
molecules that can be delivered to cell membranes, as
shown above for a rat retina
• Protocols have been established for loading a particular
VSD into cell membranes
• The entire thickness of the retina can be imaged with
single cell resolution (see figure)
• Changes in cell voltage cause changes in the optical
properties of VSDs
• Parameters for imaging the VSD using MPM have been
established
• Multi-photon microscopy (MPM) is a technique that
allows high resolution imaging of thicker tissues, such
as retina
• Small changes in fluorescence of the VSD can be
measured with suitable speed and resolution
• MPM combined with VSDs offers the promise of
simultaneously studying the functional electrical activity
of large numbers of retinal cells
• Future goals include demonstrating that FOI can
measure physiologically relevant voltage changes, and
using FOI to study visually or electrically evoked signals
in isolated retina of rat
Neurotronic Communication: Olfactory Biosensor
Based on the Four-Channel Electroantennogram
Investigators: John R. Hetling, Bioengineering; Tom C. Baker, Entomology (Iowa State)
Prime Grant Support: NSF – Biological Information Technology and Systems (BITS)
Problem Statement and Motivation
Pore
Cuticle
Sensory
Neuron
• Artificial nose technology has several potential
applications in security, defense, industry and clinical
diagnosis
Ch. 3
Dendrite
Sensillar
Lymph
• Current artificial nose technology is constrained by
low sensitivity, specificity and reproducibility, and slow
response times. Efforts to improve AR technology are
largely biomimetic.
Ch. 4
Axon
Insect antenna equivalent circuit
Ch. 1
Technical Approach
• Our objective is to use the insect olfactory organ as
the sensor in a hybrid device that is fast, sensitive and
highly specific.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• A four-channel biopotential amplifier was constructed
to measure the electroantennogram (EAG) from four
species of antennae in an air-stream.
• Individual odor strands can be accurately classified in
< one second, at concentrations approaching 1 ppb
(significantly better than current artificial noses).
• Both parametric and non-parametric classifiers were
developed which operate on the four-channel EAG signal
in near-real time.
• A global measure of classifier performance (accuracy
weighted by confidence) ranged from just above chance
to near 100%.
• The system was characterized under laboratory
conditions (wind tunnel) and in the field. Up to 9 odors
have been tested with a single preparation, consisting of
natural (insect pheromone components) and
anthropogenic (DNT, a volatile associated with land
mines) compounds.
• Ultimate Goal: Consistent 80% performance for each
odor strand in a turbulent environment, and coupling with
meteorological data for source localization.
• The Goal is being achieved by moving to a cell-based
preparation cultured on a 60-channel multielectrode
array, and integrating wind and GPS information.
10
Cardiac Sound Separation and Analysis
Investigators: Roland Priemer, ECE; Vivek Nigam , ECE
Prime Grant Support: Prakash Agarwal Foundation
Phonocardiogram Dissection
Mitral Component
Aortic Component
Hole
Murmur
Tricuspid
Component
Background Noise
Pulmonary Component
Apply blind source
separation algorithms to
isolate major delayed
components of the heart
sound.
Utilize dynamics of the
heart to detect and isolate
major heart sounds.
Motivation, Problems and Goals
Motivation
Problems
Goals
Extract clinically
relevant features from
isolated heart sounds to
perform clinical
diagnosis.
Mitral Component
Tricuspid Component
Statistically
Independent
S3
S4
Systolic Murmur Classification
Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the world.
One percent of all newborns have some sort of heart
dysfunction. The stethoscope is the most widely used frontline
instrument to detect heart dysfunction.
Ejection
Regurgitant
Ejection
Using the stethoscope requires extensive training .
Interpretation of the phonocardiogram can be subjective .
The phonocardiogram is a mixture of sounds with complexity
that makes it difficult to analyze for diagnosis of heart
dysfunctions .
Extract discrete heart sounds from the phonocardiogram and
develop algorithms for real-time analysis. Non-invasive, easy
to use and inexpensive apparatus. Automated support of
diagnosis of the separated sounds to classify dysfunctions.
Pulmonary Component
Murmur
Primary auscultation sites.
Heart sound with a VSD
murmur.
Background Noise
Aortic Component
Ejection or
Regurgitant
Ejection or
Regurgitant
Simplicity based detection of heart
sounds. Top: Mitral stenosis murmur.
Bottom: Simplicity of mitral stenosis
murmur
Normal
Simplicity based classification of
systolic murmurs.
Teaching Sensorimotor Skills with Haptics
Investigators: Miloš Žefran, ECE; Matteo Corno, ECE; Maxim Kolesnikov, ECE
Prime Grant Support: NSF; UIC College of Dentistry
Problem Statement and Motivation
• New surgical procedures are introduced at a high rate.
Each requires costly training.
• Haptic simulators provide a cost-effective alternative
to traditional training: no need to travel, 24/7 availability,
easy to create additional units as needed.
• Existing paradigm for haptics is not suitable for
teaching sensorimotor skills. Lack of good models and
of realistic haptic rendering are main obstacles to
creating useful simulators.
Technical Approach
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Position and force information are simultaneously
displayed to facilitate motor skill acquisition. The user is
modeled as a three-input, single-output system.
• Developed a new paradigm for teaching of
sensorimotor skills with haptics.
• The model of the human enables stability analysis
through the Lyapunov second method; traditional
passivity techniques can not be used. Time delays are
critical for stability and are explicitly modeled.
• The Euclidean group SE(3) used to develop haptic
rendering algorithms that properly account for
translations and rotations. Kinetic energy provides an
intrinsic way to define the penetration which is in turn
used to compute the reaction force.
11
• Proposed a new model for a user responding to haptic
and visual stimuli. The model experimentally verified.
• Stability analysis of the system performed. Stability
boundaries explicitly identified.
• Implemented a new method for haptic rendering.
• Future work: applications in medical training, rehabilitation; faster implementation of the haptic rendering;
implementation on cheap haptic displays; extensions of
the new paradigm for collaborative haptics.
Atomic & Molecular BioNanotechnology
G.Ali Mansoori, Bio & Chem Eng Dept.s
Prime Grant Support: ARO, KU, UMSL, ANL
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Diamondoids and Gold Nanoparticle - based
nanobiotechnology - Applications for Drug Delivery.
<Insert some type of visual picture/diagram, etc.>
• Quantum and statistical mechanics of small systems Development of ab initio models and equations of state of
nanosystems. Phase transitions, fragmentations.
• Molecular dynamics simulation of nano systems - Nonextensivity and internal pressure anomaly.
• DNA-Dendrimers nano-cluster formation.
Related Publications
Technical Approaches
•DNA-Dendrimer Nano-Cluster Electrostatics (CTNS, 2005)
• Nanoparticles-Protein Attachmrnt
•Nonextensivity and Nonintensivity in Nanosystems - A Molecular
Dynamics Sumulation J Comput & Theort Nanoscience (CTNS,2005)
•Nano-Imaging (AFM & STM), Microelectrophoresis
•Principles of Nanotechnology (Book) World Scientific Pub. Co
(2005)
•Ab Initio computations (Applications of Gaussian 98)
• Nano-Systems Simulations (Molecular Dynamics)
•Nano-Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics
• Statistical Mechanical Modeling and its Application to
Nanosystems Handbook of Theor & Comput Nanoscience and
Nanotechnology (2005)
•Phase-Transition and Fragmentation in Nano-Confined Fluids J
Comput & Theort Nanoscience (2005).
•Interatomic Potential Models for Nanostructures" Encycl
Nanoscience & Nanotechnology (2004).
Stem Cell-Based Tissue Engineering
Michael Cho, Ph.D. Bioengineering
Grant Support: National Institutes of Health and Office of Naval Research
Problem Statement and Motivation
New Tissue Engineering Strategy
• The costs associated with tissue loss or organ failure
have been estimated over several hundreds of billion
dollars.
• Severe shortage of tissues and organs continues to
persist and cannot adequately be overcome.
• Tissue engineering attempts to control, manipulate, and
reconstitute tissues in vitro ultimately for in vivo use to
repair and replace damage tissues, and therefore offers
a viable alternative.
• Recently, the use of stem cells in tissue engineering
has advanced exciting possibilities for numerous
biomedical and clinical applications
Technical Approach
• Both bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells
and embryonic stem cell lines are used to engineer
several tissues including bone and cartilage, just to name
a few.
• Regulation of stem cell proliferation and tissue-specific
differentiation by biochemical and physical cues appears
to lead to enhanced regenerative capability that will likely
result in desired integrity and functionality.
• Appropriate use of both mechanical cues and
biochemical cues may be combined to solve one of the
most challenging problems in tissue engineeringangiogenesisi, formation of blood vessels.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• We have engineered a co-culture system that exploits
the physicochemical differentiation factors and thereby
minimizes the use of biochemical factors that could have
unwanted side effects
• This unique model may offer an alternate tissue
engineering approach to design pre-vascularized bone
tissue constructs
• Future: Translate these laboratory results to clinical
settings, including animal models and eventually human
trials. Ultimate goal is to engineer tissues that can be
implanted to treat and regenerate lost and damage
tissues.
12
Computational Tools for Population Biology
Tanya Berger-Wolf, Computer Science, UIC; Daniel Rubenstein, Ecology and
Evolutionary Biology, Princeton; Jared Saia, Computer Science, U New Mexico
Supported by NSF
Problem Statement and Motivation
Of the three existing species of zebra, one, the Grevy's zebra, is
endangered while another, the plains zebra, is extremely
abundant. The two species are similar in almost all but one key
characteristic: their social organization.
Finding patterns of social interaction within a population has
applications from epidemiology and marketing to conservation
biology and behavioral ecology. One of the intrinsic
characteristics of societies is their continual change. Yet, there
are few analysis methods that are explicitly dynamic.
Zebra with a
sensor collar
A snapshot of zebra population and the
corresponding abstract representation
Our goal is to develop a novel conceptual and computational
framework to accurately describe the social context of an
individual at time scales matching changes in individual and
group activity.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
Technical Approach
• Collect explicitly dynamic social data: sensor collars on animals,
disease logs, synthetic population simulations, cellphone and
email communications
• Represent a time series of observation snapshots as a layered
graph. Questions about persistence and strength of social
connections and about criticality of individuals and times can be
answered using standard and novel graph connectivity algorithms
• Validate theoretical predictions derived from the abstract graph
representation by simulations on collected data and controlled
experiments on real populations
• A formal computational framework for analysis of dynamic
social interactions
• Valid and tested computational criteria for identifying
• Individuals critical for spreading processes in a population
• Times of social and behavioral transition
• Implicit communities of individuals
• Preliminary results on Grevy’s zebra and wild donkeys data
show that addressing dynamics of the population produces
more accurate conclusions
• Extend and test our framework and computational tools to
other problems and other data
Molecular dynamics simulation of chloride ion channels (CIC)
Hongmei Liu, Cynthia Jameson and Sohail Murad, Chemical Engineering Department
Prime Grant Support: US National Science Foundation
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Need for understanding transport of ions in
biological membranes
•Understand the conduction mechanism of
chloride ions in simpler models of ClC.
• Explain the permeation mechanisms of ions in
such ClC ion channels.
•Validate our models with the experimental
results, and then extend studies to more
complex systems.
Technical Approach
13
Key Achievements and Future Goals
permeation of ions in chloride ion channels.
• Explained the molecular basis of conduction
mechanisms of ions in ClC.
•Examine the effects of the architecture of the
tube surface on the water molecules in the tube.
•Used this improved understanding to predict
behavior of ions in ClC.
•Determine reorientation correlation times of
water molecules of the first hydration shell of the
ions in ion channels and in the bulk solution.
•Used molecular simulation to explain the
permeation mechanism of ions in ClC.
• Use molecular simulations to model the
.
Effects Of Bone Mineral Density And Surgical Technique On Stability
Of Acetabular Cup After Total Hip Replacement
Investigators: Ivan Zivkovic1; Farid Amirouche1; Mark Gonzalez2
1Department of Mechanical Engineering and 2Department of Orthopedic Surgery
Prime Grant Support: Zimmer Orthopedic
Problem Statement and Motivation
•Total hip replacement surgery has become a common
procedure to alleviate pain caused by osteoarthritis, rheumatoid
arthritis, fractures, and other hip related problems for patients
over 55 years of age.
•With the aging of the global population, the demand for hip
replacements is increasing, along with the required clinical
lifetime.
Technical Approach
• Experimental cadaveric study was conducted to measure
initial relative micromotion at the prosthesis/bone interface and
to investigate the effect of bone density and surgical technique
on the early micromotion at the interface that may predispose
to a prosthesis loosening.
• Sensor technology was used to capture the micromotion of
acetabular prosthesis
• Image-processing package (SeScan 3.0) was designed to
generate a 3-D bone geometry and material distribution from
ST scan and MRI data.
• Parametric patient based finite element model, validated with
experimental results, was developed to further analyze the
conditions affecting the initial stability and loosening of the
interface for different loading conditions.
•The goal of this research is to study the effect of aging and
surgical technique on stability of a hip prosthesis and ultimately
to improve durability of hip joint prosthesis.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Patient specific computer system is developed which couples
clinical imaging with finite element method
• This increased interpretive power has the potential to streamline
biomedical diagnosis, analysis, non-invasive surgical planning and
most importantly computer-assisted surgery
• At the initial clinical consultation proposed system would
warn orthopedic surgeon of any anatomical abnormalities that
could jeopardize the implant fixation, helps in determining
optimal positioning of the prosthesis, insertion method, etc.
which leads to reduction of operating time and to enchased
patient care.
Orienting Human Stem Cells (hMSCs)
by Means of Electrospun Polymer Nanofibers
Investigators: M. Cho, Bioengineering; A. Yarin, C. M. Megaridis, Mechanical and Industrial
Engineering; E. Zussman, Technion-Israel
Oriented
Random
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Cell orientation and adhesion control the functionality
of natural and engineered tissues
• Electrospinning is a low-cost technique which can
produce polymer nanofibers aligned along a specific
direction
• Polymer nanofibers can be used to mimic the native
extracellular matrix (ECM) features
A1
B1
Cells: Green, Nanofibers: Red
Technical Approach
• Random and oriented polycaprolactone (PCL)
nanofibrous scaffolds produced using electrospinning
• Electrospun polymer nanofiber scaffolds are used to
manipulate cell orientation and adhesion
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• hMSCs adhered and oriented along PCL nanofibers
• hMSCs were cultured and seeded on two scaffold types
(random, oriented)
• During long-term culture, hMSCs demonstrated no
preferred orientation on random nanofibrous scaffolds;
cells consistently aligned on oriented scaffolds
• Orientations of hMSCs and nanofibers on random and
oriented nanofibrous scaffold samples were measured
via laser scanning confocal microscopy at different time
points during an 18-day culture period
• Oriented PCL nanofibrous scaffolds could be used to
mimic the cell and ECM organization in the native tissue,
such as muscle, tendon, and the superficial zone of
articular cartilage
• hMSC viability tests were performed to verify
compatibility of the cells with the PCL
• The fiber scaffold/hSMC approach holds promise for a
variety of tissue engineering applications
14
Multi-scale Modeling of Failure in Cortical Bone
Investigator: Elisa Budyn, Mechanical Engineering
Grant Support: UIC; Collaboration: Ecole Centrale Paris (Thierry Hoc, Material Science)
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Determination of the effects of the local
geometrical and material heterogeneities in
sane and pathological cortical bone at the
micro and nano scales over the local strain
and stress fields and global response of the
unit cells.
• A better understanding of the effect of
pathologies over cortical bone quality
Technical Approach
• Multi-scale numerical models to
characterize the mechanics of materials and
biomaterials with multi-phase complex
microstructures.
• Failure mechanics of these microstructures
though damage and fracture processes
studied over the micro and nano scales,
modeled through FEM and X-FEM approaches.
• Concomitant experiments over the multiple
scales.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Determination
of the RVE
• Determination of the Macroscopic Moduli
• Effect of the cement lines over the local
strain field and the work of separation due to
crack propagation
• Determination of localization patterns
• Crack initiation and crack propagation
in cortical bone
Multi-Electrode Electroretinography: Toward Single-Flash
Mapping of Retinal Function
Principle Investigator: John R. Hetling, Bioengineering
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Prevalent blinding eye diseases often begin locally,
and progress across the retina (e.g. glaucoma, diabetic
retinopathy, macular degeneration). Early detection is
critical to minimizing vision loss.
• Existing clinical techniques for measuring local health
of the retina have limitations, including long test
duration (10 min) and indirect measurement.
• The new test proposed here can be administered in
one second, and provides a direct measure of retinal
physiology.
Technical Approach
• A multi-electrode array contact lens was designed for
the rat eye to establish proof of concept for this
approach, including experimentally induced laserdamage lesions on the retina.
• The ERG potentials recorded at the cornea will be
used in conjunction with a finite-element model of the
eye to estimate local activity of the retina.
• The meERG signal contains detailed information on
the physiological state of the retina which cannot
currently be measured with other functional mapping
techniques.
15
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Prototype multi-electrode contact lenses have been
fabricated.
• A detailed FE model of a rat eye has been constructed.
• Preliminary meERG data have been recorded and
used to optimize and validate the model, with
encouraging results.
• Ultimate Goal: Thoroughly demonstrate proof of
concept in rat, and transfer the technology to human
studies for eventual clinical application.
• A U.S. Patent is pending.
Independent control of gas concentrations
in a multiwell format
Investigators: Kihwan Nam and David T. Eddington, Bioengineering
6-Well format (top view)
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Oxygen is a key modulator in many cellular pathways
and current laboratory techniques for probing this
important variable lack precise control.
• Several conditions within the same incubator can be
generated through the use of hypoxic chambers, however
only 4 chambers generally fit within a standard incubator.
Side view
21 % 0 %
Oxygen
• Additionally, gradients can be easily implemented in
static culture models which are impossible to do in
standard techniques.
Cells
Technical Approach
• Soft lithography for microfabrication of thin membrane
for oxygenation
• Microfabricated insert for multiwell formats, 6-well to
96-well
• Multiple and independent control of oxygen
concentration for each well
• Polydimethylsiloxane is permeable to oxygen allowing
microfluidic gas channels to control the conentrations in
the well
• Cells can be cultivated under different concentration of
oxygen in each well
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• A microfabricated insert for multiwell formats has been
developed to control the gas concentration of each well
independent of the global incubator’s condition.
• Diffusive transport of oxygen is quick
• Simple and efficient platform does not require special
equipment besides incubators, gas cylinders, and multiwell plates
• High-throughput systems for development of cellular
microenvironmental models
• Application for in vitro model for liver zonation and
suitable platforms to study stem cells
Signal Transduction Network Inference from Experimental Evidence
Investigators: Bhaskar DasGupta, CS, UIC with other researchers outside UIC
Primary Grant Support: NSF CAREER IIS-0643973
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Understanding of many signaling processes is limited
to the knowledge of the signal(s) and of key mediators'
positive or negative effects on the whole process.
• Need methods for synthesizing indirect information
into a consistent network that maintains all observed
causal relationships.
Technical Approach
• distill experimental conclusions into qualitative regulatory
relations between cellular components of the type “A
promotes (inhibits) B”, or “C promotes (inhibits) the
process through which A promotes (inhibits) B”.
• direct biochemical interactions are marked as such.
• assume that a three-node indirect inference corresponds
to an intersection of two paths (A⇒B and C⇒B) in the
interaction network, i. e., we assume that C activates an
unknown pseudo-vertex of the AB path.
•Using techniques from combinatorial optimization we find
the sparsest graph, both in terms of pseudo vertex
numbers and non-critical edge numbers, that is consistent
with all reachability relationships between real vertices.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• developed efficient algorithms for the entire network
synthesis procedure.
• validated the procedure by applying it to experimental
results for abscisic acid-induced stomatal closure and
comparing the results with the manually curated network.
• our graph sparsification procedure returns solutions
close to optimal for randomly generated networks with a
structure similar to those observed in transcriptional
regulatory and signal transduction networks.
•An implementation of the graph synthesis procedure is
available from http://www.cs.uic.edu/~dasgupta/networksynthesis/
16
A Test of the Leibowitz Hypothesis
J. E. Barton1, R.V. Kenyon2, T.E. Cohn1
of California, 2University of Illinois at Chicago
1University
•Why do some people deliberately drive through railroad
crossings and into the path of oncoming trains, even when
warning signals are flashing? Are they seeking the ultimate
thrill or is there something amiss in their judgment about
the danger of crossing?
•Leibowitz observed that landing jumbo jets appeared to
move more slowly than smaller counterparts, even though
the former were traveling much faster.
•He speculated that this might be a contributing factor in
railroad crossing accidents, and hypothesized that this
misperception was the result of the way in which the visual
system interprets the cues at hand.
Technical Approach
Proportion of times subjects perceived the smaller sphere to be approaching faster (P5).
Except for large sphere speeds of 10 and 15 m/sec where the smaller sphere was
greater than then equal to the large sphere speed, respectively, the smaller sphere was
always slower than the larger sphere, as the Correct response [red filled circles and
dotted line] indicates. Thick dashed line shows chance level of response. Asterisks
indicate response significantly less than the proportion for the next lower speed.
Key Achievements
• Our experiment used a 3D Virtual Environment to
display different sized textured spheres approaching an
observer at different speeds.
• Our experiments show that speed perception is a
function of object size, as hypothesized by Leibowitz.
• We hypothesize that subjects inaccurately estimated
the large sphere’s size and distance as smaller and
closer, but use the actual expansion rate information for
this sphere.
• This lead them to incorrectly estimate the sphere’s
approach speed as slower than it really is and maybe at
important factor in collisions between small and large
vehicles.
Neuro-Machine Interfaces
James Patton, Ph.D., UIC BioEngineering and The Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago (RIC)
Grant Support: NIH, Department of Education (NIDRR), American Heart Association
Problem Statement and Motivation
New technology and understanding has led to new
possibilities in exploring the control of movement:
• Robotics and Haptics (artificial rendering of touch)
• Human machine interface
• Neural adaptation and Sensory-motor intelligence
• Robotic Teaching
• Augmented reality
• Rehabilitation of stroke patients
• Bimanual coordination
• Postural control
• Hand-eye coordination
Technical Approach
• Measure forces, motions, and muscle activity while
individuals attempt to move in different activities
• Robotic devices can follow along, assist, perturb, or
perform otherwise unrealizable forces and torques
during movement
• Enhancement of the feedback through error
augmentation
• Altering the mechanical world using robotics
• Altering the visual world using virtual environment
technology
• Repetitive practice and rehabilitation of stroke patients,
in the presence of specialized forces and visual
feedback designed by the computer
17
Key Achievements and Goals
• Understanding of the nervous system and how to
approximate sensory-motor interactions with a computer
model
• Several training techniques that improve hand-eye
coordination
• Restoration of function in survivors of stroke
• Human machine operator training that enhance the
motor learning process
• Faster and better learning of tasks
• Understanding the learning related to multiple types of
interfaces with the nervous system – physical, sensory,
and electrophysiological
OPTIMIZING PARAMETERS AND DESIGNING A CONTROL LOOP FOR DEEP BRAIN
STIMULATION USED FOR TREATING PARKINSONS DISEASE
Investigators: Ishita Basu,ECE ; Daniela Tuninetti,ECE; Daniel Graupe,ECE; Konstantin Slavin,Neurosurgery;
Problem Statement and Motivation
MOTIVATION: The existing system of treating Parkinson’s disease
involves high frequency stimulation of some parts of the basal
ganglia.
PROBLEMS: Stimulation parameters are tuned by trial and error
with feedbacks from the patient, and it is continuous -- till the battery
lasts.
OBJECTIVE: 1) Explore the possibility of an intermittent deep brain
stimulation instead of a continuous one, to extend battery life and
reduce side effects for patients. 2) Tune stimulation parameters
(frequency, pulse amplitude, and pulse duration) by closed-loop
feedback control, to eliminate over stimulation of healthy ones.
Important Facts
Technical Approach
1.
Model the Basal Ganglia as a system which allows
input signals from the somato-sensory cortex to be
conveyed to the motor cortex, based on the input
salience, the modulatory effect of the dopaminergic
system and the neuronal noise level.
ƒ
The basal ganglia can be thought of as a multiple parallel
channel system connecting sensory inputs to motor output.
ƒ
In the presence of multiple inputs, only one of the channels
is open for signal transmission and the other channels are
shut down by the action of the subthalamic nucleus.
2.
Model how externally applied high frequency
electrical impulses restore/mimic normal functioning
of the basal ganglia in a state of highly reduced
dopamine.
ƒ
In Parkinson’s disease, with degenerated dopamine
producing cells, the subthalamic nucleus becomes
overactive which results in none of the channels being
selected leading to akinesia.
3.
Use some measured parameter such as the firing
rate/tremor frequency to control the stimulation
frequency/ amplitude/duration.
ƒ
The external stimulus masks the abnormal subthalamic
nucleus activity thus restoring/mimicking the normal
functioning of the basal ganglia.
The Audible Human Project
Investigator: Thomas J. Royston, Mechanical & Industrial Engineering, Bioengineering
Primary Grant Support: NIH
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Develop and experimentally validate a subject-specific
computer model of sound generation, transmission and
measurement in the pulmonary system and chest.
Mechanical phantom model
for code validation: foam with
airways (lungs) surrounded
by silicon with embedded
garalite ribs (chest wall).
Wire mesh geometry of
chest surface, lungs and
main airways based on
Visible Human Male.
• Motivation: Complement to National Library of Medicine
Visible Human Project. Research and education/ training
tool. Integration into Haptic Virtual Reality environment in
the future (e.g. ImmersiveTouch™).
Technical Approach
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Patient-specific acoustic
model based on coupling an
analytical airway model with a
lung tissue boundary element
model and finite element
model of the ribcage and
chest surface
• Code validation via experimental
phantom studies in progress
Front view
• Validated via experimental
studies on phantom models
and human subjects
• Development of computational
model based on Visible Human
Male in progress
• Future plans: Experimental
validation on human subjects
• Future plans: Extend to
cardiovascular, musculoskeletal
and gastroinstestinal systems
flexible sonic sensor array pad
Biomedical & Biotechnology
18
MATERIALS AND NANO-TECHNOLOGY
Research projects in Materials and Nano-Technology include activities such as
integration of nanostructures with biological structures, nanofluidics, and
nanoelectronics. This research thrust area is populated by faculty from many
departments, including bioengineering, chemical engineering, civil and materials
engineering, electrical and computer engineering, and mechanical and industrial
engineering.
For an on-line view of the quad-charts in the Materials and Nano-Technology area, visit
the College of Engineering’s research web page at the following URL:
www.engr.uic.edu/research/slides/ThrustAreas/MatNanoTech_show/
19
Atomic & Molecular Nanotechnology
G. Ali Mansoori, Bio & Chem Eng; Dept.s
Prime Grant Support: ARO, KU, UMSL, ANL
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Experimental and theoretical studies of organic
nanostructures derived from petroleum (Diamondoids,
asphaltenes, etc.)..
<Insert some type of visual picture/diagram, etc.>
• Quantum and statistical mechanics of small systems Development of ab initio models and equations of state of
nanosystems. Phase transitions, fragmentations.
• Molecular dynamics simulation of small systems Studies in non-extensivity and internal pressure anomaly
of nanosystems.
• DNA-Dendrimers nano-cluster formation, nanoparticleprotein attachment for drug delivery
Related Publications
Technical Approaches
•DNA-Dendrimer Nano-Cluster Electrostatics (CTNS, 2005)
• Nanoparticles-Protein Attachmrnt
•Nonextensivity and Nonintensivity in Nanosystems - A Molecular
Dynamics Sumulation J Comput & Theort Nanoscience (CTNS,2005)
•Nano-Imaging (AFM & STM), Microelectrophoresis
•Principles of Nanotechnology (Book) World Scientific Pub. Co
(2005)
•Ab Initio computations (Applications of Gaussian 98)
• Statistical Mechanical Modeling and its Application to
Nanosystems Handbook of Theor & Comput Nanoscience and
Nanotechnology (2005)
• Nano-Systems Simulations (Molecular Dynamics)
•Nano-Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics
•Phase-Transition and Fragmentation in Nano-Confined Fluids J
Comput & Theort Nanoscience (2005).
•Interatomic Potential Models for Nanostructures" Encycl
Nanoscience & Nanotechnology (2004).
A Simple, Scientific Way to Optimize Catalyst Preparation
John R. Regalbuto, Dept. of Chemical Engineering
Prime Grant Support: NSF
2) Finding optimum pH
Kads
[PtCl6]-2
OH2+
K1
PZC
[H]+ (pH shifts)
OH
K2
pH>PZC
O-
Kads
[(NH3)4Pt]+2
H2
1
L90
Pt ads orbe d ( m ol/m2 )
pH<PZC
0.8
M 7D
3) Optimized
Pt/SiO2 catalyst
EH5
VN3S
0.6
FK300
M odel
0.4
0.2
0
1) Electrostatic adsorption mechanism
0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14
pH Final
Problem Statement and Motivation
• supported metal catalysts like the automobile catalytic
converter are immensely important for
•environmental cleanup
•chemical and pharmaceutical synthesis
•energy production
•catalyst preparation is thought of as a “black art”
•industry has successful recipes but little fundamental
understanding; development is laborious and expensive
• our lab is a world leader at fundamental studies of
catalyst preparation
Technical Approach
• method of “strong electrostatic adsorption:”
•locate pH of optimal electrostatic interaction
•reduce metal coordination complex at conditions which
retain the high dispersion of the precursor
•extremely small nanocrystals result (sub-nanometer)
•metal utilization is optimized
•method is generalizeable
Key Applications
• fuel cell electrocatalysts
•automobile catalytic converters
•petroleum refining catalysts
20
Integrating Nanostructures with Biological Structures
Investigators: M. Stroscio, ECE and BioE; M. Dutta, ECE
Prime Grant Support: ARO, NSF, AFOSR, SRC, DARPA, DHS
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Coupling manmade nanostructures with biological
structures to monitor and control biological
processes.
• For underlying concepts see Biological
Nanostructures and Applications of Nanostructures
in Biology: Electrical, Mechanical, & Optical
Properties, edited by Michael A. Stroscio and Mitra
Dutta (Kluwer, New York, 2004).
Technical Approach
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Synthesis of nanostructures
• Binding nanostructures to manmade structures
• Modeling electrical, optical and mechanical
properties of nanostructures
• Experimental characterization of intergated manmade
nanostructure-biological structures
• Numerous manmade nanostructures have been
functionalized with biomolecules
• Nanostructure-biomolecule complexes have been used
to study a variety of biological structures including cells
• Interactions between nanostructures with biomolecules
and with biological environments have been modeled for
a wide variety of systems
• Ultimate goal is controlling biological systems at the
nanoscale
Nano-magnetism and high-density magnetic memory
Vitali Metlushko, Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering and Nanotechnology Core Facility (NCF)
Prime Grant Support: NSF ECS grant # ECS-0202780, Antidot and Ring Arrays for Magnetic Storage Applications
and
NSF NIRT grant # DMR-0210519 : Formation and Properties of Spin-Polarized Quantum Dots in Magnetic
Semiconductors by Controlled Variation of Magnetic Fields on the Nanoscale, B. Janko (P.I.), J. K. Furdyna (co-P.I.),
M. Dobrowolska (co-P.I.), University of Notre Dame is leading organization, A. M. Chang (Purdue) and V. Metlushko,
(UIC)
Lorentz image of
magnetic nanostructure.
UIC’s Nanoscale Core Facility
21
SEM
image
of
700nm
MRAM
cells.
Problem Statement and Motivation
The field of nanoelectronics is overwhelmingly
dedicated to the exploitation of the behavior of electrons
in electric fields. Materials employed are nearly always
semiconductor-based, such as Si or GaAs, and other
related dielectric and conducting materials. An
emerging basis for nanoelectronic systems is that of
magnetic materials. In the form of magnetic random
access memories (MRAM), nanoscale magnetic
structures offer fascinating opportunities for the
development of low-power and nonvolatile memory
elements.
Technical Approach
Key Achievements and Future Goals
In past few years, the interest in nano-magnetism has
encreased rapidly because they offer potential
application in MRAM. Modern fabrication techniques
allow us to place the magnetic elements so close
together that element-element interactions compete with
single-element energies and can lead to totally different
switching dynamics. To visualize the magnetization
reversal process in individual nano-magnets as well as in
high-density arrays, Metlushko and his co-authors
employed several different imaging techniques- magnetic
force microscopy (MFM), scanning Hall microscopy,
magneto-optical (MO) microscopy, SEMPA and Lorentz
microscopy (LM).
•This project has led to
collaboration with MSD, CNM
and APS ANL, Katholieke
Univesiteit Leuven, Belgium,
University of Notre Dame, NIST,
Universita` di Ferrara, Italy, InterUniversity
Micro-Electronics
Center (IMEC), Belgium, Cornell
University, McGill University and
University of Alberta, Canada
•During the past 3 years this
NSF-supported work resulted in
21 articles in refereed journals
already published and 10 invited
talks in the US, Europe and
Japan.
Tera-scale Integration of Semiconductor Nanocrystals
Investigators: M. Dutta, ECE; M. Stroscio,ECE and BioE
Prime Grant Support: ARO, NSF, AFOSR, SRC, DARPA
Problem Statement and Motivation
Au wire
CdS
• Future
electronic and optoelectronic
systems must be integrated on the
terascale and beyond
CdSe-ZnS
CdSe-ZnS-GGGC
Technical Approach
• Synthesis of semiconductor nanostructures
• Chemical self-assembly of semiconductor
nanostructures
• Modeling electrical, optical and mechanical
properties of ensembles of nanostructures
• Experimental characterization of massively integrated
networks of semiconductor nanostructures
•This research effort explores the use of
biomolecules as molecular interconnects
for such terascale systems
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Numerous manmade semiconducting nanostructures
have been synthesized
• Integrated semiconductor quantum dots have been
assembled chemically in the Nanoengineering Research
Laboratory at UIC
• Interactions between semiconductor nanostructures
and molecular wires have been modeled for a wide
variety of systems
• Untimate goal is massive integration of semiconductor
nanostructures in functional electronic and optoelectronic
networks
Multiferroic Thin Films Grown by MBE
Investigators: Siddhartha Ghosh Prime Grant Support: Office of Naval Research
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Frequency tunable microwave devices
• Magnetoelectric thin films
• Multiferroism in multilayered heterostructures
• Advanced RADAR arrays for Navy
• Spintronics
Key Achievements and Future Goals
RF Plasma Assisted Oxide MBE System
Technical Approach
• RF Plasma assisted complex oxide epitaxial
growth on oxide and semiconductor substrates
• Alternate piezoelectric and magnetostrictive
layers provide mechanical coupling between
the ferroelectric and ferromagnetic thin films
• Atomically smooth interfaces
• First reported MBE growth of multiferroic
layers by RF Plasma oxygen source
• Research on controlling thin film interfaces
is underway
• Collaboration has been established with
Argonne National Labs and Center for
Nanoscale Materials
• Discussion for collaboration with Naval
Research Laboratory has been initiated
22
MicroOptoElectroMechanical Systems (MOEMS)
Investigators: A. Feinerman, ECE; C. Megaridis, MIE
Prime Grant Support: NASA, and DARPA
Problem Statement and Motivation
ƒ Standard deformable structures rely on spindly
linkages to achieve the flexibility required for motion.
ƒ Spindly structures are thermal insulators.
ƒ Tethered liquid drops provide electrical, and thermal
conduction, as well as a restoring force/torque to mirror.
75 volts @ 300Hz with 35 μm actuation
Technical Approach
• tethered drops are super-deformable, large
displacements at low voltages are possible
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Achieved reproducible piston motion
• Achieved reproducible rotation
• drops can be tethered by patterning the wetting
properties of a surface
• Used technique to make variable reflection display
• precision dispensing of Hg drops
• Developing RF switch – liquids do not suffer from
stiction.
• self-alignment of ~50 μg mirrors.
Carbon Nanopipes for Nanofluidic Devices
Investigators: C. M. Megaridis, A. Yarin, Mechanical and Industrial Eng., UIC;
Y. Gogotsi, J.C. Bradley, Drexel Univ.; H. Bau, Univ. Pennsylvania
Prime Grant Support: National Science Foundation
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Investigate the physical and chemical properties of
aqueous fluids contained in multiwall carbon nanotubes
• Determine the continuum limit for fluid behavior under
extreme confinement
• Provide experimental data for parallel modeling efforts
• Evaluate the feasibility of fabricating devices using
carbon nanotubes as building blocks
Technical Approach
• Multiwall carbon nanotubes filled by high-pressure hightemperature processing in autoclaves
•Nanotube diameter in the range 5nm-200nm, and
lengths 500nm-10μm
•Gas/liquid interfaces used as markers of fluid transport
• High-resolution electron microscopy and chemical
analysis techniques used to resolve behavior of fluids
stimulated thermally in the electron microscope
•Model simulations used to interpret experimental
observations
23
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Gas/Liquid interfaces in carbon nanotubes with
diameter above 10nm resemble interfaces in
macroscopic capillaries
• Non-continuum behavior observed in nanotubes with
diameter below 10nm
• Wettability of carbon walls by water observed;
important property for adsorption applications
• Future applications include drug delivery systems, labon-a-chip manufacturing, electrochemical cells, etc.
Stability of Electrical Properties for Nanowires
Investigators: Carmen M. Lilley, Mechanical Engineering
(a)
Experimental data
Combined model
p=0.50, R=0.34
−8
Reistivity ρ (10 Ω ⋅ m)
7
Problem Statement and Motivation
6
•Successful integration of nanosystems into
microelectronics depends on stable material properties
that are reliable for at least a 10 year lifecycle with over
a trillion cycles of operation.
5
Surface scattering
4
Grain boundary scattering
3
(b)
100
150
200
250
300
350
Width w (nm)
Figure1 A micrograph of the
sample layout and of the Cu
nanowire (l = 2.04 μm, w =90
nm, and t = 50 nm) between
the contact pads.
Figure 2 Experimentally measured
resistivity of Cu nanowires (l = 2.04 μm
and t = 50 nm) as a function of wire width
at room temperature (open circles) and as
compared with theoretical models.
•Fundamental understanding of the physics of
deformation and failure in nanometer scale capped or
layered structures, where surfaces play a dominant role,
does not exist. Prior work has mostly focused on
monolithic nanometer scale materials.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
Technical Approach
•Identify surface contaminants present in as-synthesized
nanowires according to metallic, organic, and mixedmaterials classifications.
•Measure the electrical properties of as-synthesized
nanowires and identify contamination effects on electrical
properties with an accuracy of 5%.
•Measure the stability of electrical properties of nanowire
under accelerated electrical testing and classified
according to structure.
• Preliminary results on measuring the presence of
surface contaminants indicate that Carbon and Oxygen
are found on Au and Cu nanowires.
• These contaminants have been found to influence
electrical properties for Au and the research for Cu is
ongoing.
• Future work will be to continue to correlate structure
and surface composition for Face Centered Cubic metals
and Carbon Nanotubes to electrical properties.
• Additionally, this work will be extended to identifying the
key factors that affect the long term stability of electrical
properties to improve nanowire lifetimes.
Low-Pressure Plasma Process for Nanoparticle Coating
Investigators: Farzad Mashayek, MIE/UIC; Themis Matsoukas, ChE/Penn State
Prime Grant Support: NSF
Problem Statement and Motivation
Simulated flow of ions over a nanoparticle
Nanolayer coating
on a silica particle
Technical Approach
A low-pressure, non-equilibrium plasma process is
developed using experimental and computational
approaches. Two types of reactors are being
considered. The first reactor operates in “batch”
mode by trapping the nanoparticles in the plasma
sheath. Agglomeration of the particles is prevented
due to the negative charges on the particles. The
second reactor is being designed to operate in a
“continuous” mode where the rate of production
may be significantly increased. This reactor will also
provide a more uniform coating by keeping the
nanoparticles outside the plasma sheath.
Nanoparticles of various materials are building
blocks and important constituents of ceramics and
metal composites, pharmaceutical and food
products, energy related products such as solid
fuels and batteries, and electronics related
products. The ability to manipulate the surface
properties of nanoparticles through deposition of
one or more materials can greatly enhance their
applicability.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• The batch reactor is already operational and has been used
to demonstrate the possibility of coating nanoparticles.
• A reaction model has been developed to predict the
deposition rate on the nanoparticle surface.
• The possibility of using an external magnetic field to control
the trapping of the particles has been investigated
computationally.
• The experimental effort is now focused on the design of the
“continuous” mode reactor.
• The computational effort is focused on development of a
comprehensive code for simulation of the plasma reactor,
nanoparticle dynamics, and surface deposition.
24
Atomic & Molecular BioNanotechnology
G.Ali Mansoori, Bio & Chem Eng Dept.s
Prime Grant Support: ARO, KU, UMSL, ANL
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Diamondoids and Gold Nanoparticle - based
nanobiotechnology - Applications for Drug Delivery.
• Quantum and statistical mechanics of small systems Development of ab initio models and equations of state of
nanosystems. Phase transitions, fragmentations.
<Insert some type of visual picture/diagram, etc.>
• Molecular dynamics simulation of nano systems - Nonextensivity and internal pressure anomaly.
• DNA-Dendrimers nano-cluster formation.
Related Publications
Technical Approaches
•DNA-Dendrimer Nano-Cluster Electrostatics (CTNS, 2005)
• Nanoparticles-Protein Attachmrnt
•Nonextensivity and Nonintensivity in Nanosystems - A Molecular
Dynamics Sumulation J Comput & Theort Nanoscience (CTNS,2005)
•Nano-Imaging (AFM & STM), Microelectrophoresis
•Principles of Nanotechnology (Book) World Scientific Pub. Co
(2005)
•Ab Initio computations (Applications of Gaussian 98)
• Statistical Mechanical Modeling and its Application to
Nanosystems Handbook of Theor & Comput Nanoscience and
Nanotechnology (2005)
• Nano-Systems Simulations (Molecular Dynamics)
•Nano-Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics
•Phase-Transition and Fragmentation in Nano-Confined Fluids J
Comput & Theort Nanoscience (2005).
•Interatomic Potential Models for Nanostructures" Encycl
Nanoscience & Nanotechnology (2004).
Molecular Simulation of Gas Separations
Sohail Murad, Chemical Engineering Department
Prime Grant Support: US National Science Foundation
Problem Statement and Motivation
FAU Zeolite
MFI Zeolite
CHA Zeolite
• Understand The Molecular Basis For Membrane
Based Gas Separations
y
z
Zeolite Membrane
• Explain At The Fundamental Molecular Level
Why Membranes Allow Certain Gases To Permeate
Faster than Others
x
Feed
Compartment
(High Pressure)
Product
Compartment
(Low Pressure)
Feed
Compartment
(High Pressure)
• Use This Information To Develop Strategies For
Better Design Of Membrane Based Gas Separation
Processes For New Applications.
Recycling Regions
Technical Approach
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Determine The Key Parameters/Properties Of The
Membrane That Influence The Separation Efficiency
• Use Molecular Simulations To Model The Transport Of
Gases –i.e. Diffusion or Adsorption
•Focus All Design Efforts On These Key Specifications To
Improve The Design Of Membranes.
•Use Molecular Simulations As A Quick Screening Tool For
Determining The Suitability Of A Membrane For A
Proposed New Separation Problem
25
• Explained The Molecular Basis Of Separation of N2/O2 and
N2/CO2 Mixtures Using a Range of Zeolite Membranes.
• Used This Improved Understanding To Predict Which
Membranes Would Be Effective In Separating a Given Mixture
•Used Molecular Simulation to Explain the Separation
Mechanism in Zeolite Membranes.
.
Rheology of Polymeric and Complex Nanostructured Fluids
Investigator: Ludwig C. Nitsche, Chemical Engineering Department
Collaborator: Lewis E. Wedgewood, Chemical Engineering Department
Problem Statement and Motivation
Numerical versus
asymptotic PDF’s for a
linear-locked dumbbell
Closure relations for the
conformatioally averaged
Smoluchowski equation
• Derive macroscopic constitutive laws from
stylized molecular models of polymers and
complex fluid substructure in dilute
solution.
• Obtain probability density functions
describing external (translational) and
internal (conformational) degrees of
freedom of suspended bead-spring entities.
• Manipulate complex fluids with flow
geometry and external fields.
Technical Approach
• Numerical simulations by atomistic smoothed
particle hydrodynamics (ASPH).
• “Smart swarms” of particles solve the
Smoluchowski equation for translational and
conformational motions of dumbbell models of
polymers in dilute solution.
• Asymptotic theory (singular perturbations
and multiple scales) consolidates numerics
and extracts formulas for probability density
profiles, scaling laws and rheological
constitutive equations.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Developed model of cross-stream migration
of polymers in flows with gradients in shear.
• The first asymptotic PDF for the classic
problem of FENE dumbbells stretching in
elongational flows.
• Rigorous basis for the recent “L-closure”,
and analytical explanation for the numerically
observed collapse of transient stressbirefringence curves for different polymer
lengths.
Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics: The Vorticity Decomposition
Lewis E. Wedgewood, Chemical Engeineering Department
Prime Grant Support: National Science Foundation, 3M Company
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Construct a Theory that Allows the Vorticity to be
Divided into an Objective and a Non-Objective Portion
• Develop Robust Equations for the Mechanical
Properties (Constitutive Equations) of Non-Newtonian
Fluids using the Objective Portion of the Vorticity
• Solve Flow Problems of Complex Fluids in Complex
Flows such as Blood Flow, Ink Jets, Polymer Coatings,
Etc.
Technical Approach
• Mathematical Construction of Co-rotating Frames (see
Figure above) to Give a Evolution for the Deformational
Vorticity (Objective Portion)
• Finite Difference Solution to Tangential Flow in an
Eccentric Cylinder Device
• Brownian Dynamics Simulations of Polymer Flow and
Relation Between Polymer Dynamics and Constitutive
Equations
• Continuum Theory And Hindered Rotation Models To
Model Mechanical Behavior
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Improved Understanding Of the Modeling of Complex
Fluids
• Applications to Structured Fluids such as Polymer
Melts, Ferromagnetic Fluids, Liquid Crystals, etc.
• Development Of Constitutive Relations Suitable For
Design Of New Applications
• Verification Of Hindered Rotation Theory And The
Transport Of Angular Momentum In Complex Fluids
26
Sensor Technology for Non Destructive Assessment
of Materials Degradation
J. Ernesto Indacochea & Ming L. Wang, Civil & Materials Engineering
National Science Foundation
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Corrosion and creep damage of materials are among the
most important challenges for engineers in selecting
materials for operation in extreme environments.
• Corrosion stands for loses of about 300 billion dollars
per year only in the USA.
• Creep assessment is a major concern for repair and life
extension of infrastructure equipment in power plants.
• Early detection and close monitoring of corrosion and
creep by non-destructive examination (NDE) is most
effective to extend the life of structures and insure the
continuous operation of power plants.
Intermediate
F
creep
u
l
l
As-received
c
r
e
e
p
Key Achievements and Future Goals
Technical Approach
• The material is a key part of the sensor. A magnetic field is
applied to the component being assessed and its magnetic
response is monitored.
• The hysteresis loop and magnetic saturation depend on the
microstructure and cross section of the exposed material.
• Corrosion is a surface phenomenon that reduces the cross
section of materials due to mass loss.
• During the different stages of creep, materials suffer
changes in grain size, phases, crystallographic lattice, and
voids appear.
• The magnetoelastic response of metals due to corrosion or
creep gradually changes and it is used to estimate the
degradation level due to creep or corrosion.
• Corrosion damage with 0.5% mass loss of ferromagnetic
materials can be detected with a 95% confidence limit.
• Microstructural changes are also detected during the
sensing of corrosion and creep.
• In the third stage of creep damage the material becomes
magnetically harder and the hysteresis curve shifts.
Future Goals
• Improve sensor sensitivity to detect less than 0.5% mass
loss due corrosion and subtle microstructure changes
during creep.
• Extend our studies to development of nanostructured
hydrogen sensing MOS devices.
Development of ultrafast AAO nanowell/Pd nanoparticle structures
for hydrogen detection at low temperature
Investigators: J.E. Indacochea, M.L. Wang, Department of Civil and Materials Engineering, UIC
H.H. Wang, Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory
Primary Grant Support: National Science Foundation
AAO nanowell
Pd nanoparticle
Problem Statement and Motivation
0.735
Al substrate
H off
1% H
0.734
• Hydrogen has been envisioned as a futuristic energy
system. Gas detectors will be key components to
ensure safety and reliability in hydrogen infrastructure.
Resistance (kOhm)
0.733
0.5% H
0.732
0.3% H
0.2% H
0.731
0.1% H
0.73
• Limitations of current hydrogen sensing devices
include long response time, low sensitivity, and poor
performance at room temperature.
0.05% H
H on
0.729
0.728
0.727
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
140
160
Time (s)
Change in resistance in presence of
hydrogen at different concentrations
Technical Approach
27
• Very large active surface and nanoscale dimensions
make nanostructures a promising alternative to
overcome current limitations in hydrogen detectors.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) nanowell array has been
selected as substrate because it provides a robust,
insulating, and ordered structure for catalyst deposition.
• The electrical resistance of the nanostructure increases
with hydrogen concentration due to the formation of a
non conductive Pd hydride phase.
• Pd nanoparticles have been selected as catalyst due to
their high sensitivity and selectivity to react with hydrogen.
• Response time is greatly faster compared to that for
other nanostructured and micro sensing devices.
• The nanostructure is being characterized and tested for
hydrogen detection. Dimensions and configuration are
being systematically studied to achieve optimal
performance.
• Very low hydrogen concentrations can be detected at
room temperature without compromising sensitivity.
• The main goal is to achieve optimal performance and
integrate the nanostructure into modern sensors.
Joining Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) to Crofer22-APU®
for Applications in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells
Investigator: J.E. Indacochea, Department of Civil and Materials Engineering, UIC
YSZ
Ticusil®
YSZ
Problem Statement and Motivation
Braze metal
YSZ
• Develop a filler material and brazing procedure that
provides a high quality hermetic seal to enhance the
performance of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs).
Reaction layer
Ti
Zr
Ag
2.0 μm
• Reactive brazing has proved to be the most effective
and efficient method for joining ceramics–to-metals.
The addition of reactive elements to filler metals
improve wetting in ceramics by the formation of a
reaction layer that insures bonding.
Cu
Ticusil®
1: Monoclinic ZrO2
2: Tetragonal ZrO2
3: γ-AgTi3
4: δ-TiO
YSZ
(c)
Interface
(b)
2.0 mm
(a)
2θ
YSZ/Ticusil®,
XRD spectra of interface
900°C, 60’. (a). Pure YSZ, (b).
HNO3 etched interface YSZ/Ticusil®, (c). Ground interfaceYSZ/Ticusil®.
Technical Approach
• The thickness of the reaction layer on the interface
YSZ/filer metal will have an important effect on the
mechanical properties of the joint.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• YSZ reacted with the active filler metals (Ag-Cu-Ti) to
form a reaction layer at the interface. This reaction layer
was rich in Ti and the presence of δ - TiO was confirmed
using XRD analysis and SEM-EDS.
®
• YSZ was brazed to itself and to Crofer22-APU using AgCu-Ti alloys.
• Commercial alloys: Ticusil® (4.5%Ti) and Cusil-ABA®
(1.5%Ti) were evaluated for joining efficiency at 900°C for
15, 30, and 60 minutes in vacuum (~6 x 10-6 torr.).
• The thickness of the reaction layers was a function of
the Ti content in the filer metal. Reaction layers for
Ticusil® as a filler metal were larger than Cusil-ABA®.
• Optical microscopy, electron microscopy, dispersive energy
spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were
carried out in order to study the interface YSZ/Ag-Cu-Ti.
• The main goal is to develop a sound seal between the
interconnect and the electrolyte that withstand operating
temperatures up to 1000°C, using novel materials.
Advanced Sensor Development for
Life Assessment of Power Plants
J. Ernesto Indacochea & Ming L. Wang, Civil & Materials Engineering
National Science Foundation
Problem Statement and Motivation
Strain -Time
0.14
0.12
Strain
0.1
0.08
0.06
1.6
Spent Life:
18 % :
33%
63%
76%
0.04
0.02
1.2
0.8
0
100
200
300
400
500
600
700
800
Time (Hours)
900
1000
B (Teslas)
0.4
0
0
-6000
-4000
-2000
0
2000
4000
6000
-0.4
-0.8
-1.2
-1.6
H (A/m)
Technical Approach
• The societal needs for greater energy, demand larger
power outputs. Higher yields are possible by exposing
plant components to higher temperatures; this will
hasten materials degradation or creep and their end life.
• Accurate damage appraisal is needed for effective plant
maintenance and repair, as well as for remaining life
assessment of components for safe operation.
• The electromagnetic response of the material is affected
by the microstructural changes due to damage and this is
assessed by means of advanced sensors.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Systematic creep microstructural changes are induced and
assessed in conjunction with their magnetic properties. The
magnetic responses are measured with hysteresis curves.
• The material creep damage is measured by changes in
grain size, dislocations density, micro particle precipitation
and coarsening, void formation, and coalescence
• The microstructure changes affect the pinning factor of the
magnetic domain walls (k) during magnetization; this is
reflected in variations of the magnetic hysteresis curves,
which is then use to estimate the creep degradation level.
( Ma − M ) + c dMa
dM dH
=
(1− c)
k
dt
dt
dt
δ − α ( Ma − M )
• Accurate identification of the stages allows for better
component maintenance and remaining life prediction.
• An extension of the Jiles-Atherton model of magnetic
hysteresis to evaluate creep changes was attained to
closely check the progress of the pinning domain factor.
• In the final creep stage, void coalescence cuses the most
significant changes in the magnetic hysteresis of steel.
• Extend the validity of the sensor to similar failure
mechanisms such as like radiation damage in nuclear
power plants.
μo
28
Simulation of Thermodynamics and Flow Processes at
Nano Scales
Suresh K. Aggarwal, Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
Vaporization of a non-spherical nano-droplet
Z
1000 Steps
X
• Use of Monte Carlo and Molecular Dynamics
methods to investigate thermodynamics and
flow processes at nanoscales
• Dynamics of droplet collision and interfacial
processes
• Interaction of a nanodroplet with carbon
nanotube
• Solid-liquid Interactions and Nanolubrication
1)
Y
40
30
z
20
0
10
10
20
30
0
0
40
50
10
y
60
20
x
70
30
40
80
2)
Molecular Dynamics Simulation of
Droplet Evaporation, Int. J. of Heat &
Mass Transfer, 46, pp. 3179-3188,
2003.
Molecular Dynamics Simulations of
Droplet Collision. M.S. Thesis, K.
Shukla, 2003.
MD simulation of the collision
between two nano-droplets
Nanocrystalline Carbide Derived Carbon for Tribological Applications
Investigators: Michael McNallan, Civil and Materials Engineering, UIC; Ali Erdemir, Argonne
National Laboratory Prime Grant Support: U.S. Department of Energy
Problem Statement and Motivation
max. safe
SiC-SiC
temperature
SiC-CDC
• Mechanical Seals and bearings fail due to frictional
heating and wear
• Materials used are hard ceramics, such as SiC or WC
• Friction can be reduced by coating with carbon as
graphite or diamond
• Graphitic coatings are not wear resistant
Pump seal face temperature during dry running at 4000 rpm
With and without CDC coating
Technical Approach
• Produce a low friction carbon layer by chemical
conversion of the surface of the carbide
• SiC(s) + 2Cl2(g) Î SiCl4(g) + C(s)
• At temperatures < 1000oC, carbon cannot relax into
equilibrium graphitic state and remains as Carbide
Derived Carbon (CDC)
•CDC coating contains nano-porous amorphous C,
fullerenes, and nanocrystalline diamond
• CDC is low friction, wear resistant, and resistant to
spallation and delamination
29
• Diamond coatings are wear resistant, but fail by
spallation or delamination from the underlying ceramic
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• CDC has been produced in the laboratory
• It’s structure and conversion kinetics have been
characterized
• Tribological performance was verified in laboratory and
industrial scale pump tests with water
• CDC was patented and selected for an R&D 100 Award
in 2003
• CDC was Licensed to Carbide Derivative Technologies,
Inc.in 2006
• Scale up to industrial production rates, characterization
of process reliability and testing in specific industrial
environments is the next goal.
Conceptual Understanding of Nanoscale Self-Assembly
UIC Investigators: Tom Moher, Andy Johnson, John Bell, Computer Science,
Carmen Lilley, Mechanical Engineering, Jim Pellegrino, Psychology
Prime Grant Support: National Science Foundation (Nanotechnology Center for Learning & Teaching,
PI: Robert Chang, Northwestern; Grant partners: Northwestern, UIC, Michigan, Purdue, UIUC)
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Developing capacity for research advances in
nanoscale science and engineering is a critical national
priority
• Nanoscale concepts are essentially unrepresented in
today’s middle and high school curricula
• Self-assembly is an accessible phenomenon that can
be studied with context of design.
• Little is known about effects of representation and
sequencing of instruction on learning at nanoscale
Technical Approach
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Develop conceptual inventory (learning goals) of
nanoscale phenomena
• Articulation of self-assembly conceptual inventory
• Situate conceptual inventory within national (AAAS and
NRC) standards for science learners
• Developed tangible and computer simulations models of
molecular self-assembly, virus detection, electric field
strength and gradients
• Test effectiveness of tangible and computer-based
models of self-assembly in virus detection applications
• Classroom testing in urban middle schools, UIC
undergraduates (Spring, Fall 2007)
• Test effectiveness of “design-first” vs. “domain-first”
instructional sequencing in molecular self-assembly
• Continued research on understanding of representational
affordances and instructional sequencing on learners’
understanding of nanoscale self-assembly
• Assess understanding of 2-d and 3-d electric field
models for understanding dielectrophoresis
• Development of K-16 instructional materials
Printing Electronic Circuitry with Copper Solutions
Investigators: C. M. Megaridis, Mechanical and Industrial Engineering; C. Takoudis,
Bioengineering; J. Belot, Univ. Nebraska-Lincoln; J. McAndrew, Air Liquide, Inc.
Prime Grant Support: Air Liquide
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Patterned metal films are essential to a wide range of
applications ranging from printed circuits, to thin-film
displays and electrodes in biomedical implants
• Inkjet printing has environmental benefits while
offering flexibility, cost savings, and scalability to large
area substrates
• Initial focus on Copper due to its very low resistivity.
Future extension to bio-compatible metals
• Homogeneous metal inks eliminate obstacles
encountered while using nanoparticle ink suspensions
Technical Approach
• Synthesis of metal compounds as primary ingredients
of homogeneous inks
• Ink physical and rheological properties (viscosity,
surface tension) optimized for printability
• Printing tests for optimal line formation; thermal
treatment to reduce the deposit to pure metal; final
product testing/evaluation
• X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and electron
microscopy used to characterize deposit chemical
composition and surface quality
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Candidate organocopper compounds and solvents
have been identified, providing facile decomposition to
metallic copper (removal of ligands + reduction of Cu2+
to Cu0), and copper content > 10% wt.
• Copper lines printed in the laboratory indicate that
homogeneous solutions of organocopper compounds
can be developed with suitable properties for ink-jet
printing
• Research has the potential to catapult progress in
metal ink fabrication and in-situ formation of metallic
lines with feature size in the 10-100 μm range
30
Modeling Multiphase Fluids Trapped in Carbon Nanotubes
A. L.Yarin and C. M. Megaridis, Mechanical and Industrial Eng., UIC;
Y. Gogotsi, Drexel Univ.
Prime Grant Support: National Science Foundation
Problem Statement and Motivation
• To explain the experimentally observed evolution of
water volumes encased in carbon nanotubes (CNTs)
• To develop a quantitative theory describing the related
phenomena
• To compare model predictions with the experimentally
recorded evolution patterns
Key Achievements and Future Goals
Technical Approach
• Physical estimates of the energy flux in electron
microscope delivered by the electron beam to liquid
volumes encapsulated inside carbon nanotubes
• Continuum model of mass diffusion and heat transfer,
which also accounts for intermolecular interactions
• A new phenomenon was explained on the physical
level
• A new continuum equation accounting for
intermolecular interactions was proposed
• Agreement of the model predictions with the
experimental data was good
• Experimental results for hydrothermal CNTs in
transmission electron microscope were explained and
described
• Direct heating experiments conducted and confirmed
the proposed thermal mechanism
• Experimental results for CVD-produced CNTs in the
Environmental SEM were explained and described
• Preliminary calculations for nanofluidic applications
were conducted and can be extended in future
Surface Effects on the Overall Young’s Modulus of FCC
Metal Nanowires
Investigators: Carmen M. Lilley, Mechanical Engineering
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Surface effects, such as a surface elastic modulus and
surface stress have been predicted for FCC NWs from
atomistic simulations.
• Experimentally, elastic modulus measurements of
FCC metal NWs have been found to vary widely. Some
results indicate apparent size effects, other studies
indicate no size effects.
Modeling Surface Stress Effects on the Static Bending Behavior of Nanowires (NW). (a)
Schematic of the undeformed and deformed NW centerline. (b) Cross-sectional view of a
rectangular NW with the surface highlighted. (c) Cross-sectional view of circular NW with
the surface highlighted..
Technical Approach
• Model the Elastic Bending Behavior of Face Centered
Cubic (FCC) Metals with a Continuum Mechanics
Approach
• Apply Young-Laplace Theory to Study Transverse Load
Effects as a Result of Intrinsic Surface Stress of
Nanowires (NWs) due to Undercoordinated Atoms at the
Surface
• Study the influence of Boundary Conditions on the
Resultant Analytical Solutions
•Validate Hypothesis that Surface Stress and Boundary
Conditions Affect the Apparent Elastic Modulus of NWs
with Published Values for Elastic Modulus
31
• For Nanoelectromechanical Systems (NEMS),
accurate elastic properties are necessary to design
devices.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Derived Analytical solutions for cantilever, fixed-fixed,
and simply-supported NWs under static bending.
• Validated theory that both surface stress and boundary
conditions affect the apparent elastic modulus measured
experimentally.
• Proposed a Surface Effect Factor as a Qualitative
Parameter for Researchers to Predict the Influence of
Surface Stress and Geometry on the Elastic Behavior of
Static Bending Nanowires
• Are Extending the Research to Bending Vibration of
NWS for Application to NEMS Resonators.
Fundamental Design of Nanocatalysts
Randall J. Meyer, Chemical Engineering Department
Prime Grant Support: PRF
Technical Approach
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Finite fossil fuel reserves dictate that new solutions must
be found to reduce energy consumption and decrease
carbon use
Thin Metal
Oxide Film
Size Selected Metal
Cluster
• Size selected clusters are
deposited on oxide
substrates
• New processes must be developed to handle renewable
feedstocks
• Current design of catalysts is often done through trial and
error or through combinatorial methods without deep
fundamental understanding
• Our group seeks to combine experimental and theoretical
methods to provide rational catalyst design
Metal Single
Crystal
• Density Functional Theory
Calculations complement
experimental work
Collaborations
Future Goals
• Selective growth of carbon
nanotubes with controlled
helicity through size selected
clusters
• Stefan Vajda, Argonne National Lab (Chemistry), Selective Carbon
• Cheaper more efficient deNOx
catalysts for lean burn exhaust
using core/shell Pt catalysts
• Jerry Rathke and Bob Klinger, Argonne National Lab (Chemical Eng.), CO
Hydrogenation with Co carbonyl catalysts
• CO hydrogenation to produce
ethanol selectively
Nanotube Growth using size selected clusters
• Mike Trenary, UIC (Chemistry), Reactions of N atoms and hydrocarbons
on Pt(111)
• Hau Wang, Argonne National Lab (Materials Sci.), Growth of segmented
nanowires as novel thermoelectric materials
• Jeff Miller, BP, Size and support effects in adsorption behavior of Pt
nanoparticles
• Carnen Liilley, UIC (Mechanical Eng.), stability of gold nanowires
Co-electrospinning of Core-Shell Fibers
Using a Single-Nozzle Technique
Investigators: A.V. Bazilevsky, A.L. Yarin, C. M. Megaridis,
Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Ordinary co-annular nozzles used in coelectrospinning have a number of drawbacks; good
concentricity is difficult to achieve; core entrainment is
also not automatic.
• Eliminating the co-annular nozzle feature in coelectrospinning would accelerate progress in this area.
• Co-electrospinning of core-shell fibers from a single
nozzle is possible when polymer blends are elecrospun.
Technical Approach
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• PMMA/PAN blends in DMF solvent transform into
emulsions of PMMA/DMF droplets in PAN/DMF matrix.
• Co-electrospinning from a single nozzle has been
demonstrated.
•The emulsions, when electrospun, produce a Taylor
cone where PMMA/DMF droplets are trapped in the tip of
the PAN/DMF matrix.
• A related theory of the process has been proposed.
• The trapped droplets form the fiber core, whereas the
surrounding PAN forms the shell.
• The as-spun core-shell fibers are carbonized by heattreatment to produce hollow carbon nano/microtubes.
• Core-shell fibers were carbonized and carbon
microtubes were produced.
• In the future, these carbon microtubes will be used in
microfluidics experiments.
• Scale down of the process should be achieved to
fabricate hollow nanotubes.
32
Solubility of Gases in Liquids Under Extreme Conditions
Investigators: Huajun Yuan, Cynthia Jameson and Sohail Murad
Primary Grant Support: National Science Foundation, Dow Chemical Company
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Needs for Better Physical Property Model
• Industrial Interest – Safe Storage of Liquids at Extreme Conditions
• Understand Molecular Basis For Chemical Shift in Liquids
•Explain At the Fundamental Molecular Level the Close Relation
Between Chemical Shift and Solute-Solvent Interaction Potential
• Use This Information to Develop Strategies For Better Design of
Solute-Solvent Interaction Potentials, and Provide a Better Estimation
of Henry’s Constant (Solubility of Gases in Liquids)
Technical Approach
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Use Molecular Dynamics Simulation to Model Chemical Shift of
Gases in Alkanes
• Determined the Key Parameters of Solute-Solvent Interaction
Potential, Improved the Potential for Better Solubility Estimations.
• Determine the Key Parameters of Solute-Solvent Interaction
Potential.which Affect the Solubility
• Use Molecular Simulation for Chemical Shift Calculation as a
Quick Screening Tool for Improving the Intermolecular Potential.
•Estimate the Solubility of Gases in Liquids using the Improved
Potential Model.
• Calculated the Gas Solubility of Xenon in Different Alkanes at
Different Temperatures. Showed that Improved Agreement with
Chemical Shift Resulted In Better Solubility Results
• Able to Use Modified Potential Model to Get Better Estimations of
Solubility of Gases In Liquids, Especially under Extreme Conditions
Which are Difficult to Measure Experimentally.
Ultra-Fast Optochemical Sensor for Express Monitoring of
Oxyhydrogen Gas Mixtures in Combustion and Catalysis
Eduard G. Karpov, Civil & Materials Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago
Problem Statement and Motivation
O-radicals
• Measuring the concentrations of simple gas-phase
radicals (H, O, OH) is difficult due to the short lifetimes
H-radicals
• Standard methods (paramagnetic resonance, optical
and mass spectroscopy, etc.) are often slow, and
insufficiently focused to be applicable to local regions of
interest, microflames, nanocatalysis, and other nano
applications.
• There is a great potential for fast and reliable sensors
with a fast response, and short repetition/measurement
cycle, for measuring oxyhydrogen radicals content in gas
mixtures.
Technical Approach
• “Atomic probe” procedure is developed to select an
appropriate sensor core material (with dominant EleyRideal channel of radical recombination across the sensor
range). Also, the material is selected to have
luminescence properties, ZnS-Cu, ZnS-Tm, CaO-Bi, etc.
Surface radical recombination invokes e-h generation with
successive recombination on the luminescence centers
(dopants).
• The atomic probe procedure is used also to provide the
etalon flow of radicals for sensor self-calibration.
• Ratio of background luminescence intensity and
intensity pikes due to the etalon flow is proportional to the
sought concentration of radicals in the gas phase.
33
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Ultra-short response times of up to 10–7 s, and high
repetition rates of 0.5-1.0 measurement per second.
• High robustness and repetitiveness of the data (O and
H).
• Approach excludes any spurious effects of sensor
surface transformation. Approach eliminates the need for a
preliminary preparation of the sensor surface.
• Simplicity: etalon flow can be formed by a simple
pyrolytic source (typically a platinum filament);
luminescence intensity is measured by a standard
photometric equipment.
• The approach can be extended to the analysis of (photo)catalytic properties of solid surfaces.
COMPUTING AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
Research projects in Computing and Information Technology include activities such as
computer simulation of engineering techniques, real-time multimedia processing,
computer security, computer networking and high-resolution display. This research thrust
area is populated by faculty from many departments, including bioengineering, chemical
engineering, civil and materials engineering, computer science, electrical and computer
engineering, and mechanical and industrial engineering.
For an on-line view of the quad-charts in the Computing and Information Technology
area, visit the College of Engineering’s research web page at the following URL:
www.engr.uic.edu/research/slides/ThrustAreas/CompInfoTech_show/
34
Advanced Membrane Based Water Treatment Technologies
Sohail Murad, Chemical Engineering Department
Prime Grant Support: US Department of Energy
Semi-permeable Membranes
S
O
L
U
T
I
O
N
S
O
L
U
T
I
O
N
S
O
L
V
E
N
T
Recycling Regions
Solvated Ion Clusters Prevent
Ions from Permeating the
Membrane
Technical Approach
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Understand The Molecular Basis For
Membrane Based Separations
• Explain At The Fundamental Molecular Level
Why Membranes Allow Certain Solvents To
Permeate, While Others Are Stopped
• Use This Information To Develop Strategies
For Better Design Of Membrane Based
Separation Processes For New Applications.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Determine The Key Parameters/Properties Of The
Membrane That Influence The Separation Efficiency
• Explained The Molecular Basis Of Reverse Osmosis in a
Desalination Process (Formation of Solvated Ionic Clusters).
• Use Molecular Simulations To Model The Transport Of
Solvents And Solutes Across The Membrane?
• Used This Improved Understanding To Predict The Zeolite
Membranes Would Be Effective In Removing A Wide Range
Of Impurities From Water.
•Focus All Design Efforts On These Key Specifications To
Improve The Design Of Membranes.
•Use Molecular Simulations As A Quick Screening Tool
For Determining The Suitability Of A Membrane For A
Proposed New Separation Problem
• This Prediction Was Recently Confirmed By Experimental
Studies Carried Out In New Mexico.
• Showed That Ion Exchange Is Energetically Driven Rather
Than Entropic. Explains The More Efficient Exchange
Between Ca And Na In Zeolites.
Simulation and design of microfluidic lab-on-chip systems
Investigator: Ludwig C. Nitsche, Chemical Engineering Department
Prime Grant Support: USIA Fulbright Commission
Hydrodynamic
interaction kernel
Wavelet compression
of hydrodynamic
information for fast
summations
Surface wetting
Technical Approach
• “Smart swarms” of particles automatically
solve for low-Reynolds-number fluid dynamics
and catastrophic evolutions of phase and
surface geometry (surface wetting,
coalescence, rupture, reaction).
• Hydrodynamic interaction kernels and
interfacial forces can be extended to include
molecular effects.
• Wavelet compression of summations vastly
increases computational speed.
35
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Develop fast, predictive computer
modeling capability for droplet formation,
motion, mixing and reaction in microchannels and lab-on-chip systems.
• Merge continuum hydrodynamic models
with molecular dynamics for nano-fluidic
applications.
• Design and optimize μ-unit-operations for
sensors and chemical analysis.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Developed novel cohesive chemical
potential that models interfaces more simply
than previous volumetric formulations and
also includes diffusion.
• Treated surface wetting and contact angles
through suitable adhesive force laws.
• Development of simulations of lab-on-chip
assay and sensor reactions is underway.
Real-Time Distributed Multiple Object Tracking
Investigators: Dan Schonfeld, ECE; Wei Qu, ECE; Nidhal Bouaynaya, ECE
Prime Grant Support: Motorola, Inc., NeoMagic Corp.
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Video Surveillance (Activity Monitoring)
• Video Communications (Virtual Background)
• Video Enhancement (Handheld Camera Quality)
• Video Animation (Virtual Conference Room)
• Video Steroegraphy (3D from a Single Camera)
• Video Retrieval (Visual Search Engine)
Technical Approach
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Particle Filter
• Magnetic-Intertia Model
• Motion Proposal
• Interactive Distributed Model
• Detection Proposal
• Mixture Hidden Markov Model
1
1
1
2
x
x
x12
x
..
..
..
.
.
.
z11
x2m
z12
• Video Auto-Focus (Fixed Lens Camera)
• Video Stabilization (Handheld & Vehicle Vibrations)
.
.
.
z2m
zt2
..
..
z1m
xtm
z1t
z22
..
z12
• Low-Power (Embedded Processors)
• Multiple Camera Tracking (Information Fusion)
xt2
x1m
• Very Fast (Few Particles Required)
• Complete Occlusion (Hidden Targets)
1
t
x22
• Real-Time (No Offline Processing Required)
ztm
• Randomly Perturbed Active Surfaces (Robust Contour)
Architectural Integration of Software Protection
Investigator: Gyungho Lee, ECE dept.
Primary Grant Support: NSF
Problem Statement and Motivation
Technical Approach
• instruction-level program behavior description with
execution path
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Achievement
• program counter encoding for low cost control
flow validation
• augmented branch predictor for complete control
flow validation
• Future
•Data Flow Validation
• Industrial Control System - SCADA
• mobile devices – 4G cell phone environment
36
Neural Dynamic Programming for Automotive Engine Control
Investigator: Derong Liu, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Prime Grant Support: National Science Foundation and General Motors
Computational Intelligence Laboratory
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Automobile emissions are a major source of pollution
• Exhaust air-to-fuel ratio control to reduce emission
• Engine torque control to improve driveability
• On-board learning to deal with vehicle aging effects
• Reduced emissions - Environmental benefit
• Better fuel efficiency - Economic benefit
Technical Approach
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Dynamic programming minimizes a cost function
• Self-learning controller for better transient torque
• Neural network approximation of the cost function
• Self-learning controller for tighter air-to-fuel ratio
• Neural network controller to minimize the cost function
• Neural network modeling of automotive engines
• Approximate optimal control/dynamic programming
• Neural network modeling of several engine components
• Initial controller will be trained off-line using data
• Other potential application: Engine diagnostics
• Controller is further refined through on-line learning
• Short term goal: Collaborate with industry
• Controller performance is improved with experience
• Long term goal: Implement our algorithms in GM cars
Energy-Efficient Wireless Sensing
Investigator: Yingwei Yao, ECE
System Model
A sensor network with many sensors and a fusion center.
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Limited resources (energy budgets and processing
capabilities) of wireless sensors
• Harsh wireless communication channels subject to fading,
shadowing, and interference
• Existing works focus on communication-oriented metrics
such as data rates and bit error rate, instead of sensing
performance
• Existing works treat sensor data as generic data and do not
exploit its structure
Technical Approach
37
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• A cross-layer design approach to develop information-driven
fusion protocol that allows the fusion center to collect data
most relevant to sensing tasks with minimal delay.
• We have developed a group-ordered sequential probability
ratio test that greatly reduces the number of bits needed to be
transmitted to reach a target sensing performance.
• An energy efficiency perspective to evaluate the energy
consumption implications of various design options and to
develop communication protocols suitable for sensors
operating on tiny batteries.
• We have investigated the asymptotic performance of a sensor
network and proved that multiple relaying is asymptotically
optimal.
• We will develop energy-efficient information-driven random
access protocols for wireless sensor networks.
Human Activity Scripts and Queries for Video Databases
Principal Investigator: Jezekiel Ben-Arie, ECE Dept.
Prime Grant Support: NSF
Problem Statement and Motivation
.
This project is focused on the development of methods
and interactive tools that enable efficient querying,
recognition and retrieval of video clips in a video
database of human motion. Natural and symbolic
languages are not suited to accurately describe human
motion.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
.
An Example of a query composition of human activity
along a trajectory. The humanoid then animates it for
visual feedback.
Technical Approach
Our Approach: is to represent human motion by novel
temporal scripts that define the 3D pose and velocity of
important body parts. The human body is represented by
an hierarchic structure. This enables not only efficient
representation but also robust recognition from any
viewpoint. The user is also allowed to interactively
compose practically any desired motion query and to
view it.
An innovative method for human motion Recognition
by Indexing and Sequencing (RISq) was developed.
The RISq requires only few video samples. An
interactive GUI based tool for composing articulated
human motion was also established.
This project has also broader Impacts. Since our
interactive-graphic approach does not require reading
or writing, it could be also applied to enhance the
creativity and educational participation of groups such
as children in authoring animated plays and movies.
Our future goals is to extend the range of activities and
the number of persons that can be composed. We are
also extending our activity recognition system –RISq
(which is currently patent pending) to include speech
and object recognition.
Efficient Visual Tracking
Investigators: Rashid Ansari, ECE; Ashfaq Khokhar, ECE/CS
Prime Grant Support: NSF, U.S. Army
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Real-time visual tracking is important in automated video
scene understanding for applications such as surveillance,
compression, and vision-based user interfaces
• Visual Tracking: Locate moving objects from visual cues.
• Low computation complexity (Real-time requirement)
• Tracking rapid motion, in presence of occlusion (self and
foreign-body)
• Tracking multiple objects using multiple cues
• High dimensionality (articulated human body tracking)
Technical Approach
• Combine particle filtering with efficiency of mean shift
tracker.
• New formulation of visual tracking in a set theoretic
framework.
• Graphical models (Markov Random Field and
Bayesian Network) provide high-level modeling for
single object and multiple object tracking in highdimensional spaces.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Real-time tracking with improved efficiency compared
with the standard particle filter-based tracker by 20-40%.
• Improved performance with robust tracking under rapid
motion
• Handles partial occlusion and short-time full-occlusion
• Naturally extends from single to multiple object tracking
• Convenient fusion of multiple cues (no pre-adjustment
of tracker needed). Easy incorporation of additional cues.
• Application in foveated video compression and event
recognition in scenes will be investigated
38
ISOGA: Integrated Services Optical Grid Architecture
Investigator: Oliver Yu, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Prime Grant Support: DOE, NSF
Cluster
All-optical
LAN
Chicago
StarLight
Amsterdam
NetherLight
ISON
PIN
UIC
Cluster
On-demand Lightpath (10 Gbps)
All-optical
LAN
ISON
All-optical
MAN
Cluster
PIN
University of
Amsterdam
ISON
PIN
Chicago
OMNInet
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Lambda Grid reserves lightpaths or lambdas of light
(10 Gbps transport capacity) among a distributed
collection of data, computing, visualization and
instrumentation resources that are integrated to provide
collaborative capability to end users.
• To support a Multi-domain Lambda Grid with ondemand lightpath provisioning over multiple optical
network domains with heterogeneous control planes.
• To support e a Multi-purpose Lambda Grid for
multidisciplinary collaborative applications.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
Technical Approach
• Photonic Inter-domain Negotiator (PIN) is developed to
support the Multi-domain Lambda Grid. It provides an
open secure inter-domain control plane to interoperate
multiple optical network domains with non-compatible
signaling and routing functions.
• Integrated Services Optical Network (ISON) is
developed to support the Multi-purpose Lambda Grid. It
provides multiple traffic transport services: Gigabit-rate
stream (single lambda per application); Kilo/Megabit-rate
stream (multiple applications per lambda); Tera/Petabitrate stream (multiple lambdas per application); and
variable bit rate bursty traffic.
• Publication
• O. Yu, “Intercarrier Interdomain Control Plane for Global Optical
Networks,” in Proc. IEEE ICC, June 2004.
• O. Yu, T. DeFanti, “Collaborative User-centric Lambda-Grid over
Wavelength-Routed Network,” in Proc. IEEE/ASM SC 2004, Nov. 2004.
• Three journal papers has been submitted to IEEE/OSA Journal of
Lightwave Technology.
• Demonstration
• Through collaboration with University of Amsterdam, on-demand
lightpath provisioning was demonstrated over Lambda Grid between
Chicago & Amsterdam in SC 2003, November 2003.
• Future Goals
• Extend multi-domain and multi-purpose Lambda Grid with photonic
multicast capability by splitting incoming light into multiple outputs.
• Demonstrate the new prototype in iGrid 2005 symposium at San Diego.
Preservation and Protection of Online Multimedia Contents
Investigators: Ashfaq Khokhar and Rashid Ansari
Multimedia Systems Lab. (http://multimedia.ece.uic.edu)
Prime Grant Support: National Science Foundation
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Emergence of peer to peer networks and increased interest
in online sharing poses challenges for preserving and
protecting online digital repositories.
• Existing efforts are mostly focused on text data. Research
challenges are amplified when the contents are multimedia –
just re-sampling of voice or image data, which is difficult to
detect, compromises the authentication and validation.
• Developing multimedia asset management tools and
distributed protocols that embed signatures, evaluate
authentication, and help perform recovery using copies at
peer nodes, if contents have been compromised.
Technical Approach
• Develop efficient watermarking techniques that can
imperceptibly embed information in the media
• Embedding capacity (#of bits embedded) of the proposed
techniques should be large and embedded information
should withstand different types of adversary attacks
including re-sampling, compression, noise,
desynchronization, etc. – exploit temporal and spatial
correlation in the multimedia data.
39
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Developed novel watermarking techniques that embed
information in selective frequency subbands. The
embedded information is 10-15 times more than existing
techniques and can withstand adversary attacks.
• Developed an Independent Component Analysis based
detector that can detect embedded information in the
presence of extreme noise (less than 1% error probability
even in the presence of 80% noise).
• Develop detection algorithms that can detect the
embedded information in the face of modifications and
other adversary attacks.
• Developing a comprehensive digital asset management
system using data hiding for fingerprinting and
authentication.
• Develop distributed protocols based on trust metrics to
recover modified contents
• Developing a suite of distributed protocols for content
validation and recovery in case of compromised data.
Compiling Software Applications to Reconfigurable
Hardware
Investigator: Prith Banerjee, ECE Department and Dean of Engineering
Grant Support: NASA
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Many signal and image processing applications can be
sped up by FPGA based reconfigurable hardware
• Major roadblock is design tools; need to develop
automated techniques to take software applications and
map them to FPGAs and SOCs
• Reduce design times from months to days
• Perform area-delay-power tradeoffs
• Reuse software for general processors, and migrate to
SOCs seamlessly
Key Achievements and Future Goals
Technical Approach
• Developed a preliminary software prototype called the
FREEDOM compiler
• Compile applications to general purpose software
binaries using regular compilers
• Speedups of 3-20X reported on a Xilinx Virtex-II over a
TI C6000 DSP processor for several benchmarks
• Study techniques for automatic translation of software
binaries to RTL VHDL / Verilog for mapping to FPGAs on
reconfigurable hardware
• Future work include development of high-level
synthesis techniques for area, delay and power tradeoffs
• Investigate techniques for hardware/software co-design
at software binary level for reconfigurable hardware
• Extensive benchmarking of real multimedia applications
• Results are being commercialized by BINACHIP
• Develop prototype compiler for TI C6000 and ARM
processors and Xilinx Virtex II and Altera Stratix FPGAs
Incremental Placement and Routing Algorithms for FPGA and VLSI Circuits
VLSI CAD Flow:
Partitioning
Floorplanning
Investigators: Shantanu Dutt, Electrical & Computer Engr.
Prime Grant Support: National Science Foundation
Placement
Problem Statement and Motivation
Routing
Simulation
• Current and future very deep submicron chips are so
complex and minute that they need “corrections” or reoptimizations in small parts after initial design & simul.
• Need to keep the correct parts of the chip as intact as
possible – good resource usage, time-to-market req.
Incr. Place
e.g., for timing
closure
Technical Approach
• Use of a constraint-satisfying depth-first search
(DFS) process that explores the design space for the
incremental changes to:
• Optimize them (e.g., power, critical path, signal
integrity)
• Subject to not deteriorating metrics of the larger
unchanged chip beyond pre-set bounds (e.g., <=
10% increase in wire-length)
• Use of a new network-flow based methodology to
explore the design space in a more continuous manner
(as opposed to discrete in DFS) for faster solutions:
• Some approximations involved for discrete ->
continuous optimization mapping
• Need incremental CAD algorithms that re-do the
“incorrect” parts fast and w/o significant effect on the
correct parts
• This project focuses on such incremental algorithms at
the physical CAD or layout level of chip design –
placement & routing
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Incremental routing for FPGAs:
• optimal DFS algorithm wrt # of tracks– if a solution
exists will find it; 13 times faster than competitor VPR
• Incremental routing for VLSI ASICs:
• 98% success rate in completing routes – up to 9-12
times fewer failures than Std and R&R routers
• Timing-driven incremental routing for VLSI ASICs:
• 94% succ rate; 5 times fewer timing violations
• Incremental placement for VLSI ASICs:
• Prel results: applied to timing closure – 10% improv
• Future Work: (1) Apply to timing, power closure via logic &
circuit re-synthesis at the physical level + re-placement & rerouting; (2) Integration of incremental routing & placement
40
Data-Flow Analysis in the Memory Management
of Real-Time Multimedia Processing Systems
Investigator: Florin Balasa, Dept. CS
Prime Grant Support: NSF
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Data transfer and memory access operations typically
consume more power than datapath operations in
multimedia processing systems; moreover, the area
cost is often largely dominated by memories.
• This research addresses the still open problem of
deriving a distributed memory architecture optimized for
area and / or power subject to performance constraints.
Technical Approach
• This research employs data-flow analysis techniques to
extract the needed information from the behavioral
specifications of the multidimensional processing systems.
• Data-flow analysis is used as a steering mechanism
which allows more exploration freedom than a scheduling –
based investigation, since the memory management tasks
typically need only relative (rather than exact) life-time
information on the signals.
• Moreover, data-flow analysis enables the study of
memory managements tasks at the desired level of
granularity (between array level and scalar level) trading-off
computational effort, solution accuracy and optimality.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Key achievement: methodology based on algebraic
transformations and data-flow analysis techniques for
memory size computation for the entire class of affine
behavioral specifications.
• Memory size computation for parameterized specifications
and for specifications with explicit parallelism.
• Memory allocation based on data reuse analysis
• Data-flow –driven data partitioning for on/off –chip
memories.
• Memory management with abstract data types and
dynamic memory allocation.
Multi-Camera Head Tracking for the Varrier Autostereo Display
Jason Leigh, Luc Renambot, Javier Girado, Andrew Johnson, Dan Sandin, Tom DeFanti,
Electronic Visualization Laboratory, Dept. of Computer Science
Office of Naval Research and National Science Foundation
7x5 LCD panels covered with a black line screen overlay to
achieve an autostereoscopic effect.
Problem Statement and Motivation
High resolution stereoscopic computer graphics is
crucial to understanding abstract structures in
geoscience and bioscience. Such displays do not
currently exist on the market. A key factor in enabling
widespread adoption of stereo in the future is to create
stereoscopic displays that can be viewed without
wearing special glasses. The Varrier system prototypes
this capability using arrays of LCD panels mounted with
black line screens. Precise realtime, low-latency, head
tracking is required to ensure perfect stereoscopic
effect.
Technical Approach
•
•
•
By placing a black line screen in front of commodity LCD
panels and applying the correct graphical transformations,
one can create stereoscopic computer graphics which can
be viewed without wearing specialized glasses.
A cluster of 35 computers with high-end graphics cards is
used to drive the pictured 7x5 panels.
A high speed neural network-based facial recognition
system is used to track the viewer so that the correct
perspective is drawn relative to the viewer’s viewpoint. The
facial recognition system also allows the system to lock onto
a single user, even when some one else steps in front of the
display.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
•
•
•
•
41
A first prototype of a 7x5 LCD Varrier system exists at UIC
and has been tested with a single camera head tracking
system with good results. A small 2x2 system will be
deployed at the Technology Research Education and
Commercialization Center (TRECC) in DuPage County,
Illinois.
Next generation capability will have increased frame rate,
high resolution and lower latency for tracking.
Next generation system will use an array of cameras to
allow full resolution coverage of a wide viewing area for
supporting a full-sized 7x5 Varrier system. This system will
be deployed at the ACCESS center in Washington D.C.
This will be demonstrated at the iGrid 2005 and SC2005
conferences in the Fall of 2005.
TransLight/StarLight International Research Network Connections
Investigators: Tom DeFanti and Maxine Brown, CS Department
Prime Grant Support: National Science Foundation #OCI-0441094
Problem Statement and Motivation
In cooperation with US and European national
research and education networks, UIC’s
TransLight/StarLight five-year project, which
began in 2005, is implementing a strategy to best
serve established production science networks,
including usage by those scientists, engineers and
educators who have persistent large-flow, realtime, and/or other advanced application
requirements.
GLIF, the Global Lambda Integrated Facility, is an international virtual organization
supporting persistent data-intensive scientific research and middleware development
on “LambdaGrids” – a Grid in which the optical networks themselves are resources
that can be scheduled like any other computing, storage or visualization resource.
TransLight/StarLight funds two network
connections between the US and Europe for
production science:
• OC-192 routed connection between New York
City and Amsterdam that connects the US
Abilene, National LambdaRail (NLR) and DOE
ESnet networks to the pan-European GÉANT2
network.
• OC-192 switched connection between StarLight
in Chicago and NetherLight in Amsterdam that
is part of the GLIF LambdaGrid fabric
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• TransLight/StarLight is the international extension
to the NLR and the TeraGrid
• TransLight is a USA member of GLIF
• Develop a global science engineering and
education marketplace for network diversity
• Lead research to enable laboratories and centers to
procure networking services with equipment and
services budgets, just as they buy computer
clusters and software today
• Help close the Digital Divide separating our
scientists from the rest of the world
The OptIPuter Project
Tom DeFanti, Jason Leigh, Maxine Brown, Tom Moher, Oliver Yu, Bob Grossman, Luc Renambot
Electronic Visualization Laboratory, Department of Computer Science, UIC
Larry Smarr, California Institute of Telecommunications and Information Technology, UCSD
National Science Foundation Award #OCI-0225642
Problem Statement and Motivation
The OptIPuter, so named for its use of optical networking,
Internet Protocol (IP), computer storage, and processing and
visualization technologies, is an infrastructure research effort
that tightly couples computational resources over parallel optical
networks using the IP communication mechanism. It is being
designed as a virtual parallel computer in which the individual
processors are distributed clusters; the memory is large
distributed data repositories; peripherals are very-large scientific
instruments, visualization displays and/or sensor arrays; and the
motherboard uses standard IP delivered over multiple dedicated
lambdas that serve as the system bus or backplane.
UIC’s 100-Megapixel tiled display is managed by its SAGE software (Scalable
Adaptive Graphics Environment), which organizes the screen’s “real estate” as if
it were one continuous canvas, enabling researchers to view large-scale images
while conducing high-definition video-teleconferences with remote colleagues.
Technical Approach—UIC OptIPuter Team
Key Achievements and Future Goals—UIC Team
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Develop ultra-high-resolution displays and collaboration tools
Transmit ultra-high-resolution images over advanced networks
Research distributed optical backplane architectures
Create and deploy lightpath management methods
Implement novel data transport protocols
Create outreach mechanisms benefiting scientists and educators
Assure interoperability of UIC software with OptIPuter
partners. Academic partners: UCSD; UIC; Northwestern U; San
Diego State U; University of Southern California;
UIUC/NCSA; University of California-Irvine; Texas A&M U.
Affiliate partners: NASA; U Michigan; USGS; CANARIE
(Canada); U Amsterdam and SARA (The Netherlands); KISTI
(Korea); AIST (Japan).
•
•
•
•
Deployed tiled displays and SAGE software to partner sites
Procured a 10Gbps private network from UIC to UCSD
Connected 1GigE and 10GigE metro, regional, national and
international research networks into the OptIPuter project
Developing software to interconnect and interoperate
heterogeneous network domains, enabling applications to set
up on-demand private networks
Developing advanced data transport protocols to move large
data files quickly
Developing Earthquake and Bioscience instructional programs
for local elementary schools
Developing high-bandwidth distributed applications in
geoscience, medical imaging and digital cinema
42
Scalable Adaptive Graphics Environment
Investigators: Jason Leigh, Andrew Johnson, Luc Renambot, Thomas A. DeFanti, Computer Science
Primary Grant Support: National Science Foundation & Office of Naval Research
Problem Statement and Motivation
A key component missing in today’s high-definition video
conferencing solutions is the ability to share content at high
resolution and frame rates.
•
Ultra-high-resolution display walls are fast becoming
affordable and are already in widespread use in scientific
research and development.
•
In the future all the walls of offices, laboratories and meeting
rooms will be covered with digital wallpaper on which
information can be posted.
•
Needed is the equivalent of a “Windows” operating system to
enable next-generation applications and user-interfaces to
make use of these display walls.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
Technical Approach
•
The Scalable Adaptive Graphics Environment (SAGE)
is a scalable software system that enables users to
work with scalable display environments as intuitively as
working on their laptop.
•
SAGE is designed to operate on tiled displays driven by
a cluster of computers connected by high-speed
networks.
•
Content for the displays can be generated from remote
computers and streamed in real-time for display on the
walls.
•
•
•
SAGE is now being used by over a dozen
institutions in the world equipped with tiled high
resolution display walls including Sharp and Nortel
Networks.
•
SAGE is now capable of Visualcasting, which
allows high resolution content and High-definition
video to be broadcasted to multiple distributed
sites simultaneously to facilitate distance
collaboration between users on tiled display walls.
•
For more information:
http://www.evl.uic.edu/cavern/sage
Users can manipulate the content in real-time using
wireless pointers and keyboards, including the ability to
stream one’s own laptop to the display wall.
Distributed Systems and Networking
Investigators: Ajay Kshemkalyani, Computer Science
Prime Grant Support: none
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Advance theoretical foundations of
• Distributed computing, and
• Network design
• Understand inherent limitations on
• upper and lower bonds, and solvability
• Subareas: sensor networks, peer-to-peer networks,
mobile, ad-hoc, and wireless networks
Technical Approach
• Design of distributed algorithms
• Prove upper and lower bounds
• Experimental evaluation, where necessary
• More info: see publications at
http://www.cs.uic.edu/~ajayk/int/dsnl.html
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Design of routing and multicast algorithms
• Advance understanding of:
• Causality and time; Temporal modalities
• Synchronization and monitoring mechanisms
• Predicate detection algorithms for distributed systems
• Web and internet performance
43
Automatic Analysis and Verification of Concurrent
Hardware/Software Systems
Investigators: A.Prasad Sistla, CS dept.
Prime Grant Support: NSF
Problem Statement and Motivation
Concurrent System
Spec
Yes/No
Model
Checker
Correctness
• The project develops tools for debugging and
verification hardware/software systems.
•Errors in hardware/software analysis occur frequently
• Can have enormous economic and social impact
Counter example
• Can cause serious security breaches
• such errors need to be detected and corrected
Spec
Technical Approach
• Model Checking based approach
• Correctness specified in a suitable logical frame work
• Employs State Space Exploration
• Different techniques for containing state space
explosion are used
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Developed SMC ( Symmetry Based Model Checker )
• Employed to find bugs in Fire Wire Protocol
• Also employed in analysis of security protocols
• Need to extend to embedded systems and general
software systems
• Need to combine static analysis methods with model
checking
Mathematical foundations of Representing Knowledge
Investigators: Robert H. Sloan, Computer Science, Gy. Turan, Mathematics
Prime Grant Support: National Science Foundation (grant # CCF-0431059)
Problem Statement and Motivation
<Insert some type of visual picture/diagram, etc.>
• All “intelligent systems” (artificial intelligence–AI) rely
on large quantities of knowledge.
• Knowledge representation is an old area of study in AI
that saw great progress in last dozen years or so
• Similarly (machine) learning is old area of AI that is
absolutely critical for building modern systems, and that
has had great progress in last dozen or so years.
• BUT little study of interaction between them; little
recent study of foundations of knowledge representation
Technical Approach
• Precisely determine expressiveness of basic
representation formalisms (e.g., decision trees,
Disjunctive Normal Forms)
• Complexity theory and combinatorics are the key
mathematical tools
• Develop algorithms for learning important
representations that have no learning algorithms, such
as modal logic
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Recent new results on k-Disjunctive Normal Forms
• “3 SAT” sentence solvers have been one of the great
areas of progress recently, but Horn sentences are
widely used in AI applications. Currently working on
detailed analysis of properties of Horn sentence (figue in
opposite corner).
• Also completing study of the revision of Horn
sentences–it’s easiest to learn when you have a “pretty
good” starting point
44
AIDS: Adaptive Intrusion Detection System
Investigators: Jeffrey J.P. Tsai, Department of Computer Science
Prime Grant Support: Motorola
Problem Statement and Motivation
Class 1
Class n
Final Class
Data
Final Arbiter
Model
Model
• Computer virus attacks cost global business an
estimated $55 billion in 2003, a sum that is expected
to increase this year. (ZDNet Security News)
• The research goal is to develop an adaptive
intrusion detection system (IDS) to control the
quantity and quality of alarms.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
Technical Approach
• Use learning algorithm to produce a high
performance detection model.
• An intrusion detection system based on learning
algorithm has been implemented.
• Use neural network to improve the decision making
procedure from multiple models.
• The IDS gets better performance than the winner of
the KDDCUP’99 contest using the DARPA
database.
• Use a new predication algorithm to finely tune the
detection model dynamically.
• The IDS will be extended to detect the security
problem of wireless sensor network systems.
Natural Language Interfaces for Intelligent Tutoring Systems
Investigators: Barbara Di Eugenio (Computer Science)
Prime Grant Support: ONR, NSF
Problem Statement and Motivation
<Insert some type of visual picture/diagram, etc.>
Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITSs) help students
master a certain topic: e.g. CMU Geometry / Algebra
ITSs used by 150,000 students in nearly 100 school
districts
• Can ITSs be made more effective by providing
natural dialogue between student and system, as if ITS
were human tutor?
• If yes, what features of natural dialogue engender the
most learning?
Technical Approach
• Collect natural dialogues between human tutors and
students. Domains: troubleshooting, letter puzzle
•Mine the dialogues for features thought to correlate with
learning, using machine learning techniques
Key Achievements and Future Goals
We have shown that
‘sophisticated enough’
dialogue engenders the
most learning
• Build computational model for those features
• Implement model in dialogue interface
• Run systematic evaluation with students: compare at
least two versions of ITS, one with full dialogue model,
one without, or with simplified interface
ƒApply methodology to new domain, basic data
structure and algorithms – collaboration with Stellan
Ohlsson (Psychology, UIC)
•Build ITS on computer science to be deployed in core
classes
45
Ubiquitous Computing in the Natural Classroom
Investigators: Mitchell D. Theys Department of Computer Science;
Kimberley Lawless College of Education
Prime Grant Support: NSF, Dept of Ed., Industry Sponsors (Microsoft, HP)
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Nationwide call for educators to emphasize methods
that engage students during class
• Ubiquitous computing is becoming available on campus
• Merge the above and provide a system that
•Exposes students to technology in the classroom
•Improves feedback for both formative and summative
assessment
•Allows more collaborative activities
•Enables the creation of a richer set of course
archives
Key Achievements and Future Goals
Technical Approach
• Completed preliminary results using a single Tablet
PC by the instructor
• Leverage existing technologies (Wireless networking,
Tablet PCs and digital ink, classroom communication
systems, and course specific software)
• Completed some experiments with summative
assessment using the Tablet PCs and digital ink
• Create a mobile Tablab system
• Goal to create several mobile Tablab systems
• Extend the research already performed by utilizing
wireless technology and a mobile system to bring the
technology to students in large classroom
• Future testing at a 1:1 ratio in larger CS courses
• Future testing in other large lectures (> 60students) to
determine whether system scales effectively
• Utilize the technology in courses the PIs are already
teaching, then encourage more use of the systems
Placement-Coupled Logic Replication and Resynthesis
Investigators: John Lillis, Computer Science
Prime Grant Support: NSF, IBM
Problem Statement and Motivation
A
B
B
A
CR
• Optimizations made by traditional logic synthesis
tools correlate poorly with post-layout performance
C
C
D
• Today, circuit performance determined by wiring more
than logic
E
D
Inherently non-monotone paths
E
All paths near-monotone after
replication
Technical Approach
• Extract timing-critical sub-circuit
• Induce equivalent logic tree by replication
• Optimally embed tree in context of current placement
by Dynamic Programming
• Embedding objective includes replication cost to
prevent excessive replication
• Mechanism applied iteratively
• Need for functionality preserving circuit perturbations
at physical level
• Candidate: Logic Replication
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Very large reductions in clock period (up to 40%)
observed in FPGA domain with minimal overhead [DAC
2004]
• Adapts easily to graph-based architectures common in
modern FPGAs. Many conventional placers ill-suited to
this environment.
• Generalizations deal with limitations resulting from
reconvergence [IWLS2004]
• Ongoing work includes: application to commercial
FPGAs; simultaneous remapping of logic; study of lowerbounds on achievable clock period; integrated timing
optimization based on Shannon factorization.
46
Gene Expression Programming for Data Mining and
Knowledge Discovery
Investigators: Peter Nelson, CS; Xin Li, CS; Chi Zhou, Motorola Inc.
Prime Grant Support: Physical Realization Research Center of Motorola Labs
Problem Statement and Motivation
Genotype:
sqrt.*.+.*.a.*.sqrt.a.b.c./.1.-.c.d
Phenotype:
Mathematical form:
( a + bc ) ∗ a
1
c−d
Figure 1. Representations of solutions in GEP
• Real world data mining tasks: large data set, high
dimensional feature set, non-linear form of hidden
knowledge; in need of effective algorithms.
• Gene Expression Programming (GEP): a new
evolutionary computation technique for the creation of
computer programs; capable of producing solutions of
any possible form.
• Research goal: applying and enhancing GEP
algorithm to fulfill complex data mining tasks.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
Technical Approach
• Overview: improving the problem solving ability of the
GEP algorithm by preserving and utilizing the selfemergence of structures during its evolutionary process
• Constant Creation Methods for GEP: local optimization
of constant coefficients given the evolved solution
structures to speed up the learning process.
• A new hierarchical genotype representation: natural
hierarchy in forming the solution and more protective
genetic operation for functional components
• Dynamic substructure library: defining and reusing selfemergent substructures in the evolutionary process.
• Have finished the initial implementation of the
proposed approaches.
• Preliminary testing has demonstrated the feasibility and
effectiveness of the implemented methods: constant
creation methods have achieved significant improvement
in the fitness of the best solutions; dynamic substructure
library helps identify meaningful building blocks to
incrementally form the final solution following a faster
fitness convergence curve.
• Future work include investigation for parametric
constants, exploration of higher level emergent
structures, and comprehensive benchmark studies.
Massive Effective Search from the Web
Investigator: Clement Yu, Department of Computer Science
Primary Grant Support: NSF
Problem Statement and Motivation
Users
• Retrieve, on behalf of each user request, the most
accurate and most up-to-date information from the
Web.
Queries
Metasearch Engine
Results
Queries
Search
Engine 1
………
Search
Engine N
Technical Approach
• A metasearch engine connects to numerous search
engines and can retrieve any information which is retrievable
by any of these search engines.
• On receiving a user request, automatically selects just a
few search engines that are most suitable to answer the
query.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Optimal selection of search engines to answer accurately a
user’s request.
• Automatic connection to search engines to reduce labor cost.
• Automatic extraction of query results to reduce labor cost.
• Has a prototype to retrieve news from 50 news search engines.
• Connects to search engines automatically and maintains
the connections automatically.
• Has received 2 regular NSF grants and 1 phase 1 NSF SBIR
grant.
• Extracts results returned from search engines
automatically.
• Has just submitted a phase 2 NSF SBIR grant proposal to
connect to at least 10,000 news search engines.
• Merges results from multiple search engines automatically.
47
• The Web is estimated to contain 500 billion pages.
Google indexed 8 billion pages. A search engine, based
on crawling technology, cannot access the Deep Web
and may not get most up-to-date information.
• Plans to extend to do cross language (English-Chinese)
retrieval.
Embedded Phenomena
Investigator: Tom Moher, Computer Science
Prime Grant Support: National Science Foundation
Problem Statement and Motivation
• K-12 learners have insufficient opportunity to engage in
“patient science” involving extended observation,
manipulation of variables, and aggregation of evidence.
• “Ubiquitous computing” often associated with personal
computational devices; embedded phenomena explore
the “other side” of ubiquitous computing: ambient media
embedded in the physical environment.
• Use of conventional classroom computers running
standard browsers creates opportunities for widespread
adoption on installed school technology base.
Technical Approach
Key Achievements and Future Goals
•
Simulated phenomena are “mapped” onto the physical
space of the classroom.
•
The state of the simulation is represented through
conventional computers located around the classroom
serving as “portals” into that phenomenon.
•
Students conduct investigations of the phenomenon by
monitoring and manipulating of the state of the
simulation through those portals.
•
The simulations are persistent, running concurrently with
the regular instructional flow for periods of days and
weeks.
• Four applications: RoomQuake (seismology), HelioRoom
(astronomy), RoomBugs and WallCology (population
ecologies).
• “Phenomenon Server” allows teachers to configure and
schedule phenomena for delivery to their classrooms.
• Field trials and investigation of student learning in over
two dozen classrooms.
• Best paper, ACM Conference on Human Factors in
Computing Systems (CHI 2006): “Embedded
Phenomena: Supporting Science Learning with.
Classroom-sized Distributed Simulations.”
MOBI-DIC: MOBIle DIscovery of loCal resources
Investigators: Ouri Wolfson and Bo Xu, Computer Science Dept.
Prime Grant Support: NSF
resource-query D
resource 8
A
Problem Statement and Motivation
D
resource-query C
resource 6
resource 7
resource-query A
resource 1
resource 2
resource 3
B
• Currently, while on the move, people cannot efficiently
search for local resources, particularly if the resources
have a short life, e.g. an available parking slot, or an
available workstation in a large convention hall.
C
resource-query B
resource 4
resource 5
Technical Approach
• Use Database and Publish/Subscribe technology to
specify profiles of interest and resource information
•Peer-to-Peer information exchange among mobile devices
such as cell phones and pda’s, that form ad hoc network
• Exchange uses short-range, unlicensed wireless
communication spectrum including 802.11 and Bluetooth.
• Exchanged information is prioritized according to a
spatial-temporal relevance function to reduce bandwidth
consumption and cope with unreliable wireless connections.
• Adaptive push/pull of resource information
• Applications in matchmaking and resource discovery
in many domains, including
• social networks
• transportation and emergency response
• mobile electronic commerce.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Developed and analyzed search algorithms for different
mobility environments and communication technologies.
• Designed a comprehensive simulation system that
enables selection of a search algorithm
• Built a prototype system
• Published 6 papers, received $250k in NSF support,
delivered two keynote addresses on the subject.
• Submitted provisional patent application
• Future goals: design complete local search system,
combine with cellular communication to central server,
test technology in real environment, transfer to industry.
48
Learning from Positive and Unlabeled Examples
Investigator: Bing Liu, Computer Science
Prime Grant Support: National Science Foundation
Problem Statement and Motivation
Positive
training
data
Unlabeled
data
• Given a set of positive examples P and a set of unlabeled
examples U, we want to build a classifier.
• The key feature of this problem is that we do not have
labeled negative examples. This makes traditional
classification learning algorithms not directly applicable.
Learning
algorithm
•.The main motivation for studying this learning model is to
solve many practical problems where it is needed. Labeling
of negative examples can be very time consuming.
Classifier
Key Achievements and Future Goals
Technical Approach
We have proposed three approaches.
• Two-step approach: The first step finds some reliable
negative data from U. The second step uses an iterative
algorithm based on naïve Bayesian classification and
support vector machines (SVM) to build the final classifier.
• In (Liu et al. ICML-2002), it was shown
theoretically that P and U provide
sufficient information for learning, and
the problem can be posed as a constrained
optimization problem.
• Biased SVM: This method models the problem with a
biased SVM formulation and solves it directly. A new
evaluation method is also given, which allows us to tune
biased SVM parameters.
• Some of our algorithms are reported in
(Liu et al. ICML-2002; Liu et al. ICDM2003; Lee and Liu ICML-2003; Li and Liu
IJCAI-2003).
• Weighted logistic regression: The problem can be
regarded as an one-side error problem and thus a weighted
logistic regress method is proposed.
• Our future work will focus on two aspects:
• Deal with the problem when P is very small
• Apply it to the bio-informatics domain. There are
many problems there requiring this type of learning.
Automated Decision-Making in Interactive Settings
Investigators: Piotr Gmytrasiewicz, Department of Computer Science
Prime Grant Support: National Science Foundation
Problem: Allow artificial agents to make
optimal decisions while interacting with the
observation Beliefs
world and possibly other agents
Environment
• Artificial agents: Robots, softbots, unmanned systems
State
• Hard-coding control actions is impractical
• Let’s design agents that can decide what to do
Agent(s)
actions
Technical Approach
• Combine decision-theoretic framework with elements of
game theory
• Use decision-theoretic solution concept
• Agent’s beliefs encompass other agents present
• Solutions tell the agent what to do, given its beliefs
• Computing solutions is hard (intractable), but
approximate solutions possible
• Solution algorithms are variations of known decisiontheoretic exact and approximate solutions
• Convergence results and other properties are
analogous to decision-theoretic ones
49
• One approach: Decision theory, not applicable when
other agents are present
• Another approach: Game theory, not applicable when
agent is action alone
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• A single approach to controlling autonomous agents is
applicable in single- and multi-agent
settings
• Unites decision-theoretic control with game theory
• Gives rise to a family of exact and approximate control
algorithms with anytime properties
• Applications: Autonomous control, agents, humanmachine interactions
• Future work: Provide further formal properties; improve
on approximation algorithms; develop a
number of solutions to dynamic interactive
decision-making settings
APPLYING FORMAL MODELING TO UML DIAGRAMS
Investigator: Sol M. Shatz, Department of Computer Science
Prime Grant Support: ARO, NSF
Rational
Rose
UML model
(XMI)
UML-CPN
Conversion
•Two types of languages for building design models:
Semi-formal languages - such as UML - are easy to use
and understand but do not support formal analysis;
Formal languages - such as Petri nets - support formal
analysis but are more difficult to understand and need
expertise to use.
CPN
Model
(XML)
MSC
Simulation
Query Tool
Simulation Trace
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Complex software systems are difficult to design and
analyze
Design/CPN
• This project aims to develop techniques to profit from
both types of languages.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
Technical Approach
• Transformation based approach
• Design an algorithmic approach to transform UML
diagrams systematically into a formal notation (colored
Petri nets)
• Formal analysis based on simulation
• Develop various techniques to help users, who are not
familiar with the formal notation, reason about the
behavior of a system design
• Develop techniques for checking qualitative properties
of the system
• Provided a formal semantics to UML statecharts by
transforming UML statecharts into colored Petri nets
• Developed a prototype tool that transforms UML
statecharts into colored Petri nets automatically
• Developed a prototype tool that allows users to input
and check queries about the properties of the system
• Future plans: include other types of UML diagrams;
experimental evaluation; add time into the model so that
quantitative properties can be checked
Performance Modeling and Analysis of Distributed Systems
Using Petri Nets and Fuzzy Logic
Investigator: Tadao Murata, Department of Computer Science
Prime Grant Support: National Science Foundation
Problem Statement and Motivation
P1a
Pout-a
• The size and complexity of real-time distributed
t1a
Pa
Pfree
Pb
(0,0,0,0)
d1a(τ)
(4,5,7,9)
d2a(τ)
systems makes it extremely difficult to predict the
performance of these applications and their underlying
networks
d2b(τ)
• Fuzzy-timing models associate possibility distributions
of delays with events taking place in the system being
modeled, well mimicking complex behaviors of the
system, making the formal model very beneficial in
performance modeling and analysis of complicated
distributed systems
d2a(τ) (4,5,7,9)
d2b(τ) (4,5,7,9)
d1b(τ)
P1b
(4,5,7,9)Pout-b
Technical Approach
• Monitor the system to obtain parameters such as
bandwidth and latency to characterize the possibility
distributions of the Fuzzy-Timing Petri Net (FTHN) model
• Build the FTHN model of the architecture to be
analyzed based on the collected data
• Use fuzzy logic and simulation to analyze and verify the
modeled system. Network features that are needed in
order to implement currently unattainable interactions
can be obtained
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Applied FTHN model to assist us in the design of a
high-speed transport protocol for Long Fat Networks.
• Developed techniques and tools for performance
analysis of network protocols and QoS requirement
analysis of the networks: Proposed a topologyapproximation to enable the formal model to have
capability in modeling unpredictable dynamic topology,
thus enlarging its application domains
• Future work includes: apply FTHN model in other areas
such as developing the intelligent optimization of
concerted heterogeneous data transmissions in
distributed wide-area cluster computing environments
50
SIMULATION OF MULTIBODY RAILROAD VEHICLE/TRACK
DYNAMICS
Investigator: Ahmed A. Shabana, Department of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering
Prime Grant Support: Federal Railroad Administration (USA)
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Develop new methodologies and computer algorithms
for the nonlinear dynamic analysis of detailed multibody railroad vehicle models.
• The computer algorithms developed can be used to
accurately predict the wheel/rail interaction, derailment,
stability and dynamic and vibration characteristics of
high speed railroad vehicle models.
•Develop accurate small and large deformation
capabilities in order to be able to study car body
flexibility and pantograph/ catenary systems.
Technical Approach
• Methods of nonlinear mechanics are used to
formulate the equations of motion of general multibody systems; examples of which are complex
railroad vehicles.
• Small and large deformation finite element
formulations are used to develop the equations of
motion of the flexible bodies.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Fully nonlinear computational algorithms were
developed and their use in the analysis of complex
railroad vehicle systems was demonstrated.
• The results obtained using the new nonlinear
algorithms were validated by comparison with measured
data as well as the results obtained using other codes.
• Numerical methods are used to solve the resulting
system of differential and algebraic equations.
• Advanced large deformation problems such as
pantograph/catenary systems have been successfully
and accurately solved for the first time.
• Computer graphics and animation are used for the
visualization purpose.
• The tools developed at UIC are currently being used by
federal laboratories and railroad industry.
UIC-Mechatronics Lab by Professor S. Cetinkunt
Prime sponsors: Caterpillar, NSF, Motorola
Problem Statement and Motivation
• The world needs more, affordable, reliable, energy
efficient, environmentally friendly construction and
agricultural equipment Energy efficiency improvements
to beat poverty in developing world
• Embedded computer control and information
technology applications in construction and agricultural
equipment: closed loop controls, GPS, autonomous
vehicles.
Technical Approach
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Developed a new steer-by-wire EH system (for wheel
loaders)
• Developed a new closed center EH hydraulic implement
control system
• Developed semi-active joystick controls
• Developed payload monitoring systems
• Closed loop control for graders, site planning with GPS
• Three US patents awarded (forth filed) .
• 12+ former graduate students employed by CAT
51
Control Reconfiguration of Complex Discrete Event Dynamic Systems
Investigators: Houshang Darabi, Mechanical and Industrial Engineering;
Prime Grant Support: NIST, Motorola, IVRI
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Today’s manufacturing and service information systems
(IS) contain complex decision making processes.
• These processes can be modeled as supervisory
control problems with dynamic control specifications.
• Many theoretical results and software tools are already
available to analyze supervisory control problems.
• Discrete manufacturing IS, hospital IS and supply chain
IS are governed by the same control principals.
• Control specifications of these system change over
time and require reconfiguration of their control rules.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
Technical Approach
• Modeling of systems by Petri Nets and Finite Automata
• Systematic methods for modeling of manufacturing IS
• Modular and hierarchical decomposition of control
• Automatic procedures to reconfigure PLC programs
subject to sensor failures
• Formal verification and validation of system properties
• Classification of reconfiguration needs and triggers
• Systematic procedures for modeling hospital IS
• Cost/benefit modeling of reconfiguration response
• Modeling and analysis tools assisting medical service
control systems during mass casualty situations
• Simulation modeling and analysis of systems based
regular events and reconfiguration events
•Simulation models for hospital resource assignment
• Supervisory control of discrete event systems
• Adaptive mixed integer programming models for
reconfiguring supply chain controllers
• Standard supply chain agent models for distributed
decision making and peer to peer communication
Product Platform Design
Investigators: Michael J. Scott, Mechanical & Industrial Engineering
Prime Grant Support: National Science Foundation, (General Motors)
−3
2.5
Hierarchical clusters of NC
x 10
group
group
1
2
Problem Statement and Motivation
Index of Dissimilarity
2
• Product platforms are used to achieve variety at low
cost in product design; families of products share
common characteristics. E.g.: single-use cameras,
passenger aircraft, Sony Walkman’s, electric motors.
1.5
1
• Need rigorous methods to determine 1) which product
variants should share variable values, and 2) what the
values should be (state-of-the-art only addresses #2)
0.5
0
2
(930)
3
(992)
4
5
(1004)
(1016)
1
6
Motor No.
(1107)
(1019)
7
(1160)
8
(1199)
9
(1236)
10
(1295)
Technical Approach
• Use cluster analysis and sensitivity analysis to group
variables.
• Use preference aggregation to treat multi-objective
optimization/decision problem. Multiple objectives arise
from the individual product design, from the need for
robust solutions, and from the trade-off between
commonality (to save cost) and performance (of
individual products).
• Model uncertainties, both stochastic (irreducible
random variations) and epistemic (incomplete
information in preliminary design)
• New commonality indices
• NSF-funded research: development of a repository of
example/test problems for the research community.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Three journal, four conference papers in last two years.
• Done: New methods for individual product optimization
demonstrating results superior to those available in the
literature.
• Done: More comprehensive formulation of problem than
given in the literature allows for each variable to be
shared by any subset of member products (as opposed
to either all or none).
• Ongoing: web-based repository of problems in this
nascent area for use by the general research community.
• Future: Some steps are still ad hoc; more formalization;
also more explicit methods for cost analysis.
52
Computational Intelligence for Diagnostics and Prognostics
Investigators: David He and Pat Banerjee, MIE Department
Prime Grant Support: BF Goodrich (USA)
Problem Statement and Motivation
Sensor
Signals
*Time domain
*Frequency domain
Optimal
Data
Extraction
* Flight profiles
Integrated
Computational
Intelligence
Diagnostic +
Prognostic Models
Technical Approach
•Innovative probabilistic approaches will be integrated with wavelet analysis
to develop integrated diagnostic and prognostic computational intelligence.
•Different failure modes of left generator shafts in UH-60 will be
identified and failure conditions will be used to predict the remaining
useful life of the system.
•Develop innovative computational
intelligence for diagnostic and
prognostic applications of complex
systems such as helicopters.
•The computational intelligence
developed can be used to accurately
diagnose the failure conditions of
the complex systems and predict
the remaining useful life or operation
of the systems.
•The developed diagnostic and
prognostic computational intelligence
will be tested and validated with the
data collected by Goodrich’s IMDHUMS units that are currently used in
US Army’s helicopters.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
•Diagnostic and prognostic algorithms are currently
being developed and tested for different
helicopters.
• The developed algorithms will be eventually
integrated into the Goodrich’s IMD-HUMs for
different military and commercial applications.
Invention and Applications of ImmersiveTouch™, a High-Performance
Haptic Augmented Virtual Reality System
Investigator: Pat Banerjee, MIE, CS and BioE Departments
Prime Grant Support: NIST-ATP
Problem Statement and Motivation
High-performance interface
enables development of
medical, engineering or
scientific virtual reality
simulation and training
applications that appeal to many
stimuli: audio, visual, tactile and
kinesthetic.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
Technical Approach
•First system that integrates a
haptic device, a head and hand
tracking system, a cost-effective
high-resolution and high-pixeldensity stereoscopic display
•Patent application by University
of Illinois
• Depending upon future
popularity, the invention can be as
fundamental as a microscope
•Continue adding technical
capabilities to enhance the
usefulness of the device
53
Computational Protein Topographics for Health Improvement
Jie Liang, Ph.D. Bioengineering
Prime Grant Support: National Science Foundation Career Award, National Institutes of Health R01,
Office of Naval Research, and the Whitaker Foundation.
Protein surface matching
Problem Statement and Motivation
• The structure of proteins provide rich information about
how cells work. With the success of structural genomics,
soon we will have all human proteins mapped to
structures.
• However, we need to develop computational tools to
extract information from these structures to understand
how cell works and how new diseases can be treated.
Evolution of
function
•Therefore, the development of computational tools for
surface matching and for function prediction will open the
door for many new development for health improvement.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
Technical Approach
• We use geometric models and fast algorithm to
characterize surface properties of over thirty protein
structures.
• We have developed a web server CASTP (cast.engr.
uic.edu) that identify and measures protein surfaces. It
has been used by thousands of scientists world wide.
• We develop evolutionary models to understand how
proteins overall evolve to acquire different functions
using different combination of surface textures.
• We have built a protein surface library for >10,000
proteins, and have developed models to characterize
cross reactivities of enzymes.
• Efficient search methods and statistical models allow us
to identify very similar surfaces on totally different
proteins
• We also developed methods for designing phage library
for discovery of peptide drugs.
• Probablistc models and sampling techniques help us to
understand how protein works to perform their functions.
• We have developed methods for predicting structures
of beta-barrel membrane proteins.
• Future: Understand how protein fold and assemble, and
designing method for engineering better proteins and
drugs.
Structural Bioinformatics Study of Protein Interaction Network
Investigators: Hui Lu, Bioengineering
Prime Grant Support: NIH, DOL
Protein-DNA complex:
gene regulation
DNA repair
cancer treatment
drug design
gene therapy
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Protein interacts with other biomolecules to perform a
function: DNA/RNA, ligands, drugs, membranes, and other
proteins.
• A high accuracy prediction of the protein interaction
network will provide a global understanding of gene
regulation, protein function annotation, and the signaling
process.
• The understanding and computation of protein-ligand
binding have direct impact on drug design.
Technical Approach
• Data mining protein structures
• Molecular Dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations
• Machine learning
• Phylogenetic analysis of interaction networks
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Developed the DNA binding protein and binding site
prediction protocols that have the best accuracy
available.
• Developed transcription factor binding site prediction.
• Gene expression data analysis using clustering
• Developed the only protocol that predicts the protein
membrane binding behavior.
• Binding affinity calculation using statistical physics
• Will work on drug design based on structural binding.
• Will work on the signaling protein binding mechanism.
• Will build complete protein-DNA interaction prediction
package and a Web server.
54
Biological Signal Detection for Protein Function Prediction
Sequences
Investigators: Yang Dai
Prime Grant Support: NSF
Text File of
Protein
description
Problem Statement and Motivation
Coding
Coding
Vectors
Vectors
MASVQLY ... …HKEPGV
• High-throughput experiments generate new protein
sequences with unknown function prediction
•In silico protein function prediction is in need
Machine Learner
specific subcellular
and subnuclear localization
•Protein subcellular localization is a key element in
understanding function
•Such a prediction can be made based on protein
sequences with machine learners
•Feature extraction and scalability of learner are keys.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
Technical Approach
• Use Fast Fourier Transform to capture long range
correlation in protein sequence
• Design a class of new kernels to capture subtle
similarity between sequences
•Use domains and motifs of proteins as coding vectors
•Use multi-classification system based on deterministic
machine learning approach, such as support vector
machine
• Use Bayesian probabilistic model
•Developed highly sophisticated sequence coding
methods
•Developed an integrated multi-classification system for
protein subcellular localization
•Developed a preliminary multi-classification system for
subnuclear localization
• Will incorporate various knowledge from other
databases into the current framework
• Will design an integrative system for protein function
prediction based on information of protein localizations,
gene expression, and protein-protein interactions
Control software for manufacturing plants
Principal Investigator: Ugo Buy---Support: NIST
GUI
Constraints
SFCs
Problem Statement and Motivation
Plant
spec
• Control programs are hard to write and
maintain
Translator
TPNs
• Flexible manufacturing demands rapid
reconfiguration
Supervisor
generator
Refined
TPNs
Code
generator
• Possibility of deadlock, mutex violations,
deadline violations
Control code
Technical Approach
55
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Avoid verification complexity with supervisory
control
• System for enforcing deadlines on transition
firing in time Petri nets
• Petri nets vs. finite state automata
• Framework for compositional control
• Synthesis of deadline-enforcing supervisors
using net unfolding
• Integration of methods for enforcing mutual
exclusion and freedom from deadlock
• Compositional methods (e.g., hierarchical
control)
• Generation of target code
NSF ITR Collaborative Research: Context Aware Computing with
Applications to Public Health Management
Isabel F. Cruz, Ouri Wolfson (Computer Science) and Aris Ouksel (Information and Decision Sciences).
In collaboration with Roberto Tamassia (Brown U.) and Peter Scheuermann (Northwestern U.)
Problem Statement and Motivation
biological and
chemical sensors
service
layer
web services, on-line
libraries, emergency info
CASSIS
application
layer
3
6
7
8
7
8
city maps, floor
plans of buildings
database
layer
user
layer
police
profile
db
hospital,
clinic
police
station
Application
Server
5
2
environmental db
(hospital states,
sensor states, etc.)
• Architecture of a new system, CASSIS, to provide
comprehensive support for context-aware applications in the
Health Domain as provided by the Alliance of Chicago
4
Context and
Profile
Manager
1
on-line cameras with
recording device
GIS data
fire
house
firemen
profile
db
aggregated
user profiles
healthcare
profile
db
subway
control
center
• Testing on operational scenarios of public health
management applications:
FBI
profile
db
• Daily operations of health care providers
dy
na
e. mic
g.
GP in fo
S
police
officer
fireman
• Epidemic occurrences (e.g., meningitis)
doctor
travelling
businessman
Technical Approach
• Crisis situations (e.g., terrorist attacks, natural
disasters)
Key Achievements
• Peer to Peer Semantic Integration of XML and RDF Data
Sources [Cruz, Xiao, Hsu, AP2PC 2004]
• Peer-to-peer and mediated semantic data integration
• Dynamic data as collected by sensor networks
• Matching of user profiles to services
• Competitive environment management
• Security and privacy
• Performance and scalability (e.g., caching and data
aggregation)
• Opportunistic Resource Exchange in Inter-Vehicle Ad-Hoc
Networks (Best paper award) [Xu, Ouksel, Wolfson, MDM 2004,
Best Paper Award]
• An Economic Model for Resource Exchange in Mobile Peer-toPeer Networks [Wolfson, Xu, Sistla, SSDBM, 2004].
• Multicast Authentication in Fully Adversarial Networks
[Lysyanskaya, Tamassia, Triandopoulos, IEEE Security and
Privacy, 2004]
• Personal Service Areas for Location-Based Wireless Web
Applications [Pashtan, Heusser, Scheuermann, IEEE Internet
Computing, 2004]
Collaborative Research: Information Integration for Locating and
Querying Geospatial Data
Lead PI: Isabel F. Cruz (Computer Science). In collaboration with Nancy Wiegand (U. Wisconsin-Madison)
Prime Grant Support: NSF
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Geospatial data are complex and highly
heterogeneous, having been developed independently
by various levels of government and the private sector
• Portals created by the geospatial community
disseminate data but lack the capability to support
complex queries on heterogeneous data
• Complex queries on heterogeneous data will support
information discovery, decision, or emergency response
Technical Approach
• Data integration using ontologies
• Ontology representation
• Algorithms for the alignment and merging of ontologies
• Semantic operators and indexing for geospatial queries
• User interfaces for
• Ontology alignment
• Display of geospatial data
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Create a geospatial cyberinfrastructure for the web to
• Automatically locate data
• Match data semantically to other relevant data
sources using automatic methods
• Provide an environment for exploring, and querying
heterogeneous data for emergency managers and
government officials
• Develop a robust and scalable framework that
encompasses techniques and algorithms for integrating
heterogeneous data sources using an ontology-based
approach
56
Metasearch Engines for e-commerce
Clement Yu, Department of Computer Science
National Science Foundation
Problem Statement and Motivation
‰ Many companies sell the same type of products ( eg
computers) or services ( eg. life insurance) via the Web.
Looking for the best product or service (eg lowest
price and meeting specifications) requires excessive
checking of many Web search engines.
‰
ƒThis imposes too much burden on a user.
The aim is to allow a user seeking a product or a
service to submit a single query and to receive the
results ranked in descending order of desirability.
‰
Technical Approach
Key Achievements and Future Goals
Companies selling products or services via the Web
have different user interfaces.
‰ Most steps in the construction of the integrated user
interface have been automated.
‰
Create an user interface that integrates the features of ‰ The same technique can be applied in other areas
each individual user interface and organize them such
(e.g. construct generalized forms):
that the integrated interface is easily understood.
ƒ For selling a car online multiple forms need to be filled in
‰ A user query submitted against the integrated
ƒ Create a generalized form applicable to multiple sellers.
interface is translated into subqueries against individual
‰ Preliminary results have also been obtained to
interfaces.
determine the proper search engines to invoke for each
‰ It is possible to determine for each user query, which
given user query.
search engines should be invoked:
‰ Will produce metasearch engines for various
ƒbased on the previously processed queries
products and services.
‰
Applications of Formal Methods
Lenore Zuck, CS
Support from NSF, ONR, and SRC
Problem Statement and Motivation
•Translation Validation
•Backward Compatibility of successive
generations of software
•Formal proofs that optimizing compilers
maintain semantics of programs
•Termination proofs of Pointer programs
•Property Verification of parameterized systems (bus
protocols, cache coherence, &c)
Technical Approach
• Translation validation verifies each go of the system.
Verification conditions that are automatically created are
send to theorem provers
• Combination of model checking and deductive methods
allows to push the envelope of automatic verification of
infinite-state systems (for both pointer programs and
protocols)
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Based on methodology developed, Intel is using
MicroFomal to verify backward compatibility of
micropgrams (between RISC & CISC)
•(Need to develop better methodologies to prove
theories that have bit vectors)
• IIV is a new tool that allows automatic verification of
safety properties of parameterized systems (nothing bad
will ever happen)
• Researchers at MSR have expressed interest to
integrate pointer analysis in their verification tool
57
Communications Scheme For Gaussian Channels with noisy feedback
Investigators: Stefano Rini and Daniela Tuninetti, ECE
Primary Grant Support: Rotary Club Milano Sempione (Italy)
Problem Statement and Motivation
Decoder side
Noise
Noise
Etc Etc…
DATA
DATA11
FEEDBACK
FEEDBACK11
DATA 2
Noise
FEEDBACK
FEEDBACK12
Noise
Etc Etc…
time passing
Encoder side
Technical Approach
• Several schemes for single source-destination systems with noisy feedback
have been proposed, but their optimality has not been proved yet. We are
currently investigating schemes whose performance can be easily
characterized though recursive equations.
• We focus on two strategies: the decoder either sends back a linear
combination of the received signals, or a tentative decision on the transmitted
message based on the received signals. Combination of these two strategies
are also possible.
• We aim at characterizing the evolution of the message reliability at the
decoder as the number of communication rounds increases.
• In today’s communication systems the problem of noisy forward
communication with noisy feedback arises frequently, in particular in
cooperative wireless networks.
• Feedback greatly simplifies the complexity of coding schemes and can
increase the capacity region of multi-user channels. Feedback also
enables cooperation among users.
• The case of noiseless feedback has been widely studied for a great
variety of channel models.
• How to optimally utilize noisy feedback is the topic of this investigation.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• We have been able to characterize the performance of some
suboptimal schemes and compare their performances.
• We currently investigating the asymptotical optimality of these
schemes.
• We plan to extend our results to multi-terminal wireless networks.
Brief Bibliography:
K. Yamamoto, H. Itoh
Asymptotic performance of a modified Schalkwijk-Barron scheme for channels with
noiseless feedback.
A. Lapidoth Y. H. Kim and T. Weissman.
The Gaussian channel with noisy feedback.
Teaching Sensorimotor Skills with Haptics
Investigators: Miloš Žefran, ECE; Matteo Corno, ECE; Maxim Kolesnikov, ECE
Prime Grant Support: NSF; UIC College of Dentistry
Problem Statement and Motivation
• New surgical procedures are introduced at a high rate.
Each requires costly training.
• Haptic simulators provide a cost-effective alternative
to traditional training: no need to travel, 24/7 availability,
easy to create additional units as needed.
• Existing paradigm for haptics is not suitable for
teaching sensorimotor skills. Lack of good models and
of realistic haptic rendering are main obstacles to
creating useful simulators.
Technical Approach
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Position and force information are simultaneously
displayed to facilitate motor skill acquisition. The user is
modeled as a three-input, single-output system.
• Developed a new paradigm for teaching of
sensorimotor skills with haptics.
• The model of the human enables stability analysis
through the Lyapunov second method; traditional
passivity techniques can not be used. Time delays are
critical for stability and are explicitly modeled.
• The Euclidean group SE(3) used to develop haptic
rendering algorithms that properly account for
translations and rotations. Kinetic energy provides an
intrinsic way to define the penetration which is in turn
used to compute the reaction force.
• Proposed a new model for a user responding to haptic
and visual stimuli. The model experimentally verified.
• Stability analysis of the system performed. Stability
boundaries explicitly identified.
• Implemented a new method for haptic rendering.
• Future work: applications in medical training, rehabilitation; faster implementation of the haptic rendering;
implementation on cheap haptic displays; extensions of
the new paradigm for collaborative haptics.
58
Multi-Scale Simulations of Flames and Multiphase Flow
Suresh K. Aggarwal, Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
Sponsors: NASA, NSF, Argonne National Laboratory
40
Y, mm
30
20
10
0
-10
-5
0
X, mm
5
10
-3 -1
-3
Heat-release, kJm s *10
(b)
1 5 10 15 20 50 75
The image on the left shows a
comparison of simulated and measured
triple flames that are important in
practical combustion systems, while the
five images on the right depict a
simulated flame propagating downward
in a combustible mixture.
• Application of the advanced computational
fluid dynamics (CFD) methods using detailed
chemistry and transport models
• Simulation of flame structure, extinction and
fire suppression
• Multi-scale modeling of combustion and twophase phenomena
• Extensive use of computer graphics and
animation
1) “A Numerical Investigation of Particle Deposition
on a Square Cylinder Placed in a Channel Flow,"
Aerosol Sci. Technol. 34: 340, 2001.
2) “On Extension of Heat Line and Mass Line
Concepts to Reacting Flows Through Use of
Conserved Scalars," J. Heat Transfer 124: 791, 2002.
3) “A Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Droplet
Evaporation," Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer 46: 3179,
2003.
4) “Gravity, Radiation and Coflow Effects on Partiall
Premixed Flames,” Physics of Fluids 16: 2963, 2004.
Computational Tools for Population Biology
Tanya Berger-Wolf, Computer Science, UIC; Daniel Rubenstein, Ecology and
Evolutionary Biology, Princeton; Jared Saia, Computer Science, U New Mexico
Supported by NSF
Problem Statement and Motivation
Of the three existing species of zebra, one, the Grevy's zebra, is
endangered while another, the plains zebra, is extremely
abundant. The two species are similar in almost all but one key
characteristic: their social organization.
Finding patterns of social interaction within a population has
applications from epidemiology and marketing to conservation
biology and behavioral ecology. One of the intrinsic
characteristics of societies is their continual change. Yet, there
are few analysis methods that are explicitly dynamic.
Zebra with a
sensor collar
A snapshot of zebra population and the
corresponding abstract representation
Technical Approach
• Collect explicitly dynamic social data: sensor collars on animals,
disease logs, synthetic population simulations, cellphone and
email communications
• Represent a time series of observation snapshots as a layered
graph. Questions about persistence and strength of social
connections and about criticality of individuals and times can be
answered using standard and novel graph connectivity algorithms
• Validate theoretical predictions derived from the abstract graph
representation by simulations on collected data and controlled
experiments on real populations
59
Our goal is to develop a novel conceptual and computational
framework to accurately describe the social context of an
individual at time scales matching changes in individual and
group activity.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• A formal computational framework for analysis of dynamic
social interactions
• Valid and tested computational criteria for identifying
• Individuals critical for spreading processes in a population
• Times of social and behavioral transition
• Implicit communities of individuals
• Preliminary results on Grevy’s zebra and wild donkeys data
show that addressing dynamics of the population produces
more accurate conclusions
• Extend and test our framework and computational tools to
other problems and other data
Performance Optimization and Thermal Management of
Memory Systems
Memory
Temperature
Investigators: Zhichun Zhu, ECE
Prime Grant Support: NSF
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Multi-core processors have become mainstream
Tshutdown
• Memory systems must be able to handle so many
threads simultaneously
Tcritical
Thermal Zone 3
Ttm
Thermal Zone 2
• Memory access scheduling will play a critical role in
overall performance
Thermal Zone 1
• With increasing memory traffic, memory thermal
emergency becomes an important issue
Time
Key Achievements and Future Goals
Technical Approach
• Processor-memory cooperation to maximize memory
bandwidth efficiency
• Active feedback from memory controller to adjust
multithreaded execution
• Thread co-scheduling to smooth out memory access
phases
• Thread-aware memory scheduling for SMT processors
• New approaches to optimize multi-core processor
performance
• New memory thermal management schemes
• Memory thermal models and simulators
• Adaptive core gating and coordinated dynamic voltage/
frequency scaling to meet memory thermal limits
Intelligent Traveler Assistant (ITA)
Investigators: John Dillenburg, Pete Nelson, Ouri Wolfson, CS Department
Prime Grant Support: NSF, Chicago Area Transportation Study, Illinois Department of Transportation
Problem Statement and Motivation
G lo b a l P o s i t i o n i n g
S y s te m
Tra nsi t
Internet
T r a ve l
A s s i ta n t
R id e S ha re
P a r tn e r s
T ra ve l
A s s i ta nt
• Congestion costs
U.S. economy over
$100 billion/year
• Vehicle occupancy
has dropped 7% in
last two decades
V MT (1980=100)
180
170
160
Index 1980 = 100
T r a ve l
A s s i ta nt
T r a v e le r s
US Highw ay Miles
• Vehicles increase,
roads do not
150
140
130
120
110
100
1980
1985
1990
1997
Ye ar
C e n tr a l T r a v e l
In fo rm a ti o n C o m p u te r
Technical Approach
• We envision a convenient mobile device capable of
planning multimulti-modal (car, bus, train, ferry, taxi, etc.) travel
itineraries for its user
• The devices communicate with each other and with a
central database of travel information via a peerpeer-toto-peer adadhoc network
• Trips with other users could be shared via dynamic ride
sharing
• Fares and payment are negotiated electronically
• Traffic prediction is used to determine the best route
• Persistent location management is used to track device
locations
• Trajectory management is used to predict the future
location of a device for planning purposes
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Partnered with Regional Transportation Authority on multimultimodal trip planner system project sponsored by FTA
• Prime developer of Gateway traveler information system
sponsored by IDOT
• Prime developer of Ride Match System 21 car and van
pooling system sponsored by CATS
• Realistic, full scale micro simulation of ITA system
• Test bed deployment for Chicago metro area
60
Location-Specific Query Processing in Two-Layer Networks
Composed of Mobile Objects and Sensor Nodes
Investigators: Sol Shatz, Computer Science Department
Problem Statement and Motivation
• There is a lack of research on the problem of query
processing for mobile base stations operating in the
context of sensor networks, especially for sensors that
are accepted to be “location-ignorant.” .
• Therefore, we propose a query processing approach
that is based on the “Pull” query model and designed for
such two-layer networks, including the mobile-object
network layer and the sensor network layer
Technical Approach
• Design an “end-to-end” approach, covering the key
phases of query processing: Query Generation, Query
Distribution, Query Analysis, Query Injection, and QueryResult Routing
• Emphasize cooperation among mobile base stations,
which are connected with peer-to-peer network
• Adopt Query-triggered wake-up scheme
• Based on “Pull” query model
• Develop an effective method to estimate the accuracy
of query results
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Achieve an efficient balance between mobile-object
routing and sensor routing
• Location-awareness of mobile objects are used to
effectively offset the constraints associated with sensor
nodes.
• Future research will focus on simulation analysis of the
basic approach and extension of the approach to
efficiently manage multiple query results that arise due to
multiple objects injecting a common query
MURI: Adaptive waveform design for full spectral dominance
Investigators: Arye Nehorai (P.I.) and Danilo Erricolo, ECE
Co-P.I.’s with Arizona State University, Harvard University, Princeton University,
Purdue University, University of Maryland, University of Melbourne, and Raytheon
Prime Grant Support: AFOSR
Problem Statement and Motivation
Block diagram of adaptive waveform design.
Technical Approach
• Developing waveform design methods that
exploit both existing and new forms of diversities.
• Modeling the environment and channel to extract
the attributes needed to adaptively choose the
optimal waveforms.
• Optimizing the choice of the waveform by
introducing cost functions adapted to the channel
and/or environment.
• Verifying the applicability of our results by testing
and implementing the new waveform designs in
complex realistic environments using an anechoic
chamber and radar tower test-bed facilities.
61
• The current state of the channel spectral occupancy can
have a profound effect on the choice of waveform to
achieve optimal communication and sensing performance.
• Transmitted waveforms not optimally matched to the
operational scenario, may severely limit the performance.
• Recent advances in information processing and related
hardware have opened the way to exploit characteristics of
the transmitted waveforms that will have tremendous
impact on the performance of communication and sensing
systems.
Future Goals
• Develop unifying perspectives on waveform
design and diversity that cross-cut both sensing and
communication applications.
• Ensure the best ideas for waveform design in
communications are appropriately manifested in
sensing and vice versa.
• Demonstrate the potential of waveform scheduling
and diversity enabled by recent technological
advances, such as agile software-driven digital
modulators, through experiments with real data.
Activity-Based Microsimulation Model of Travel Demand
Kouros Mohammadian, PhD, S. Yagi, J. Auld, and T.H. Rashidi (PhD Candidates), CME, UIC
Source of Funding: NIPC/CMAP, FACID, and IGERT (NSF)
Synthetic
Population
Activity
Generation Model
Synthetic City
Problem Statement and Motivation
•Traditional four step travel demand models are widely
criticized for their limitations and theoretical deficiencies
Activity
Scheduling Model
ADS/HTS
Surveys
Synthesized
Population
Policy
scenarios
Activity-Based Modeling
Activity/Travel
Microsimulation
•These problems lead the model to be less policy
sensitive than desired
Executed Schedules
•Travel is derived from participation in activities. This fact
is not accounted for in 4-step models. Therefore, there is
a need for a better modeling approach
Activities/
Tours/Trips
Travel Demand
Highway/Transit
Network Assignment
•An activity-based microsimulation travel demand model is
considered that simulates activity schedules for all
individuals
Policy
Analysis
Vehicle/Fuel
Condition
Emission Model
Key Achievements and Future Goals
Technical Approach
•The modeling framework utilizes both econometric and
heuristic (rule-based) approaches
•A comprehensive multi-tier activity-based
microsimulation modeling system is developed.
•A new population synthesizer is developed.
•Activity scheduling/rescheduling decision rules are
developed and applied to adjust the simulated daily
activity patterns.
•Intra-household interaction rules are developed and
applied to account for joint activity generation and
household maintenance activity allocation problems.
•Transferability of activity scheduling/rescheduling
decision rules across different spatial and temporal
contexts are evaluated.
•The microsimulation model is applied to evaluate future
transportation policy scenarios.
•All human activities are related to broad project categories
which have a common goal (e.g., Work, School,
Entertainment, etc.) and tasks and activity episodes that are
required to reach that goal are modeled
•Activity participation is modeled at household/individual level
(microsimulation)
•Explicit representation of time/space of occurrence for all
travel episodes, linked to associated activities
•Activity scheduling model is linked to a population
synthesizer, rescheduling and resource allocation models, and
a regional network microsimulation and emission models
LambdaTable
Investigators: Jason Leigh, Andrew Johnson, Luc Renambot, Thomas A. DeFanti, Computer Science
Primary Grant Support: National Science Foundation
Problem Statement and Motivation
Technical Approach
•
The LambdaTable is a 24-Megapixel table-oriented
LCD display (12x high-definition video resolution) built
from a tiling of 4 Megapixel LCD panels and a cluster of
PCs interconnected by a high speed network switch.
•
Table-oriented displays provide an intuitive way for users to
examine and manipulate complex information.
•
Current commercially available systems have at most highdefinition resolution (1920x1080) and therefore are not
suitable for many real-world applications such as viewing of
high resolution maps, satellite and aerial photos, and
microscopy images. Also these systems use projectors
which require the room lights to be dimmed to be able to see
the visuals.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
•
LambdaTable has been successfully demonstrated at the
Supercomputing and Communication conference in 2007.
•
Applications in bioscience and geoscience have been
developed to demonstrate the inherent benefits of working
on an ultra-high-resolution table. NSF Program Manager
Tom Wagner called the LambdaTable the most innovative
use of IT for visualizing geoscience data he has ever
seen.
•
An array of infra-red cameras mounted above the
display tracks passive “pucks” that are used to interact
with the computer graphics displayed on the table.
•
The middleware is scalable to enable tables of any
dimension and configuration to be constructed.
•
The Science Museum of Minnesota and Adler Planetarium
are working with with us to build their own tables.
•
Software has been developed to enable a broad range
of applications to be developed for the table.
•
For more information:
http://www.evl.uic.edu/core.php?mod=4&type=3&indi=331
62
Modeling Conflict Control in Multi-Agent Systems
Investigators: Sol M. Shatz, Department of Computer Science
Primary Grant Support: U.S Army Research Office
Problem Statement and Motivation
• In a Multi-Agent System (MAS), multiple agents may work
together to perform tasks or solve problems. Conflicts may
occur in the runtime when multiple agents compete for
external resources.
• How can we design a multi-agent system, where these
conflicts can be avoided or resolved promptly?
• State-of-the art Approaches:
¾Static avoidance approach: little design flexibility.
¾Negotiation approach: low efficiency.
Technical Approach
Dynamic Avoidance Approach
• Distinguish the presentation of potential conflicts
and real conflicts in the modeling stage by extending
Colored Petri Net (CPN) to Potential Colored Petri
Net (PCPN).
• Component based modeling.
¾Model each agent independently as a
PCPN model.
¾Create a coordinator (a CPN model) to
coordinate the inter-agent resource sharing.
¾Concatenate local agent plans with a
coordinator to generate the MAS model (a
CPN model).
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Key Achievements
• Design flexibility: each agent can be independently
designed.
• Model resource coordination via a special coordinator
component.
• Exploit Petri net techniques and tools for model analysis.
• Future Goals
• Design a set of intelligent coordinators.
• Model real-time systems.
Protocols of Gaussian Fading Channel
Investigators: Yang Weng and Daniela Tuninetti, ECE;
Prime Grant Support: NSF CAREER 0643954
Problem Statement and Motivation
• In wireless peer-to-peer networks, the signal received
by mobile users experience wide fluctuations due to
fading and interference.
• Orthogonalization techniques, such as TDMA, although
leading to simple network architectures, can be very
suboptimal in terms of achievable rates.
• We propose communication strategies that improve
network throughout over TDMA, especially at low SNR.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
Technical Approach
• The received signal for user u is
where
is the additive Gaussian noise,
channel gain, and
are the inputs.
is the
• Our goal is to maximize the sum of the achievable rates,
or throughput, in the following two settings:
¾Ergodic capacity: perfect channel knowledge at the
transmitters and mild delay constraints.
¾Outage capacity: unknown channel knowledge at the
transmitters and strict delay constraints
63
• Recently we determined a closed-form expression for
the sum-rate of a two-user unfaded channels.
• We are extending the result to fading channels. We
design power control strategies that improve the sumrate, especially at low SNR.
• We plan to extend our results to large networks.
Brief Bibliography:
Y. Weng, D. Tuninetti
On Gaussian Interference Channels wth mixed interference, ITA 2008, San Diego,
CA, Jan 2008.
Optimization Models for Dynamic Pricing and Inventory
Control under Uncertainty and Competition
Investigator: Elodie Adida, Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
Problem Statement and Motivation
• A small improvement in pricing and revenue management
strategy may yield significant profits.
• What are the optimal prices and production levels over
time? How to allocate capacity among multiple products?
• What is the impact of demand uncertainty?
• What is the impact of competition? Can we predict the
state of equilibrium?
• Is there a realistic and yet computationally tractable way
to model the dynamic problem?
Technical Approach
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Modeling the optimal decision-making problem as a
nonlinear, constrained, dynamic program
• Heuristic algorithm to determine the optimal pricing and
allocation of available production capacity among products
• Robust optimization technique incorporates the presence
of uncertainty with limited probabilistic information
• Under data uncertainty, equivalent robust formulation is of
the same order of complexity; involves safety stock levels
• Dynamic aspect with feedback (closed-loop) or without
feedback (open-loop)
• In a duopoly with uncertain demand, a relaxation algorithm
converges to a particular unique Nash equilibrium
• Game theoretical framework and determination of Nash
equilibria encompasses competitors’ interactions
• A good trade-off between performance (closed-loop) and
tractability (open-loop) is to let controls be linearly
dependent with the uncertain data realizations
• Price of anarchy: loss of efficiency due to competition in
the system
• Design of incentives (such as a contract) to reduce the loss
of efficiency when suppliers compete on prices.
Travel Data Simulation and Transferability of Household
Travel Survey Data
Kouros Mohammadian, PhD and Yongping Zhang (PhD Candidate), CME, UIC
Prime Grant Support: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA)
Problem Statement and Motivation
•Household travel data is critical to transportation planning
and modeling
• Surveys are expensive tools
• Emerging modeling techniques (e.g., microsimulation)
need much richer datasets that do not exist in most
metropolitan areas
• Transferring or simulating data seems to be an attractive
solution
Technical Approach
•Considered a large set of socio-demographic, built
environment, and transportation system variables to identify
clusters of households with homogeneous travel behavior
•Transferred cluster membership rules and cluster-based
travel attributes to local areas
•Calibrated/Validated travel data transferability model
•Synthesized population for 5 counties of New York City with
all their attributes
•Updated parameters of the transferability model using a small
local sample and Bayesian updating
•Simulated travel attributes for the synthetic population
Key Achievements and Future Goals
•A new travel forecasting modeling approach is designed
and validated
•The new approach significantly improves the process of
travel demand forecasting
•Using synthetically derived data found to be appealing
•The appeal of the approach lies in its low-cost, relative
ease of use, and freely available sources of required
data
•Improved Bayesian updating and small area estimation
techniques for non-normal data
•Improved travel data simulation techniques
•Used synthesized and transferred data for model
calibration and validation.
•Validated the simulated data against actual observed data
64
Dynamic Scheduling Process Model:
Model Framework and Data Collection
Investigators: Kouros Mohammadian and Joshua Auld, CME
Primary Grant Support: CTS IGERT, NSF
Problem Statement and Motivation
•Congestion, environmental effects and other negative
impacts of transportation system are growing
• Mitigation needs no longer met with construction alone
•New solutions are generally behavioral in nature –
TDM strategies, congestion pricing, etc.
• New generation of models which replicate decision
making behavior of travel needed to evaluate next
generation mitigation strategies
Key Achievements and Future Goals
Technical Approach
• Develop activity based microsimulation model of travel
behavior which directly simulates decision making
process.
• The framework will relax the fixed order assumption in
activity planning inherent in other activity-based models
•Incorporate learning behavior and group interactions
into decision making
•First of its kind long term planning dataset collected
through GPS will be used to develop learning and
planning models
• The decision making model is based on decision
planning which will be observed in long-term GPS-based
travel demand survey.
•In the future, the model should incorporate a traffic
simulation module directly in the travel microsimulation
•Internet-based survey will be used to track participants
movements and gain insight into activity planning
•In the linked activity planning and traffic simulation
model, route learning models should be used for
individual route choices
Towards Lifelike Computer Interfaces that Learn
Investigators: Jason Leigh, Andrew Johnson, Luc Renambot, Thomas A. DeFanti, Computer Science;
Steve Jones, Communication
Primary Grant Support: National Science Foundation
Problem Statement and Motivation
Technical Approach
•
This project co-funds the University of Central Florida to
develop the Artificial Intelligence for the avatar.
•
UIC is primarily developing the Responsive Avatar
Engine that will take input from speech as well as a live
camera feed, to produce a lifelike avatar that can speak
back to the user about a topic in a limited domain,
gesture naturally using motion-captured data, and
maintain proper eye contact.
•
65
•
The need for ultra-realistic computer-generated characters
(known as avatars) is growing rapidly as the general public
embraces online social environments such as SecondLife,
World of Warcraft, and Facebook.
•
Avatars alone are not enough. Autonomous avatars must be
“aware” of the presence of other users and be able to interact
with them intelligently and naturally.
•
Once developed these avatars can be used not only to
populate social virtual spaces and games, but also to create
virtual training environments such as emergency response
simulations or doctor/patient interaction scenarios.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
•
A production pipeline that allows us to quickly
create a lifelike digital human character using
image and motion-capture data.
•
A responsive avatar engine that will parse speech
input from a user and respond with synthesized
speech and gestures.
•
Future goals are to: increase realism, provide
ways for avatars to be “aware” of the presence of
users, and reaction reasonably, and to apply the
technique to a variety of application areas- such
as informal learning environments, training
simulations or gaming environments.
•
For more information: projectlifelike.org
Studies will also be conducted to understand which
aspects of an avatar (visual or auditory) contribute to
making the avatar a believable character. Believability is
important to ensure acceptance by the user.
Using Node Mobility to Enhance Greedy Forwarding in
Geographic Routing for Mobile Ad Hoc Networks
Investigators: Sol M. Shatz, Department of Computer Science,
Primary Grant Support: U. S. Army Research Office
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Node mobility is normally considered a hazard for
geographic routing, causing a degradation of performance or
even persistent routing failures.
• This research seeks to exploit mobility to enhance greedy
forwarding in geographic routing, especially for those
applications with loose delay constraints.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
Technical Approach
• Two ways to move a packet: (1) Transmission Hops (TH),
and (2) Physical Motion (PM).
• Trade-offs: TH produces short delay, however it incurs
significant resource consumption and is vulnerable to localmaximum problems. Use both TH and PM to optimize packet
routing.
• Motion Potential: Combines node mobility attributes with
node position information as a metric to be used in selecting a
next-hop node.
• Our method can enhance routing performance in terms of
route hop-count (energy) and packet delivery rate, especially
under the scenarios of low network density and high node
mobility.
• Uses low computation overhead at each step of forwarding,
maintaining the pure localized decision making of
conventional geographic routing.
• Future research would focus on: (1) energy-delay trade-off
study; (2) long-term mobility pattern predication accuracy.
• New approach called Mobility-based Adaptive Greedy
Forwarding (MAGF)
A Coordination Mechanism for Mobile Devices to Gather
and Share Common-Interest Sensor Data
Investigators: Sol M. Shatz, Department of Computer Science,
Primary Grant Support: U. S. Army Research Office
Problem Statement and Motivation
•Introducing mobile devices into wireless sensor network has
attracted significant attention. However, one fundamental
problem that has not yet been well investigated is how to
effectively coordinate mobile device applications specifically
intended to gather and share sensor data.
•We propose a group-based coordination mechanism for this
context to efficiently exploit potential cooperative behaviors
among multiple mobile devices.
Technical Approach
•Dynamically grouping of mobile devices according to their
subscribed interests (represented by queries targeting certain
sensor nodes).
Key Achievements and Future Goals
•Inter-group cooperation: a device shares common-interest
sensor data directly with other devices that are interested in
this same data.
• This research is especially challenging, but of significant
value, in the context of applications that impose high-volume
data-retrieval requests. It is useful to explore how query
overlaps and query correlations can coordinate sensor-data
requests in a way that avoids unnecessary interactions with
sensors, thus conserving sensor-node energy consumption.
•Intra-group cooperation: a device sends data that it happens
to know about, but is not currently interested in itself, to other
devices that have expressed an interest in this data.
•Future research will focus on: (1) processing long-running
“stream” queries; and (2) formally explore the pay-gain
principle.
•The core theory of “You Gain, You Pay” can help
significantly enforce continuous cooperation.
66
Opinion Retrieval
Clement Yu, Department of Computer Science
Problem statement and Motivation
• Given a collection of documents and a query, the
proposed system finds documents which are relevant to
the query and are opinionated
• The proposed system can advise consumers about
the sentiments of a given product or service. It can
suggest hints for advertisements
• The system can also analyze political opinions as well
as comparing the political viewpoints of different parties
Technical approach
• Accurate retrieval by identifying concepts in queries
and documents
• Identify opinionated features by Chi-square test
• Utilize Support Vector Machine to classify sentences
• Determine whether opinions are relevant to a given
query topic
Key achievements and future goal
• Achieve the highest effectiveness scores for title
queries in the Blog Track of TREC (Text REtrieval
Conference) in 2006 and 2007. The tasks include
retrieving relevant opinionated documents as well as
classify them into positive, negative or mixed categories
• Plan to build various systems to have higher
effectiveness, higher efficiency and satisfy different
needs
• Determine if an opinion is positive, negative or mixed
(positive and negative)
DoD/AFOSR
DoD/AFOSR MURI FA9550FA9550-0505-1-0443
Adaptive Waveform Design for Full Spectral Dominance
Co-PI: Danilo Erricolo
PI: Arye Nehorai
Analytical and numerical models for EM wave propagation
Goals
Results
• Development of parametric physically-based
propagation models for electromagnetic waves to UWB propagation models
be jointly used with signal processing optimization applying the time-domain
version of the uniform theory
methods
of diffraction are accurate for
late times when waveforms
• Development of UWB propagation models
have negligible low frequency
• Propagation model for the electromagnetic field
components
that accounts for the clutter and metallic objects in
the sea
Technical approach
• Application of the Geometrical Theory of
Diffraction and of the recently developed
Incremental Theory of Diffraction to obtain
physically-based parametric models for
electromagnetic wave propagation
• Validation by comparison with other numerical
methods, such as FD-TD,
exact solutions and measurements
67
Developed fast 2D propagation
model for the scattering of EM
waves by sea surface in the
presence of clutter and metallic
objects
Validation of the ITD shows
accurate results at caustics
DoD/AFOSR
DoD/AFOSR MURI FA9550FA9550-0505-1-0443
Adaptive Waveform Design for Full Spectral Dominance
Co-PI: Danilo Erricolo
PI: Arye Nehorai
Anechoic room measurements and vector sensors
Goals
Results
• Development of vector antennas
• Collocated sensors
• Distributed sensors
• Experimental validation of adaptive
waveform design
Distributed vector sensor
Synthesized collocated vector sensor
Technical approach
• Acquisition of new instrumentation to
generate, transmit and receive adaptive
waveforms
Two-collocated loops
• Design of vector sensors
• Anechoic room experiments to measure
the performance of adaptive waveform
design
Preliminary measurements with collocated vector sensors
using CAZAC waveforms show better performance of the
synthesized vector sensor vs. linear array.
Cooperative Interference Channels
Investigators: Echo Yang and Daniela Tuninetti, ECE;
Prime Grant Support: NSF CAREER
Problem Statement and Motivation
• In wireless networks, concurrent communications
interfere with each other. Due to the broadcast nature of
the wireless media, a sender can sense the channel and
use the overhead information cooperate with other users.
• Cooperative communications allow to increase the
achievable rates of all the users without increasing the
transmit power.
• We study communication strategies that combined
ideas from relaying, broadcasting and multiaccess.
Technical Approach
• We assume that senders use the overheard information
to partially decode the information sent by the other
users.
• The transmitters then cooperatively send those data
streams that are decoded at all receivers by forming a
virtual multi antenna transmitter.
•Each transmitter that has decoded data non intended for
its receiver, uses Dirty Paper Coding to pre-code the
intended data against the interference produced by the
non-intended data.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Recently we have determined an achievable region that
combines and simplifies known achievable regions.
• We are currently studying the optimality of our
proposed scheme.
• We plan to extend our results to large networks.
Brief Bibliography:
Y. Weng, D. Tuninetti
A new achievable region for interference channels with generalized feedback, CISS
2008, Princeton, NJ, March 2008.
68
INFRASTRUCTURE AND ENERGY/ENVIRONMENTAL
TECHNOLOGY
Research projects in Infrastructure and Energy/Environmental Technology include
activities such as power electronics, energy efficient networks, carbon nanostructures,
combustion and emissions, and environmental contamination. This research thrust area is
populated by faculty from many departments, including chemical engineering, civil and
materials engineering, electrical and computer engineering, and mechanical and industrial
engineering.
For an on-line view of the quad-charts in the Infrastructure and Energy/Environmental
Technology area, visit the College of Engineering’s research web page at the following
URL:
www.engr.uic.edu/research/slides/ThrustAreas/InfraEnerEnvTech_show/
69
Studies on Fluid-Particle Systems
Raffi M. Turian, Chemical Engineering Department
Prime Grant Support: NSF, DOE, EPA, International Fine Particle Research Institute
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Prediction of Effective Properties of Suspensions from
Properties of Constituents.
• Prediction of Flow Regimes and Transition Velocities
in Slurry Transport and Design of Coal Slurry Pipelines.
• Cleaning, De-watering of Fine Coal.and Formulation of
Coal-Water Fuels (CWF).
• Design of Vitrification Processes for Nuclear Waste
Disposal.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
Technical Approach
• Measurement and Correlation of Effective Properties of
Solid-Liquid Suspensions.
• Experiments and Modeling of Flow of Highly-Loaded
Coarse-Particle Slurries through Piping Systems.
• Rheology and Flow of Concentrated Fine-Particle and
Colloidal Suspensions.
• Experiments and Modeling of Filtration and Dewatering of Fine Particulate Materials.
• Developed a Comprehensive Self-consistent Slurry
Flow-Regime Delineation Scheme.
•Established Correlations for Prediction of Effective
Properties and Friction Losses for Slurries.
• Developed Methodologies for Design of Slurry Pipelines
and Vitrification Processes.
• Developed Methods for Enhancing Dewatering, and
Formulation of CWF.
Kinetics of Combustion Related Processes
Investigator: John H. Kiefer, Department of Chemical Engineering
Prime Grant Support: U. S. Department of Energy
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Program involves use of shock tube with laser
schlieren (LS), dump tank, GC/MS analysis and
time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry as
diagnostics for exploration of reaction rates and
energy transfer processes over an extremely wide
range of T and P
• We are interested primarily in energy transfer and
the kinetics of unimolecular reactions at
combustion temperatures, in particular the
phenomena of unimolecular incubation and falloff
Technical Approach
• Measure density gradients in shock waves.
• dρ/dx directly proportional to rate of reaction
•Technique has outstanding resolution, sensitivity
and accuracy
•Allows rate measurement for faster reactions and
higher temperatures than any other technique
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Measured non-statistical (non-RRKM) reaction rates
for CF3CH3 dissociation; only such experimental study
to date
•Measured rates in very fast relaxation, incubation and
dissociation for a large number of important
combustion species
•Developed a complete chemical kinetic model for
ethane dissociation, a particularly important reaction
in combustion systems
• Estimated the heat of formation of t-butyl radical in
neopentane (C5H12) dissociation; consequently
developed a complete kinetic model
• Future work: Study toluene decomposition, falloff in
pyrolle and stilbene, extended use of our simple
method to extract energy transfer rates
70
NextNext-Generation Power Electronics
Investigator: Sudip K. Mazumder,
Mazumder, Electrical and Computer Engineering
Prime Grant Support: NSF, DOE (SECA and I&I), PNNL, CEC, NASA, Ceramatec,
Ceramatec, Airforce (award pending), TI, Altera
Problem Statement and Motivation
• To achieve reliable interactive powerpower-electronics networks
• To design and develop powerpower-management electronics for
residential and vehicular applications of renewable/alternate
energy sources (e.g., fuel and photovoltaic cells)
• To achieve higher power density and realize systems on chip
Key Achievements and Future Goals
Technical Approach
• Stability and Stabilization of PowerPower-Electronics Networks:
a) Global stability analysis of stochastic and functional hybrid system
b) Stabilization using wireless networked control
• Optimal Fuel Cell based Stationary and Vehicular Energy
Systems
a) Resolving interactions among energy source (such as fuel cells),
cells),
power electronics, and balance of plant.
b) FuelFuel-cell powerpower-electronics inverter design that simultaneously meet
criteria of cost, durability, and energy efficiency
• Robust and efficient power devices and smart power ASIC
a) HighHigh-speed, EMI immune, widewide-bandgap power devices
b) Integration of lowlow- and highhigh-voltage electronics on the same chip
• First, wireless distributed control dc/dc and multiphase
converters and threethree-phase induction motor control
• First, zerozero-ripple, multilevel, energyenergy-efficient fuel cell inverter
• First, photonicallyphotonically-triggered power transistor design for power
electronics
• First, nonlinear VRM controller for nextnext-generation Pentium
processors
• Comprehensive solidsolid-oxideoxide-fuelfuel-cell (SOFC) spatiospatio-temporal
system model
MURI: Analysis and design of ultrawide-band and high-power microwave pulse
interactions with electronic circuits and systems
Investigators: P.L.E. Uslenghi (P.I.), S. Dutt, D. Erricolo, H-.Y. D. Yang, ECE
in collaboration with Clemson University, Houston University, Ohio State University, University of Illinois
at Urbana-Champaign, University of Michigan
Prime Grant Support: AFOSR
Problem Statement and Motivation
High Power EM fields
E
Puls
• Understand and predict the effects of the
new electromagnetic threat represented
by high power microwave (HPM) and ultrawide
band (UWB) pulses on digital electronic
systems found inside fixed or moving
platforms.
H
External EM Source
(Impulse Radiating Antenna)
Illuminated target
Technical Approach
Key Achievements and Future Goals
•Apply electromagnetic topology to predict
the effects of HPM/UWB aggressor signals
• Fast computer codes are under
development at UH, UIUC, UM and OSU.
•Apply recently developed fast and accurate
computer simulation tools.
• Topology studies are underway at CU.
Analysis of devices and of processor faults
are being conducted at CU and UIC.
•Further extend the capabilities of the
computer simulation tools to obtain a better
understanding of the overall problem.
71
• Develop recommendations for performing
field tests/measurements
• Validation tests for codes are being
developed at CU, OSU, and UIC.
High Pressure Single Pulse Shock Tube
Kenneth Brezinsky, Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
Sponsors: Department of Energy, National Science Foundation,
National Aeronautical Space Administration, Office of Naval Research
Oxidation of Aromatic Compounds
Soot Formation Chemistry
High Pressure Carbon Monoxide
Combustion
Rocket Nozzle Erosion Chemistry
High Pressure Shock Tube:
5 atm < Pressure < 1000 atm
800 K < Temperature < 3000 K
0.5 ms < time < 2.0 ms
1) “Shock Tube Study of Thermal Rearrangement of 1,5Hexadiyne over Wide Temperature and Pressure
Regime”, J. Phys. Chem. A 2004, 108, 3406-3415
2) “A High Pressure Model for the Oxidation of Toluene”,
In Press, Proc. Int. Comb. Symp. 30, 2004
3) “High Pressure, High Temperature Oxidation of
Toluene”, Combustion and Flame, 139(4), 340-350, 2004
4) “Ethane Oxidation and Pyrolysis from 5 bar to 1000
bar: Experiments and Simulation”.,In Press, International
Journal of Chemical Kinetics, 2004
5) “Chemical Kinetic Simulations behind Reflected Shock
Waves”, Submitted, Int. J. Chem. Kin., 2005
6) “Isomeric Product Distributions from the Self Reaction
of Propargyl Radicals”, Submitted, J. Phys. Chem. 2005
High-Rate Synthesis of Carbon Nanostructures in Oxy-Flames
Investigators: Lawrence A. Kennedy, MIE; Alexei V. Saveliev, MIE
Prime Grant Support: National Science Foundation, Air Liquide
Problem Statement and Motivation
(b)
• Carbon nanotubes are materials of the future and
synthesis techniques are required for their high quality
production at commercial rates
0.34nm
~40μm
(a)
(c)
(d)
• At present, oxy-flames are the major industrial source
of pyrolytic (black) carbon. The development of highrate synthesis method of carbon nanotubes and carbon
nanofibers with controlled structure and morphology will
open new horizons stimulating numerous applications
requiring large volumes of carbon nanomaterials
Technical Approach
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Formation of carbon nanomaterials in opposed flow
flames of methane and oxygen enriched air is studied
experimentally at various oxygen contents
• The method of high-rate synthesis of vertically aligned
CNTs with high purity and regularity has been developed
• A catalytic probe is introduced in the flame media, the
products are analyzed using transmission and scanning
electron microscopy
• An electric field control of carbon nanomaterial growth
is implemented applying combinations of internal and
external fields
• A model of carbon nanotube interaction with electric
field is developed and applied for the result interpretation
• It is shown experimentally that application of controlled
electrostatic potential to a catalytic probe in a flame
induces uniform growth of CNT layer of multi-walled
nanotubes
• The mechanism of the electric field growth
enhancement has been studied experimentally and
theoretically. It is found that the major influence of the
electric field is related to the polarization alignment of
growing nanotubes and charge induced stresses acting
on the catalytic particles
72
INTEGRATED ELECTROCHEMICAL SOIL REMEDIATION
Investigator: Krishna R. Reddy, Department of Civil & Materials Engineering
Prime Grant Support: National Science Foundation
Problem Statement and Motivation
•More than 500,000 contaminated sites exist in the U.S.
that require urgent remediation to protect public health
and the environment
•Existing technologies are ineffective or expensive for
the remediation of mixed contamination (any
combination of toxic organic chemicals, heavy metals,
and radionuclides) in heterogeneous/low permeability
subsurface environments
• Innovative and effective new technologies are urgently
needed
Technical Approach
Key Achievements and Future Goals
•Chemical oxidation can destroy organic contaminants, while
electrokinetic remediation can remove heavy metals
•Bench-scale experiments revealed that:
• Integration of chemical oxidation and electrokinetic
remediation is proposed to accomplish simultaneous:
•Electroosmotic delivery of the oxidant into
homogeneous and heterogeneous soils to destroy
organic contaminants
•Removal of heavy metals by electromigration and
electroosomosis processes
•Fundamental processes and field implementation
considerations are being investigated through bench-scale
experiments, mathematical modeling, and field pilot-scale
testing
•Oxidants such as hydrogen peroxide can be introduced
into clay soils effectively based on electroosomosis
process. Native iron in soils can be utilized as catalyst
in Fenton-like reactions. Organic compounds such as
PAHs can be destroyed.
•Heavy metals such as mercury and nickel can
electromigrate towards the electrode wells and then be
removed.
•Electrical energy consumption is low
• On-going research evaluating field contaminated soils,
optimization of the process variables, mathematical modeling,
and planning of field pilot-scale test.
Black Carbon in the Great Lakes Environment
Investigators: Karl Rockne, PhD, PE, Department of Civil and Materials Engineering
Prime Grant Support: Environmental Protection Agency
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Previous literature reports suggest that Black Carbon
(soot) does not have significant intra-particle porosity
•We hypothesize that not only is black carbon highly
porous at small pore scales, but it is an important vector
for hydrophobic organic contaminant transport in the
environment
• These include important airborne pollutants such as
polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and
potentially, emerging pollutants such as polybrominated
diphenyl ethers (PBDEs).
Technical Approach
•Density Functional Theory/gas porisimetry and chemical
characterization of soot particles
• Sediment sampling on all the Great Lakes onboard the
R/V Lake Guardian
• Characterization of black carbon and other organic
material in the sediment cores
• Quantification of deposition rates using radiological
dating techniques
• Quantification of hydrophobic pollutants
• Modeling of deposition processes
73
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Characterization of high intra-particle porosity primarily
in the nano/micro-pore size
• Quantification of the deposition in the Great Lakes
Basin
• Demonstration of its importance to PAH and PBDE
deposition to Great Lakes Sediment
• Future goal is to combine air sampling with black
carbon quantification
•Couple Lake Michigan soot deposition history to
historical hydrocarbon usage rates in the Chicago area
Visualization of Multiphase Flow in Porous Media
Investigators: Christophe Darnault, UIC, Civil and Materials Engineering Department;
Tammo Steenhuis, Cornell University, Biological and Environmental Engineering Department
Prime Grant Support: United States Air Force Office of Scientific Research
Problem Statement and Motivation
0
• Groundwater pollution involving nonaqueous phase liquids
(NAPLs) is threatening the environment and human health.
5
10
Depth (cm)
15
• Transient and multiphase flow in porous media: preferential flow
20
•Preferential flow is a by-pass transport phenomena that facilitates the
transport of water and pollutants (e.g. NAPLs) through vadose zone
and impacts the quality of groundwater resources
25
30
35
40
a
b
c
Water
Oil
Air
45
50
0.0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
Volumetric fluid content
3
3
(cm /cm )
Visualization of water fingering phenomena in soil-air-oil system using (a) RGB system, (b) hue image,
and (c) intensity image. Vertical fluid content profile of a water finger in soil-air-oil system
Technical Approach
• Development of a Light Transmission Method (LTM) to visualize
transient and multiphase flow in porous media
• LTM consists in (1) placing an experimental chamber where
multiphase flow in porous media occurs in front of a light source,
(2) recording the transmitted light through a video camera, and (3)
converting images in HSI (Hue, Saturation and Intensity) system
• A calibration chamber containing cells with known fluid ratios
representative of sand-water-oil-air system was used to obtain
relationships between Hue (color) & Water Content (colored with a
blue dye), as well as Intensity & Liquid Content (Water and Oil)
• Validation of LTM was performed using Synchrotron X-rays
• Transient flow experiment consisted in a point source water
fingering flow (preferential flow) in sand-oil-air-system occurring
in a two-dimensional chamber (See Above Figure)
• Development of non-invasive and non-destructive visualization and
measurement method for characterization of vadose zone hydrology
and processes
• Development of high spatial and temporal resolution method for
quantification of fluid contents
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Development of a technique to visualize and to investigate
the mechanics of multiphase flow in porous media, with the
following characteristics:
• Non-intrusive and non-destructive method
• High spatial and temporal resolution method
• Use for transient and multiphase flow
• Visualization of the whole flow field
• Acquisition of key parameters (e.g. fluid contents,
velocity, dimensions) for flow in porous media and to
validate one and two-dimensional computer models
• Simulation of groundwater remediation technologies
Evaluation of Full-Depth Precast/Prestressed Concrete Bridge Deck
Replacement with Protective Overlay System
Mohsen A. Issa, Ph.D., P.E., S.E., FACI, Department of Civil and Materials Engineering
The projects are Supported by IDOT & IDOT/Modjeski and Masters, Inc.
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Corrosion of reinforcing steel and the consequent
delamination of bridge decks are considerably intensified
by the use of deicing chemicals on highways.
• Effective rehabilitation methods with minimal
construction time and bridge closures and without
interference with the traffic flow are needed.
• Reliable, economic, and durable overlay construction
without fault practices is crucial to protect the underlying
bride deck system.
Technical Approach
• Full-Scale bridge system was fabricated and tested under
simulated AASHTO HS20 truck fatigue loading.
• The bridge was tested before and after overlay application
for the maximum negative and positive moments.
• Target performance criteria were adopted to ensure
successful and economic overlay construction.
• laboratory Investigations supported with field applications
were implemented for the overlay performance evaluation.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• The proposed bridge deck system provides an
effective, fast, and economic design concept for the
rehabilitation and new bridge construction.
• Protective LMC and MSC overlays that can last at
least 20 years, are successfully developed.
• LMC overlay with synthetic fibers will be applied
soon on the New Mississippi River Bridge deck.
74
Performance-Based Aspects and Structural Behavior of High Performance
Fibrous Bonded Concrete Overlays
Professor Mohsen Issa: Ph.D., P.E., S.E., FACI, Department of Civil and Materials Engineering
Ph.D. Student: Mohammad Alhassan
The Study is Supported by IDOT/Modjeski and Masters, Inc.
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Most of the overlay projects have experienced early age
delaminations and severe cracking.
• Development of high performance, durable, reliable, and
cost-efficient overlay is essential to effectively protect bridge
decks from corrosion problems and consequent deteriorations.
• The stress state at the overlay-deck bond interface and the
enhancement in the stiffness of a bridge by the overlay
require reasonable analysis and quantification.
Investigation of different overlay materials
For the New Mississippi River Bridge, the
widest cable stayed bridge in the world
Technical Approach
•Development of high performance, durable bonded concrete
overlay for the New Mississippi River Bridge.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Plain and fibrous LMC and MSC overlay mixtures
meeting target performance criteria were developed.
• The developed LMC with synthetic fibers were selected as
overlay system for the New Mississippi River Bridge, the
Widest Stay-Cable Bridge in the World.
• Guidelines were proposed regarding the magnitudes of
live load and shrinkage-induced bond stresses.
50 0
Strain @ to p of ov erlay 14 ft from central sup port
20 0
Strain @ top o f overlay over cen tral supp ort
1 50 0
Sur
fac e
ten sio
1 00 0
5 00
10 0
0
-50 0 -250
n
Load, kN
30 0
Surface compression
Load, kip
40 0
2 00 0
0
250
500
7 50
0
100 0 1 250 15 00 175 0 2 000 22 50 250 0 2 75 0
Strain , με
• Future goals include: 1) evaluating the performance of
LMC and MSC overlays with different types of fibers; and
2) monitoring the long-term overlay performance.
Experimental and Theoretical Behavior of Reinforced Concrete Beams and
Columns Wrapped with CFRP-Composites
Mohsen A. Issa, Ph.D., P.E., S.E., FACI, Department of Civil and Materials Engineering
Ph.D Student: Rajai Alrousan
Problem Statement and Motivation
▪ Worldwide repairing of aging infrastructure became necessary
as the structural elements cease to provide satisfactory strength
and serviceability, etc.
▪ Sudden failures (brittle) of RC columns and beams, are
considered as the most disastrous failure modes that occur
with no advance warning of tribulation.
▪ Use of CFRP-composites can provide substantial enhancements
in the beams shear strength and column ultimate capacity.
▪ It is very beneficial and crucial to provide rationalized models
that consider the concrete and structure nonlinearities.
Technical Approach
• Fabrication of reinforced concrete (RC) beams and columns
and testing their behaviors with and without CFRP-composites.
• Performing nonlinear finite element analysis (FEA) to simulate
the response of the beams and columns.
• Calibration and validation of the FEA models.
• Expansion of the FEA to study additional critical issues related
to the beams shear strength and ultimate strength of columns.
• Use of the experimental and FEA results to provide rational
models that predict the beam shear strength and column
ultimate capacity based on the configuration of CFRP
composites.
75
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• The study showed that the CFRP-composites is a very effective
strengthening/repair system that provide substantial
enhancements in the behaviors of beams and columns.
• Guidelines and preliminary models were proposed to predict the
shear strength of RC beams and ultimate strength of columns
strengthened with CFRP-composites.
• Various repair projects of beams and columns were
implemented employing the recommendations of this research.
• The current work is focusing onto rationalizing the proposed
preliminary models to be applicable for any CFRP-composite
configuration and concrete strength.
Structural Health Monitoring System (SHMS) for Bridge Girders
Retrofitted with CFRP Composites
Mohsen A. Issa, Ph.D., P.E., S.E., FACI, Department of Civil and Materials Engineering
The Study is Supported by the Illinois Toll Highway Authority
Problem Statement and Motivation
▪ It is imperative that bridges are always open to traffic, resistant
to natural disaster, and undaunted by millions of loading cycles.
250
200
210 με
MSC (plain)
MSC (with synthetic fibers)
MSC (with steel fibers)
150
▪ Early signs of deterioration are often not seen because bridge
components mask them. It is hard to visually inspect or using
hardwiring sensors in some components of special bridges.
▪ Structural health monitoring (SHM) is the diagnostic monitoring
of the integrity or condition of a structure capable of detecting
and locating damage or degradation in its components.
Strain, με
100
50
0
-50
-100
-150
-200
- 230 με
-250
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
140
160
180
200
▪ It is crucial to evaluate and recommend long-term bridge
monitoring systems that are cost-effective, durable, and reliable.
Time (days)
Technical Approach
• Health monitoring systems were incorporated in large-scale
bridge members, full-scale bridge prototypes, and actual Toll
Highway Authority bridges.
• The critical locations were selected based on laboratory
experimental programs and nonlinear finite element analysis.
• The effectiveness of the health monitoring systems were
evaluated based on: accuracy of data, simplicity of installation,
cost, reliability, and durability.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Various health monitoring systems were incorporated in actual
repair projects of damaged I-girders. The data is continuously
collected and showed consistence results with the actual
conditions of the repaired girders.
• The current and future work are focused toward designing and
selecting wireless health monitoring systems that are durable,
reliable, and smart to send understandable and accurate
messages about the conditions of the major bridge components.
Development of an Innovative Prefabricated Full-Depth Precast Concrete Bridge
Deck System for Fast Track Construction, Get in, Get out, and Stay out
Mohsen A. Issa, Ph.D., P.E., S.E., FACI, Department of Civil and Materials Engineering
The projects are Supported by Illinois Department of Transportation
Problem Statement and Motivation
• The interstate highway system is approaching its service life
and urban congestion is increasing. Anticipated future costs
of repair/reconstruction of the nation’s infrastructures are
huge.
• Utilization of innovative full-depth deck panel system (high
performance, durable, ease and speed of construction, costsaving, aesthetic, minimal noise, and no interference with the
traffic flow) leads to substantial reductions in the costs of
repair and new construction projects.
• The concerns about the performance of the components of the
system and its constructability require systematic optimization
to achieve high performance and fast construction.
Technical Approach
• All of the full-depth system major components (deck panels
configurations, transverse joints, post-tensioning levels, shear
connectors, overlay system, and materials) were tested and
optimized based on consecutive studies included large scale
specimens and prototypes.
• Nonlinear finite element models were created to optimize the
components and support the experimental testing.
• Based on the findings, a full-scale prototype bridge full depth
deck panel system was designed, fabricated, and tested with
and without overlay simulating AASHTO HS-20 truck
loading, overload, and ultimate load .
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Complete innovative full-depth deck panel system with clear
information about its constructability and details and
performance of its components was developed .
• The system is utilized in many new and repair bridge projects
implementing the recommendations of this study.
• Current and future research are focused onto generalizing the
full-depth concept to develop totally prefabricated
superstructure system (bridge deck and beams).
• The developed full-depth system as well as the LMC overlay
system will be utilized in the coming New Mississippi River
Bridge Project (the widest stay-cable bridge in the world).
76
Modeling Toll Plaza Queueing and Air Quality
Investigators: Jane Lin,
Department of Civil and Materials Engineering & Institute of Environmental Science and Policy
Funded by Illinois State Toll Highway Authority
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Illinois Tollway’s 5-year 5-billion-dollar conversion of
existing toll plazas to open road tolling (ORT) system
will have large impact on regional highway traffic
• Lack of analytical tools to model toll plaza queueing
phenomena, and also scientifically challenging because
of both physical design and uncertainty of human
decision procedure
• Potential air quality, health exposure, social and
economic impacts
Technical Approach
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Step 1: Development of stochastic toll plaza queueing
models with probabilistic lane selection
•Step 2: Calibration using field observations and traffic
simulation model
• Step 3: Estimation of vehicle emissions from queued
traffic using EPA’s emission model at user-specified
spatial and temporal resolutions
• Step 4: Prediction of pollution concentrations at given
distance to road center line
• Step 5: Estimation of population exposure in GIS
• Project started in early 2005
• Final product of this project is a windows-based, userfriendly toll plaza air quality model with sound queueing
algorithm and improved pollution prediction method
• This model can be used to quantify the impact of (ORT)
on toll plaza traffic, air quality and even human exposure
• Future goals include improving the model algorithm in
heavy traffic, developing a microscopic toll plaza
queueing simulation model, and assessing ORT’s social,
economic, and environmental impacts at the regional
level.
Toll Plaza CO Screening Tool (TPCOST)
Investigators: Jane Lin, PhD, assistant professor
Department of Civil and Materials Engineering & Institute of Environmental Science and Policy
Funded by Illinois State Toll Highway Authority
Model Validation
Problem Statement and Motivation
Sensitivity Analysis
• Project level CO hot-spot analysis requirement
0. 25
•CALINE3/4: uninterrupted highway traffic
•CAL3QHC: signalized intersection
• Illinois DOT’s COSIM model
•Based on CAL3QHC with MOBILE6 emission factor
estimation
• Problem: those models aren’t suitable for toll highways
because traffic conditions and physical configurations are
different at toll plaza than a signalized intersection
• Need a model suitable for CO prediction on tollways
77
CO concent rat i on (PPM
)
• EPA models for roadside air quality prediction:
Manual
Aut o
CV I PO
PC I PO
PC I PX
CV Manual
0. 2
0. 15
0. 1
0. 05
0
100
400
700
1000 1300 1600 1900 2200
Tr af f i c Vol ume ( Veh/ hr )
2500
DYNAMIC WATER BALANCE AND GEOTECHNICAL
STABILITY OF BIOREACTOR LANDFILLS
Investigator: Krishna R. Reddy, Department of Civil and Materials Engineering
Prime Grant Support: NSF, EREF, CReeD & Veolia Environment
Problem Statement and Motivation
• In conventional “dry tomb” landfills, waste biodegradation is
very slow because of the lack of adequate moisture. These
landfills require long-term monitoring for any potential
environmental problems (regarding the water and air pollution).
• The leachate re-injection or addition of selected liquids to
landfill waste (bioreactor) has potential to accelerate waste
decomposition and settlement, but will affect the waste
properties and slope stability.
•Urgent need exists to understand the moisture distribution in
the waste and its effects on waste biodegradation and
properties as well as geotechnical stability of landfills.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
Technical Approach
• Field monitoring at bioreactor landfills is in progress.
Studies conducted to date show that dynamic moisture
variations within the waste mass during leachate
recirculation can be characterized with geophysical
methods (electrical resistivity tomography).
ƒMonitoring several bioreactors to monitor moisture content
(with geophysics), biogas and leachate production and
quality, waste degradation and properties, and waste
settlement.
•Coupled flow and mechanical modeling is in progress
for different bioreactor landfill conditions. Preliminary
results show that the coupled flow and mechanical
modeling can predict both waste moisture and settlement
with time under different operational conditions.
ƒDeveloping a mathematical model for:
ƒUnderstanding the spatial and temporal variations of
moisture distribution and landfill settlement
ƒIncorporating change in waste properties caused by
decomposition with respect to time
ƒUnderstanding the influence of leachate recirculation
on landfill settlement and slope stability
ƒOptimizing leachate recirculation system designs
•Field monitoring and modeling results will be utilized to
develop design and monitoring guidelines for bioreactor
landfills.
Combustion and Emissions Research Relevant to Practical Systems
S. K. Aggarwal, MIE/UIC; I. K. Puri, Virginia Tech; V. R. Katta, ISSI; D. Longman, ANL.
Primary Sponsors: ANL, NASA, NSF
Quantifying the Effects of Fluid Flow Characteristics Near the
Nozzle Tip on Diesel Engine Particulate Emissions
• This research
is being
collaboration with ANL.
performed
Gravitational Effects on Partially Premixed Flames
in
• ANL’s Advanced Photon Source (APS) is
used to obtain quantitative data of CAT HEUI
315B fuel injector spray.
• State-of-art flame diagnostic tools will be
used to obtain in-cylinder images and data of
the fuel injector spray and combustion in a
CAT single cylinder engine.
• Fire suppression on Earth and in space.
• Multi-scale modeling of combustion and
two-phase phenomenon.
• Application of advanced CFD methods
using detailed chemistry and transport
models to characterize the effective of
various fire suppressants..
• Parametric studies will be performed to quantify the effects of fuel injection
pressure, tip orifice size and geometry on engine performance, emissions,
and particulate formation.
• In collaboration with CAT the KIVA-3V code will be developed further and
various sub-models, such as for fluid breakup, will be improved.
Simulation of Partially Premixed Flames Burning a Variety of Fuels
• Blending Hydrogen to primary
reference fuels to improve
combustion and emission
characteristics.
• Experimental and numerical
investigation of structure and emission
characteristics of n-heptane flames.
• Flame structure, extinction, and emission characteristics of
high pressure flames with different fuels [H2, CH4, nheptane, Synthetic Gas] in engine-like conditions.
• Innovative strategies to reduce combustion-generated
pollutants.
• Extensive use of computer graphics and animation.
Achievements
• Developed comprehensive CFD-based reacting flow codes using
detailed chemistry and transport models for a variety of flames.
• Application of these codes to investigate
ƒ structure and emission characteristics of high-pressure partially
premixed flames (PPF).
ƒ stabilization, liftoff, and blowout of nonpremixed and partially
premixed flames in Earth and Space environments.
ƒ effect of hydrogen blending with hydrocarbon fuels on flame stability
and emissions of NOx, soot, etc.
ƒ combustion and emission characteristics of alternative fuels, such
as hydrogen, synthetic gas, ethanol, and bio-diesels.
• Develop innovative strategies including partial premixing, alternative
fuels, and fuel blending to improve combustor performance and reduce
pollutants emissions.
78
Large-Scale Simulation of Complex Flows
Investigators: F. Mashayek, MIE/UIC; D. Kopriva/FSU; G. Lapenta/LANL
Prime Grant Support: ONR, NSF
Problem Statement and Motivation
The goal of this project is to develop advanced
computational techniques for prediction of various
particle/droplet-laden turbulent flows without or
with chemical reaction. These techniques are
implemented to investigate, in particular, liquid-fuel
combustors for control of combustion and design
of advanced combustors based on a countercurrent shear concept. The experimental
components are conducted at the University of
Minnesota and the University of Maryland.
Technical Approach
• Turbulence modeling and simulation
• Direct numerical simulation (DNS)
• Large-eddy simulation (LES)
• Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS)
• Droplet modeling
• Probability density function (PDF)
• Stochastic
• Combustion modeling
• PDF
• Eddy-breakup
• Flamelet
• Flow simulation
• Spectral element
• Finite volume
• Finite element
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Pioneered DNS of evaporating/reacting droplets in
compressible flows.
• Developed a multidomain spectral element code for large
clusters.
• Developed user-defined functions (UDFs) for implementation
of improved models in the CFD package Fluent.
• Developed several new turbulence models for
particle/droplet-laden turbulent flows.
• In the process of development of a new LES code with
unstructured grid.
• Investigating advanced concepts for liquid fuel combustors
based on counter-current shear flow.
Droplet Impact on Solid Surfaces
Investigator: C. M. Megaridis, Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
Prime Grant Support: Motorola, NASA
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Droplet impact ubiquitous in nature and relevant to
many practical technologies (coatings, adhesives, etc.)
• Spreading/recoiling of droplets impacting on solid
surfaces (ranging from wettable to non-wettable)
features rich inertial, viscous and capillary phenomena
• Objective is to provide insight into the dynamic
behavior of the apparent contact angle θ and its
dependence on contact-line velocity VCL at various
degrees of surface wetting
Technical Approach
• Perform high-speed imaging of droplet impacts under a
variety of conditions
• By correlating the temporal behaviors of contact angle θ
and contact-line speed VCL, the θ vs. VCL relationship is
established
• Common wetting theories are implemented to extract
values of microscopic wetting parameters (such as slip
length) required to match the experimental data
79
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Surface wettability has a critical influence on dynamic
contact angle behavior
• There is no universal expression to relate contact angle
with contact-line speed
• Spreading on non-wettable surfaces indicates that only
partial liquid/solid contact is maintained
• The present results offer guidance for numerical or
analytical studies, which require the implementation of
boundary conditions at the moving contact line
Gateway Traveler Information System
Investigators: John Dillenburg, Pete Nelson, and Doug Rorem, CS Department
Prime Grant Support: Illinois Department of Transportation
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Integrate disparate systems into a central traffic
information system
• Provide XML and CORBA data streams to
government agencies, academic institutions, and
industry
• Provide www.gcmtravel.com website with realreal-time
maps of congestion, travel times, incidents and
construction
Key Achievements and Future Goals
Technical Approach
• System developed by AI Lab personnel
• 435,000,000 website hits per year
• Centerpiece of corridor’
corridor’s intelligent transportation
system architecture
•USDOT’
USDOT’s “Best Traveler Information Website”
Website” two years
in a row
• Uses NTCIP CenterCenter-toto-center communications
standards to network with Tollway and other IDOT
agencies
• Advanced AI techniques for data fusion of multiple data
sources
• Website hosted via 4 clustered servers in AI Lab
• Dual T1 lines to Schaumburg for traffic data feeds and
Internet access for IDOT
• Traffic data from Wisconsin Department of
Transportation’
Transportation’s MONITOR system, Indiana Department
of Transportation, *999, Northwest Central Dispatch,
IDOT’
IDOT’s Traffic System Center
• Gateway II system planned for near future: upgraded
hardware and software, more data connections to other
agencies, 511 integration, cell phones as probes for
arterial streets, redundant fault tolerant design, geogeodatabase upgrade
Activity-Based Microsimulation Model of Travel Demand
Kouros Mohammadian, PhD, S. Yagi, J. Auld, and T.H. Rashidi (PhD Candidates), CME, UIC
Source of Funding: NIPC/CMAP, FACID, and IGERT (NSF)
Synthetic
Population
Activity
Generation Model
Synthetic City
Activity
Scheduling Model
ADS/HTS
Surveys
Synthesized
Population
Policy
scenarios
Activity-Based Modeling
Activity/Travel
Microsimulation
Executed Schedules
Activities/
Tours/Trips
Travel Demand
Highway/Transit
Network Assignment
Policy
Analysis
Vehicle/Fuel
Condition
Emission Model
Technical Approach
•The modeling framework utilizes both econometric and
heuristic (rule-based) approaches
•All human activities are related to broad project categories
which have a common goal (e.g., Work, School,
Entertainment, etc.) and tasks and activity episodes that are
required to reach that goal are modeled
•Activity participation is modeled at household/individual level
(microsimulation)
•Explicit representation of time/space of occurrence for all
travel episodes, linked to associated activities
•Activity scheduling model is linked to a population
synthesizer, rescheduling and resource allocation models, and
a regional network microsimulation and emission models
Problem Statement and Motivation
•Traditional four step travel demand models are widely
criticized for their limitations and theoretical deficiencies
•These problems lead the model to be less policy
sensitive than desired
•Travel is derived from participation in activities. This fact
is not accounted for in 4-step models. Therefore, there is
a need for a better modeling approach
•An activity-based microsimulation travel demand model is
considered that simulates activity schedules for all
individuals
Key Achievements and Future Goals
•A comprehensive multi-tier activity-based
microsimulation modeling system is developed.
•A new population synthesizer is developed.
•Activity scheduling/rescheduling decision rules are
developed and applied to adjust the simulated daily
activity patterns.
•Intra-household interaction rules are developed and
applied to account for joint activity generation and
household maintenance activity allocation problems.
•Transferability of activity scheduling/rescheduling
decision rules across different spatial and temporal
contexts are evaluated.
•The microsimulation model is applied to evaluate future
transportation policy scenarios.
80
Structural Health Monitoring of Turin’s Olympic Village
Cable-Stayed Bridge
Investigators: Iman Talebinejad, Chad Fischer, Luca Giacosa, and Farhad Ansari
Civil & Materials Engineering - Sponsor: City of Turin
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Cable-stayed bridges can have complex geometry and
non-standard structural members making them difficult
to analyze with conventional methods.
• Previous problems with vibrations in similar pedestrian
bridges have been experienced.
• The long term performance of such bridges has not
been fully documented.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
Technical Approach
• Employed fiber optic sensors to monitor the
performance of the bridge cables.
• Establishment of structural performance of asymmetric
cable-stayed bridges.
• Monitor the cables during load tests and under ambient
vibration conditions.
• Developed methods to estimate dynamic
characteristics of the bridge by only monitoring cable
forces in the bridge.
• Use finite element modeling to correlate sensor data
and understand the modal properties and long term
performance of the bridge.
• Real-time monitoring to assess the long term bridge
performance by observing changes in sensor response.
Fiber Optic Weigh-in-Motion (WIM) sensor for Bridges
Luisa Degiovanni and Farhad Ansari, Civil and Materials Engineering, University of Illinois at
Chicago
Problem Statement and Motivation
• The measure of static axle load of heavy vehicles as they drive
at highway speed is an effective tool for condition assessment of
in-service structures.
• Results can be used for improvement of pavement managing
systems, road transport analysis, detection of overloaded vehicles,
enforcement of weight limits.
110
105
100
95
strain
90
INFLUENCE LINE
85
80
75
70
65
60
150
160
170
180
190
200
210
220
230
240
250
• WIM systems may provide
reliable information about the
actual dynamic load and
calculate the fatigue cycles
experienced by the structures.
load location
Technical Approach
• development of sensors
weigh trucks.
and data processing
system for the detection of
speed and static axle loads
of heavy vehicles.
• Application of fiber optic sensor technology (accuracy, low cost, light
weight, Immune to interference, non-intrusive).
• Placement of sensors under the bridge deck (no need for new
construction or weigh station).
• Use of influence lines as a tool for the detection of the truck weight
through the bridge deck responses to loading.
LANE 1
2
1
= LINK POINT
81
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• INVERSE PROBLEM: use the response of a highway bridge to
LANE 2
3
= LOCAL STRAIN FBG POSITION
• evaluations of errors due
to the dynamics of the
problem, due to vehicles
speed, change in tires
pressure, spring types,
pavement roughness.
• study of WIM systems (sensors number and placement to improve
the accuracy).
Nucleation and Precipitation Processes in the Vadose Zone
During Contaminant Transport
Investigators: Burcu Uyusur, UIC Civil and Materials Engineering Department;
Christophe Darnault, UIC Civil and Materials Engineering Department;
Kathryn L. Nagy, UIC Earth and Environmental Science Department
Neil C. Sturchio, UIC Earth and Environmental Science Department;
Soufiane Mekki, UIC Earth and Environmental Science Department
Primary Grant Support: U.S. Department of Energy
Problem Statement and Motivation
•Leakage has been determined in the vadose zone sediments of
Hanford Site, U.S. Department of Energy Complex in Washington
since 1950s, including radioactive elements such as uranium.
•Preferential flow, a common phenomena in unsaturated soil, is the
movement of water and solutes faster than the average pore water
velocity due to fingering.
)Visualization and mapping of simulated Hanford leakage water
•Contaminant mobility is affected by sorption, colloid formation,
nucleation and precipitation of secondary solids.
SEM and EDS of metaschoepite(UO3·n(H2O)(n<2)
(Buck et al., 2004)
)Characterize and quantify the formation of secondary
precipitates in the presence of uranium with quartz and feldspar
minerals.
)Investigation of possible colloid formation
Technical Approach
¾Three dimensional unsaturated column experiments
¾Two dimensional light transmission visualization
experiments
¾Autoradiography Technique
¾Surface Analysis techniques (BET Gas Adsorption; AFMAtomic Force Microscopy; XRD-X Ray Diffraction)
¾Insight Analysis Techniques (TRLFS-Time Resolved Laser
Fluorescence Spectroscopy; EXAFS- Extended X-Ray
Absorption Fine Structure)
¾Incorporation of the data to a reactive transport code
Achievements and Future Goals
Understanding the fate and transport of uranium in simulated
Hanford vadose zone
Refining the conditions needed for incorporation of radionuclides
into secondary solids.
Predicting the effect of precipitates on vadose zone flow.
Modeling with colloids, nucleation, precipitation, sorption
incorporated
Extracting general governing ideas applicable to other radioactive
contaminated sites
Fate and Transport of Fullerenes and SingleSingle-Wall Carbon Nanotubes (SWNT)
in Unsaturated and Saturated Porous Media
Investigators: Itzel G Godinez, UIC, Department of Civil and Materials
Materials Engineering;
Christophe Darnault, UIC, Department of Civil and Materials Engineering
Engineering
Primary Grant Support: National Science Foundation Bridge to the Doctorate Fellowship at the University of Illinois at Chicago
Problem Statement and Motivation
•
•
•
•
•
Technical Approach
•
•
•
•
Implementation of segmented soil columns to assess the transport
of fullerenes and SWNTs in unsaturated conditions
Concentration of nanomaterials in column’s effluent will be
analyzed by UV-vis spectrophotometer
Three-dimensional reconstruction of the columns will be
accomplished through the Advanced Photon Source Hard-Ray
Microbe from Argonne National Laboratory
Pore-scale visualization technique will consist of an infiltration
chamber, mounting assembly, light source, electronic equipment
(e.g. camera, lens and computer system), and imaging software
Generation of scientific data to explain the fate and transport of
nanomaterials in subsurface environment
Development of non-intrusive, high-spatial and temporal
techniques to describe transport and measure concentrations of
fullerenes and SWNTs in porous media
Assessment of the extend in which fullerenes and SWNTs are
transported in the vadose zone through preferential flow
Establishment of the impact of wetting and drying cycles on the
transport of nanomaterials by characterizing the role of gas-liquid
interface regions and reconstructing the soil column’s threedimensional structure
Development of a pore-scale visualization method by adapting
existing models and techniques to investigate the mechanisms
controlling nanomaterials retention and immobilization in
unsaturated porous media (e.g. air-water and air-water-soil
interfaces)
Expected Key Achievements and Goals
•
Development of techniques to visualize and describe the fate and
transport of fullerenes and SWNTs in the vadose zone by
preferential flow according to the following characteristics:
ƒ Non-intrusive, high-spatial and temporal methods
ƒ Use of preferential flow (e.g. fingering and gravitational
flow)
ƒ Reconstruction of 3-D columns
ƒ Development of a real-time pore-scale visualization
method
ƒ Acquiring data (e.g. nanomaterial concentration, soil
moisture, velocity, distribution of nanoparticles, etc.) to
explain the behavior of nanomaterials in porous media
under different conditions
82
Transferability of Household Travel Survey Data for Small Areas
Jie (Jane) Lina,b, Ph.D. Assistant Professor, Liang Long (PhD candidate)a,
of Civil and Materials Engineering & bInstitute of Environmental Science and Policy
Funded by the Federal Highway Administration
aDepartment
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs) with population of
over 50,000 are required to have their models calibrated on a
continuing basis using new data
• Surveys are expensive instruments and the data required to support
the planning process can become outdated
• Improving simple conventional approach of testing feasibility of
transferability
• Investigating new methods of updating/synthesis trip information
Technical Approach
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Defining neighborhood type using US Census Transportation Planning
• Studies have shown the importance of residential location,
neighborhood type and household lifestyle to household travel
behavior.
Package (CTPP). Each neighborhood type is distinctively defined and
reasonably homogenous in terms of socio-economic and travel
characteristics.
• Two-level random coefficient models are applied to test transferability of
travel attributes across geographic areas, like number of trips, Mode Choice
and Vehicle Miles Traveled(VMT) by using National Household Travel
Survey (NHTS) for each neighborhood type.
•Small area estimation methods, i.e. Generalized regression estimator,
synthetic estimator and empirical linear unbiased predictor, are investigated
to simulate travel survey information for local areas by using NHTS and
CTPP.
•We have shown that transferability can be formulated into a twolevel random coefficient structure and thus transferability can be
statistically tested. In general number of journey to work vehicle
trips is the most transferable across geographic areas compared to
mode choice. While the mode choice is transferable across CMSAs
with similar census tracts information.
• Small area estimation provides good methods to simulate local
travel information by using National survey dataset, like NHTS and
CTPP.
Modeling Land Use, Bus Ridership and Air Quality: A Case Study of Chicago Bus Service
aDepartment
Jie (Jane) Lina,b, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Minyan Ruana (PhD student)
of Civil and Materials Engineering & bInstitute for Environmental Science and Policy
Study Area and Problem Statement
• Fifty-five CTA bus routes covering 9 neighborhood
type with distinct characteristics are studied between
2001 and 2003.
• An effective public transit system will reduce traffic
pollution by attracting more passengers from auto drive.
• Public transit accessibility and ridership are affected
by land use in the neighboring areas along the transit
lines.
• Investigating the relations between land use features
and bus ridership will help find way to improve the air
quality.
Model Structure
• A mixed regression model with heterogeneity among
routes, via random effects, and autocorrelation over time,
via autoregressive error terms was built.
• The first-order autoregressive error structure AR(1) and
Toeplitz TOEP(h) error structure are tested.
• The unit ridership daily bus emission (defined as daily bus
emission per ridership by route) was estimated using the
Chicago-specific summer and winter input parameters for
both PM10 and NOX.
•The set of possible covariates include features in Transit
service, sociodemographics and land use by neighborhood
type, and 11 month dummy variables refer to January .
83
Key Findings and Future Work
• The unit ridership daily bus emission will decrease if stops
are added in the route.
• Total population in the urban non-Hispanic Black
neighborhoods is positively correlated with unit ridership
daily bus emission due to low employment rates, poor
connectivity to transit, and therefore low transit users in
general .
• High road length in the urban elite neighborhoods
decrease the unit ridership daily bus emissions .
• Future goal includes modeling the emission at stop level,
in order to provide direct explanation between the type of
surrounding neighborhood and ridership at each bus stop.
Trip Table Realization: Underlying Stochasticity and Its Effects on Assigned Link Flows
Wenjing Pu (PhD student)a, David Boyce, PhDc, Jie (Jane) Lina,b, PhD
of Civil and Materials Engineering & bInstitute of Environmental Science and Policy
cDepartment of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Northwestern University
aDepartment
Problem Statement and Motivation
• A static trip table can only represent the travel demand
distribution during a specific time period (e.g. peak
hours) of a day
• Random day-to-day variations in travel demand,
however, inherently exist
• This research aims to explore the impacts of trip table
random day-to-day variation on assigned link flows and
costs
Technical Approach
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• The original static trip table is assumed to be the
“mean” trip table for the modeling period (e.g. peak
hours) over a number of days
• Although large discrepancy exists for the cell-level OD
trips, the overall variability of the assigned link flows and
costs is fairly small
• Each O-D demand (cell value) is independent and has
a Poisson distribution about the original value
• Justified the common practice of only using only one
original trip table to do trip assignment when the
objective is to obtain overall network performance
measurements, such as VMT, VHT
• Inverse transformation was used to generate random
number of trips for each OD pair
• Total 30 realized trip tables were simulated for Chicago
and Barcelona network, respectively
• All original and realized trip tables were assigned to
relevant networks using command code TAPAS
• However, it should be cautioned in drawing conclusions
on a sub-network level analysis (individual link level) and
scenario analysis where large link flow variations may be
found
• Future research could relax the Poisson assumption
BUS ROUTE SCHEDULE ADHERENCE ASSESSMENT USING
AUTOMATIC VEHICLE LOCATION (AVL) DATA
Master’s thesis: Peng Wanga, Advisors: Jie (Jane) Lina,b, Darold Barnumc
of Civil and Materials Engineering & bInstitute for Environmental Science and Policy,
cDepartment of Management, Funded Chicago Transit Authority (through Urban Transportation Center)
aDepartment
Problem Statement and Motivation
250
•Transit service reliability has been the top 1 factor that
influences customers’ satisfaction with transit service.
Percentage
200
150
•Reliability performance measures (e.g. running time
adherence, headway regularity, etc.) often show contradicting
results separately.
100
50
0
16_C 17_U 30_f
Scor e
8_f 30_H 4_f 11_U 7_f 8_c 15_c 1_c
DMU (Week_RouteDirection)
PosRT. Met r i c
NagRT. Met r i c
5_O 30_o 26_X 30_X 30_O
PosHW. Met r i c
NagHW. Met r i c
•Objective: To demonstrate an optimization method that
develops a composite performance index of bus route
schedule adherence by combining two elementary metrics
together.
Illustration of Relationship between Performance Scores and Metric Values
Technical Approach
•Development of elementary reliability performance
measures using archived panel AVL data obtained from
CTA
•Using a linear program model based on Data Envelopment
Analysis (DEA) to combine the above four individual
measures into a single composite index
•Using panel data analysis technique to estimate the
confidence intervals of the obtained performance scores
•Conducting DEA-based sensitivity analysis to investigate
the influence of input variations on the generated
performance scores
Key Achievements and Future Goals
•The research demonstrates that a linear program
method is able to generate one single composite
measure that accounts for all input measures properly.
The method is testd on 48 CTA bus route-directions over
6 months in 2006, using the archived continuous
Automatic Vehicle Location (AVL) data collected by onboard devices on CTA buses.
•Future direction: to expand the study to including more
performance measures and the entire CTA bus system.
84
Electrostatic Atomizers for Mineral & Biological Oil Combustion
Investigators: Farzad Mashayek, MIE/UIC; John Shrimpton, Imperial College London
Prime Grant Support: NSF
Problem Statement and Motivation
The nozzle
Spray without (left) and with Combustion of Diesel
(right) charge injection
oil in open air
Bio-fuel combustion in direct injection engines and
stationary gas turbines is now widely considered
as a potential solution to future energy crisis.
Burning bio-fuels reduces CO2 production by
naturally recycling this gas. It is also strategically
favored because of reducing our dependency to
foreign mineral oil. The main impediment to
existing technology for combustion of bio-fuels,
however, is the difficulty of atomization due to
higher viscosity of these oils.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
Technical Approach
We use an electrostatic process which has proven
extremely efficient in improving atomization,
dispersion, evaporation rate, and hence combustion
mixture preparation. The novelty of this work lies in
the implementation of this process for electrically
insulating liquids such as bio-fuels. This is
accomplished by injecting charge into the liquid
prior to its flow through the orifice. The charging
process is more efficient for more viscous fluids and
requires a negligible (~ mW) electric power with a
small (~ 3-4 bar) pressure. This makes these
nozzles ideal for injection of highly viscous liquid
fuels without any need for preheating.
• Electrostatic spraying has already been successfully
implemented for a range of mineral oils.
• A workable theory exists for predicting the size of the
drops by assuming a negligible role of
hydrodynamics.
• The main goal of this project is to extend this process
to bio-fuels which are viscous than common diesel
oil.
• The role of hydrodynamic and the physics behind the
charge injection process will be investigated
theoretically to improve the design of the atomizer.
Benefits Assessment of the California Public Interest Energy Research
Research
(PIER) Program at the California Energy Commission
Investigator: Athanasios D. Bournakis, UIC/ERC
Prime Contract Support: California Energy Commission (current)
Problem Statement and Motivation
Assess the energy, economic, environmental, and
security benefits that have accrued or will accrue to
California ratepayers from commercially successful
RD&D products from the PIER Program.
● Communicate results to PIER management and the
public through an annual Benefits Assessment report
and contributions to the PIER Annual Report.
● Provide benefits information on an ad hoc basis for
use in various Energy Commission published
documents and management presentations.
●
Technical Approach
• Comparisons of PIER technology and most likely
competing technology available in the market.
• Assumptions based on information from users,
demonstrations, manufacturers, standard reference,
other sources.
• Sales history and projections from product vendors or
market analysis.
• Mix of realized and projected benefits.
• Benefits reduced to present value dollar benefits,
reductions in criteria emissions and greenhouse gases,
electricity and gas savings and electricity generated,
avoided construction of new electric generating capacity.
85
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Identified the parameters needed to assess the benefits
of the PIER program
• Developed a Benefits Assessment Action Plan for
directing the benefits assessment activities
• Initiated work to quantify the economic value generated
by PIER-sponsored projects and programs
• Evaluate the magnitude of market changes achieved by
PIER-sponsored projects and programs
• Establish an ongoing PIER program evaluation
methodology
The Gas Research Institute Benefits Assessment Program
Investigator: Athanasios D. Bournakis, UIC/ERC
Prime Grant Support: Gas Research Institute (completed)
Problem Statement and Motivation
Benefits Assessment of Gas R&D in the residential, commercial,
industrial, power generation, NGVs, gas production, processing,
transmission, distribution, and environment and safety sectors.
• The Benefits Assessment Program, under the management
of Dr. Bournakis, was sponsored by the Gas Research
Institute (GRI) in the 1987-2005 period.
• Evaluate the Economic Benefits and Market Impcats of GRIsponsored Gas Technologies
• Corporate Performance Measurement Activities
• Evaluate Benefits for GRI Member Companies and
Federal/State Regulatory Agencies.
• Communicate Benefits to Board of Directors, Federal and
State Government, Gas Industry, Public and Private Sector.
• Strategic Planning Support for Future R&D Activities.
• Financial Impacts Analysis of R&D Products to Local
Distribution Companies and other Investors.
Technical Approach
Key Achievements
• Comparisons of GRI technology and most likely competing
technology available in the market.
• Assumptions based on information from users,
demonstrations, manufacturers, standard reference, other
sources.
• Sales history and projections (5 years) from product vendors
or market analysis.
• Tracks products commercialized within the last 5 years
• Mix of realized and projected benefits.
• Benefits reduced to present value dollar benefits and energy
saved/impacts.
• Approximately 100 products evaluated annually.
• Created by analysts with no project connection.
• Over 500 commercialized gas products, information items
and research programs were evaluated.
• A series of fifteen annual reports to the Federal Energy
Regulatory Commission, evaluating the economic benefits of
commercialized GRI R&D Projects and Products.
• Annual Reports to the GRI Board of Directors on the Impacts
of R&D.
• Annual Audit Reports of a group of 20 R&D items selected
by the GRI Board of Directors.
• Over 300 proposed new R&D technologies evaluated.
• Created about 80 case studies (brochures).
• Created more than 50 analyses of the impacts of GRI R&D
for gas companies and state agencies.
The Economic and Environmental Impacts of Clean Energy
Development in Illinois
Investigators: Athanasios D. Bournakis, UIC/ERC; Steffen Mueller, UIC/ERC
Prime Grant Support: Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (completed)
Cost of Electricity
Problem Statement and Motivation
0.25
$/kWh
0.20
0.15
0.10
0.05
0.00
2004
2006
2008
2010
2012
2014
2016
2018
2020
2022
Year
Wind ($/kWh)
Biomass-Cofiring ($/kWh)
Coal-fired IGCC ($/kWh)
Solar ($/kWh)
Biomass-Gasification ($/kWh)
Nat. Gas CHP ($/kWh)
Landfill ($/kW)
Biomass-Manure ($/kWh)
Technical Approach
•Calculated capacity potential for each renewable energy
resource in the state: Wind; Solar; Hydro (very limited in
Illinois); and Geothermal (not available for power
generation).
•Capacity potential from biomass feedstocks was
assessed for: landfill gas; animal manure; and other
biomass feedstocks (switchgrass etc.).
•Investigated use of integrated gasification combined
cycle (IGCC) clean coal and natural gas fired combined
heat and power (CHP).
•Calculated the cost to generate electricity (in $/kWh)
and prioritized the deployment of these technologies to
meet the sustainable energy portfolio requirements.
Assess the energy, economic, employment and
environmental benefits that Illinois could realize by
increasing investment in renewable energy, energy
efficiency and two environmentally benign technologies.
Study Scenarios:
•Increase Renewable Energy to 8% of Electricity
Consumption in Illinois in 2012 and to 16% by 2020.
•Increase Energy Efficiency to 16% of Electricity
Consumption in Illinois by 2020.
•Investigate Air Emissions Impacts for the State
Implementation Plan.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
•Direct impacts of the different clean energy scenarios
would increase economic output in Illinois by $2 billion in
2012 and by $7 billion in 2020, and would increase
income for Illinois residents by $1.5 billion in 2020.
•Implementing these scenarios will also result in the
creation of 43,000 direct new jobs in Illinois by 2020.
•Combined direct and indirect economic output in Illinois
would increase by over $4.5 billion in 2012 and by over
$18 billion in 2020; income for Illinois residents would
increase by about $5.5 billion in 2020.
•Analysis of combined total direct and indirect job
creation produces even larger estimated job creation,
totaling 191,000 new net jobs created by 2020.
86
Travel Data Simulation and Transferability of Household
Travel Survey Data
Kouros Mohammadian, PhD and Yongping Zhang (PhD Candidate), CME, UIC
Prime Grant Support: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA)
Problem Statement and Motivation
•Household travel data is critical to transportation planning
and modeling
• Surveys are expensive tools
• Emerging modeling techniques (e.g., microsimulation)
need much richer datasets that do not exist in most
metropolitan areas
• Transferring or simulating data seems to be an attractive
solution
Key Achievements and Future Goals
Technical Approach
•Considered a large set of socio-demographic, built
environment, and transportation system variables to identify
clusters of households with homogeneous travel behavior
•Transferred cluster membership rules and cluster-based
travel attributes to local areas
•Calibrated/Validated travel data transferability model
•Synthesized population for 5 counties of New York City with
all their attributes
•Updated parameters of the transferability model using a small
local sample and Bayesian updating
•Simulated travel attributes for the synthetic population
•A new travel forecasting modeling approach is designed
and validated
•The new approach significantly improves the process of
travel demand forecasting
•Using synthetically derived data found to be appealing
•The appeal of the approach lies in its low-cost, relative
ease of use, and freely available sources of required
data
•Improved Bayesian updating and small area estimation
techniques for non-normal data
•Improved travel data simulation techniques
•Used synthesized and transferred data for model
calibration and validation.
•Validated the simulated data against actual observed data
Post Seismic Structural Health Monitoring of Bridges
Investigators: A. Bassam, A. Iranmanesh and F. Ansari, Civil and Materials Engineering
Primary Grant Support: National Science Foundation
Problem Statement and Motivation
Bridges are the
major lifelines of
the infrastructure
system
In the event of earthquakes it is important to quickly
estimate the severity of damage
Technical Approach
Key Achievements and Future Goals
0.8
0.7
displacement(mm)
0.6
• Network of serially multiplexed
fiber optic sensors
• Real-time Damage detection
0.5
0.4
0.3
0.2
0.1
0
-0.1
-0.2
250
0
5
10
15
t(s)
Moment, KN.m
200
150
100
level 1
50
level 2
level 3
level4
0
0
0.000005
0.00001
0.000015
0.00002
Curvature, rad/mm
87
0.000025
0.00003
0.000035
20
25
30
• Development of novel fiber
optic seismic sensors
•Real-time monitoring of
progressive damage
•Robust Damage Detection
Methodologies
Mayor Daley's Chicago Industrial Rebuild Program
Investigators: Andrew L. Sheaffer, MIE; Noel Corral, MIE; Michael Chimack, MIE
Project Lead: Commonwealth Edison
Problem Statement and Motivation
The City of Chicago Department of Environment
(CDOE), together with Commonwealth Edison (ComEd)
and the Energy Resources Center (ERC), developed the
Chicago Industrial Rebuild Program (CIRP) to help the
most energy and waste intensive industries in Chicago
become more efficient. Each year, the CDOE targets a
selected industry and the CIRP audit team (CDOE,
ComEd, ERC, General Energy Corp, the Waste
Management Resource Center and Asset E3) conduct
comprehensive assessments to identify potential
improvements.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
Technical Approach
•Identify energy efficiency, productivity improvement,
and waste minimization measures by providing multiday comprehensive on-site industrial assessments to
manufacturers in the City of Chicago.
• To date, the CIRP program has targeted and helped
the following industries: metal casting, chemicals,
confectionary, and paper and pulp.
• The program has assisted participating industrial
facilities secure low interest loans provided by the city to
help participating industrial facilities offset the capital
investment and implementation cost of recommendations
made by the CIRP team.
•Develop and present recommendations to increase
the efficiency of energy users typical of industrial
facilities such as motors, drives, lighting, compressed
air systems, and process heating and cooling, in
addition to, productivity improvement and waste
minimization opportunities.
•It is anticipated that the CIRP program will continue in
FY07.
Enhanced Dehumidification Air Conditioning (AC) Systems
Investigator: Douglas Kosar, Energy Resources Center
Prime Grant Support: National Center for Energy Management and Building Technologies
and Department of Energy
Problem Statement and Motivation
3.50
ARI Rating Point
3.00
• Diverse direct expansion (DX) AC products being introduced
with enhanced dehumidification features incorporated
COP
2.50
2.00
• Leading issue being addressed is large dehumidification load
from moisture laden outside air in humid climates that is being
mechanically introduced into buildings to meet ASHRAE
Standard 62 Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality
1.50
1.00
Ideal Latent Capacity Shift COP
0.50
Condenser Reheat COP
0.00
0.0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
0.9
SHR
Technical Approach
• System component spreadsheet models
• Existing DOE EnergyPlusTM algorithms
• New desiccant dehumidifier algorithms
• Steady state performance calculations
• Baseline single path DX systems w/o & w/reheat
• 3 enhanced dehumidification DX systems using
heat pipe and desiccant dehumidifier augmentations
• Performance metrics comparisons
• Best practices for lower SHR with high COP
• Cooling coil versus system Dew Points (DP)
• Component algorithm applications to tools
• Active DLLs for VB modeling tool for education
• Program code for EnergyPlusTM tool for simulations
1.0
• The building and HVAC professions and trades are now
faced with the challenge of understanding how to apply this
array of cooling system offerings
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Cooling coil augmentations define “best practice” for lower SHR
with high COP in enhanced dehumidification performance region
defined by “ideal” & reheat range of DX based AC systems
• Desiccant dehumidifier augmentation provides lower system
DPs with higher coil DPs
• Brunauer Type 3 desiccant dehumidifiers provide less heat
of sorption effects than Type 1
•Challenging decision-making tradeoffs in building applications
• Humidity control improvements over DX only
• Compressor energy reductions versus reheat approaches
• Fan energy use increases of augmented components
• Outreach to building and HVAC professions and trades
• journal and conference papers in first half of 2006
• SMACNA trades training in second half of 2006
• ASHRAE Professional Short Course in early 2007
88
Air Cleaning Technology Laboratory (ACTLab)
Investigators: Douglas Kosar and David Chojnowski, Energy Resources Center
Prime Grant Support: National Center for Energy Management and Building Technologies
and Department of Energy
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Most people spend the vast majority of their time indoors
• Costly conditioning of ventilation air from outdoors is the
current solution for the dilution of indoor air pollution
• Strong interest in substituting clean recirculated air , at least
in part, for ventilation air to potentially save costs
• Also interest in securing buildings against airborne threats
• Lack validated performance for many current filter types
• Need testing standards for many emerging filter technologies
Technical Approach
• Basic through applied research on cleaning air of
particulates and gases/vapors using various forms of:
• fibrous media
• energetic surfaces
• sorbent materials
• Test duct loop compliant with current and emerging
ASHRAE Method of Testing (MOT) standards including:
• 52.2 MOT General Ventilation Air-Cleaning
Devices for Removal Efficiency by Particle Size
• 145.2P MOT Gaseous Contaminant Air-Cleaning
Devices for Removal Efficiency
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Construction of laboratory began late 2004 and test loop
became operational late 2006 for particulate filter research
• Benchmark particulate filter tests were completed early 2007
• Industry Expert Panel formed early 2006, released prioritized
research needs, and will update those needs annually
• Top research need for filter bypass evaluation now underway
• Gas phase filter research capabilities are being introduced in
stages with first targeted gas generation and instrumentation to
be incorporated in the test loop by late 2007
• UIC leading a team of three universities (including Penn State
and Syracuse Universities) to provide a more comprehensive
air cleaning research capability for NCEMBT/DOE
High Performance Homes in Cold Climates
Investigator: Douglas Kosar, Energy Resources Center
Prime Grant Support: National Center for Energy Management and Building Technologies
and Department of Energy
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Significant growth in residential construction in the U.S.
• Volatile energy markets and rising costs for homes
• High performance features needed in production housing
• Quantify benefits and understand barriers
• Save electricity and natural gas
• Maintain good indoor air quality (IAQ)
• Limit first cost premiums for home construction
• Breakeven on net home mortgage & energy costs
compared to conventional benchmark home
Technical Approach
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Model energy saving technology options for homes
• Modeling phase of project completed in 2006
• Provide high performance technology portfolio for builders
• Monitor high performance single family home with builder
• Electricity and natural gas consumption by end use
• IAQ -- temperature, humidity, and carbon dioxide
• Verify modeled performance of home envelope and systems
• Least (mortgage and energy) cost approach
• Target 30% whole house primary energy savings
• Monitoring phase of project underway in 2007
• Claretian Associates home in South Chicago
• Major appliance energy consumption
• Low infiltration structural insulated panel (SIP)
envelope, high efficiency furnace/AC/DHW,
Energy Star appliances, and 1.2 kW PV array
• On-site renewable energy production
• Projected 31.1% primary energy savings
• Space heating/cooling and water heating loads
• Evaluate builder and homeowner economics
89
• High performance technology portfolio
• 12 month monitoring activity begun in February
UIC Energy Management Pilot Study
Investigators: Andrew L. Sheaffer, MIE; Noel Corral, MIE; Michael Chimack, MIE
Prime Grant Support: University of Illinois at Chicago, Department of Facilities Management
Problem Statement and Motivation
The UIC Energy Management Pilot Study is geared
towards identifying the level of energy consumption and
cost savings that can be captured through energy
efficiency upgrades and practices on the UIC campus.
Molecular Biology Research Building (MBRB) on the West Campus
Technical Approach
• A complete walk-through assessment of University Hall
(UH) and the Molecular Biology Research Building
(MBRB) identifying all energy users
• Simulation modeling of both buildings
• Identification of energy conservation opportunities
available for both buildings
• Development of detailed cost savings to determine
project paybacks
• Verification of energy consumption of major energy
systems through submetering
• Projection of potential campus-wide energy savings
using results from completed work
Key Achievements and Future Goals
The UIC Energy Management Pilot Study has been
completed successfully and has provided the following
results:
• $470,000/yr total energy cost savings potential
was identified for UH, corresponding to 47% of the
building’s total annual energy cost
• $525,000/yr total energy cost savings potential
was identified for MBRB, corresponding to 19% of
the building’s total annual energy cost
• $17,000,000/yr total energy cost savings was
projected for the UIC East and West campuses
with a simple payback of less than 10 years
Training Student Engineers Through Industrial Energy Conservation:
The UIC Industrial Assessment Center
Investigators: William M. Worek, MIE; Michael J. Chimack, MIE; Robert Miller, MIE
Prime Grant Support: U.S. Department of Energy
Problem Statement and Motivation
IAC Student Conducting a Flue-Gas Test on a Plant Boiler
Technical Approach
A team of faculty, academic professionals and
engineering students visits an industrial plant to conduct
a one-day assessment. Opportunities are identified,
quantified, analyzed, written-up and then presented to
the client in a comprehensive report. Each
recommendation is completely explained, with supporting
information provided that is justified by calculations,
measurements, industry information and vendor cost
quotes. Six to nine months after the assessment, followup contact is made to determine which recommendations
have been implemented, providing a measure of
program effectiveness and feedback to the students on
how they are impacting industry in a meaningful manner.
The UIC-IAC promotes the training of young engineers
in the understanding of the role of energy efficiency,
demand and supply side energy management, and
renewable energy practices in basic manufacturing
systems and operations. The goals of the program are
to provide engineering students with practical
experience and training in energy engineering and
assist small- and medium-sized manufacturers in
identifying opportunities to reduce their energy usage
with investment costs that reside inside their capital
investment guidelines.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Since September 2000, completed over 120
assessments
• Over 1,000 recommendations identified and quantified
• Over $5.6 million in implemented savings realized by
clients
• UIC-IAC students have been awarded a number of
university and engineering fellowships, scholarships
and honors, including a Massachusetts Institute of
Technology (MIT) Presidential Fellowship
• Students in the UIC-IAC program have a 100%
graduation and placement rate, with the vast majority
of students accepting positions with employers well
before graduation
90
Energy Conservation in U.S. Army Industrial Facilities
Investigators: William M. Worek, MIE; Michael J. Chimack, MIE; Robert Miller, MIE; Andrew
Sheaffer, MIE; Jonathan Aardsma, MIE; Noel Corral; MIE
Prime Grant Support: Construction Engineering Research Laboratory
Problem Statement and Motivation
Executive Order 13123 requires all Army industrial
facilities to reduce energy consumption by 25% from
their 1990 baselines by 2010. Many Army industrial
processes are unique and the installations are unable to
quantify, or control their energy consumption. Energy
consumption baselines for each process must be
established to measure efficiency improvements
Welding on an Armored Personnel Carrier in an Army Arsenal
Technical Approach
The project proceeded along three separate lines:
• An understanding of major Army industrial processes in
terms of how they operate and how they consume
energy was developed
• Through research, site visits, and consultations, a
consensus in defining the current state of the art of
technologies related to the Army processes was
developed
• Data collection and analysis of contaminant emissions
and ventilation within Army facilities was conducted in
order to develop a better understanding of building
process exhaust and thermodynamic principles
In addition, an overall understanding of material
demand and waste generation must be achieved in
order to meet the Federal mandate, maintain mission
readiness, and improve process efficiency.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• A number of Army industrial processes were
benchmarked against similar state of the art processes
•Technologies for the Army processes were identified
and examined to determine the costs and benefits of
implementation
• A software tool was designed to provide strategies to
reduce harmful emissions in Army industrial buildings
• System optimization control strategies were developed
to optimize heating, cooling and ventilation loads
• Studies of four Army facilities were conducted to
demonstrate the benefits in efficiency improvements and
energy savings that can be realized by adopting the
technologies, tools, and strategies
Energy Reduction Through Practical
Scheduled Maintenance
Investigators: Michael J. Chimack, MIE; Jonathan Aardsma, MIE
Prime Grant Support: National Center for Energy Management and Building Technology and the Illinois Department
of Commerce and Economic Opportunity
Problem Statement and Motivation
Clean Boiler Tubes without Scale
• Commercial buildings spend $55 billion annually on
Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning (HVAC)
• More than 55% of companies use a reactive
maintenance (RM) approach for equipment
maintenance; while less than 33% of companies use a
scheduled maintenance (SM) approach
Dirty Boiler Tubes with Scale
Technical Approach
• A literature review was conducted to determine the
status of the HVAC industry with respect to scheduled
maintenance (SM)
• Unstructured, open-ended interviews of industry
experts were conducted to determine the energy savings
and other financial benefits of a proper SM program, and
the reason why the clear benefits of proper scheduled
maintenance are overlooked
• Retraining the market through Best Practices seminars
and webcasts will be conducted. Targeted attendees
include building owners and operators, design engineers,
HVAC contractors and apprentice tradesmen
91
• Advantages of programmed SM include increased
equipment life, improved indoor air quality and
productivity, and a potential energy savings of 15-20%
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Created a comprehensive literature review report.
Potential savings in commercial buildings are estimated
to be $8-$11 billion annually.
• Developed a Best Practices manual of SM protocols
• First seminar given to major international property
manager (responsible for 900 million square feet
worldwide)
• Seminars scheduled for meetings of the Chicago
Chapter of the American Society of Heating,
Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE)
Mechanical Systems Technology Evaluation
Investigators: Michael J. Chimack, MIE; Jonathan Aardsma, MIE
Prime Grant Support: National Center for Energy Management and Building Technology and the Illinois Department
of Commerce and Economic Opportunity
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Commercial buildings spend $55 billion annually on
Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning (HVAC)
• Ventilation alone is estimated to consume 1.4 quads
(1.0 E15 Btu) of energy annually
• Conventional HVAC technologies can meet the needs
of buildings, but are unable to efficiently meet the needs
of higher ventilation air loads, humidity control, and
varying occupancy densities
Displacement Ventilation
Technical Approach
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• A literature review was conducted to compare existing
HVAC designs to the emerging generation of mechanical
systems technologies (MSTs)
• A literature review of 147 articles has been completed,
identifying the road blocks to MST selection and
implementation in HVAC specifications
• Building simulation and other quantitative modeling
tools will be utilized to identify proper applications for
MSTs and to quantify associated energy savings and
lifecycle costs
• Next generation MSTs will improve indoor air quality
and ventilation effectiveness, while reducing energy
consumption in buildings
• Educational materials will be developed to educate
building owners and operators, design engineers and
HVAC contractors on the costs and benefits of MSTs
• Educational materials will include recommended
actions to move next generations MSTs closer to
application
• Proper applications for MSTs will be determined by
building simulation (climate and building type)
• Educational materials and training seminar
presentations will be developed to educate the market on
the advantages and applications of MSTs including the
recommended actions determined through the literature
review and building simulations
Commissioning and Retrocommissioning
of Commercial Buildings
Investigators: Michael Chimack, MIE; Christine Walker, MIE
Prime Grant Support: National Center for Energy Management and Building Technology
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Though the benefits of commissioning (Cx) and
retrocommissioning (RCx) protocols in the literature are
numerous, they are principally anecdotal
• Commissioning a building or systems within a building
(e.g. decentralized heating, ventilating and air
conditioning systems) is a method of reducing risk by
ensuring that proper systems operation is achieved for
the building owner
• Quantification of the benefits of Cx is warranted
Technical Approach
• A literature review was conducted to determine the
status of commissioning (Cx) and retrocommissioning
(RCx) within the building and HVAC industries
• Building simulation and other quantitative modeling
tools will be utilized to identify proper applications for Cx
and RCx and to quantify energy savings potential
• Educational materials will be developed to educate
building owners and operators, design engineers and
HVAC contractors on the direct costs and benefits of Cx
and RCx
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• The literature review is nearing completion
• Building simulation protocols for this project are being
developed
• Educational materials and training seminar
presentations will be developed to educate the market on
the advantages and applications of Cx and RCx,
including the recommended actions determined through
the literature review and building simulations
92
Evaluation of LEED Certification Program for Buildings
A Case Study
Investigator: Michael Chimack, MIE
Prime Grant Support: National Center for Energy Management and Building Technology
Problem Statement and Motivation
LEED Buildings
180
160
140
Number of Projects
120
100
Certified
Silver
Gold
Platinum
80
60
40
• The LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental
Design) Green Building Rating System® is a voluntary,
consensus-based national standard for developing highperformance, sustainable buildings
• Very little empirical data exists that demonstrate the
short- and long-term benefits of constructing a LEED
building
20
0
USA
India
Canada
Mexico
China
Current LEED Projects Worldwide
Spain
Technical Approach
Select two identical or nearly identical buildings, one
LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design)
rated and one non-LEED rated, to monitor the following
variables for a period of one year:
•Temperature, Humidity, Carbon Dioxide
concentration, Lighting levels and Power
consumption of all pertinent heating, ventilating
and air conditioning subsystems
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Two City of Chicago buildings have been selected for
the case studies
• Preliminary building equipment assessments are
complete
• Monitoring equipment has been ordered. Monitoring of
buildings should commence in August 2006.
• Use building simulation software to normalize data for
differences in building orientation, occupancy, equipment
scheduling, etc.
Midwest Combined Heat & Power Application Center
Investigators: John Cuttica, Steffen Mueller, Cliff Haefke (Energy Resources Center)
Prime Grant Support: U.S. Department of Energy & Eight Midwest SEOs
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Combined Heat & Power (CHP) is defined as an
integrated system that generates at least a portion of
the electricity requirements of a building or facility onsite, and recycles the thermal energy exhausted from
the electric generation equipment to provide cooling,
heating, dehumidification, and/or process heating
• The U.S DOE established a national Challenge to
double the installed capacity of CHP in the US from 46
GW in 1998 to 92 GW by the year 2010.
• The MAC was established to support the U.S. DOE
CHP Challenge in the 12 State Midwest Region
Technical Approach
• The MAC was established as the first of its kind
application center in 2001 to test the concept of regional
application centers
• The MAC fosters project identification and
implementation through targeted education, unbiased
information, and technical assistance
• The MAC, working closely with each of the State
Energy Offices, has formed partnerships with the CHP
stakeholders in the Midwest
• The MAC has implemented a full gamut of outreach
services, including website, targeted market
workshops, project profiles, site technical &
financial analyses, and specialty reports
93
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• As reported at the 6th National CHP Road-map Meeting
in the fall of 2005, the Midwest region is on track
regarding its contribution to the National CHP Challenge
• In 2003, the U.S. DOE expanded the concept of
regional CHP centers Today their exists 8 regional
centers covering the entire U.S. based on the MAC
success and model.
• The MAC was recognized in 2005 with the MEEA
Energy Efficiency Achievement Award in Education and
the MAC Director received the CHP Champion award in
2005 from the U.S. CHP Association in recognition of the
MAC accomplishments
Energy Commodity Procurement Program
Investigators: Mark J. Pruitt, Energy Resources Center
Prime Grant Support: Illinois Department of Central Management Services
Problem Statement and Motivation
• Natural gas and electricity markets in Illinois are
deregulating
• Management of commodity delivery, pricing, and risk
management are now the responsibility of the end user
• The State realized that direct management of
procurement, billing, and risk management were
essential to protecting the State’s interests and
operating budgets
• The ERC was selected to manage deregulated
commodity procurement for all state facilities
Key Achievements and Future Goals
Technical Approach
• Data analysis and management is key to supporting
daily purchasing decisions as well as long term strategy
development.
• The ERC developed a series of billing, modeling, and
analytical tools to support data and decision
management activities
• The ERC now trades utility account data with utilities
and suppliers on a daily basis to track and verify
consumption and costs
• recently expanded program to include electricity
procurement in addition to natural gas procurement
•Successfully negotiated a five year natural gas contract
for State facilities
• Saved state accounts thousands in misapplied taxes
through special exemption filing
• Developed an electricity solicitation for all state
accounts in the Commonwealth Edison Service territory
• Drafting amendment to CMS and ERC interagency
agreement that will extend our relationship to 2011
Freight Mode Choice Modeling:
Applications to Freight Transportation and Logistics
Investigators: Kouros Mohammadian and Amir Samimi, CME
Primary Grant Support: Illinois Department of Transportation
Problem Statement and Motivation
• An efficient freight transportation system could have
considerable positive impacts on the economy.
• Freight models and related public policy tools are far
behind the logistics and technological advances.
• Freight transport modeling frameworks should be
revised in a way that captures the basis of decision
making process across the supply chain.
Technical Approach
• Simulate the commodity flow between each pair of
firms using the Freight Analysis Framework and County
Business Patterns 2005 data from census.
• Do a survey to model the logistic cost of the shipment.
The survey should have data on individual shipments;
freight terminals, consolidation and distribution centers,
ports and airports; and also transport and logistics costs.
•Determine the shipment size for each firm pair by
minimizing the total logistic costs for each commodity
group.
•Assign the commodity flow to the whole network.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Developing a behavior-based model is in the design
process to improve freight movement analysis.
• The framework relies mostly on the available datasets,
however because of the deficiency of the authentic public
data, a well-developed survey could boost the model
accuracy significantly.
• Firms, as the real decision making units, are making
the decisions in the model.
• Data simulation techniques should be improved.
• Model results should be validated with the real
observations.
94
PIPING POTENTIAL IN EARTH DAMS
Investigators: Krishna Reddy & Kevin Richards, Department of Civil and Materials Engineering
Prime Grant Support: National Science Foundation
Problem Statement and Motivation
•Piping causes approximately 46% of all dam failures, with the
backwards erosion mode of piping in perhaps 31% of all these
piping cases
•Current methods for evaluation of backwards erosion piping
have not been successful in preventing or assessing piping in
unfiltered dams, which results in billions of dollars in
unnecessary damages and repairs each year.
•A laboratory investigation of the constitutive behavior of pipe
initiation is necessary to define key parameters that influence
piping potential and to allow formulation of predictive tools and
develop remediation strategies.
Technical Approach
ƒPrevious investigations into piping have focused on pipe
progression. Our focus is on pipe initiation, which should yield
a more sensitive tool for the prediction of the critical hydraulic
conditions necessary to initiate piping.
ƒPrevious investigators have found a correlation between
confining stress conditions and critical piping parameters. Our
work is addressing this phenomenon in more detail.
ƒResearch includes conducting bench-scale experiments to (1)
determine the critical hydraulic gradient and the critical
discharge coefficient of different granular soils subjected to
variable confining stresses in a true-triaxial load cell, and (2)
assessing the influence seepage direction and the rate of
change in hydraulic loading conditions has on the critical
hydraulic gradient and critical discharge coefficient.
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Different soil types have been characterized and are
being used in the experiments
• Preliminary results have found a relationship between
the confining stresses and critical piping parameters
when soils are in a non-buoyant condition
•The geometry of the exit also plays a large role in pipe
initiation due to the convergence of flow lines at the exit
point and increased gradients due to confinement. This
explains the high incidence of piping failures where
convergence effects are produced around buried
structures.
•The influence of seepage direction and rate of change of
hydraulic loading are currently being investigated.
REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED SUBSURFACE USING
NANOSCALE IRON PARTICLES
Investigators: Krishna Reddy & Amid Khodadoust, Department of Civil and Materials Engineering
Prime Grant Support: National Science Foundation
Problem Statement and Motivation
Fe3O4
70nm
Fe0
•Nanoscale zerovalent iron (nZVI) particles have the potential to
be superior to iron filings, both in terms of initial rates of
reduction and total moles of contaminants reduced per mole of
iron.
•Instead of waiting for the contaminants to pass through the
permeable reactive barriers, the nZVI particles can be injected
into the contaminated source zones for rapid and effective
detoxification of the contaminants.
•The delivery of nZVI particles into the contaminated zones
uniformly and in required amounts in a controlled manner is
essential for effective remediation.
Technical Approach
ƒOur hypotheses are that: (1) as a result of aggregation, nZVI
particles can be transported only to limited distances in
subsurface; and (2) enhancement strategies such as use of
dispersants and pressurized system have potential to enhance
transport of nZVI particles in subsurface.
ƒResearch scope includes conducting (1) bench-scale column
experiments to determine transport of nZVI particles in different
gradation soils without and with enhancement strategies, and
(2) bench-scale tank experiments to determine transport of nZVI
particles in homogeneous and heterogeneous soils under the
optimal conditions determined from the column experiments.
Preliminary mathematical modeling will be performed to predict
the transport of nZVI particles in porous media under laboratory
and simulated field conditions.
95
Key Achievements and Future Goals
• Different soil types and commercial nZVI particles are
being characterized and used for the experiments
•. Enhanced treatments are being achieved through the
use of novel dispersants, pressurized system, and the
simultaneous use of dispersant-pressurized systems.
•The commercial nZVI particles possess magnetic
properties; therefore, a real-time transport of the nZVI
particles in porous media is being monitored using an
electromagnetic susceptibility sensor system.
•Experiments are being conducted to evaluate the effects
of soil heterogeneities on the transport of nZVI particles.
The reactivity of nZVI particles is being quantified before
and after transport in contaminated soils.
Rapid and Extensive Debromination of Brominated Flame Retardants in
Thermophilic Municipal Wastewater Digesters
Ke Yin, Jayashree Jayaraj , Kelly Granberg and Karl Rockne*
Department of Civil and Materials Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago
Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs)
HYPOTHESIS: Reductive dehalogenation of Deca
and other PBDEs in sewage sludge will be extensive
Technical Approach
ƒAnaerobic digester sludge sampled from two WWTPs:
ƒCalumet (CWRP)– Heavy industrial + domestic waste
ƒWoodridge Green Valley (WGV)– Domestic waste only
ƒAnalyzed 49 PBDEs by mass spectrometry-NCI
ƒ Debromination rate in continuously mixed flow reactor:
V
dC
= Q(Co − C ) − V (Ck R − Cm k P )
dt
At Steady state: k NET =
(C o − C )
Cτ
PF- CWRP
SF- CWRP
PD- CWRP
SD- CWRP
0.01
0.001
0.0001
N o rm a lized T o B D E 2 0 9
N o rm a lized T o B D E 2 0 9
ƒUsed as flame retardants in textiles, electronics and
furniture industries with up to 10 Br per molecule
ƒConsumer products decompose and end up in wastewater
treatment plants (WWTPs)
ƒDeca (10 Br atoms) is relatively non-toxic to humans
ƒOcta and Penta product more bioavailable and toxic
ƒBanned by the European Union and California
ƒVoluntary ban by US manufacturers
ƒDeca is still used in electronics and other plastics
ƒHOWEVER: Halogenated compounds CAN BE
DEHALOGENATED by anaerobic bacteria
1
1
0.1
PF- WGV
SF- WGV
0.1
MF- WGV
SC- WGV
0.01
0.001
0.0001
0.00001
0.00001
Dis
Tris
Tetra
Penta
Hexa
BDE fraction
Hepta
Octa
Nona
Dis
Tris
Tetra
Penta
Hexa
Hepta
Octa
Nona
BDE fraction
Figure 1. Total BDE homolog concentrations normalized to deca BDE in the CWRP (left) and
WGV (right) digesters at different locations in the plant. Shown are groupings of dibromo
diphenyl ethers through nonabromo diphenyl ethers in primary digester feed (PF), primary
digester draw (PD, CWRP only), secondary (methanogenic) digester feed (SF), secondary
(methanogenic) digester effluent (SD) and sludge cake (SC, WGV only) samples. Note log
scale on the y axis.
Key Achievements & Future Goals
ƒPBDEs are much higher in domestic wastewater!
ƒDeca BDE-209 is rapidly debrominated
ƒKinetic rate of 0.34 day-1 at WGV
ƒHighest rate ever reported (100x higher!)
ƒExtensive removal in only 10 d
ƒThe first report of lower brominated PBDEs being
debrominated in the WWTPs
ƒBanning Octa and Penta technical product will not
eliminate their presence in the environment
ƒContinued use of Deca may still release bioavailable and
toxic lower brominated BDEs into the environment
842 West Taylor St., M/C 246; 3077 Engineering Research Facility; [email protected]
96
RESEARCH GRANTS
This chapter reports on a sample of active external research grants during the period July 1, 2007 to June 30, 2008.
BIOENGINEERING
Michael Cho
Determination of Nociceptive Molecular Effects in Engineered Tissues in Response to Active Denial Type
94 GHz Irradiation, ONR, October 2005 – September 2008.
Manipulation of Stem Cell Differentiation by Noninvasive Electrical Stimulus, NIH, July 2006 – June
2008.
Biopolymers for Tissue Electroporation: The Mechanism of Membrane Sealing, NIH, September 2008 –
August 2012.
Novel Hybrid Artificial Cornea Optimized for 3D Cell Adhesion, Eye Bank Assoc. of Am, September 2007 –
August 2008.
Yang Dai
Computational Prediction of MHC Class II Epitopes, NIH 1 R03 AI069391-01, March 2006 – February
2008.
Innovative Curriculum of Bioinformatics Training for BiTmaP, Chicago Technology Park, DOD, May
2005 – June 2008.
David Eddington
Cnidocytes as Microscale Drug Synthesis and Delivery Module, DARPA, May 2007 – March 2009.
Microfluidic Microbial Sieve, Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, May 2007 – April 2009.
Jie Liang
Collaborative Research: Monte Carlo Study of Pseudoknotted RNA Molecules: Motifs, Structure and
Folding, NSF/DMS-0800257, June 2008 – May 2012.
High-accuracy Models of Proteins from Remote Homology, NIGMS/NIH R01-GM081682-01, September
2007 – August 2012.
Tools and Databases for Enzyme Function Prediction and Active Site Identification: Evolutionary
Matching of Protein Surfaces, NSF DB&I-0646035, August 2007 – July 2008.
Computational Assembly of Beta Barrel Membrane Proteins, NIGMS/NIH, R01-GM079804, March 2007
– February 2012.
CAREER: A Database for Modeling Protein Spatial Geometry – Discovering Protein Functions, NSF, DBI0133856, September 2002 – August 2007.
Development of Nanoscale Neuromodulating Platform, NIH (R01-EY016094-01A1, January 2007 –
December 2011.
Determination of Nociceptive Molecular Effects in Engineered Tissues in Response to Active Denial Type
94-GHz irradiation, ONR/DOD, November 2005 – September 2008.
Subcontract of P20: NIH Exploratory Center for Cheminformatics Research, NIH/National Human
Genome Research Institute, October 2005 – September 2007.
97
Constrained Sequential Monte Carlo and its Applications in Structural Bioinformatics, NIGMS/NIH, R01GM68958-01, June 2003 – May 2008.
James Lin
Carcinogenic Potential of Wireless Communication Radiation, Univ Tokyo, Indefinite duration.
Bioelectromagnetics, BEMS, July 2007 – June 2008.
Andreas Linninger
Chicago Science Teacher Research (CSTR) Program – Research Experiences for Teachers, NSF,
December 2007 – December 2010.
Collaborative Research: Mathematical Optimization for Targeted Macro-molecules Delivery to the Brain,
NSF, 2007 – 2009.
Modeling, Monitoring and Control of Hydrocephalus, NIH, 2007 – 2009.
Integrated Design and Control under Uncertainty, NSF, October 2006 – October 2009.
New Design Methods and Algorithms for Highly Energy-efficient and Low-cost Multicomponent
Distillation Processes, DOE, October 2006 – October 2011.
Chicago Science Teacher Research (CSTR) Program – Research Experiences for Teachers, NSF,
December 2005 – April 2008.
Invasive Drug Delivery to the Brain, JNCL Research Fund, September 2007.
Development of a Volume Sensor for the Treatment of Hydrocephalus, STARS – Kids, April 2006 – April
2008.
Interstitial Dynamics of the Poroelastic Brain and Cerebral Vasculature in Humans, NSF, September 2008
– September 2011.
Hui Lu
Innovative Bioinformatics Curriculum Development for BiTmaP, DOL (Through Illinois Medical District),
May 2005 – June 2008.
Novel Therapeutic Drug Design for SARS, NIH, May 2005 – April 2010.
Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Cellular Protein Networks on Membranes, Chicago Biomedical Consortium,
January 2008 – December 2008.
Richard Magin
MRI: Acquisition of a Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometer System, NSF, September 2008 – August 2009.
James Patton
Machines Assisting Recovery from Stroke, ED-NIDRR, October 2007 – September 2012.
Engineering for Neurologic Rehabilitation, NIH-NICHD, October 2005 – September 2010.
Error-enhanced Learning & Recovery in 2 & 3 Dimensions, NIH-NINDS, November 2007 – October 2011.
Device for Overground Gait/Balance Training Post-Stroke, NIH-NICHD, December 2005 – November
2008.
98
Patrick Rousche
CAREER: Technological Developments and Intellectual Infrastructure Development for Advanced Neural
Engineering, NSF, February 2004 – January 2009.
Michael Stroscio
Extension of Integrated Semiconductor-Nanoscale-Semiconductor Nanostructures, Grant of the Army
Research Office with funds from the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, August 2006 – August 2008.
III-nitride and Related Würtzite Quantum-dot-based Optoelectronic Devices with Enhanced Performance,
Grant of the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, June 2005 – May 2008.
Devices with Optimum Performance, AFOSR, May 2008 – May 2011.
Integrated Nanoscale-Semiconductor-Biological Structures, ARO W911NF-08-1-0114, June 2008 – May
2012.
CB Detection Using Nanostructures, EPIR/Army CREL, October 2007 – September 2009.
Christos Takoudis
NIRT: Active Multiferroic Nanostructures, NSF CMS 0609377, July 2006 – June 2010.
REU Supplement in Atomic Scale Investigation of High Dielectric Constant Thin Films Using in Situ and
other Techniques, NSF CTS 0706699, January 2006 – December 2007.
RET Supplement in Novel Materials and Processing, NSF EEC 0703958, April 2007 – April 2008.
REU Supplement for NIRT Active Multiferroic Nanostructures, NSF CMS 0731730, July 2006 – June
2008.
RET Supplement for NIRT Active Multiferroic Nanostructures, NSF CMS 0731734, July 2006 – June
2008.
REU Supplement for NIRT Active Multiferroic Nanostructures, NSF CMS 0829903, July 2007 – June
2009.
RET Supplement for NIRT Active Multiferroic Nanostructures, NSF CMS 0829895, July 2007 – June
2009.
REU Site in Novel Advanced Materials and Processing with Applications in Biomedical, Electrical and
Chemical Engineering, NSF EEC 0755115, April 2008 – March 2011.
Equipment Supplement for NIRT Active Multiferroic Nanostructures, NSF CMS 0752880, September
2007 – August 2009.
REU Site in Novel Materials and Processing in Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, NSF EEC
0453432, April 2005 – April 2008.
The Center for Authentic Science Practice in Education, NSF, August 2004 – August 2009.
Chicago Science Teacher Research (CSTR) Program, NSF EEC 0502272, May 2005 – April 2009.
RET Supplement for REU Site in Novel Advanced Materials and Processing with Applications in
Biomedical, Electrical and Chemical Engineering, NSF EEC 0839043, June 2007 – June 2009.
Novel High Dielectric Constant Nanostructures, Air Liquide - MRC, January 2007 – December 2007.
99
Research Equipment Grant: Atomic Layer Deposition Systems and Characterization Tools, Air Liquide,
Non-Cash Award, January 2007 – June 2008.
Organic Microelectronic Transistors, Motorola –College of Engineering Tech. Centers, August 2006 –
August 2007.
Novel High Dielectric Constant Nanostructures, Air Liquide - MRC, March 2007 – February 2008.
Surface Characterization and Modification for Dielectric Layer of OTFTs, Motorola –MRC, August 2007 –
August 2008.
Yttria-based High Dielectric Constant Nanostructures, Air Liquide, December 2007 – March 2009.
100
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
Andreas Linninger
Chicago Science Teacher Research (CSTR) Program – Research Experiences for Teachers, NSF,
December 2007 – December 2010.
Collaborative Research: Mathematical Optimization for Targeted Macro-molecules Delivery to the Brain,
NSF, 2007 – 2009.
Modeling, Monitoring and Control of Hydrocephalus, NIH, 2007 – 2009.
Integrated Design and Control under Uncertainty, NSF, October 2006 – October 2009.
New Design Methods and Algorithms for Highly Energy-efficient and Low-cost Multicomponent
Distillation Processes, DOE, October 2006 – October 2011.
Chicago Science Teacher Research (CSTR) Program – Research Experiences for Teachers, NSF,
December 2005 – April 2008.
Invasive Drug Delivery to the Brain, JNCL Research Fund, September 2007.
Development of a Volume Sensor for the Treatment of Hydrocephalus, STARS – Kids, April 2006 – April
2008.
Interstitial Dynamics of the Poroelastic Brain and Cerebral Vasculature in Humans, NSF, September 2008
– September 2011.
Randall Meyer
REU: Simple Scientific Synthesis of Bimetallic and Mixed Oxide Catalysts, NSF/CBET, January 2008 –
August 2008.
REU: Development of Novel Heterogeneous Catalysts for NOx Storage Reduction (NSR), NSF/CBET,
January 2008 – August 2008.
Collaborative Research: Development of Novel Heterogeneous Catalysts for NOx Storage Reduction
(NSR), NSF/CBET, September 2007 – August 2010.
IREE: Simple Scientific Synthesis of Bimetallic and Mixed Oxide Catalysts, NSF/CBET, January 2008 –
August 2008.
Ab Initio Study of Support Effects in the Direct Oxidation of Propylene to Propylene Oxide, ACS-PRF,
May 2007 – August 2009.
Density Functional Theory Study of Alloying on Sub-Surface Hydrogen and Carbon in Pd Acetylene
Hydrogenation Catalysts, UOP, January 2008 – August 2008.
Fundamental Studies of the Roles and Interactions of Disparate Metals in p-d Alloy Catalysts, CBET/NSF,
July 2008 – June 2013.
Sohail Murad
Molecular Modeling of Ion Transport and Separation in Nanochannels, NSF, September 2007 – August
2010.
Molecular Simulations of Transport Processes in Structured Membranes, Department of Energy, June 2003
– June 2009.
101
GOALI: Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Membrane Assisted Phase Equilibria, NSF, May 2003 –
April 2009.
US-India Collaborative Research: Phase Transitions in Confined Aqueous Environments, NSF, May 2003
– April 2008.
Solubility of Hydrogen in Hydrocarbons, UOP, May 2008 – December 2008.
Absorption in Pen Markers, LaCo, June 2008 – December 2008.
Modeling of Phospho Lipid Bi Layer Membranes, DOE, September 2008 – August 2011.
Ludwig Nitsche
Experimental and Modeling Activities for Several Promising Alternative Thermochemical Cycles, ANL,
October 2007 – July 2008.
Hoover Tech Center Project, Hoover Materials Handling Group, Inc., June 2008 – December 2008.
John Regalbuto
Simple, Scientific Syntheses of Bimetallic and Mixed Oxide Catalysts, NSF, July 2006 – June 2009.
Non-Platinum Bimetallic Cathode Electrocatalysts, DOE, Subcontracted from Argonne, February 2007 –
January 2011.
Non-Platinum Bimetallic Cathode Electrocatalysts, OVCR match to DOE grant, February 2007 – January
2011.
The Development of Titania Supported Noble Metal Catalysts, Honeywell, June 2008 – December 2008.
The Development of Bimetallic Catalysts, Chevron-Phillips, July 2008 – June 2009.
Christos Takoudis
NIRT: Active Multiferroic Nanostructures, NSF CMS 0609377, July 2006 – June 2010.
REU Supplement in Atomic Scale Investigation of High Dielectric Constant Thin Films Using in Situ and
other Techniques, NSF CTS 0706699, January 2006 – December 2007.
RET Supplement in Novel Materials and Processing, NSF EEC 0703958, April 2007 – April 2008.
REU Supplement for NIRT Active Multiferroic Nanostructures, NSF CMS 0731730, July 2006 – June
2008.
RET Supplement for NIRT Active Multiferroic Nanostructures, NSF CMS 0731734, July 2006 – June
2008.
REU Supplement for NIRT Active Multiferroic Nanostructures, NSF CMS 0829903, July 2007 – June
2009.
RET Supplement for NIRT Active Multiferroic Nanostructures, NSF CMS 0829895, July 2007 – June
2009.
REU Site in Novel Advanced Materials and Processing with Applications in Biomedical, Electrical and
Chemical Engineering, NSF EEC 0755115, April 2008 – March 2011.
102
Equipment Supplement for NIRT Active Multiferroic Nanostructures, NSF CMS 0752880, September
2007 – August 2009.
REU Site in Novel Materials and Processing in Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, NSF EEC
0453432, April 2005 – April 2008.
The Center for Authentic Science Practice in Education, NSF, August 2004 – August 2009.
Chicago Science Teacher Research (CSTR) Program, NSF EEC 0502272, May 2005 – April 2009.
RET Supplement for REU Site in Novel Advanced Materials and Processing with Applications in
Biomedical, Electrical and Chemical Engineering, NSF EEC 0839043, June 2007 – June 2009.
Novel High Dielectric Constant Nanostructures, Air Liquide - MRC, January 2007 – December 2007.
Research Equipment Grant: Atomic Layer Deposition Systems and Characterization Tools, Air Liquide,
Non-Cash Award, January 2007 – June 2008.
Organic Microelectronic Transistors, Motorola –College of Engineering Tech. Centers, August 2006 –
August 2007.
Novel High Dielectric Constant Nanostructures, Air Liquide - MRC, March 2007 – February 2008.
Surface Characterization and Modification for Dielectric Layer of OTFTs, Motorola –MRC, August 2007 –
August 2008.
Yttria-based High Dielectric Constant Nanostructures, Air Liquide, December 2007 – March 2009.
Lewis Wedgewood
Experimental and Modeling Activities for Several Promising Alternate Thermochemical Cycles – CuCl,
ANL, August 2007 – July 2008.
103
CIVIL AND MATERIALS ENGINEERING
Farhad Ansari
PIRE: US-Asia Network of Centers for Intelligent Structural Health Management of Safety-Critical
Structures, NSF, September 2007 – September 2012.
Structural Health Monitoring of Patroon River Bridge, Federal Highway Administration, October 2007 –
December 2008.
Simplified and Cost Effective Scour Sensor, Illinois Department of Transportation, August 2007 – June
2008.
Alexander Chudnovsky
Measurements of Dynamic Toughness of PE Pipes, DOW Co., March 2008 – December 2009.
Rock Splitting Test under Biaxial Confinement, Shell Co., April 2003 – April 2008.
Rock Splitting Test under Biaxial Confinement, Shell Co., April 2008 – April 2009.
Christophe Darnault
Nucleation and Precipitation Processes in the Vadose Zone during Contaminant Transport, U.S.
Department of Energy, March 2006 – February 2008.
NATO ASI: Overexploitation and Contamination of Shared Groundwater Resources: Management,
(Bio)Technological, and Political Approaches to Avoid Conflicts, NATO Security Through Science
Programme, April 2007 – December 2007.
J. Ernesto Indacochea
Development of Nanostructured-based Sensor for Reliable Detection of Improvised Explosive Devices,
NSF, September 2007 – August 2010.
Development of Crosscutting Materials for the Electrochemical Reduction of Actinide Oxides Used in
Advanced Fast Burner Reactors, DOE – ANL, March 2008 – September 2008.
Real Time Detection Methods to Monitor TRU Compositions in UREX+ Process Streams, DOE Subcontract from Texas A&M, October 2007 – September 2010.
Development of Sensor Systems for Reliable Detection of Explosives, ANL, May 2008 – January 2009.
Study of Glass and Steel Interfaces in Phosphate Cement Composites, ANL, September 2007 – August
2008.
Nanostructured Sensors for Detecting Low Levels of Hydrogen at Low Temperatures, NSF, September
2005 – August 2008.
Amid Khodadoust
Biodegradation of PCBs in Contaminated Sediments Using Iron, U.S. EPA, October 2007 – September
2008.
Remediation of Contaminated Subsurface Using Nanoscale Iron Particles, NSF, August 2007 – August
2009.
Removal of Cyanide from Groundwater, Burns and McDonnell, Downers Grove, IL, July 2007 – June
2008.
104
Jie Lin
Transferability of Household Travel Survey Data in Calibrating and Validating Travel Forecasting Models,
Federal Highway Administration, November 2004 – June 2008.
Integrated Graduate Education and Research Training (IGERT) in Computational Transportation Science,
NSF, June 2006 – June 2011.
Integrated Graduate Education and Research Training (IGERT) in Landscape, Ecological & Anthropogenic
Processes, NSF, June 2006 – June 2011.
UIC - Chicago Transit Authority Research Grant, Chicago Transit Partnership Program, July 2007 – April
2008.
Design of a Travel Time Information System for Dynamic Content Dissemination & Management,
NAVTEQ, August 2007 – December 2007.
Development of Freight Planning Support System for Northeastern Illinois, University of Wisconsin,
Madison, September 2007 – August 2012.
Project Level PM2.5 and PM10 Hotspot Analysis: A Peer Exchange, Illinois Center for Transportation
(ICT), Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT), July 2007 – February 2008.
Post-Implementation Evaluation of Emissions Benefits of CMAQ Projects, Chicago Metropolitan Agency
for Planning, May 2008 – May 2009.
Abolfazl Mohammadian
Transferability of Travel Survey Data and Household Travel Data Simulation Tool, Federal Highway
Administration (FHWA), September 2007 – March 2009.
System-wide Information for Transportation Assessment and Research: Transferability of Household
Travel Survey Data in Calibrating and Validating Travel Forecasting Models, Federal Highway
Administration (FHWA) through IDOT, November 2005 – June 2008.
IGERT Graduate Program in Computational Transportation Science, NSF, June 2006 – May 2011.
Metropolitan Transportation Support Initiative, Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT), July 2006 –
June 2009.
Population Synthesis in Support of Regional Travel Demand Modeling, Northeastern Illinois Planning
Commission (NIPC) / Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning (CMAP), March 2007 – June 2008.
Effectiveness of Transit Strategies Targeting Elderly People, IDOT- Illinois Center for Transportation
(ICT), July 2006 – December 2007.
Partnership under National Center for Freight and Infrastructure Research and Education (CFIRE),
University of Wisconsin Madison, August 2007 – April 2012.
Bus on Shoulders: Analysis of Preliminary Concept, IDOT- Illinois Center for Transportation (ICT), July
2007 – June 2008.
Population Synthesis and Simulation in Support of Regional Travel Demand Modeling, Chicago
Metropolitan Agency for Planning (CMAP), 5/1/8 - 8/15/9.
Trip Chaining Behavior of Senior Travelers: Applications to Public Transportation Planning, IDOTIllinois Center for Transportation (ICT), 8/16/8 - 8/16/9.
105
Krishna Reddy
GOALI: Field Monitoring and Performance Evaluation of Four Bioreactor Landfills, NSF, May 2006 –
April 2009.
IGERT: Ecology, Management and Restoration of Integrated Human/Natural Landscapes, NSF, June 2006
– June 2011.
Remediation of Contaminated Subsurface Using Nanoscale Iron Particles, NSF, August 2007 – July 2009.
Dynamic Water Balance and Geotechnical Stability of Bioreactor Landfills: Field Monitoring and
Mathematical Modeling, Centre de Recherche pour l’Environnement, l’Energie, et le Dechet (CREED),
Limay, France and ONYX Waste Services Inc., July 2005 – August 2007.
Integrated Electrochemical Oxidation: Feasibility Studies for Different MGP Sites, Hi-Tech Environmental
Inc., Chicago, November 2005 – October 2008.
Geophysical Monitoring of Leachate Recirculation and Its Effects on Waste at Orchard Hills Landfill,
Environmental Research and Education Foundation, October 2006 – October 2007.
Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Global Environnemental Changes, Graduate College, May 2008 – August
2008.
Karl Rockne
NEW GRANT: Collaborative Research: Debromination of PBDEs in Aquatic Sediments, NSF, April 2008
– March 2011.
CAREER: Active Capping for Contaminated Sediment Remediation, NSF, January 2004 December 2008.
Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship (IGERT): Ecology, Management and Restoration
of Integrated Human/Natural Landscapes, NSF, July 2006 – June 2011.
Fate Analysis of Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers in Anaerobic Digester Sludge, IL Waste Management
and Research Center, January 2007 – December 2008.
ECO-PRO: An Intelligent System for Shipping to Protect the Ecosystem of the Great Lakes, Great Lakes
Protection Fund, 2006 – 2008.
106
COMPUTER SCIENCE
Tanya Berger-Wolf
CAREER: Computational Tools for Population Biology, NSF, May 2008 – April 2013.
III-CXT: Collaborative Research: Computational Methods for Understanding Social Interactions in Animal
Populations, NSF, August 2007 – July 2010.
Collaborative Research: SEI: Computational Methods for Kinship Reconstruction, NSF, July 2006 – June
2009.
Ugo Buy
Formal Method Support for Reliability and Security Metrics, Army Research Lab., July 2007 – December
2008.
Eclipse-Based IDE for Cache’s Object Script Language, SERC, August 2007 – July 2008.
Isabel Cruz
Collaborative Research: Information Integration for Locating and Querying Geospatial Data, NSF, July
2005 – June 2009.
ITR Collaborative Research: Context-aware Computing with Applications to Public Health Management,
NSF, August 2003 – August 2009.
ITR Collaborative Research: Context-aware Computing with Applications to Public Health Management –
Supplement, NSF, August 2004 – August 2009.
IGERT Graduate Program in Computational Transportation Science, NSF, 2006 – 2011.
Bhaskar DasGupta
CAREER: Efficient Algorithms for Computational Problems in Bioinformatics via Combinatorial and
Geometric Techniques, NSF, April 2004 – March 2009.
Bioinformatics Tools Enabling Large-Scale DNA Barcoding, NSF, July 2006 – June 2009.
Collaborative Research: SEI: Computational Methods for Kinship Reconstruction, NSF, July 2006 – June
2009.
Barbara Di Eugenio
CAREER: Automatic Knowledge Acquisition for NL Interfaces to Educational Applications, NSF, June
2002 – May 2008.
A Collaborative Dialogue Architecture for Peer Learning Interactions, NSF, September 2005 – August
2008.
REU: A Collaborative Dialogue Architecture for Peer Learning Interactions, NSF, September 2005 –
August 2008.
Extending and Validating a Computational Model of Effective Tutoring, ONR, March 2007 – March 2009.
Intelligent Aggregation for Mobile Search, Motorola University Partnership, August 2007 – July 2010.
Piotr Gmytrasiewicz
Decision-Theoretic Planning in Multi-Agent Environments, NSF, July 2007 – July 2010.
107
Andrew Johnson
MRI: Development of Instrumentation for Lambda Vision, NSF, September 2004 – August 2008.
NCLT: A Center to Develop Nanoscale Science and Engineering Educators with Leadership Capabilities,
NSF, October 2004 – August 2009.
Visualization Techniques for Supporting Rapid Decision Making Involving Large Scale Data, Office of
Naval Research/NCSA, March 2007 – February 2008.
Visualization Techniques for Supporting Rapid Decision Making Involving Large Scale Data, Office of
Naval Research/NCSA, March 2008 – February 2009.
Toward Life-like Computer Interfaces that Learn, NSF, January 2007 – December 2009.
Environmentally Non-disturbing Under-ice Robotic Antarctic Explorer (ENDURANCE), NASA, March
2006 – August 2008.
Robert Kenyon
Rehabilitation Robotics and Tele-manipulation Systems: Machines Aiding Recovery in Stroke, NIDRR,
November 2002 – October 2007.
Minimizing Instability with Dynamic Visual Inputs, NIH, December 2002 – November 2007.
Posture and Orientation in Healthy and Impaired Elderly, NIH, November 2006 – October 2006.
Rehabilitation Robotics and Tele-manipulation Systems: Machines Aiding Recovery in Stroke, NIDRR,
November 2007 – October 2012.
Error-enhanced Learning and Recovery in 2 and 3 Dimensions, NIH, July 2006 – June 2010.
Ashfaq Khokhar
International Supplement- MotionSearch: Motion Trajectory-Based Object Activity Retrieval and
Recognition from Video and Sensor Databases, NSF, 2007 – 2010.
SGER: Reliable Information Dissemination and Resource Discovery in Mobile Environments, NSF, 2007 –
2009.
Foveation Based Data Reduction Technologies for All-time, All-weather Surveillance Systems, SBIR
Program, DHS, 2006 – 2007.
Foveation Based Event Classification for All-time, All-weather Surveillance Systems, State of Indiana,
2007 – 2008.
MotionSearch: Motion Trajectory-Based Object Activity Retrieval and Recognition from Video and Sensor
Databases, NSF, 2006 – 2009.
Development of Computational Mechanics Infrastructure and Human Resources for Advancing
Engineering Design Practices, NAS, 2006 – 2009.
Secure Streaming of Multimedia Contents, Nokia, 2007 – 2008.
Jason Leigh
The OptIPuter, NSF, October 2002 – September 2007.
StarLight: Strategic Technologies for Internet Discovery and Development, NSF, October 2002 –
September 2006.
108
Development of Instrumentation for LambdaVision, NSF, September 2004 – August 2008.
Towards Life-Like Computer Interfaces, NSF, January 2007 – December 2009.
CoreWall- Integrated Environment for Interpretation of Geoscientific Data from Sediment and Crystaline
Cores, NSF, March 2006 – February 2009.
Scientific Visualization and Analysis Support, NASA, August 2006 – April 2008.
Visualization Techniques for Supporting Rapid Decision Making, ONR, March 2005 – February 2008.
ONVECTOR, Pacific Interface/NTT, 2007 – 2008.
StarFlight, Adler, January 2006 – May 2008.
Magic Carpet, Science Museum of Minnesota, September 2005 – December 2007.
Advanced Visualization on High Resolution Tiled Displays, Sharp Labs, September 2007 – September
2008.
Collaborative Application Development / Networking Research, Nortel Networks, June 2007 – December
2007.
Eye Tracking Analysis System, Learning by Design, June 2006 – December 2007.
ONVECTOR, Pacific Interface/NTT, 2005 – 2008.
OmegaTable / Omega Desk MRI, NSF, September 2008 – August 2011.
Future Earth, NSF, September 2008 – August 2010.
CoreWall Supplement, NSF, September 2008 – August 2010.
Towards Life-Like Computer Interfaces REU, NSF, February 2007 – January 2008.
Bing Liu
IGERT Graduate Program in Computational Transportation Science, NSF, 2006 – 2011.
Eco-Pro: An Intelligent System for Shipping to Protect the Ecosystem of the Great Lakes, Great Lake
Protection Fund, October 2006 – December 2008.
Opportunity Map: Further Development, Motorola, 2007 – 2009.
Thomas Moher
Supporting Whole-class Science Investigations with Spatial Simulations, NSF, January 2008 – December
2010.
Nanoscience Center for Learning and Teaching, Northwestern University (NSF Pass-thru), October 2006 –
September 2007.
Nanoscience Center for Learning and Teaching, Northwestern University (NSF Pass-thru), October 2007 –
September 2008.
109
Scientists Kids and Teachers. SKIT: A GK-12 Partnership with the Chicago Public School, NSF, January
2004 – December 2008.
ITR: The OptIPuter, University of California (NSF Pass-thru), October 2002 – September 2008.
Development of Instrumentation for LambdaVision, NSF, October 2004 – September 2008.
MSCOPE, University of Chicago, January 2008 – September 2008.
Peter Nelson
Knowledge Discovery for Manufacturing and Design, Motorola through the Manufacturing Research Center,
August 2003 – August 2009.
Knowledge Discovery for Manufacturing, Design and Business Intelligence, Motorola through the
Manufacturing Research Center, August 2004 – August 2007.
Regional Transit Asset Management Operations, Regional Transportation Authority, September 2004 –
September 2007.
Regional Transit Asset Management Research and Development, Regional Transportation Authority,
February 2005 – January 2008.
Cronos – A Data Mining Approach to Analysis of the Protein Space, Argonne National Laboratory, May 2005 –
December 2007.
IGERT: Graduate Program in Computational Transportation Science, National Science Foundation, June 2006 –
May 2011.
Learning the Origins and Representing Uncertainty in the Data Fusion Process for both Distributed and
Centralized Architectures, Motorola through the Manufacturing Research Center, August 2006 – August 2007.
Advanced System for Comparative Analysis of Metabolism, Chicago Biomedical Consortium, May 2006 –
April 2008.
Ridematch 21 Maintenance Enhancements and Hosting, Pace, July 2006 – June 2008.
Interface from IDOT AVL Entry System to Gateway, Meade Electric, October 2006 – September 2007.
TAMP Development and Vista Installation, Northeastern Illinois Planning Commission, December 2006 –
December 2007.
Women in Science and Engineering System Transformation, National Science Foundation, August 2006 –
July 2011.
Gateway Traveler Information System Enhancements II, Illinois Department of Transportation, July 2005 –
June 2008.
Providing Reliable Route Guidance Using the Gary-Chicago-Milwaukee (GCM) Traveler Information System,
Center for the Commercialization of Innovation Transportation Technology, February 2008 – December 2008.
Sol Shatz
Model-Based Techniques and Tools to Support Analysis and Simulation of UML Diagrams, ARO, January
2006 – December 2008.
110
Collaborative Research: CT-ISG: Agent-Based Trust Management for Trust Re-Evaluation in Online
Auctions, NSF, August 2007 – July 2010.
A. Prasad Sistla
Monitoring Off-the-Shelf Components, NSF, September 2007 – August 2008.
IGERT: Graduate Program in Computational Transportation Science, NSF, June 2006 – May 2011.
Static and Dynamic Techniques for Enforcement of Security Properties of Critical Software Systems,
A.R.O, August 2008 – August 2011.
Reasoning about Spatial relationships in Text, National Geospatial Intelligence Agency, July 2008 – June
2011.
Robert Sloan
Complexity Aspects of Knowledge Representation, NSF, September 2004 – August 2008.
IGERT: Graduate Program in Computational Transportation Science, NSF, June 2006 – August 2011.
CRI: The SecLab at UIC, NSF, May 2006 – May 2009.
Jon Solworth
Factoring High-level Authorizations into Kernel-level Configurations, NSF, September 2006 – August
2008.
CRI: The SECLAB at UIC, NSF, May 2006 – April 2009.
Jeffrey Tsai
A Dual Adaptive Approach for Detecting Internal/External Intrusion, Motorola, December 2006 –
December 2007.
A Framework for Cancer-Related Genes Mining Systems, Wei Company, March 2003 – August 2007.
Cancer-Related Genes Mining System, Wei Company, January 2007 – Indefinite.
V. N. Venkatakrishnan
CyberTrust: Runntime Techniques for Protecting Sensitive Information In Large Scale Software, NSF,
June 2007 – May 2009.
Computing Research Infrastructure: The Seclab at UIC, NSF, May 2006 – May 2009.
Ouri Wolfson
IGERT: Graduate Program in Computational Transportation Science, NSF, June 2006 – May 2011.
STTR Phase I: Feasibility of Mobile Peer-to-Peer Search on Hand-held Devices, NSF, July 2006 – June
2007.
SEI(IIS): MotionEye: Querying and Mining Large Datasets of Moving Objects, NSF, July 2005 – June
2008.
ITR Collaborative Research: Context-Aware Computing with Applications to Public Health Management,
NSF, September 2003 – August 2008.
Computational Transportation Science, Hitachi Co., September 2006 – August 2017.
111
Clement Yu
Auditory Perception of Drug Names: Neighborhood Effects, AHRQ, June 2003 – May 2008.
Achieving Information Integration of Web Databases through the Construction of Metasearch Engine,
NSF, July 2005 – June 2009.
Intelligent Use of Dictionaries for Document Retrieval, NSF, September 2007 – August 2008.
Advanced System for Comparative Analysis of Metabolism, Chicago Biomedical Consortium, July 2006 –
December 2007.
Lenore Zuck
Methodology for Establishing the Dependability and Security of Telecommunications Protocols,
subcontract from NYU, August 2004 – July 2008.
TITLE: Collaborative Research: CSR-EHS: Property Based Development of Reactive and Embedded
Systems, NSF, August 2007 – July 2008.
Formal Verification of High-level Models and Transformations Between Them, SRC, November 2004 –
April 2008.
SGER: Monitoring Off the Shelf Components, NSF, September 2007 – February 2009.
CRI- The Sec Lab at UIC, NSF, May 2006 – April 2009.
112
ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING
Jezekiel Ben-Arie
IGERT: Graduate Program in Computerized Transportation, NSF, June 2006 – August 2011.
Shantanu Dutt
Incremental Placement and Routing Algorithms for FPGA and VLSI Circuits, NSF, January 2003 –
December 2008.
Algorithms for Simultaneous Exploration of Multi-Domain Transforms for Design Closure in Emerging
Technologies, NSF, July 2008 – July 2011.
Mitra Dutta
Extension of Integrated Semiconductor-Nanoscale-Semiconductor Nanostructures, Grant of the Army
Research Office with Funds from the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, August 2006 – August 2008.
III-nitride and Related Würtzite Quantum-dot-based Optoelectronic Devices with Enhanced Performance,
Grant of the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, June 2005 – May 2008.
Devices with Optimum Performance, AFOSR, May 2008 – May 2011.
Integrated Nanoscale-Semiconductor-Biological Structures, ARO W911NF-08-1-0114, June 2008 – May
2012.
Rapid Nanosensors for Biological Warfare Agents in Buildings and HVAC Systems Detection Using
Nanostructures, Phase II, SBIR Award, EPIR EPIR/Army CREL, October 2007 – September 2009.
Broadband LWIR C-IHET FPA for Discrimination Seekers, IntelliEPI/MDA, October 2007 – April 2008.
Pbse Studies, Northrop Grumman Corporation, Indefinite term.
CdTe Studies, Red Cell Solar, May 2008 – June 2008.
Danilo Erricolo
MURI: Adaptive Waveform Design for Full Spectral Dominance, AFOSR, May 2005 – April 2010.
Adaptive Waveform Design for Detecting Low-grazing-angle and Small-RCS Targets in Complex
Maritime Environments, NRL/DARPA, January 2006 – October 2007.
DURIP: Acquisition of Instrumentation for High Frequency Measurements at the University of Illinois at
Chicago, AFOSR, August 2007 – July 2008.
Alan Feinerman
Continued Development of the AF/SGR “Tricorder” and LEP (Nonlinear Optics) Programs for Homeland
Security, Military Public Health and Medical Operations, AF/SG, October 2007 – September 2011.
Chicago Science Teacher Research Program, NSF-RET, May 2005 – April 2008.
Ethics in the Details, NSF, September 2006 – August 2009.
Ultra-low Thermal Conductivity Insulation, ONR-TRECC, May 2007 – December 2007.
Siddhartha Ghosh
Thermoelectrically Cooled MWIR APDs, EPIR Tech, October 2005 – October 2007.
113
MBE Growth of Multiferroics on GaN, ONR, July 2004 – September 2008.
Active Multiferroics Nanostructures, NSF-NIRT, July 2006 – July 2010.
Multifucntional Conducting Oxides, Amseng, September 2006 – September 2008.
Lifecycle in Nanomanufacturing, NSF, August 2006 – August 2008.
REU: Advanced Materials, NSF, August 2007 – August 2010.
Ashfaq Khokhar
International Supplement- MotionSearch: Motion Trajectory-Based Object Activity Retrieval and
Recognition from Video and Sensor Databases, NSF, 2007 – 2010.
SGER: Reliable Information Dissemination and Resource Discovery in Mobile Environments, NSF, 2007 –
2009.
Foveation Based Data Reduction Technologies for All-time, All-weather Surveillance Systems, SBIR
Program, DHS, 2006 – 2007.
Foveation Based Event Classification for All-time, All-weather Surveillance Systems, State of Indiana,
2007 – 2008.
MotionSearch: Motion Trajectory-Based Object Activity Retrieval and Recognition from Video and Sensor
Databases, NSF, 2006 – 2009.
Development of Computational Mechanics Infrastructure and Human Resources for Advancing
Engineering Design Practices, NAS, 2006 – 2009.
Secure Streaming of Multimedia Contents, Nokia, 2007 – 2008.
Sharad Laxpati
Assuring STEM Credential Expansion Through Nurturing Diversity (ASCEND), NSF, January 2006 –
December 2010.
Technical Assistance on Coherent Oscillator Project, Northrop Grumman, May 2008 – September 2008.
Gyungho Lee
Augmenting Branch Prediction for Trusted Computing, NSF, September 2006 – August 2009.
James Lin
Carcinogenic Potential of Wireless Communication Radiation, Univ. Tokyo, Indefinite duration.
Bioelectromagnetics, BEMS, July 2007 – June 2008.
Derong Liu
SENSORS: Approximate Dynamic Programming for Dynamic Scheduling and Control in Sensor Networks,
NSF, September 2005 – August 2008.
Finite Horizon Discrete-Time Adaptive Dynamic Programming, NSF, September 2006 – August 2009.
Adaptive Critic-Based Powertrain Control System Design, General Motors, January 2003 – December
2007.
114
Sudip Mazumder
A High Performance Real-time Simulation System for Multiscale Analysis of Advanced Power and Control
Networks and Hardware-in-the-loop Testing, ONR, May 2008 – May 2009.
Hybrid-modulation Based High Power High Frequency and Scalable SiC Polyphase Fuel Cell Inverter for
Power Quality and Distributed Generation, NSF, August 2007 – July 2010.
Modular and Efficient Power Converter with Source Ripple-current Mitigation, US Hybrid (via California
Energy Commission), May 2008 – May 2010.
Optically-gated High-power Solid-state Switch (SiC-OGHSS) for Pulsed-power Application, Department
of Energy, July 2007 – March 2008.
Optically-gated Non-latched High Gain Power Device, ONR, December 2006 – May 2008.
Wireless Distributed Control of Naval Advanced Electrical Power Systems, ONR, April 2005 – May 2008.
Nonlinear Analyses and Robust Control of Interactive Power Networks Using a Unified Hybrid Modeling
Framework, NSF, February 2003 - February 2009.
All-SiC Bidirectional dc/dc Converter for Hybrid Electric Vehicle, US Hybrid, October 2007 – September
2008.
Vitali Metlushko
Flux Quanta Manipulation in Hybrid Magnetic-Superconductor Nanosystems, Argonne National
Laboratory Center for Nanoscale Materials Proposal CNM 470, September 2007 – September 2008.
3D Magneto-electronics, Argonne National Laboratory Center for Nanoscale Materials proposal CNM 468,
October 2007 – October 2008.
Influence of Non-planar Geometry on Nano-ring Based Spintronic Devices 09, Argonne National
Laboratory, Advanced Photon Source Proposal GUP-8733, February 2008 – February 2009.
Roland Priemer
An Objective Measure of Baby Cry, National Institutes of Health, September 2008 – September 2010.
Dan Schonfeld
MotionSearch: Motion Trajectory-Based Object Activity Retrieval and Recognition from Video and Sensor
Databases, NSF, August 2006 – July 2009.
InteractiveVision: Collaborative Multiple-Input-Multiple-Output Inverse Problems with Application in
Image and Video Processing, NSF, August 2007 – July 2010.
Real-Time High-Quality Video Communications from Handheld Cameras Using Video Stabilization and
Auto-Focus, Motorola, August 2005 – May 2008.
MobilePlenoptics: Panoramic Video Communications in Mobile Devices, Motorola, August 2007 – May
2008.
Real-Time Financial Forecasting Based on Statistical Signal Processing: Correlation Analysis and Fast
Algorithms, Gelber Group, August 2006 – May 2008.
Machine Learning and Event Detection in Biological Systems, VG Bioinformatics, August 2007 – May
2008.
115
Signal Communication and Processing in a RFID Sensor Network System, Your Life Essentials, May 2007
– December 2008.
Michael Stroscio
Extension of Integrated Semiconductor-Nanoscale-Semiconductor Nanostructures, Grant of the Army
Research Office with funds from the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, August 2006 – August 2008.
III-nitride and Related Würtzite Quantum-dot-based Optoelectronic Devices with Enhanced Performance,
Grant of the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, June 2005 – May 2008.
Devices with Optimum Performance, AFOSR, May 2008 – May 2011.
Integrated Nanoscale-Semiconductor-Biological Structures, ARO W911NF-08-1-0114, June 2008- May
2012.
CB Detection Using Nanostructures, EPIR/Army CREL, October 2007 – September 2009.
Daniela Tuninetti
CAREER: Etiquette for Collaborative Communications and Networking, NSF, 2006 – 2010.
P. L. E. Uslenghi
Electromagnetic Signature of Edge-structures for Unexploded Ordnance Detection, NATO, Science for
Peace Project SfP-982376, March 2007 – February 2009.
Kaijie Wu
Cyber System: Research: Security Aware Design for Test Methods, NSF, September 2006 – August 2009.
Hung-Yu Yang
Metamaterial Based Antennas for Multi-band Wireless Systems, BWE/NSF STTR, July 2007 – June 2008.
Zhichun Zhu
Collaborative Research: CSR – SMA: Thermal Modeling, Simulation and Management of Memory
Subsystems for Multi-Core Systems, NSF, August 2007 – July 2008.
Collaborative Research: Memory Access Throttling for Highly Multi-Threaded Processors, NSF, May
2006 – April 2009.
116
MECHANICAL AND INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING
Suresh Aggarwal
Gravitational Effects on Partially–Premixed Flames in µg , NASA, October 2004 – September 2008.
Quantifying the Effects of Fluid Flow Characteristics Near the Nozzle Tip on Diesel Engine Particulate
Emissions, DOE/ANL, November 2005 – May 2009.
International Workshop on Advances in Combustion Science and Technology, NSF, August 2007 –
December 2008.
Farid Amirouche
Experimental Investigation of Implant Stability and Micromotion after Total Hip Arthroplasty, Zimmer,
2006 – 2008.
Development of Virtual Automation Transportation System, IDOT, 2006 – 2009.
Prashant Banerjee
RecTech, a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center, US DED, October 2007 – September 2012.
IGERT – Transportation Systems, NSF, 2007 – 2012.
Virtual Prototype Training Model Using UIC Virtual Reality Infrastructure, NIST, 2006 – 2009.
Motorola Innovation Center – Hapticon Testbed, Motorola, 2007 – 2008.
Development of an Engineering Simulation Based Cataract Surgery Training lab for Ophthalmology and
Consequent Enhancements for Engineering Education, Alcon, 2007 – 2008.
Spinal Neurosurgical Simulation, NIH – NIBIB R21, 2008 – 2010.
Capsulorrhexis Surgical Simulation, NIH NEI STTR, 2008 – 2009.
Kenneth Brezinsky
Biologically Derived Diesel Fuels and NO, NSF, April 2006 – April 2009.
Fundamental Understanding of Propellant/Nozzle Interaction to Mitigate Erosion for Very High Pressure
Missile Propellant Applications, ONR, July 2004 – May 2009.
Aromatic Radicals-Acetylene Particulate Matter Chemistry, SERDP, April 2007 – March 2010.
Generation of Comprehensive Surrogate Kinetic Models and Validation Databases for Simulating Large
Molecular Weight Hydrocarbon Fuels, AFOSR, May 2007 – April 2010.
Comprehensive JP-8 Mechanism for Vitiated Flows SBIR Phase I, AFOSR, June 2008 – February 2009.
Novel Materials and Processing in Chemical and Biomedical Engineering – Research Experience for
Undergraduates, NSF, April 2005 – April 2010.
Center for Authentic Science Practice in Education, NSF, August 2004 – August 2009.
Sabri Cetinkunt
Robotics Exercise Machines for People with Disabilities, Department of Education, September 2005 –
Aug. 2008.
117
Study of Manufacturing Environment and CAD Reconstruction of the Past 40 Years in Jet Engine
Manufacturing Plants Concerning Its Health Implications, Pratt & Whitney, Jan. 2005 – Dec. 2009.
Electro-Hydraulic Control Systems and Applications in Construction Equipment, Caterpillar Inc., Jan. 2006
– Dec. 2009.
Independent Metering Valve Analysis and Experiments for Energy Efficient Motion Control Systems,
National Fluid Power Association, Jan. 2007 – Dec. 2009.
Soyoung Cha
3-D Video Velocimetry System and Entire Flow Mapping around Large-Scale Parachutes, US Army, April
2006 – April 2008.
Control of Thermal Convection in Casting-Solidification Process Using Magnetic Fields, NSF, October
2005 – October 2007.
Development of Optical NDE Techniques for Truck Components Testing, Gunite Corporation, August 2005
– July 2008.
Houshang Darabi
Diagnosis and Maintenance of Relay Ladder Logic Programs and PLC Ladder Logic Diagrams Using
Artificial Neural Networks, NSF, September 2005 – September 2009.
Active Life Style Cases, Motorola, August 2007 – August 2008.
Process Improvement, Materials Science Incorporated, January 2008 – May 2008.
David He
Bearing Damage Condition Indicator Correlation and Life Analysis, NRTC/CRI, January 2008 – January
2009.
Development and Validation of Prognostic Capability, NRTC/CRI, July 2007 – August 2008.
Construction, Data Collection, and Signal Analysis of A Notional Split-Torque, Goodrich Sensors and
Integrated, May 2008 - August 2008.
Data Mining for UH-60 Condition Based Maintenance, Goodrich Sensors and Integrated Systems, May
2008 - August 2008.
Carmen Lilley
NCLT: National Center for Learning and Teaching Nanoscale Science and Engineering, NSF (Subcontract
from Northwestern University), October 2007 – September 2008.
Senior Design Project of Dust Free Installation System, Puget Sound Navel Shipyard, September 2007 –
August 2008.
Farzad Mashayek
US–UK Workshop on Electrostatic Atomization of Electrically-Insulating Liquids, NSF, May 2007 – April
2009.
Plasma Deposition of Thin Films on Nanowires and Nanoparticles, NSF, May 2007 – April 2010.
Efficient Turbulent Flame Stabilization for Advanced Propulsion, ONR, January 2005 – December 2007.
Flame Anchoring in Dump Combustors with Counter-current Shear Flow, NASA, July 2006 – July 2009.
118
Experimental and Computational Studies to Advance Operability and Performance of Combustion Systems
Adopting Fluidic Control, ONR, February 2008 – January 2011.
Ultra-rich Superadiabatic Combustion of Hydrogen Sulfide in a Reverse Flow Reactor, Innovative Energy
Solution, February 2007 – January 2009.
Constantine Megaridis
Enhanced Heat Transfer Characteristics of Liquid Suspensions Containing Water-Filled Carbon Nanotubes,
NSF, February 2006 – July 2007.
NIRT: Nanotube-Based Nanofluidic Devices and Fundamental Fluid Studies at the Nanoscale, NSF (via
Drexel Univ.), September 2006 – August 2010.
NER: Regulating Drug Delivery with Polymeric Nanofibers, NSF, July 2007 – June 2008.
Non-contact Printing of Copper Interconnects Using Homogeneous Inks, Air Liquide, May 2004 – August
2008.
W. J. Minkowycz
In Support of Engineering Research, Elsevier, July 2007 – June 2008.
Thomas Royston
Micromagnetic Resonance Elastography,.March 2005 – February 2008.
The Audible Human Project, September 2007 – August 2009.
MRI: Acquisition of a Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometer System, NSF, September 2008 – August 2009.
Laxman Saggere
CAREER: A Biomimetic Microsystems Technology Towards a Novel Retinal Prosthesis, NSF, March
2005 – February 2010.
Chipscale Multifinger Coordinated Manipulation Methodology for Nanomanufacturing, NSF, May 2008 –
April 2011.
Chipscale Multifinger Coordinated Manipulation Methodology for Nanomanufacturing, NSF, May 2008 –
April 2011.
MRI: Acquisition of a Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometer System, NSF, September 2008 – August 2010.
Michael Scott
Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center on Recreational Technologies and Exercise Physiology
Benefiting Persons with Disabilities, DoEd/OSERS/NIDRR, November 2006 – October 2007.
Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center on Recreational Technologies and Exercise Physiology
Benefiting Persons with Disabilities, DoEd/OSERS/NIDRR, October 2007 – September 2012.
IGERT: Graduate Program in Computational Transportation Science, NSF, June 2006 – May 2011.
Senior Design Project: Development of a Dust-Free Installation System, Puget Sound Naval Shipyard
(PSNS), August 2007 – August 2008.
Senior Design Project: Mechanized Pipe Cutter, PSNS, August 2006 – August 2007.
STTR: Universal Exercise Kits for Manual Wheelchair Users, NIH, July 2005 – August 2007.
119
Research on Incorporating Uncertainty When Using AHP in Customer Surveys and Hierarchical
Engineering Decision Making, GM R&D, May 2005 – May 2007.
Special Project for Luz-Elena Aponte, Florida Dept. of Vocational Rehab, April 2007 – August 2008.
Elkay Manufacturing: Interdisciplinary Product Development Course, Elkay Manufacturing, August 2007 –
August 2008.
Motorola, Inc.: Interdisciplinary Product Development Course, Motorola, Inc., August 2007 – August
2008.
Ahmed Shabana
Modeling and Control of Robotic Manipulators with Flexible Links and Joints, NSF, September 2003 –
August 2008.
Air Brakes and Coupler Forces in Railroad Vehicle Systems, FRA, September 2003 – December 2008.
Integration of Large Deformation Finite Element Formulations in Flexible Multibody System Algorithms,
ARO, July 2006 – July 2009.
Enhancement and Development of Railroad Vehicle Dynamics Simulation Capabilities, FRA, April 2006 –
April 2011.
William Worek
Establishment of an Industrial Assessment Center at University of Illinois at Chicago, U.S. Department of
Energy, September 2006 – August 2011.
National Center for Energy Management And Building Technology Research Prog., NCEMBT/DOE,
January 2004 – January 2009.
Technology and Market Assessment of CNC as Heat Transfer Fluids- Phase 1, N-Baro Tech, Co., LTD,
February 2008 – May 2008.
Alexander Yarin
Nanotube-Based Nanofluidic Devices and Fundamental Fluid Studies at the Nanoscale, National Science
Foundation through Grant NSF-NIRT CTS 0609062., 2006 – 2010.
NER: Regulating Drug Delivery with Polymeric Nanofibers, National Science Foundation through Grant
NSF-NER CBET 0543538, 2007 – 2008.
Nanofiber Manufacturing for Energy Conversion and Utilization, NIRT through the University of Akron,
2005 – 2008.
Functional Composite Nanofibers by Co-electrospinning: Functional Nano-objects for Life Science, The
Volkswagen, 2006 – 2007.
120
PUBLICATIONS
This chapter reports on a sample of book and chapter publications, and journal and conference publications during the
period July 1, 2007 to June 30, 2008.
BOOK AND CHAPTER PUBLICATIONS
BIOENGINEERING
Michael Cho
J. K. Wise, M. R. Cho, E. Zussman, C. M. Megaridis and A. L. Yarin, “Electrospinning Techniques to Control
Deposition and Structural Alignment of Nanofibrous Scaffolds for Cellular Orientation and Cytoskeleton
Reorganization,” in Nanotechnology and Tissue Engineering: The Scaffold, C. Laurencin, Editor, CRC Press,
In press.
Yang Dai
L. Huang, O. Karpenko, N. Murugan and Y. Dai, “Building a Meta-predictor for MHC Class II-Binding
Peptides,” in Immunoinformatics: Predicting Immunogenicity in Silico, D. R. Flower, Editor, Humana
Press Inc., Totowa, NJ, pp. 355-364, 2007.
John Hetling
J. R. Hetling, “Electrophysiology of Natural and Artificial Vision,” in Artificial Sight, Springer, pp. 355380, 2007.
James Lin
J. C. Lin, P. Bernardi, S. Pisa, M. Cavagnaro and E. Piuzzi, “Antennas for Medical Diagnosis and
Therapy,” in Modern Antenna Handbook, C. Balanis, Editor, Wiley, Hoboken, NJ, Chapter 27, In press.
J. C. Lin, P. Bernardi, S. Pisa, M. Cavagnaro and E. Piuzzi, “Antennas for Biological Experiments,” in
Modern Antenna Handbook, C. Balanis, Editor, Wiley, Hoboken, NJ, Chapter 28, In press.
Michael Stroscio
V. V. Mitin, V. V. Kochelap and M. A. Stroscio, “Introduction to Nanoelectronics,” Cambridge University
Press; written as part of an NSF NUE Grant, 2007.
M. Dutta, K. Sun, Y. Li, V. Narayanamurthy, K. Reinhardt and M. A. Stroscio, “Colloidal Quantum Dots
(QDs) in Optoelectronic Devices --- Solar Cells, Photodetectors, Light-emitting Diodes,” in Handbook for
Self-Assembled Semiconductor Nanostructures for Novel Devices in Photonics and Electronics, Edited by
M. Henini, Elsever Pub., In press.
121
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
John Regalbuto
J. Regalbuto, “Strong Electrostatic Adsorption of Metals onto Catalyst Supports,” in Heterogeneous
Catalyst Preparation, K. P. de Jong, Editor, Wiley, 2008.
122
CIVIL AND MATERIALS ENGINEERING
Subrata Chakrabarti
S. Chakrabarti, “State of Offshore Structure Development and Design Challenges,” Handbook of Coastal
and Ocean Engineering,” Chapter 52, World Scientific, Singapore, In press.
Christophe Darnault
C. J. G. Darnault, “Overexploitation and Contamination of Shared Groundwater Resources: Management,
(Bio)Technological and Political Approaches to Avoid Conflicts,” NATO Science for Peace and Security
Series – C: Environmental Security, Pub. Springer, pp. 1-453, The Netherlands, 2008.
C. J. G. Darnault, S. Boninea, B. Uyusur and P. Snee, “Visualization and Transport of Quantum Dot
Nanomaterials in Porous Media,” in Risk, Uncertainty and Decision Analysis for Nanomaterials:
Environmental Risks and Benefits and Emerging Consumer Products, I. Linkov, et al., Editors, NATO
Science for Peace and Security Series – C: Environmental Security, Springer, In press.
C. J. G. Darnault and I. Godinez, “Coastal Aquifer and Seawater Intrusion,” in Overexploitation and
Contamination of Shared Groundwater Resources: Management, (Bio)Technological, and Political
Approaches to Avoid Conflicts, C. J. G. Darnault, Editor, NATO Science for Peace and Security Series –
C: Environmental Security, Pub. Springer, The Netherlands, pp. 185-202, 2008.
C. J. G. Darnault, “Karst Aquifers: Hydrogeology and Exploitation,” in Overexploitation and
Contamination of Shared Groundwater Resources: Management, (Bio)Technological, and Political
Approaches to Avoid Conflicts, C. J. G. Darnault, Editor, NATO Science for Peace and Security Series – C:
Environmental Security, Pub. Springer, The Netherlands, pp. 203-226, 2008.
C. J. G. Darnault, “Shared Groundwater Resources Management,” in Overexploitation and Contamination
of Shared Groundwater Resources: Management, (Bio)Technological, and Political Approaches to Avoid
Conflicts, C. J. G. Darnault, Editor, NATO Science for Peace and Security Series – C: Environmental
Security, Pub. Springer, The Netherlands, pp. 291-308, 2008.
C. J. G. Darnault, “Sustainable Development and Integrated Management of Water Resources,” in
Overexploitation and Contamination of Shared Groundwater Resources: Management,
(Bio)Technological, and Political Approaches to Avoid Conflicts, C. J. G. Darnault, Editor, NATO Science
for Peace and Security Series – C: Environmental Security, Pub. Springer, The Netherlands, pp. 309-324,
2008.
C. J. G. Darnault, “Hydrodiplomacy and Environmental Security,” in Overexploitation and Contamination
of Shared Groundwater Resources: Management, (Bio)Technological, and Political Approaches to Avoid
Conflicts, C. J. G. Darnault, Editor, NATO Science for Peace and Security Series – C: Environmental
Security, Pub. Springer, The Netherlands, pp. 433-446, 2008.
Krishna Reddy
K. R. Reddy and C. Cameselle, “Electrochemical Remediation Technologies for Polluted Soils, Sediments
and Groundwater,” John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, New Jersey, In press.
K. R. Reddy, M. V. Khire and A. N. Alshawabkeh, “Geosustainability and Geohazard Mitigation,”
Geotechnical Special Publication No. 178, ASCE Press, Reston, Virginia, 1203p (ISBN: 978-0-7844-0971-8),
2008.
A. N. Alshawabkeh, K. R. Reddy and M. V. Khire, “Characterization, Monitoring and Modeling of
Geosystems,” Geotechnical Special Publication No.179, ASCE Press, Reston, Virginia, 1101p (ISBN: 9780-7844-0972-5), 2008.
123
M. V. Khire, A. N. Alshawabkeh and K. R. Reddy, “Geotechnics of Waste Management and Remediation,”
Geotechnical Special Publication No.177, ASCE Press, Reston, Virginia, 856p (ISBN: 978-0-7844-0970-1),
2008.
K. R. Reddy, “Physical and Chemical Groundwater Remediation Technologies,” Chapter 12 in
Overexploitation and Contamination of Shared Groundwater Resources, C. J. G. Darnault, Editor, Springer
Science Publisher, pp. 257-274 (ISBN: 978-1-4020-6984-0), 2008.
K. R. Reddy, “Enhanced Aquifer Recharge,” Chapter 13 in Overexploitation and Contamination of Shared
Groundwater Resources, C. J. G. Darnault, Editor, Springer Science Publisher, pp. 275-288 (ISBN: 978-14020-6984-0), 2008.
124
COMPUTER SCIENCE
Isabel Cruz
I. F. Cruz and H. Xiao, “Data Integration for Querying Geospatial Sources,” in Geospatial Services and
Applications for the Internet, J. Sample, K. Shaw, S. Tu and M. Abdelguerfi, Editors, Springer, In press.
Bhaskar DasGupta
B. DasGupta, X. He, T. Jiang, M. Li, J. Tromp and L. Zhang, “Nearest Neighbor Interchange and Related
Distances,” in Encyclopedia of Algorithms, M.-Y. Kao, Editor, Springer-Verlag, In press.
B. DasGupta and M.-Y. Kao, “Efficient Combinatorial Algorithms for DNA Sequence Processing,” in
Bioinformatics Algorithms: Techniques and Applications, Wiley Book Series on Bioinformatics:
Computational Techniques and Engineering, A. Zelikovsky and I. Mandoiu, Editors, John Wiley & Sons,
Inc., pp. 223-239, 2008.
B. DasGupta, D. Liu and H. Siegelmann “Neural Networks,” in Handbook on Approximation Algorithms
and Metaheuristics, T. F. Gonzalez, Editor, Chapman & Hall/CRC, Computer & Information Science
Series, Series Editor: Sartaj Sahni, pp. 22-1 – 22-14, 2007.
B. DasGupta and L. Wang, “Biology Computing,” in Wiley Encyclopedia of Computer Science and
Engineering, B. W. Wah Editor, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., December 2007.
Ashfaq Khokhar
T. Canli and A. Khokhar, “Data Acquisition and Data Dissemination in Wireless Sensor Networks,” in
Encyclopedia of Database Systems, Springer, In press.
Ajay Kshemkalyani
A. Kshemkalyani and M. Singhal, “Distributed Computing: Principles, Algorithms and Systems,”
Cambridge University Press, 752 pages, 2008.
John Lillis
C. K. Cheng, J. Lillis, S. Lin and N. Chang, “Interconnect Analysis and Synthesis,” John-Wiley, 2000,
Chinese version edited by W. Yu, EISBN:0-471-29366-0, 2008.
Thomas Moher
T. Moher, Contributing author for Being Human, R. Harper, T. Rodden, Y. Rogers, and A. Sellen, Eds.,
Microsoft Research Ltd., 2008.
Peter Nelson
J. F. Dillenburg and P. C. Nelson, “Data Handling in Intelligent Transportation Systems,” Wiley
Encyclopedia of Computer Science and Engineering (edited by B. Wah), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2008.
Jeffrey Tsai
Z. Yu and J. Tsai, Machine Learning-based Intrusion Detection Systems, Imperial College Press, London,
In press.
J. Tsai and P. Yu, Machine Learning in Cyber Trust: Reliability, Security, Privacy, Springer-Verlag, New
York, In press.
M. Singhal, G. Serugendo, J. Tsai, W. Lee, K. Romer and Y. Tseng, Sensor Networks, Ubiquitous and
Trustworthy Computing, IEEE, In press.
Venkat Venkatakrishnan
R. Sekar, V. N. Venkatakrishnan, S. Basu, S. Bhatkar and D. C. DuVarney, “Model Carrying Code: A New
Approach to Mobile Code Security,” in New Methods for Protecting Against Cyber Threats, Wiley Pub.
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Ouri Wolfson
Y. Luo and O. Wolfson, “Mobile Peer-to-Peer Databases,” in The Encyclopedia of Geographic
Information Science, Springer, pp. 671-677, 2008.
G. Trajcevski, O. Wolfson and P. Scheuermann, “Compression of Mobile Location Data,” in The
Encyclopedia of Database Systems, Springer, In Press.
Y. Luo and O. Wolfson, “MANET Databases,” in The Encyclopedia of Database Systems, Springer, In
Press.
Philip Yu
B. Long, Z. Zhang and P. S. Yu, “Relational Data Clustering: Models, Algorithms and Applications,” in
Advances in Database Systems, Chapman & Hall, In press.
C. Aggarwal and P. S. Yu, Privacy-Preserving Data Mining: Models and Algorithms, Springer, In press.
H. Kargupta, J. Han, R. Motwani and P. S. Yu, Next Generation of Data Mining, Chapman & Hall, In
press.
J. Tsai and P. S. Yu, Machine Learning in Cyber Trust – Security, Reliability, Privacy, Springer, In press.
C. Aggarwal, S. C. Gates and P. S. Yu, “On Supervised Clustering for Creating Categorization
Segmentations,” in Constrained Clustering: Advances in Algorithms, Theory, and Applications, Edited by
S. Basu, I. Davidson and K. Wagstaff, Chapman & Hall, In press.
Lenore Zuck
F. Logozzo, D. Peled and L. D. Zuck, “Verification, Model Checking and Abstract Interpretation,” 9th
International Conference, VMCAI, San Francisco, USA, Proceedings Springer, January 7-9, 2008.
126
ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING
Mitra Dutta
M. Dutta, K. Sun, Y. Li, V. Narayanamurthy, K. Reinhardt and M. A. Stroscio, “Colloidal Quantum Dots
(QDs) in Optoelectronic Devices --- Solar Cells, Photodetectors, Light-emitting Diodes,” in Handbook for
Self-Assembled Semiconductor Nanostructures for Novel Devices in Photonics and Electronics, Edited by
M. Henini, Elsever Pub., In press.
Ashfaq Khokhar
T. Canli and A. Khokhar, “Data Acquisition and Data Dissemination in Wireless Sensor Networks,” in
Encyclopedia of Database Systems, Springer, In press.
James Lin
J. C. Lin, P. Bernardi, S. Pisa, M. Cavagnaro and E. Piuzzi, “Antennas for Medical Diagnosis and
Therapy,” in Modern Antenna Handbook, C. Balanis, Editor, Wiley, Hoboken, NJ, Chapter 27, In press.
J. C. Lin, P. Bernardi, S. Pisa, M. Cavagnaro and E. Piuzzi, “Antennas for Biological Experiments,” in
Modern Antenna Handbook, C. Balanis, Editor, Wiley, Hoboken NJ, Chapter 28, In press.
Derong Liu
A. N. Michel, L. Hou and D. Liu, Stability of Dynamical Systems: Continuous, Discontinuous and Discrete
Systems, Birkhauser, 2007.
D. Liu, S. Fei, Z.-G. Hou, H. Zhang and C. Sun, Advances in Neural Networks, ISNN2007, Springer, 2007.
F.-Y. Wang and D. Liu, Networked Control Systems: Theory and Applications, Springer, 2008.
B. DasGupta, D. Liu and H. Siegelmann, “Neural Networks,” in Handbook of Approximation Algorithms
and Metaheuristics, Chapman & Hall/CRC, pp. 20.1-20.15, 2007.
Vitali Metlushko
J. Sautner, N. Jahedi and V. Metlushko, “Electromagnetic, Magnetostatic and Exchange Interaction
Vortices in Confined Magnetic Structures,” Vortices in Magnetic nano-rings, Review Book, Editor, E.
Kamenetskii, Research Signpost, In press.
Roland Priemer
R. Priemer, “Fundamentals of Digital Signal Processing,” in The Circuits and Filters Handbook, IEEE
and CRC Press, 39 pages, 2008.
R. Priemer, “Microprocessor-Based Design,” in The Circuits and Filters Handbook, IEEE and CRC Press,
49 pages, 2008.
Wenjing Rao
W. Rao, A. Orailoglu and R. Karri, “Towards Nanoelectronics Processor Architectures,” in Emerging
Nanotechnologies: Test, Defect Tolerance and Reliability, Springer, pp. 339-372, 2007.
Dan Schonfeld
D. Schonfeld, “Video Communication Networks,” (Invited Chapter) in The Essential Guide to Video
Processing, A. Bovik, Editor, Elsevier: Chennai, India, Chapter 16, 2008.
Michael Stroscio
V. V. Mitin, V. V. Kochelap and M. A. Stroscio, Introduction to Nanoelectronics, Cambridge University
Press; written as part of an NSF NUE Grant, 2007.
M. Dutta, K. Sun, Y. Li, V. Narayanamurthy, K. Reinhardt and M. A. Stroscio, “Colloidal Quantum Dots
(QDs) in Optoelectronic Devices --- Solar Cells, Photodetectors, Light-emitting Diodes,” in Handbook for
127
Self-Assembled Semiconductor Nanostructures for Novel Devices in Photonics and Electronics, Edited by
M. Henini, Elsever Pub., In press.
P. L. E. Uslenghi
P. L. E. Uslenghi, “Analytical Scattering and Diffraction,” Radio Science, special section, Vol. 42, No. 6,
November-December 2007.
Philip Yu
B. Long, Z. Zhang and P. S. Yu, Relational Data Clustering: Models, Algorithms and Applications,
Advances in Database Systems, Chapman & Hall, In press.
C. Aggarwal and P. S. Yu, Privacy-Preserving Data Mining: Models and Algorithms, Springer, In press.
H. Kargupta, J. Han, R. Motwani and P. S. Yu, Next Generation of Data Mining, Chapman & Hall, In
press.
J. Tsai and P. S. Yu, Machine Learning in Cyber Trust – Security, Reliability, Privacy, Springer, In press.
C. Aggarwal, S. C. Gates and P. S. Yu, “On Supervised Clustering for Creating Categorization
Segmentations,” in Constrained Clustering: Advances in Algorithms, Theory and Applications, Edited by
S. Basu, I. Davidson and K. Wagstaff, Chapman & Hall, 2008.
128
MECHANICAL AND INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING
Elodie Adida
E. Adida, Dynamic Pricing and Inventory Control - No Backorders under Uncertainty and Competition,
Pub., VDM Verlag Dr. Mueller e.K., 2007.
Suresh Aggarwal
S. K. Aggarwal, “Combustion and Emission Characteristics of Bio/Renewable Fuels,” in Frontiers in
Combustion, Science and Technology, IIT-K, 2008.
Prashant Banerjee
P. P. Banerjee, C. Luciano and S. Rizzi, “Virtual Reality Simulations,” in Anesthesiology Clinics, Editors:
A. Kofke and V. Nadkarni, 2008.
Constantine Megaridis
J. K. Wise, E. Zussman, A. L. Yarin, C. M. Megaridis and M. Cho, “Electrospinning Techniques to
Control Deposition and Structural Alignment of Nanofibrous Scaffolds for Cellular Orientation and
Cytosceletal Reorganization,” in Nanotechnology and Tissue Engineering: The Scaffold, Taylor and
Francis, 2008.
W. J. Minkowycz
W. J. Minkowycz and E. M. Sparrow, “Advances in Numerical Heat Transfer,” Vol. 3, Taylor and Francis
Pub., 2008.
A. Haji-Sheikh and W. J. Minkowycz, “Heat Transfer Analysis under Local Thermal Non-Equilibrium
Conditions,” Emerging Topics in Heat and Mass Transfer in Porous Media, Springer Science, In press.
Thomas Royston
T. J. Royston, M. B. Ozer, S. Acikgoz, H. A. Mansy and R. H. Sandler, “Advances in Computational
Modeling of Sound Propagation in the Lungs and Torso with Diagnostic Applications,” Chapter 9, in
Vibration and Acoustics in Biomedical Applications: Imaging, Characterization and Diagnostics ASME,
pp. 217-248, In press.
Laxman Saggere
L. Saggere, “Membrane Actuation for Micropumps,” in Encyclopedia of Microfluidics and Nanofluidics,
Springer Publishers, 5 pages, In press.
Ahmed Shabana
A. A. Shabana, Computational Continuum Mechanics, Cambridge University Press, 2008.
A. A. Shabana, K. E. Zaazaa and H. Sugiyama, Railroad Vehicle Dynamics: A Computational Approach,
Taylor & Francis/CRC, 2007.
Alexander Yarin
C. Tropea, A. Yarin, and J. F. Foss (editors), Springer Handbook of Experimental Fluid Mechanics,
Springer, 2007.
D. H. Reneker, A. L. Yarin, E. Zussman and H. Xu, “Electrospinning of Nanofibers from Polymer
Solutions and Melts,” in Advances in Applied Mechanics, Vol. 41, pp. 43-195, 2007.
C. J. Thompson, G. G. Case, A. L. Yarin and D. H. Reneker, “Effects of Parameters on Nanofiber Diameter
Determined from Electrospinning Model,” in Nanotechnology Research Advances, Nova Science Publishers
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J. K. Wise, M. Cho, E. Zussman, C. M. Megaridis and A. L. Yarin, “Electrospinning Techniques to Control
Deposition and Structural Alignment of Nanofibrous Scaffolds for Cellular Orientation and Cytosceletal
Reorganization,” in Nanotechnology and Tissue Engineering, Taylor and Francis, 2008.
A. L. Yarin, “Self-similarity,” in Springer Handbook of Experimental Fluid Mechanics, pp. 57-82, 2007.
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JOURNAL PUBLICATIONS
BIOENGINEERING
Michael Cho
I. Titushkin and M. Cho, “Modulation of Cellular Mechanics During Osteogenic Differentiation of Human
Mesenchymal Stem Cells,” Biophys. J., Vol. 93, pp. 3693-3702, 2007.
S. Sun, R. Vishnubhotla, T. Huq, M. Cho and S. Glover, “ROCK-II Mediates Colon Cancer Invasion via
Regulation of MMP-2 and MMP-13 at the Site of Invadopodia as Revealed by Multiphoton Imaging,” Lab.
Invest., Vol. 87, pp. 1149-1158, 2007.
V. Rao, I. Titushkin, W. Pickard, E. Moros, H. Thatte and M. Cho, “Non-thermal Effects of
Radiofrequency Field Exposure on the Calcium Dynamics in Stem Cell-derived Neuronal Cells:
Elucidation of Calcium Pathways,” Radiation Res., Vol. 169, pp. 319-329, 2008.
Y. Chen, M. Cho, A. Mak, J. Li, M. Wang and S. Sun, “Morphology and Adhesion of Mesenchymal Stem
Cells on PLLA, Apatite and Apatite/Collagen Surfaces,” J. Mater. Sci.: Mater. Med.Vol. 19, pp. 25632567, 2008.
Yang Dai
P. Larsen, E. Almasri, G. Chen and Y. Dai, “A Statistical Method to Incorporate Biological Knowledge for
Generating Testable Novel Gene Regulatory Interactions From Microarray Experiments,” BMC
Bioinformatics, 8:317, 2007.
O. Karpenko, L. Huang and Y. Dai, “A Probabilistic Meta-Predictor for the MHC Class II Binding
Peptides,” Immunogenetics, 60:1, pp. 25-36, 2008.
G. Chen, P. Larsen, E. Almasri and Y. Dai, “Rank-based Edge Reconstruction for Scale-free Genetic
Regulatory Networks,” BMC Bioinformatics, 9:75, 2008.
David Eddington
J. Higgins, D. T. Eddington, S. N. Bhatia and L. Mahadeven, “Collective Hydrodynamics and Kinetics of
Sickle Cell Vaso-Occlusion and Rescue in a Microfluidic Device,” Proceedings of the National Academy of
Sciences, Vol. 104, No. 51, pp. 20496-20500, 2007.
P. Tek, T. Chiganos, P. Ift, J. S. Mohammed, D. T. Eddington, C. P. Fall and P. R. Rousche, “Rapid
Prototyping for Neuroscience and Neural Engineering,” Journal of Neuroscience Methods, In press.
H. Caicedo, J. S. Mohammed, C. P. Fall and D. T. Eddington, “Microfluidic Add-on for Standard
Electrophysiology Chambers,” Lab on a Chip, In press.
Jie Liang
J. Dunda, T. A. Binkowski, B. DasGupta and J. Liang, “Topology Independent Protein Structural
Alignment,” BMC Bioinformatics, 8:388, doi:10.1186/1471-2105-8-388, 2007.
M. Lin, R. Chen and J. Liang, “Statistical Geometry of Lattice Chain Polymers with Voids of Defined
Shapes: Sampling with Strong Constraints,” J. Chem. Phys., 128(8):084903, 2008.
J. Zhang, M. Lin, R. Chen, W. Wang and J. Liang, “Discrete State Model and Accurate Estimation of Loop
Entropy of RNA Secondary Structures,” J. Chem. Phys., 128:125107.1-10, 2008.
J. O. Ebalunode, Z. Ouyang, J. Liang and W. Zheng, “A Novel Approach to Structure-based
Pharmacophore Search Using Computational Geometry and Shape Matching Techniques,” J. Chemical
Information and Modeling, 28;48(4):889-901. Epub., April 2008.
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Y. Cao and J. Liang, “Optimal Enumeration of State Space of Finitely Buffered Stochastic Molecular
Networks and Accurate Computation of Steady State Landscape Probability,” BMC Systems Biology, 2:30.
doi:10.1186/1752-0509-2-30, 2008.
Z. Ouyang and J. Liang, “Predicting Protein Folding Rates From Geometric Contact and Amino Acid
Sequence,” Protein Science, In press.
James Lin
Z. W. Wang, J. C. Lin, W. H. Mao, W. Z. Liu, M. B. Smith and C. M. Collins, “A SAR and Temperature:
Calculations and Comparison to Regulatory Limits for MRI,” J. of Magnetic Resonance Imaging,
26(2):437-441, August 2007.
J. C. Lin, S. Allen, J. B. Anderson, H. Bassen, M. Ikehata, N. Leitgeb, S. Pisa, S. Watanabe and K. Yamazaki,
“K ICNIRP Statement on EMF-Emitting New Technologies,” Health Phys., 94(4):376-392, April 2008.
Andreas Linninger
K. Kulkarni, P. Larsen and A. A. Linninger, “Assessing Chronic Liver Toxicity Based on Relative Gene
Expression Data,” Journal of Theoretical Biology, In press.
A. Linninger, M. Somayaji, X. Guo, T. Erickson and R. Penn, “Drug Transport in Anisotropic and
Heterogeneous Brain Tissue,” Annals of Biomedical Engineering, In press.
A. A. Linninger, M. R. Somayaji, M. Mekarski and L. Zhang, “Prediction of Convection-enhanced Drug
Delivery to the Human Brain,” Journal of Theoretical Biology, 250, pp. 5-138, 2008.
M. B. R. Somayaj, M. Xenos, L. Zhang, M. Megarski and A. A. Linninger, “Systematic Design of Drug
Delivery Therapies,” Comp. Chem. Eng., (32), 89-98, 2008.
A. Lucia, R. Gattupalli, K. Kulkarni, Kedar and A. Linninger, “A Barrier-Terrain Methodology for Global
Optimization,” Engineering Chemistry Research, Manuscript ID: ie071421t.R1, 2008.
A. Malcolm, J. Polan, L. Zhang, B. Oguannaike and A. A. Linninger, “Integrating Systems Design and
Control Using Dynamic Flexibility Analysis,” AICHE J, 53(8): 2048-2061, 2007.
R. Penn, M. Lee, A. Linninger, K. Miesel, L. Ning and L. Stylos, “Pressure Gradients in the Brain: An
Experimental Model of Hydrocephalus,” Journal of Neurosurgery, 104; p. 9, In press.
Hui Lu
Z. Ye, S. Zhao, G. Gao, R. Langlois, H. Lu and L. Wei, “Finding New Structural and Sequence Attributes
to Predict Disease-association of Single Amino Acid Polymorphisms (SAPs),” Bioinformatics., Vol. 23,
No. 12, pp. 1444-1450, 2007.
D. Sharma, O. Perisic, Q. Peng, Y. Cao, C. Lam, H. Lu and H. Li, “Single-molecule Force Spectroscopy
Reveals a Mechanically Stable Protein Fold and The Rational Tuning of its Mechanical Stability,”
Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 104, No. 22, pp. 9278-9283, 2007.
N. Bhardwaj, R. Stahelin, G. Zhao, W. Cho and H. Lu, “MeTaDoR: A Comprehensive Resource for
Membrane Targeting Domains and Their Host Proteins,” Bioinformatics, Vol. 23, No. 22, pp. 3110-3112,
2007.
L. Dougan, G. Feng, H. Lu and J. Fernandez, “Solvent Molecules Bridge the Mechanical Unfolding
Transition State of a Protein,” Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 105, No. 9, pp. 31853190, 2008.
D. Sharma, G. Feng, D. Khor, G. Genchev, H. Lu and H. Li, “Stablization Provided by Neighboring
Strands is Critical for Mechanical Stability of Protein,” Biophysical Journal, In press.
132
R. Langlois and H. Lu, “Machine Learning for Protein Structure and Function Modeling,” Annual Report in
Computational Chemistry, In press.
Richard Magin
R. L. Magin, S. Boregowda and C. Deodhar, “Modeling of Pulsating Peripheral Bioheat Transfer Using
Fractional Calculus and Constructal Theory,” Journal of Design & Nature, Vol. 1, pp. 18-33, 2007.
S. F. Othman, X. J. Zhou, H. Xu, T. J. Royston and R. L. Magin, “Error Propagation Model for
Microscopic Magnetic Resonance Elastography Shear-wave Images,” Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Vol.
25, pp. 94-100, 2007.
S. F. Othman, J. Li, O. Abdullah, J. J. Moinness, R. L. Magin and C. Muehleman, “High-resolution/highcontrast MRI of Human Articular Cartilage Lesions,” Acta Othopaedica, Vol. 78(4) pp. 536-546, 2007.
R. L. Magin, O. Abdullah, D. Baleanu and X. J. Zhou, “Anomalous Diffusion Expressed Through
Fractional Order Differential Operators in the Bloch-Torrey Equation,” Journal of Magnetic Resonance,
Vol. 190, pp. 255-270, 2008.
R. L. Magin and M. Ovadia, “Modeling the Cardiac Tissue Electrode Interface Using Fractional Calculus,”
Journal of Vibration and Control, In press.
H. Xu, S. F. Othman and R. L. Magin, “Monitoring Tissue Engineering Using Magnetic Resonance
Imaging,” Journal of Bioscience and Bioengineering, In press.
G. Ali Mansoori
G. Ali Mansoori, P. Mohazzabi, P. Macromack and S. Jabbari, “Nanotechnology in Cancer Prevention,
Detection and Treatment,” World Review of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development (WRSTSD),
4(2/3):226-257, 2007.
A. Nikakhtar, A. Nasehzadeh and G. Ali Mansoori,“Formation and Stability Conditions of DNADendrimer Nano-Clusters,” J. Comput'l & Theor'l Nanoscience, 4(3):1-8, 2007.
H. Ramezani, G. Ali Mansoori and M. R. Saberi, “Diamondoids-DNA Nanoarchitecture: From
Nanomodules Design to Self-Assembly,” J. Comput'l & Theor'l Nanoscience, 4(1):96-106, 2007.
G. Ali Mansoori, T. George, G. Zhang and L. Assoufid, “An Introduction to Nanotechnology Molecular
Building Blocks,” in Molecular Building Blocks for Nanotechnology: From Diamondoids to Nanoscale
Materials and Applications, Springer, New York, Topics in Applied Physics 109, 44-71, 2007.
G. Ali Mansoori, D. Vazquez and M. Shariaty-Niassar, “Polydispersity of Heavy Organics in Crude Oils
and Their Role in Oil Well Fouling,” J. of Petroleum Science and Engineering, In press.
B. Carpentier, A. Wilhelms and G. Ali Mansoori, “Reservoir Organic Geochemistry: Processes and
Applications,” J. of Petroleum Science and Engineering, In press.
E. K. Goharshadi, A. Morsali and G. Ali Mansoori, “A Molecular Dynamics Study on the Role of
Attractive and Repulsive Forces in Internal Energy, Internal Pressure and Structure of Dense Fluids,”
Chemical Physics, Vol. 331, Issues 2-3, pp. 332-338, 2007.
James Patton
J. Sulzer, J. Patton and M. Pehkin, “Pulling Your Strings: 2008 Cable Moment Arm Manipulation as a
Method of Joint Actuation,”IEEE Robotics and Automation Magazine, In press.
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J. L. Patton, D. Brown, M. Peshkin, J. Santos, A. Makhlin, E. Lewis, J. E. Colgate and D. Schwandt,
“KineAssist: Design and Development of a Robotic Overground Gait and Balance Therapy Device,”
Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation,” 15(2) 131-139, 2008.
J. S. Sulzer, M. A. Peshkin and J. L. Patton, “Design of a Mobile, Inexpensive Device for Upper Extremity
Rehabilitation at Home,” IEEE-International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics (ICORR), Noordwijk,
the Netherlands, 2007.
Patrick Rousche
P. J. Rousche, D. S. Schneeweis, E. Perreault and W. Jensen, “Translational Neural Engineering: From
Bench to Bedside,” Neural Engineering, Vol. 5, No. 1, P16-P20, 2008.
P. Tek, D. Eddington, C. P. Fall and P. J. Rousche, “Rapid Prototyping for Neural Engineering and
Neuroscience,” Journal of Neuroscience Methods, In press.
Michael Stroscio
M. A. Stroscio, M. Dutta and A. Raichura, “Conductance of Nanowires,” J. of Computational Electronics,
6, 247-249, 2007.
T. Yamanaka, M. Dutta and M. A. Stroscio, “Spontaneous Polarization Effects in Nanoscale Wurtzite
Structures,” J. of Computational Electronics, 6, 313-316, 2007.
M. Dutta, M. A. Stroscio, M. Vasudev, D. Ramadurai, L. Torres and B. West, “Blinking of Colloidal
Semiconductor Quantum Dots: Blinking Mechanisms,” J. of Computational Electronics, 6, 301-304, 2007.
D. Ramadurai, T. Yamanaka, Y. Li, M. Vasudev, V. Sankar, M. Dutta, M. A. Stroscio, T. Rajh and
Z. Saponjic, “Interactions of THz Vibrational Modes with Charge Carriers in DNA: Polaron-phonon
Interactions,” International Journal of High Speed Electronics, 17, 293-309, 2007.
B. Shah, P. Clark, E. K. Moioli, M. Stroscio and J. Mao, “Labeling of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Using
Bioconjugated Quantum Dots,” Nano Letters, 7, 3071-3079, 2007.
M. Dutta, M. A. Stroscio, S. Liao, M. Vasudev and T. Yamanaka, “Blinking Mechanism of Colloidal
Semiconductor Quantum Dots: Role of Fluctuating Double Layer Potential,” ECS Transactions, 6(2) 547553, 2007.
Y. Li, M. Vasudev, K. Sun, M. Dutta and M. A. Stroscio, “Electronic Properties of Organic-inorganic
Hybrid Systems,” ECS Transactions, 6(2) 297-303, 2007.
J. Yang, T. Yamanaka, K. Sun, M. Vasudev, Y. Li, M. A. Stroscio and M. Dutta, “Optoelectronic
Properties for ZnO and Related Semiconductors in Various Nanoscale Geometries,” ECS Transactions,
6(2) 149-160, 2007.
M. Vasudev, T. Yamanaka, J. Yang, Y. Li, M. Dutta and M. A. Stroscio, “Integrated DNA-Nanoparticle
Complexes: Synthesis, Electrical and Optical Properties,” ECS Transactions, Vol. 6 on New Bioanalytical
and Biomedical Methods, (15) 53, 2007.
T. Yamanaka, M. Vasudev, M. Dutta and M. A. Stroscio, “Charge Transport Analysis in DNA From the
Aspect of Phonon Scattering,” ECS Transactions, Vol. 6, (15) 45, 2007.
K. Sun, Y. Li, M. A. Stroscio and M. Dutta, “Miniband Formation in Superlattices of Colloidal Quantum
Dots and Conductive Polymers,” ECS Transactions, Vol. 6 (23), Sensors Based on Nanotechnology 3, In
press.
T. Yamanaka, M. Dutta and M. A. Stroscio, “Simulation of Charge Transport in DNA,” Physica Status
Solidi A, In press.
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M. Vasudev, T. Yamanaka, J. Yang, Y. Li, D. Ramadurai, M. A. Stroscio, T. Globus, T. Khromova and M.
Dutta, “Optoelectronic Signatures of Biomolecules Including Hybrid Nanostructure-DNA Ensembles,”
IEEE Sensors Journal, In press.
S. Liao, M. Dutta, D. Schonfeld, T. Yamanaka and M. A. Stroscio, “Quantum Dot Blinking: Physical Limit
for Nanoscale Optoelectronic Device,” Journal of Computational Electronics, In press.
T. Inoue, J. Qian, S. Liao, Y. Li, V. Narayanamurty, M. Vasudev, M. Dutta and M. A. Stroscio,
“Comparison of Calculated and Measured I-V Curves for DNA,” Journal of Computational Electronics, In
press.
T.Yamanaka, M. Dutta and M. A. Stroscio, “Monte Carlo Simulation of Polaron Transport in DNA,”
Journal of Computational Electronics, In press.
K. Sun, M. Dutta and M. A. Stroscio, “Transmission Coefficients for Minibands Formed in Quantum Dot
Arrays Under Bias,” Journal of Computational Electronics, In press.
Christos Takoudis
R. Katamreddy, R. Inman, G. Jursich, A. Soulet, A. Nicholls and C. G. Takoudis, “Post Deposition
Annealing of Aluminum Oxide Deposited by Atomic Layer Deposition Using Novel
Tris(Diethylamino)Aluminum and Water Vapor on Si(100),” Thin Solid Films 515, 6931-6937, 2007.
X. Song and C. G. Takoudis, “Effect of NH3 on the Low Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition of TiO2 Film
at Low Temperature Using Tetrakis(Diethylamino)Titanium and Oxygen,” J. Vac. Sci. Techn. A 25, 360367, 2007.
R. Katamreddy, R. Inman, G. Jursich, A. Soulet and C. G. Takoudis, “ALD and Characterization of
Aluminum Oxide Deposited on Si(100) Using Tris(Diethylamino) Aluminum and Water Vapor,” Journal
of the Electrochemical Society, 154, S5, 2007.
X. Song and C. G. Takoudis, “Cyclic Chemical Vapor Deposited TiO2/Al2O3 Films Using Trimethyl
Aluminum, Tetrakis(Diethylamino)Titanium and O2,” Journal of the Electrochemical Society G177-182,
154, 2007.
M. K. Singh, J. Rosado, R. Katamreddy, A. Deshpande and C. G. Takoudis, “Investigation of Local
Coordination and Electronic Structure of Dielectric Thin Films From Theoretical Energy-loss Spectra,” in
Characterization of Oxide/Semiconductor Interfaces for CMOS Technologies,” MRS Symposium Series
996E, 33-38, 2007.
M. K. Singh, R. Katamreddy and C. G. Takoudis, “Effect of Oxidizer on Chemical Vapor Deposited
Hafnium Oxide-based Nanostructures and the Engineering of Their Interfaces with Si(100), in
Characterization of Oxide/Semiconductor Interfaces for CMOS Technologies,” MRS Symposium Series
996E, 69-74, 2007.
P. Majumder, R. Katamreddy and C. G. Takoudis, “Characterization of Atomic Layer Deposited Ultrathin
HfO2 Film as a Diffusion Barrier in Cu Metallization,” in Materials, Processes, Integration and Reliability
in Advanced Interconnects for Micro- and Nanoelectronics, MRS Symposium Series 990, 97-102, 2007.
P. Majumder, R. Katamreddy and C. G. Takoudis, “Atomic Layer Deposited Ultrathin HfO2 and Al2O3
Films as Diffusion Barriers in Copper Interconnects,” Electrochemical and Solid-State Letters 10, H291H295, 2007.
P. Majumder, R. Katamreddy and C. G. Takoudis, “Effect of Film Thickness on the Breakdown
Tmperature of Atomic Layer Deposited Ultrathin HfO2 and Al2O3 Diffusion Barriers in Copper
Metallization,” Journal of Crystal Growth, 309, 12-17, 2007.
135
R. Katamreddy, R. Inman, G. Jursich, A. Soulet and C. G. Takoudis, “Atomic Layer Deposition of HfO2,
Al2O3 and HfAlOx Using O3 and Metal(Diethylamino) Precursors,” Journal of Materials Research, 22,
3455-3464, 2007.
P. Majumder, M. Tiwari, C. Megaridis, M. Xu, J. McAndrew and C. G. Takoudis, “Evaluation and Testing
of Organometallic Precursor for Copper Direct-Write,” MRS Symposium Series 1002E, 23-29, 2007.
P. Majumder and C. G. Takoudis, “Investigation on the Diffusion Barrier Properties of Sputtered Mo/W-N
Thin Films in Cu Interconnects,” Applied Physics Letters 91, 162108/1-162108/3, 2007.
R. Katamreddy, R. Inman, G. Jursich, A. Soulet and C. G. Takoudis, “Effect of Film Composition and
Structure on the Crystallization Point of Atomic Layer Deposited HfAlOx Using Metal (Diethylamino)
Precursors and Ozone,” Acta Materialia 56, 710-718, 2007.
F. Piret, M. Singh, C. G. Takoudis and B.-L. Su, “Optical Properties in the UV Range of a Ta2O5 Inverse
Opal Photonic Crystal Designed by MOCVD,” Chemical Physics Letters 453, 87-91, 2008.
A. Rasul, J. Zhang, D. Gamota and C. G. Takoudis, “Flexible High Capacitance Nanocomposite Gate
Insulator for Printed Organic Field Effect Transistors,” Thin Solid Films, In press.
P. Majumder and C. G. Takoudis, “Thermal Stability of Ti/Mo and Ti/MoN Nanostructures for Barrier
Applications in Cu Interconnects,” Nanotechnology, In press.
P. Majumder, G. Jursich, A. Kueltzo and C. G. Takoudis, “Atomic Layer Deposition of Y2O3 Films on
Silicon Using Tris (Ethylcyclopentadienyl) Yttrium Precursor and Water Vapor,” Journal of the
Electrochemical Society, In press.
D. Gopireddy and C. G. Takoudis, “Diffusion-reaction Modeling of the Silicon Oxide Interlayer Growth
During Thermal Annealing of High Dielectric Constant Materials on Silicon,” Physical Review B, In press.
R. Katamreddy, R. Inman, G. Jursich, A. Soulet and C. G. Takoudis, “Nitridation and Oxynitridation of Si
to Control Interfacial Reaction with HfO2,” Thin Solid Films, In press.
M. Singh, Y. Yang and C. G. Takoudis, “Low-pressure Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition of Fe2O3
Thin Films on Si(100) Using N-Butylferrocene and Oxygen,” Journal of the Electrochemical Society, In
press.
R. Katamreddy, B. Feist and C. G. Takoudis, “Bis(diethylamino) Silane as the Silicon Precursor in the
Atomic Layer Deposition of HfSiOx,” Journal of the Electrochemical Society, In press.
P. Majumder and C. G. Takoudis, “Reactively Sputtered Mo-V Nitride Thin Films as Ternary Diffusion
Barriers for Copper Metallization,” Journal of the Electrochemical Society, In press.
136
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
Andreas Linninger
K. Kulkarni, P. Larsen and A. A. Linninger, “Assessing Chronic Liver Toxicity Based on Relative Gene
Expression Data,” Journal of Theoretical Biology, In press.
A. Linninger, M. Somayaji, X. Guo, T. Erickson and R. Penn, “Drug Transport in Anisotropic and
Heterogeneous Brain Tissue,” Annals of Biomedical Engineering, In press.
A. A. Linninger, M. R. Somayaji, M. Mekarski and L. Zhang, “Prediction of Convection-enhanced Drug
Delivery to the Human Brain,” Journal of Theoretical Biology, 250, pp. 125-138, 2008.
M. B. R. Somayaj, M. Xenos, L. Zhang, M. Megarski and A. A. Linninger, “Systematic Design of Drug
Delivery Therapies,” Comp. Chem. Eng., (32), 89-98, 2008.
A. Lucia, R. Gattupalli, K. Kulkarni, Kedar and A. Linninger, “A Barrier-Terrain Methodology for Global
Optimization,” Engineering Chemistry Research, Manuscript ID: ie071421t.R1, 2008.
A. Malcolm, J. Polan, L. Zhang, B. Oguannaike and A. A. Linninger, “Integrating Systems Design and
Control Using Dynamic Flexibility Analysis,” AICHE J, 53(8): 2048-2061, 2007.
R. Penn, M. Lee, A. Linninger, K. Miesel, L. Ning and L. Stylos, “Pressure Gradients in the Brain: An
Experimental Model of Hydrocephalus,” Journal of Neurosurgery, 104; p. 9, In press.
G. Ali Mansoori
G. Ali Mansoori, P. Mohazzabi, P. Macromack and S. Jabbari, “Nanotechnology in Cancer Prevention,
Detection and Treatment,” World Review of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development (WRSTSD),
4(2/3):226-257, 2007.
A. Nikakhtar, A. Nasehzadeh and G. Ali Mansoori,“Formation and Stability Conditions of DNADendrimer Nano-Clusters,” J. Comput'l & Theor'l Nanoscience, 4(3):1-8, 2007.
H. Ramezani, G. Ali Mansoori and M. R. Saberi, “Diamondoids-DNA Nanoarchitecture: From
Nanomodules Design to Self-Assembly,” J. Comput'l & Theor'l Nanoscience, 4(1):96-106, 2007.
G. Ali Mansoori, T. George, G. Zhang and L. Assoufid, “An Introduction to Nanotechnology Molecular
Building Blocks,” in Molecular Building Blocks for Nanotechnology: From Diamondoids to Nanoscale
Materials and Applications, Springer, New York, Topics in Applied Physics 109, 44-71, 2007.
G. Ali Mansoori, D. Vazquez and M. Shariaty-Niassar, “Polydispersity of Heavy Organics in Crude Oils
and Their Role in Oil Well Fouling,” J. of Petroleum Science and Engineering, In press.
B. Carpentier, A. Wilhelms and G. Ali Mansoori, “Reservoir Organic Geochemistry: Processes and
Applications,” J. of Petroleum Science and Engineering, In press.
E. K. Goharshadi, A. Morsali and G. Ali Mansoori, “A Molecular Dynamics Study on the Role of
Attractive and Repulsive Forces in Internal Energy, Internal Pressure and Structure of Dense Fluids,”
Chemical Physics, Vol. 331, Issues 2-3, pp. 332-338, 2007.
Randall Meyer
R. Meyer, M. Lemanski, R. Yeates, J. Lockemeyer, D. Reinalda and M. Neurock, “Ab Initio Modeling of
Partially Hydroxylated Surfaces of α-Al2O3(0001),” Chemical Physics Letters, 449, pp. 155−159, 2007.
K. Mudiyanselage, R. Meyer and M. Trenary, “Formation of Methylisocyanide From Dimethylamine on
Pt(111),” Journal of Physical Chemistry C, Vol. 112, pp. 3794-3799, 2008.
137
J. Jelic and R. Meyer, “A DFT Study of Pseudomorphic Monolayer Pt and Pd Catalysts for NOx Storage
Reduction Applications,” Catalysis Today, Vol. 136, pp. 76-83 2008.
Sohail Murad
S. Murad and I. K. Puri, “Thermal Transport Across Nanoscale Solid-Fluid Interfaces,” Applied Physics
Letters, 92, 133105, 2008.
H. Liu, C. J. Jameson and S. Murad, “Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Ion Selectivity Process in
Nanopores,” Molecular Simulation, 34, 169-175, 2008.
N. Sedighi, S. Murad and S. K. Aggarwal, “Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Nano-Droplet Wetting on
a Solid Surface,” Atomization and Sprays, In press.
H. Yuan, S. Murad, C. J. Jameson and J. D. Olson, “Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Xe Chemical
Shifts and Solubility in n-Alkanes,” Journal of Physical Chemistry C, 111, 15771-15783, 2007.
S. Murad and I. K. Puri, “Dynamics of Nanoscale Jet Formation and Impingement on Flat Surfaces,”
Physics of Fluids, 19, 128102 [1-4], 2007.
H. Yuan, C. J. Jameson, S. K. Gupta, J. D. Olson and S. Murad, “Prediction of Henry’s Constants of Xenon
in cyclo-Alkanes From Molecular Dynamics Simulations,” Fluid Phase Equilibria, In press.
John Regalbuto
L. D’Souza, J. R. Regalbuto, J. T. Miller and A. J. Kropf, “Preparation of Silica- and Carbon-supported
Cobalt by Electrostatic Adsorption of Co(III) Hexaammines,” Journal of Catalysis, 248, 165, 2007.
L. D’Souza, J. R. Regalbuto, J. T. Miller and A. J. Kropf, “Preparation of Carbon-supported Cobalt by
Electrostatic Adsorption of [Co(NH3)6]Cl3, Journal of Catalysis 254, 157, 2008.
L. Jiao and J. R. Regalbuto, “The Synthesis of Highly Dispersed Noble and Base Metals on Silica via
Strong Electrostatic Adsorption: I. Amorphous Silica,” In press.
L. Jiao and J. R. Regalbuto, “The Synthesis of Highly Dispersed Noble and Base Metals on Silica via
Strong Electrostatic Adsorption: II Mesoporous Silica,” In press.
Christos Takoudis
R. Katamreddy, R. Inman, G. Jursich, A. Soulet, A. Nicholls and C. G. Takoudis, “Post Deposition
Annealing of Aluminum Oxide Deposited by Atomic Layer Deposition Using Novel
Tris(Diethylamino)Aluminum and Water Vapor on Si(100),” Thin Solid Films 515, 6931-6937, 2007.
X. Song and C. G. Takoudis, “Effect of NH3 on the Low Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition of TiO2 Film
at Low Temperature Using Tetrakis(Diethylamino)Titanium and Oxygen,” J. Vac. Sci. Techn. A 25, 360367, 2007.
R. Katamreddy, R. Inman, G. Jursich, A. Soulet and C. G. Takoudis, “ALD and Characterization of
Aluminum Oxide Deposited on Si(100) Using Tris(Diethylamino) Aluminum and Water Vapor,” Journal
of the Electrochemical Society, 154, S5, 2007.
X. Song and C. G. Takoudis, “Cyclic Chemical Vapor Deposited TiO2/Al2O3 Films Using Trimethyl
Aluminum, Tetrakis(Diethylamino)Titanium and O2,” Journal of the Electrochemical Society G177-182,
154, 2007.
M. K. Singh, J. Rosado, R. Katamreddy, A. Deshpande and C. G. Takoudis, “Investigation of Local
Coordination and Electronic Structure of Dielectric Thin Films From Theoretical Energy-loss Spectra,” in
Characterization of Oxide/Semiconductor Interfaces for CMOS Technologies,” MRS Symposium Series
996E, 33-38, 2007.
138
M. K. Singh, R. Katamreddy and C. G. Takoudis, “Effect of Oxidizer on Chemical Vapor Deposited
Hafnium Oxide-based Nanostructures and the Engineering of Their Interfaces with Si(100),” in
Characterization of Oxide/Semiconductor Interfaces for CMOS Technologies, MRS Symposium Series
996E, 69-74, 2007.
P. Majumder, R. Katamreddy and C. G. Takoudis, “Characterization of Atomic Layer Deposited Ultrathin
HfO2 Film as a Diffusion Barrier in Cu Metallization,” in Materials, Processes, Integration and Reliability
in Advanced Interconnects for Micro- and Nanoelectronics, MRS Symposium Series 990, 97-102, 2007.
P. Majumder, R. Katamreddy and C. G. Takoudis, “Atomic Layer Deposited Ultrathin HfO2 and Al2O3
Films as Diffusion Barriers in Copper Interconnects,” Electrochemical and Solid-State Letters 10, H291H295, 2007.
P. Majumder, R. Katamreddy and C. G. Takoudis, “Effect of Film Thickness on the Breakdown
Temperature of Atomic Layer Deposited Ultrathin HfO2 and Al2O3 Diffusion Barriers in Copper
Metallization,” Journal of Crystal Growth 309, 12-17, 2007.
R. Katamreddy, R. Inman, G. Jursich, A. Soulet and C. G. Takoudis, “Atomic Layer Deposition of HfO2,
Al2O3 and HfAlOx Using O3 and Metal(Diethylamino) Precursors,” Journal of Materials Research 22,
3455-3464, 2007.
P. Majumder, M. Tiwari, C. Megaridis, M. Xu, J. McAndrew and C. G. Takoudis, “Evaluation and Testing
of Organometallic Precursor for Copper Direct-Write,” MRS Symposium Series 1002E, 23-29, 2007.
P. Majumder and C. G. Takoudis, “Investigation on the Diffusion Barrier Properties of Sputtered Mo/W-N
Thin Films in Cu Interconnects,” Applied Physics Letters 91, 162108/1-162108/3, 2007.
R. Katamreddy, R. Inman, G. Jursich, A. Soulet and C. G. Takoudis, “Effect of Film Composition and
Structure on the Crystallization Point of Atomic Layer Deposited HfAlOx Using Metal (Diethylamino)
Precursors and Ozone,” Acta Materialia 56, 710-718, 2007.
F. Piret, M. Singh, C. G. Takoudis and B.-L. Su, “Optical Properties in the UV Range of a Ta2O5 Inverse
Opal Photonic Crystal Designed by MOCVD,” Chemical Physics Letters 453, 87-91, 2008.
A. Rasul, J. Zhang, D. Gamota and C. G. Takoudis, “Flexible High Capacitance Nanocomposite Gate
Insulator for Printed Organic Field Effect Transistors,” Thin Solid Films, In press.
P. Majumder and C. G. Takoudis, “Thermal Stability of Ti/Mo and Ti/MoN Nanostructures for Barrier
Applications in Cu Interconnects,” Nanotechnology, In press.
P. Majumder, G. Jursich, A. Kueltzo and C. G. Takoudis, “Atomic Layer Deposition of Y2O3 Films on
Silicon Using Tris (Ethylcyclopentadienyl) Yttrium Precursor and Water Vapor,” Journal of the
Electrochemical Society, In press.
D. Gopireddy and C. G. Takoudis, “Diffusion-reaction Modeling of the Silicon Oxide Interlayer Growth
During Thermal Annealing of High Dielectric Constant Materials on Silicon,” Physical Review B, In press.
R. Katamreddy, R. Inman, G. Jursich, A. Soulet and C. G. Takoudis, “Nitridation and Oxynitridation of Si
to Control Interfacial Reaction with HfO2,” Thin Solid Films, In press.
M. Singh, Y. Yang and C. G. Takoudis, “Low-pressure Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition of Fe2O3
Thin Films on Si(100) Using N-Butylferrocene and Oxygen,” Journal of the Electrochemical Society, In
press.
139
R. Katamreddy, B. Feist and C. G. Takoudis, “Bis(diethylamino) Silane as the Silicon Precursor in the
Atomic Layer Deposition of HfSiOx,” Journal of the Electrochemical Society, In press.
P. Majumder and C. G. Takoudis, “Reactively Sputtered Mo-V Nitride Thin Films as Ternary Diffusion
Barriers for Copper Metallization,” Journal of the Electrochemical Society, In press.
140
CIVIL AND MATERIALS ENGINEERING
Farhad Ansari
B. S. Asadollah and A. Farhad, “Post-seismic Structural Health Monitoring of a Column Subjected to Near
Source Ground Motions,” Journal of Intelligent Material Systems and Structures, Vol. 19, February 2008.
F. Ansari, “Practical Implementation of Optical Fiber Sensors in Civil Structural Health Monitoring,”
Journal of Intelligent Material Systems and Structures, Vol. 18, No. 8, pp. 879-889, August 2007.
M. Zhao, Y. Dong, A. Tennant and F. Ansari, “Monitoring of Bond in FRP Retrofitted Concrete
Structures,” Journal of Intelligent Material Systems and Structures, Vol. 18, No. 8, pp. 853-860, August
2007.
Y. Dong, F. Ansari and V. Karbhari, “Fatigue Performance of Reinforced Concrete Beams with Externally
Bonded CFRP Reinforcement,” Journal of Structure and Infrastructure Engineering, In press.
Subrata Chakrabarti
L. Tao, H. Song and S. Chakrabarti, “Nonlinear Progressive Waves in Water of Finite Depth – An Analytic
Approximation,” Coastal Engineering, 54(11), pp. 825-834, 2007.
L. Tao, H. Song and S. K. Chakrabarti, “Scaled Boundary FEM Solution of Short-crested Wave Diffraction
by a Vertical Cylinder,” Computer Method in Applied Mechanics and Engineering, 197(1-4), pp. 232-242,
2007.
S. Chakrabarti, M. Levin, A. Gupta, P. Yaghoubi and S. Abdul, “Design Analysis of Floating Structures
with Dry Tree Application in Deep Water,” Journal of Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering,
ASME, In press.
S. Chakrabarti, “Challenges for a Total System Analysis on Deepwater Floating Systems,” The Open
Mechanics Journal, Bentham Publication, In press.
S. Chakrabarti, “Instability Analysis of Offshore Towers in Waves,” Journal of Engineering Structures,
Elsevier, In press.
Alexander Chudnovsky
B.-H. Choi, K. Sehnobish and A. Chudnovsky, “Stress Corrosion Cracking in Plastic Pipes: Observation
and Modeling,” Int J. Fract., 145: pp. 81-88, 2007.
A. Zagrai, D. Donskoy, E. Golovin and A. Chudnovsky, “Micro- and Macroscale Damage Detection Using
the Nonlinear Acoustic Vibro-modulation Technique,” Research in Nondestructive Evaluation, 19: 104128, 2008.
Christophe Darnault
C .J. G. Darnault and I. Godinez, “Fate of Environmental Pollutants,” Water Environment Research, In Press.
C. J. G. Darnault and B. Uyusur, “Transport and Mixing,” Water Environment Research, In Press.
R. Chittaranjan, T. Grischek, S. Hubbs, J. Drewes, D. Haas and C. Darnault, “Riverbank Filtration for
Drinking Water Supply,” The Encyclopedia of Hydrological Sciences, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, U.K. 2008.
C. J. G. Darnault and I. Godinez, “Fate of Environmental Pollutants,” Water Environment Research, 79(10):
2049-2070, 2007.
C. J. G. Darnault and B. Uyusur, “Transport and Mixing,” Water Environment Research, 79(10): 1929-1972,
2007.
141
J. Ernesto Indacochea
F. Rumiche, J. E. Indacochea and M. L. Wang, “Assessment of the Effect of Microstructure on the
Magnetic Behavior of Structural Carbon Steels Using an Electromagnetic Sensor,” ASM J. Materials
Engineering and Performance, DOI: 10.1007/s11665-007-9184-2, 2007.
F. Rumiche, J. E. Indacochea and M. L. Wang, “Detection and Monitoring of Corrosion in Structural
Carbon Steels Using Electromagnetic Sensors,” ASME J. Materials Engineering and Technology, Vol. 130,
2008.
Polar and J. E. Indacochea, “Microstructural Assessment of Copper Friction Stir Welds,” ASME J. of
Manufacturing Science, In press.
F. Rumiche, H. H. Wang, J. E. Indacochea and M. L. Wang, “Anodized Aluminum Oxide (AAO) Based
Nanowells for Hydrogen Detection,” Smart Processing Technology, Vol. 2, pp. 145-148, 2008.
I. Puskas, T. H. Fleisch, J. A. Kaduk, C. L. Marshall, B. L. Meyers, M. J. Castagnola and J. E. Indacochea,
“Novel Aspects of the Physical Chemistry of Co/SiO2 Fischer-Tropsch Catalyst Preparations: Cobalt
Oxide-induced Silica Migration During Calcinations of Cobalt Nitrate-impregnated High Surface Silica,” J.
of Applied Catalysis A, Vol. 316, pp. 197-206, 2007.
Mohsen Issa
M. A. Issa and M. J. Saccomonto, “Strength Correlation of High Performance Concrete Using Different
Sized Specimens,” Journal of ASTM International (JAI), Vol. 4, Issue 7, p. 12, July-August 2007.
M. A. Issa, M. A. Alhassan and H. I. Shabila, “Low Cycle Fatigue Testing of High-Performance Bonded
Overlay-Bridge Deck Slab Systems,” ASCE Journal of Bridge Engineering, Vol. 12, No. 4, pp. 419-428,
July-August 2007.
M. A. Issa, A. Khalil, S. Islam and P. Krauss, “Strength and Durability Assessment of HPC Mixtures for
Bridge Decks,” Precast/Prestressed Concrete Institute Journal, In press.
M. A. Issa, M. A. Alhassan and H. Shabila, “High Performance Plain and Fibrous Latex-Modified and
Micro-Silica Concrete Overlays,” ASCE Journal of Materials Engineering, In press.
Eduard Karpov
V. P. Grankin, V. V. Styrov and E. G. Karpov, “Chemiluminescent Detection of Neutral Gaseous
Radicals,” Journal of Chemical Physics, Vol. 127, No.13, pp. 134-709, 2007.
D. E. Farrell, E. G. Karpov and W. K. Liu, “Algorithms for Bridging Scale Parameters,” Computer
Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering, Vol. 40, No. 6, pp. 965-978, 2007.
E. G. Karpov, H. S. Park and W. K. Liu, “Phonon Heat Bath for the Atomistic and Multiscale Simulation of
Solids,” International Journal for Numerical Methods in Engineering, Vol. 70, No.3, pp. 351-378, 2007.
S. Tang, W. K. Liu, E. G. Karpov and T. Y. Hou, “Bridging Atomistic/Continuum Scales in Solids with
Moving Dislocations,” Chinese Physics Letters, Vol. 24, No.1, 161-164, 2007.
Amid Khodadoust
A. Khodadoust, O. Narla and S. Chandrasekaran, “Cyclodextrin-Enhanced Extraction and Removal of 2,4Dinitrotoluene From Contaminated Soils,” Environmental Engineering Science, Vol. 25, No. 4, pp. 615626, 2008.
B. Subramanian, B. L. Yang, Q. J. Yang, A. Khodadoust and D. Dionysiou, “Photodegradation of
Pentachlorophenol in Room Temperature Ionic Liquids,” Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology A –
Chemistry, Vol. 192, No. 2-3, pp. 114-121, 2007.
142
K. Maturi, A. Khodadoust and K. Reddy, “Comparison of Extractants for Removal of Lead, Zinc and
Phenanthrene From a Manufactured Gas Plant Field Soil,” Practice Periodical of Hazardous, Toxic and
Radioactive Waste Management, In press.
Jie Lin
M. Haller, E. Welch, J. Lin and S. Fulla, “Economic Costs and Environmental Impacts of Alternative Fuel
Vehicle Fleets in Local Government: An Interim Assessment of a Voluntary Ten-Year Fleet Conversion
Plan,” Transportation Research Part D: Transportation and Environment, Vol. 12, Issue 3: 219-230, 2007.
J. Lin, C. Chen and D. A. Niemeier, “An Analysis on Long Term Emission Benefits of a Government
Vehicle Fleet Replacement Plan in Northern Illinois,” Transportation, Vol. 35, No. 2: 219 – 235, 2008.
J. Lin and D. Yu, “Traffic Related Air Quality Assessment for Open Road Tolling Highway Facility,”
Journal of Environmental Management, In press.
J. Lin, P. Wang and D. Barnum, “A Quality Control Framework for Bus Schedule Reliability,”
Transportation Research Part E: Transportation Review and Logistics, In press.
J. Lin and L. Long, “What Neighborhood Are You In? Empirical Findings of Relationships Between
Household Travel and Neighborhood Characteristics,” Transportation, In press.
J. Lin and L. Long, “Model-based Approach to Synthesize Household Travel Characteristics Across
Neighborhood Types and Geographic Areas,” The ASCE Journal of Transportation Engineering, In press.
Abolfazl Mohammadian
A. Mohammadian and T. H. Rashidi, “Modeling Household Vehicle Transaction Behavior: Competing
Risk Duration Approach,” Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research
Board, No. 2014, TRB, National Research Council, Washington, D.C., pp.9-16, 2007.
A. Mohammadian and Y. Zhang, “Investigating the Transferability of National Household Travel Survey
Data,” Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, No. 1993, TRB,
National Research Council, Washington D.C., pp. 67-79, 2007.
S. Yagi and A. Mohammadian, “Policy Simulation for New BRT and Area Pricing Alternatives Using an
Opinion Survey in Jakarta,” Journal of Transportation Planning and Technology, Vol. 31, Issue 3, Taylor
& Francis, 2008.
A. Mohammadian, M. Haider and P. Kanaroglou, “Homebuilders Choice Behavior Analysis,” Canadian
Journal of Regional Science, Vol. 31 (1), 2008.
J. Auld, A. Mohammadian and S. Doherty, “Analysis of Activity Conflict Resolution Strategies,”
Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, National Research
Council, Washington, D.C., In press.
Y. Zhang and A. Mohammadian, “Bayesian Updating of Transferred Household Travel Data Using
Markov Chain Monte Carlo Simulation with Gibbs Sampler,” Transportation Research Record: Journal of
the Transportation Research Board, National Research Council, Washington, D.C., In press.
S. Yagi and A. Mohammadian, “Modeling Daily Activity-Travel Tour Patterns Incorporating Activity
Scheduling Decision Rules,” Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research
Board, National Research Council, Washington, D.C., In press.
S. Yagi and A. Mohammadian, “Joint Models of Home-Based Tour Mode and Destination Choices:
Applications to a Developing Country,” Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation
Research Board, National Research Council, Washington D.C., In press.
143
S. Zargari, M. Araghi and A. Mohammadian, “An Application of Combined Model for Tehran
Metropolitan Area Incorporating Captive Travel Behavior,” in the American Journal of Applied Science,
Science Publications, In press.
Krishna Reddy
K. R. Reddy, T. D. Stark and A. Marella, “Clogging Potential of Tire Shred-Drainage Layer in Landfill Cover
Systems,” International Journal of Geotechnical Engineering, Vol. 2, No .4, 2008.
K. R. Reddy and M. R. Karri, “Effect of Oxidant Dosage on Integrated Electrochemical Remediation of
Contaminant Mixtures in Soils,” Journal of Environmental Science & Health, Vol. 43, No.8, 2008.
K. Maturi and K. R. Reddy, “Extraction of Mixed Contaminants From Different Soil Types,” Soil & Sediment
Contamination: An International Journal, Vol. 17, No. 6, 2008.
A. Z. Al-Hamdan and K. R. Reddy, “Geochemical Assessment of Metal Transport in Glacial Till During
Electrokinetic Remediation,” Environmental Monitoring & Assessment Journal, Vol.139, No. 1-3, pp.137149, 2008.
A. Z. Al-Hamdan and K. R. Reddy, “Transient Behavior of Heavy Metals in Soils During Electrokinetic
Remediation,” Chemosphere, Vol. 71, No. 5, pp. 860-871, 2008.
K. Maturi and K. R. Reddy, “Cosolvent-enhanced Desorption and Transport of Organic and Metal
Contaminants in Soils During Electrokinetic Remediation,” Water, Air, and Soil Pollution, Vol. 189, No.1-4,
pp. 199-211, 2008.
A. Z. Al-Hamdan and K. R. Reddy, “Electrokinetic Remediation Modeling Incorporating Geochemical
Effects,” Journal of Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineering, ASCE, Vol. 134, No.1, pp. 91-105,
2008.
K. S. Richards and K. R. Reddy, “Critical Appraisal of Piping Phenomena in Earth Dams,” Bulletin of
Engineering Geology and the Environment, Vol. 66, No. 4, pp. 381-402, 2007.
K. Maturi, A. P. Khodadoust and K. R. Reddy, “Comparison of Extractants for Removal of Lead, Zinc and
Phenanthrene From a Manufactured Gas Plant Field Soil,” Practice Periodical of Hazardous, Toxic, and
Radioactive Waste Management, ASCE, In press.
Karl Rockne
X. Zhao, K. J. Rockne, J. L. Drummond, R. K. Hurley, C. W. Slade and R. Hudson, “Methyl Mercury
Generation in Dental Wastewater: A Potential Role of Sulfate Reducing Bacteria,” Environmental Science
and Technology, 42(8):2780-2786, 2008.
M. Mittal and K. J. Rockne, “Indole Production During Anaerobic Naphthalene Biodegradation by
Pseudomonas stutzeri str. NAP-3,” Journal of Environmental Science and Health, Part A. 43(9):10271034, 2008.
P. Viana, K. Yin, X. Zhao and K. J. Rockne, “Active Sediment Capping for Pollutant Mixtures: Control of
Biogenic Gas Production Under Highly Intermittent Flows,” Land Contamination and Reclamation,
15(4):413-425, 2008.
Chien, Wu
C. Wu, “Stress-driven Diffusion in a Deforming and Evolving Elastic Circular Tube of Single Component
Solid with Vacancies,” International Journal of Fracture, Vol. 147, pp. 227-234, 2007.
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COMPUTER SCIENCE
Tanya Berger-Wolf
T. Y. Berger-Wolf, S. I. Sheikh, B. DasGupta, M. V. Ashley, I. C. Caballero, W. Chaovalitwongse and
S. L. Putrevu, “Reconstructing Sibling Relationships in Wild Populations,” Bioinformatics, Vol. 23, No.
13, pp. i49–i56, 2007.
Ugo Buy
R. Sampath, H. Darabi, U. Buy and J. Liu, “Control Reconfiguration of Discrete Event Systems with
Dynamic Control Specifications,” IEEE Transactions on Automation Science and Engineering, Vol. 5, No.
1, pp. 84—100, 2008.
Isabel Cruz
I. F. Cruz and H. Xiao, “A Layered Framework Supporting Personal Information Integration and
Application,” VLDB Journal, In press.
Bhaskar DasGupta
R. Albert, B. DasGupta, R. Dondi and E. Sontag, “Inferring (Biological) Signal Transduction Networks via
Transitive Reductions of Directed Graphs,” Algorithmica, 51 (2), pp. 129-159, 2008.
S. Kachalo, R. Zhang, E. Sontag, R. Albert and B. DasGupta, “NET-SYNTHESIS: A Software for
Synthesis, Inference and Simplification of Signal Transduction Networks,” Bioinformatics, 24 (2), pp. 293295, 2008.
P. Berman and B. DasGupta, “Approximating the Online Set Multicover Problems via Randomized
Winnowing,” Theoretical Computer Science, 393, pp. 54-71, 2008.
J. Dundas, T. A. Binkowski, B. DasGupta and J. Liang, “Topology Independent Protein Structural
Alignment,” BMC Bioinformatics, 8:388, 2007.
P. Berman, B. DasGupta, M.-Y. Kao and J. Wang, “On Constructing an Optimal Consensus Clustering
From Multiple Clusterings,” Information Processing Letters, 104 (4), pp. 137-145, 2007.
P. Berman, B. DasGupta and E. Sontag, “Algorithmic Issues in Reverse Engineering of Protein and Gene
Networks via the Modular Response Analysis Method,” Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences,
1115, 132-141, 2007.
R. Albert, B. DasGupta, R. Dondi, S. Kachalo, E. Sontag, A. Zelikovsky and K. Westbrooks, “A Novel
Method for Signal Transduction Network Inference From Indirect Experimental Evidence,” Journal of
Computational Biology, 14 (7), pp. 927-949, 2007.
T. Y. Berger-Wolf, S. Sheikh, B. DasGupta, M. V. Ashley, I. C. Caballero and S. L. Putrevu,
“Reconstructing Sibling Relationships in Wild Populations,” Bioinformatics, 23 (13), pp. i49-i56, 2007.
B. DasGupta, G. A. Enciso, E. Sontag and Y. Zhang, “Algorithmic and Complexity Results for
Decompositions of Biological Networks into Monotone Subsystems,” Biosystems, 90 (1), pp. 161-178,
2007.
Barbara Di Eugenio
B. Di Eugenio, D. Fossati, S. Haller, D. Yu and M. Glass, “Be Brief, and They Shall Learn: Generating
Concise Language Feedback for a Computer Tutor,” International Journal of AI in Education, 18(4), 2008,
In press.
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Andrew Johnson
T. Peterka, R. Kooima, D. Sandin, A. Johnson, J. Leigh and T. DeFanti, “Advances in the Dynallax SolidState Dynamic Barrier Autostereoscopic Visualization Display System,” IEEE Transactions on
Visualization and Computer Graphics, 14.3, pp. 487-498, 2008.
J. Ge, D. Sandin, A. Johnson, T. Peterka, R. Kooima, J. Girado and T. DeFanti, “Point-based VR
Visualization for Large-scale Mesh Datasets by Real-time Remote Computation,” International Journal of
Image and Graphics, 8.2, pp. 189-207, April 2008.
Robert Kenyon
R. V. Kenyon, M. Phenany, D. Sandin and T. Defanti, “Accommodation and Size-Constancy of Virtual
Objects,” Annals of Biomedical Engineering, Vol. 36, No. 2, pp. 342-348, 2008.
A. Dvorkin, R. V. Kenyon and E. A. Keshner, “Reaching within a Dynamic Virtual Environment,” Journal
NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, 4(23), 2007.
H. C. Fischer, K. Stubblefield, T. L. Kline, X. Luo, R. V. Kenyon and D. G. Kamper, “Virtual Reality and
Mechatronics for Hand Rehabilitation Following Stroke: A Pilot Study,” Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation,
14, 1- 12, 2007.
Ashfaq Khokhar
S. Djahel, F. Na¨ıt-Abdesselam, Z. Zhang and A. Khokhar, “Defending Against Packets Dropping
Attack in Vehicular Ad Hoc Networks,” Security and Communication Networks, John Wiley & Sons,
In press.
W. Ahmad and A. Khokhar, “cHawk: A Highly Efficient Biclustering Algorithm Using Weighted
Bigraph Crossing Minimization,” Bioinformatics, In press.
X. Zhang, H. Wang, F. Na¨ıt-Abdesselam and A. Khokhar, “Distortion Analysis for Real-Time Data
Collection of Spatially-temporally Correlated Data Fields in Wireless Sensor Networks,” IEEE
Transactions on Vehicular Technology, In press.
L. Abusalah, A. Khokhar and M. Guizani, “Security and Trust in Mobile Ad-Hoc Networks,” IEEE
Communications Surveys and Tutorials, In press.
X. Zhang and A. Khokhar, “Optimizing Distortion for Real-Time Data Gathering in Randomly
Deployed Sensor Networks,” Wireless Communications and Mobile Computing Journal, In press.
Ajay Kshemkalyani
B. Sieka and A. D. Kshemkalyani, “Establishing Authenticated Channels and Secure Identifiers in Adhoc Networks,” International Journal on Network Security, 5(1): 51-61, 2007.
R. Atreya, N. Mittal, A. D. Kshemkalyani, V. Garg and M. Singhal, “Efficient Detection of a Locally
Stable Predicate in a Distributed System,” Journal of Parallel and Distributed Computing, 67(4): 369385, 2007.
A. D. Kshemkalyani and B. Wu, “Detecting Arbitrary Stable Properties Using Efficient Snapshots,”
IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering, 33(5): 330-346, 2007.
A. D. Kshemkalyani, “Temporal Predicate Detection Using Synchronized Clocks,” IEEE Transactions on
Computers, 56(11):1578-1584, 2007.
B. Wu and A. D. Kshemkalyani, “Analysis Models for Unguided Search in Unstructured Peer-to-peer
Networks,” International Journal of Ad-Hoc and Ubiquitous Computing, 3(4): 255-263, In press.
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P. Chandra and A. D. Kshemkalyani, “Data Stream Based Global Event Monitoring Using Pairwise
Interactions,” Journal of Parallel and Distributed Computing, 68(6):729-751, 2008.
Jason Leigh
J. Leigh and M. D. Brown, “Cyber-Commons: Merging Real and Virtual Worlds,” Communications of
the ACM, 51, 1, 82-85, 2008.
Bing Liu
B. Liu and A. Tuzhilin, “Managing Large Collections of Data Mining Models,” Commun. ACM 51(2):
85-89, 2008.
Sol Shatz
J. Lian and S. M. Shatz, “A Modeling Methodology for Conflict Control in Multi-Agent Systems,”
International Journal of Software Engineering and Knowledge Engineering (IJSEKE), In press.
J. Lian, Z. Hu and S. M. Shatz, “Simulation-Based Analysis of UML Statechart Diagrams: Methods and
Case Studies,” The Software Quality Journal (SQJ), Vol. 16, No. 1, pp. 45-78, March 2008.
A. Prasad Sistla
A. P. Sistla, X. Wang and M. Zhou, “Checking Extended CTL Properties Using Guarded Quotient
Structures,” Formal Methods in System Design, Vol. 31, Issue 3, pp. 197-219, December 2007.
A. P. Sistla and M. Zhou, “Analysis of Dynamic Policies,” Information and Computation,” Vol. 206/2-4,
pp. 185-212, 2008.
Robert Sloan
R. H. Sloan, B. Szörényi and G. Turán, “On k-term DNF with the Largest Number of Prime Implicants,”
SIAM J. Discrete Mathematics, 21(4):987–998, 2008.
R. H. Sloan, B. Szörényi and G. Turán, “Projective DNF,” Discrete Applied Mathematics, 156(4): 530–
544, 2008.
R. H. Sloan, B. Szörényi and G. Turán, “Revising Threshold Functions,” Theoretical Computer Science,
382(3): 198–208, 2007.
Jeffrey Tsai
S. P. Ren, Y. Yu, Y. Chen, J. J. P. Tsai and K. Kwiat, “The Role of Roles in Supporting Reconfigurability
and Fault Localizations for Open Distributed and Embedded Systems,” ACM Transactions on Autonomous
and Adaptive Systems, Vol. 2, No. 3, September 2007.
L. Ma and J. Tsai, “Formal Modeling and Analysis of Secure Mobile Agent Systems,” IEEE Transactions
on System, Man, and Cybernetics, Part A, Vol. 38, No. 1, pp. 180-196, January 2008.
J. D. Wang, H. C. Liu, J. J. P. Tsai and K. L. Ng, “Scaling Behavior of Maximal Repeat Distributions in
Genomic Sequences,” International Journal on Cognitive Informatics and Natural Intelligence, Vol. 2, No.
3, 2008.
Y. Wang, W. Kinser, J. Anderson , D. Zhang, P. Sheu, J. J. P. Tsai, W. Pedrycz, J. Latombe and L. Zadeh,
“A Doctrine of Cognitive Informatics,” Fundamental Informatics, Vol. 83, No. 3, 2008.
H. W. Hsiao, S. H. Chen, P. C. Chang and J. J. P. Tsai, “Predicting Subcellular Locations of Eukaryotic
Proteins Using Bayesian and K-nearest Neighbor Classifiers,” Journal of Information Science and
Engineering, Vol. 24, No. 5, 2008.
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D. Hecht, R. M. Hu, R. M. Chen, K. L. Ng, H.W. Hsaio, S. N. Chen, L. Sheu, J. J. P. Tsai and P. Sheu,
“BioSemantics: Applications of Structured Natural Language to Pure and Applied Biological and
Biomedical Research,” International Journal of Semantic Computing, In press.
Z. Yu, J. J. P. Tsai and T. Weigert, “An Adaptive Automatically Tuning Intrusion Detection System,” ACM
Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems, In press.
J. Zhang, J. J. P. Tsai, J. J. S. Huang and S. J. H. Yang, “Supporting CSCW and CSCL with Intelligent
Grouping Services,” International Journal of Software Science and Computational Intelligence (IJSSCI), In
press.
V. N. Venkatakrishnan
M. T. Louw, J. S. Lim and V. N. Venkatakrishnan, “Enhancing Web Browser Security Against Malware
Extensions,” Journal of Computer Virology, Springer, In press.
W. Sun, Z. Liang, R. Sekar and V. N. Venkatakrishnan, “Alcatraz: A Virtual Environment for
Experimenting with Untrustworthy Software,” ACM Transactions on Information and Systems Security
(TISSEC), In press.
Ouri Wolfson
O. Wolfson and B. Xu, “Flooding by Machine Learning in Mobile Ad Hoc Networks,” ACM Transactions
on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems (TAAS), special issue on Autonomic Communication, In press.
Philip Yu
C. Aggarwal and P. S. Yu, “On Static and Dynamic Methods for Condensation-Based Privacy-Preserving
Data Mining,” ACM Trans. Database Systems, Vol. 33, No. 1, In press.
X. Gu, Z. Wen, P. S. Yu and Z.Y. Shae, “peerTalk: A Peer-to-Peer Multi-Party Voice-Over-IP System,”
IEEE Trans. Parallel and Distributed Systems, Vol. 19, No. 4, pp. 515-528, In press.
M. Vlachos, K. L. Wu, S. K. Chen and P. S. Yu, “Correlating Burst Events on Streaming Stock Market
Data,” Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery, Vol. 16, No. 1, pp. 109-133, In press.
X. Wu, V. Kumar, J. R. Quinlan, J. Ghosh, Q. Yang, H. Motoda, G. J. McLachlan, A. Ng, B. Liu, P. S. Yu,
Z. H. Zhou, M. Steinbach, D. Hand and D. Steinberg, “Top 10 Algorithms in Data Mining,” Knowledge
and Information Systems, Vol. 14, No. 1, pp.1-37, In press.
K. Hildrum, F. Douglis, J. L. Wolf, P. S. Yu, L. Fleische and A. Katta, “Storage Optimization for LargeScale Distributed Steam Processing Systems,” ACM Trans. Storage, Vol. 3, No. 4, In press.
Lenore Zuck
Y. Fang and L. D. Zuck, “Improved Invariant Generation for Tvoc,” Electr. Notes Theor. Comput. Sci.
176(3): 21-35, 2007.
I. Balban, A. Pnueli and L. D. Zuck, “Modular Ranking Abstraction,” Int. J. Found Comput. Sci. 18(1): 544, 2007.
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ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING
Rashid Ansari
A. M. Bagci, M. Shahidi, R. Ansari, M. Blair, N. P. Blair and R. Zelkha, “Thickness Profiles of Retinal
Layers by Optical Coherence Tomography Image Segmentation,” American Journal of Ophthalmology, In
press.
Jezekiel Ben-Arie
Q. Wu and J. Ben-Arie, “View Invariant Head Recognition by Hybrid PCA Based Reconstruction,”
Integrated Computer-Aided Engineering (ICAE), Vol. 15, No. 2008, pp. 97-108, October 2007.
Masud Chowdhury
M. H. Chowdhury and Y. I. Ismail, “Behavior and Analysis of Deep Sub-micron Integrated Circuits
Including Self and Mutual Inductances,” Journal of Circuits, Systems & Signal Processing, Springer, In
press.
J. Xu, A. Roy and M. H.Chowdhury, “Noise Separation in Analog Integrated Circuits,” Journal of
Integrated Computer-Aided Engineering (ICAE), In press.
J. Xu, V. P. Nigam, A. Roy and M. H. Chowdhury, “Compound Noise Separation in Digital Circuits Using
Blind Source Separation,” Microelectronics Journal, Elsevier, In press.
J. Xu, A. Roy and M. H. Chowdhury, “Power Consumption and BER of Flip-flop Inserted Global
Interconnect,” Journal of VLSI Design, Vol. 2007, Article ID 42829, 8 pages, 2007.
Shantanu Dutt
S. Dutt, V. Verma and V. Suthar, “Built-in-Self-Test of FPGAs with Provable Diagnosabilities and High
Diagnostic Coverage with Application to On-Line Testing,” IEEE Trans. Computer Aided Design of
Integrated Circuits, pp. 309-326, February 2008.
N. R. Mahapatra and S. Dutt, “An Efficient Delay-optimal Distributed Termination Detection Algorithm,”
Jour. Parallel and Distr. Computing, Vol. 67, pp. 1047-1066, 2007.
Mitra Dutta
M. A. Stroscio, M. Dutta and A. Raichura, “Conductance of Nanowires,” J. of Computational Electronics,
6, 247-249, 2007.
T. Yamanaka, M. Dutta and M. A. Stroscio, “Spontaneous Polarization Effects in Nanoscale Wurtzite
Structures,” J. of Computational Electronics, 6, 313-316, 2007.
M. Dutta, M. A. Stroscio, M. Vasudev, D. Ramadurai, L. Torres and B. West, “Blinking of Colloidal
Semiconductor Quantum Dots: Blinking Mechanisms,” J. of Computational Electronics, 6, 301-304, 2007.
D. Ramadurai, T. Yamanaka, Y. Li, M. Vasudev, V. Sankar, M. Dutta, M. A. Stroscio, T. Rajh and Z.
Saponjic, “Interactions of THz Vibrational Modes with Charge Carriers in DNA: Polaron-phonon
Interactions,” International Journal of High Speed Electronics, 17, 293-309, 2007.
M. Dutta, M. A. Stroscio, S. Liao, M. Vasudev and T. Yamanaka, “Blinking Mechanism of Colloidal
Semiconductor Quantum Dots: Role of Fluctuating Double Layer Potential,” ECS Transactions, 6(2) 547553, 2007.
Y. Li, M. Vasudev, K. Sun, M. Dutta and M. A. Stroscio, “Electronic Properties of Organic-inorganic
Hybrid Systems,” ECS Transactions, 6(2) 297-303, 2007.
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J. Yang, T. Yamanaka, K. Sun, M. Vasudev, Y. Li, M. A. Stroscio and M. Dutta, “Optoelectronic
Properties for ZnO and Related Semiconductors in Various Nanoscale Geometries,” ECS Transactions,
6(2) 149-160, 2007.
M. Vasudev, T. Yamanaka, J. Yang, Y. Li, M. Dutta and M. A. Stroscio, “Integrated DNA-Nanoparticle
Complexes: Synthesis, Electrical and Optical Properties,” ECS Transactions, Vol. 6 on New Bioanalytical
and Biomedical Methods, (15) 53, 2007.
T. Yamanaka, M. Vasudev, M. Dutta and M. A. Stroscio, “Charge Transport Analysis in DNA From the
Aspect of Phonon Scattering,” ECS Transactions, Vol. 6, (15) 45, 2007.
K. Sun, Y. Li, M. A. Stroscio and M. Dutta, “Miniband Formation in Superlattices of Colloidal Quantum
Dots and Conductive Polymers,” ECS Transactions, Vol. 6 (23), Sensors Based on Nanotechnology 3, In
press.
T. Yamanaka, M. Dutta and M. A. Stroscio, “Simulation of Charge Transport in DNA,” Physica Status
Solidi A, In press.
M. Vasudev, T. Yamanaka, J. Yang, Y. Li, D. Ramadurai, M. A. Stroscio, T. Globus, T. Khromova and M.
Dutta, “Optoelectronic Signatures of Biomolecules including Hybrid Nanostructure-DNA Ensembles,”
IEEE Sensors Journal, In press.
S. Liao, M. Dutta, D. Schonfeld, T. Yamanaka and M. A. Stroscio, “Quantum Dot Blinking: Physical Limit
for Nanoscale Optoelectronic Device,” Journal of Computational Electronics, In press.
T. Inoue, J. Qian, S. Liao, Y. Li, V. Narayanamurty, M. Vasudev, M. Dutta and M. A. Stroscio,
“Comparison of Calculated and Measured I-V Curves for DNA,” Journal of Computational Electronics, In
press.
T. Yamanaka, M. Dutta and M. A. Stroscio, “Monte Carlo Simulation of Polaron Transport in DNA,”
Journal of Computational Electronics, In press.
K. Sun, M. Dutta and M. A. Stroscio, “Transmission Coefficients for Minibands Formed in Quantum Dot
Arrays Under Bias,” Journal of Computational Electronics, In press.
Danilo Erricolo
M. Valentino and D. Erricolo, “Exact Two-dimensional Scattering From a Slot in a Ground Plane Backed
by a Semielliptical Cavity and Covered with an Isorefractive Diaphragm,” Radio Science., 42, RS6S12,
doi:10.1029/2006RS003547, 2007.
M. Valentino and D. Erricolo, “Exact Radiation of a Dipole in the Presence of a Circular Aperture in a
Ground Plane Backed by a Spheroidal Cavity and Covered with an Isorefractive Diaphragm,” Radio
Science, 42, RS6S13, doi:10.1029/2006RS003548, 2007.
T. M. Larsen, D. Erricolo and P. L. E. Uslenghi, “New Method to Obtain Small Parameter Power Series
Expansions of Mathieu Radial and Angular Functions,”Mathematics of Computation, April 2008.
D. Erricolo, S. M. Canta, H. T. Hayvaci and M. Albani, “Experimental and Theoretical Validation for the
Incremental Theory of Diffraction,” IEEE Trans. Antennas Propagat, In press.
Alan Feinerman
W. Xu, K. Sur, H. Zeng, A. Feinerman, D. Kelso and J. B. Ketterson, “A Microfluidic Approach to
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H. Busta, K. Tao and A. Feinerman, “Evidence of Electronic Cooling From Resonance States of
Nanocrystalline Graphite (NCG) Field Emitters,” JVST B, Vol. 26, No. 2, pp. 720-723, (Reprinted in
Virtual Journal of Nanoscale Science & Technology, Vol. 17, Issue 15), 2008.
Siddhartha Ghosh
S. Mallick, K. Banerjee, S. Ghosh, J. Rodriguez and S. Krishna, “Mid-wavelength Infrared Avalanche
Photodiode Using InAs-GaSb Strain Layer Superlattice,” IEEE Photonics Technology Letters, Vol. 19,
1843, 2007.
S. Mallick, K. Banerjee, B. Rodriguez, S. Krishna and S. Ghosh, “Noiseless e-initiated InAs/GaSb Strain
Layer Superlattice Avalanche Photodiode,” Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 91, 241111, 2007.
J. Kabelac, S. Ghosh, P. Dobal and R. Katiyar, “RF Plasma Assisted Oxide MBE Growth of BiFeO3,” J.
Vac. Sci. and Tech. B 25, 1071, 2007.
R. Rupani, S. Ghosh, X. Hua and P. Bhattacharya, “Low Frequency Noise Spectroscopy in Resonant
Tunneling Quantum Dot Detectors,” Micorelectronics Journal, 2007.
S. Mallick, K. Banerjee, C. Grein, J. Rodriguez, S. Krishna and S. Ghosh, “Electron Initiated InAs/GaSb
Strain Layer Superlattice Avalanche Photodiode,” Journal of Electronic Materials, In press.
Ashfaq Khokhar
S. Djahel, F. Na¨ıt-Abdesselam, Z. Zhang and A. Khokhar, “Defending Against Packets Dropping
Attack in Vehicular Ad Hoc Networks,” Security and Communication Networks, John Wiley & Sons,
In Press.
W. Ahmad and A. Khokhar, “cHawk: A Highly Efficient Biclustering Algorithm Using Weighted
Bigraph Crossing Minimization,” Bioinformatics, In Press.
X. Zhang, H. Wang, F. Na¨ıt-Abdesselam and A. Khokhar, “Distortion Analysis for Real-Time Data
Collection of Spatially-temporally Correlated Data Fields in Wireless Sensor Networks,” IEEE
Transactions on Vehicular Technology, In press.
L. Abusalah, A. Khokhar and M. Guizani, “Security and Trust in Mobile Ad-Hoc Networks,” IEEE
Communications Surveys and Tutorials, In press.
X. Zhang and A. Khokhar, “Optimizing Distortion for Real-Time Data Gathering in Randomly
Deployed Sensor Networks,” Wireless Communications and Mobile Computing Journal, In press.
James Lin
Z. W. Wang, J. C. Lin, W. H. Mao, W. Z. Liu, M. B. Smith and C. M. Collins, “A SAR and Temperature:
Calculations and Comparison to Regulatory Limits for MRI,” J. of Magnetic Resonance Imaging,
26(2):437-441, August 2007.
J. C. Lin, S. Allen, J. B. Anderson, H. Bassen, M. Ikehata, N. Leitgeb, S. Pisa, S. Watanabe,and K. Yamazaki,
“K ICNIRP Statement on EMF-Emitting New Technologies,” Health Phys., 94(4):376-392, April 2008.
Derong Liu
G. Zhai, X. Xu, H. Lin and D. Liu, “Extended Lie Algebraic Stability Analysis for Switched Systems with
Continuous-time and Discrete-time Subsystems,” International Journal of Applied Mathematics and Computer
Science, Vol. 17, No. 4, pp. 447-454, 2007.
H. Zhang, Z. Wang and D. Liu, “Robust Exponential Stability of Recurrent Neural Networks with Multiple
Time-varying Delays,” IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems-II: Express Briefs, Vol. 54, No. 8, pp. 730734, August 2007.
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S. Ledesma, D. Liu and D. Hernandez, “Two Approximation Methods to Synthesize the Power Spectrum of
Fractional Gaussian Noise,” Computational Statistics and Data Analysis, Vol. 52, No. 2, pp. 1047-1062,
October 2007.
D. Liu, Z. Pang and S. R. Lloyd, “A Neural Network Method for Detection of Obstructive Sleep Apnea and
Narcolepsy Based on Pupil Size and EEG,” IEEE Transactions on Neural Networks, Vol. 19, No. 2, pp. 308318, February 2008.
H. Zhang, Y. Wang and D. Liu, “Delay-dependent Guaranteed Cost Control for Uncertain Stochastic Fuzzy
Systems with Multiple Time Delays,” IEEE Transactions on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics-Part B:
Cybernetics, Vol. 38, No. 1, pp. 126-140, February 2008.
N. Jin and D. Liu, “Wavelet Basis Function Neural Networks for Sequential Learning,” IEEE Transactions on
Neural Networks, Vol. 19, No. 3, pp. 523-528, March 2008.
H. Zhang, Z. Wang and D. Liu, “Global Asymptotic Stability of Recurrent Neural Networks with Multiple
Time Varying Delays,” IEEE Transactions on Neural Networks, In press.
J. Ma, T. Yang, Z.-G. Hou, M. Tan and D. Liu, “Neurodynamic Programming: A Case Study of the Traveling
Salesman Problem,” Neural Computing and Applications, In press.
D. Liu, H. Javaherian, O. Kovalenko and T. Huang, “Adaptive Critic Learning Techniques for Engine Torque
and Air-fuel Ratio Control,” IEEE Transactions on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics-Part B: Cybernetics, In
press.
Z. Pang, D. Liu, N. Jin and Z. Wang, “A Monte Carlo Particle Model Associated with Neural Networks for
Tracking Problems,” IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems-I: Regular Papers, In press.
Sudip Mazumder
S. K. Mazumder and K. Acharya, “Multiple Lyapunov Function Based Reaching Criteria for Orbital
Existence of Switching Power Converters,” IEEE Transactions on Power Electronics, Vol. 23, No. 3, pp.
1449 – 1471, 2008.
K. Acharya, S. K. Mazumder and I. Basu, “Reaching Criterion of a Three-phase Voltage Source Inverter
Operating with Passive and Nonlinear Loads and its Impact on Global Stability,” IEEE Transactions on
Industrial Electronics, Vol. 55, No. 4, pp.1795-1812, 2008.
M. Tahir and S. K. Mazumder, “Markov Chain Model for Performance Analysis of Transmitter Power
Control in Contention Based Wireless MAC Protocol,” Springer Telecommunication Systems Special Issue
on Advances in Modelling and Evaluation of Communication Systems, DOI 10.1007/s11235-008-9103-3,
2008.
M. Tahir and S. K. Mazumder, “Delay Constrained Optimal Resource Utilization of Wireless Networks for
Distributed Control Systems,” IEEE Communication Letters, Vol. 12, No. 4, pp. 289 – 291, 2008.
S. K. Mazumder, C. M. Tan and K. Acharya, “Design of a Radio-frequency Controlled Parallel all-SiC
dc/dc Converter Unit,” IEEE Power Transactions on Power Electronics, In press.
S. K. Mazumder, R. Huang and K. Acharya, “Wireless-position-sensing Based Motor Speed Control,”
IEEE Power Electronics Letters, In press.
S. K. Mazumder, S. Pradhan, J. Hartvigsen, D. Rancruel, M. von Spakovsky and M. Khaleel, “A
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C. Giannetti, B. Revaz, F. Banfi, M. Montagnese, G. Ferrini, F. Cilento, S. Maccalli, P. Vavassori, G.
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Surface Acoustic Waves in Ordered Arrays of Nanodisks Studied by Near-infrared Pump-probe Diffraction
Experiments,” Phys. Rev. B 76, 125413, 2007.
V. Rose, X. M. Cheng, D. J. Keavney, J. W. Freeland, K. S. Buchanan, B. Ilic and V. Metlushko, “The
Breakdown of the Fingerprinting of Vortices by Hysteresis Loops in Circular Multilayer Ring Arrays,”
Appl. Phys. Lett. 91, 132501, 2007.
D. R. Lee, J. W. Freeland, Y. Choi, G. Srajer, V. Metlushko and B. Ilic, “X-ray Resonant Magnetic
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A. Hoffmann, L. Fumagalli, N. Jahedi, J. C. Sautner, J. E. Pearson, G. Mihajlović and V. Metlushko,
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D. R. Lee, Y. Choi, J. W. Freeland, D. J. Keavney, G. Srajer, V. Metlushko and B. Ilic, “Lateral- and layerResolved Magnetization Reversals in a Spin-valve Array,” J. Appl. Phys. 103, 07C513, 2008.
A. V. Silhanek, J. Van de Vondel, V. V. Moshchalkov, A. Leo, V. Metlushko, B. Ilic, V. R. Misko and F.
M. Peeters, “Comment on “Transverse Rectification in Superconducting Thin Films with Arrays of
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C. Giannetti, F. Banfi, D. Nardi, B. Revaz, G. Ferrini, P. Vavassori, V. Metlushko and F. Parmigiani,
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P. Vavassori, A. Busato, A. Chiappatti, A. di Bona, S. Valeri, V. Metlushko and B. Ilic,
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Roland Priemer
V. Nigam and R Priemer, “A Simplicity-Based Fuzzy Clustering Approach for Detection and Extraction of
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Wenjing Rao
W. Rao and A. Orailoglu, “Logic Mapping in Crossbar Based Nano Architectures,” IEEE Design & Test,
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Dan Schonfeld
W. Qu, D. Schonfeld and M. Mohamed, “Real-time Distributed Multi-object Tracking Using Multiple
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F. I. Bashir, A. A. Khokhar and D. Schonfeld, “Object Trajectory-based Activity Classification and
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N. Bouaynaya and D. Schonfeld, “Protein Communication System: Evolution and Genomic Structure,”
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W. Qu and D. Schonfeld, “Real-time Decentralized Articulated Motion Analysis and Object Tracking From
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S. Liao, M. Dutta, Dan Schonfeld, T. Yamanaka and M.A. Stroscio, “Quantum Dot Blinking: Relevance to
Physical Limits for Nanoscale Optoelectronic Device,” Journal of Computational Electronics, 2008.
P. Pan and D. Schonfeld, “Image Reconstruction and Multi-Dimensional Field Estimation From Randomly
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N. Bouaynaya, M. Charif-Chefchaouni and D. Schonfeld, “Theoretical Foundations of Spatially-Variant
Mathematical Morphology – Part I: Binary Images,” IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine
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N. Bouaynaya and D. Schonfeld, “Theoretical Foundations of Spatially-variant Mathematical Morphology
– Part II: Gray-level Images,” IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence, Vol. 30,
pp. 837-850, 2008.
H. Hong and D. Schonfeld, “Maximum-entropy Expectation-maximization Algorithm for Image
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N. Bouaynaya and D. Schonfeld, “Non-stationary Analysis of Coding and Noncoding Regions in
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P. Pan and D. Schonfeld, “Dynamic Proposal Variance and Optimal Particle Allocation in Particle Filtering
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W. Qu and D. Schonfeld, “Robust Control-based Object Tracking,” IEEE Transactions on Image
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J. S. Zielinski, N. Bouaynaya, D. Schonfeld and W. O'Neill, “Time-dependent ARMA Modeling of
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Michael Stroscio
M. A. Stroscio, M. Dutta and A. Raichura, “Conductance of Nanowires,” J. of Computational Electronics,
6, 247-249, 2007.
T. Yamanaka, M. Dutta and M. A. Stroscio, “Spontaneous Polarization Effects in Nanoscale Wurtzite
Structures,” J. of Computational Electronics, 6, 313-316, 2007.
M. Dutta, M. A. Stroscio, M. Vasudev, D. Ramadurai, L. Torres and B. West, “Blinking of Colloidal
Semiconductor Quantum Dots: Blinking Mechanisms,” J. of Computational Electronics, 6, 301-304, 2007.
D. Ramadurai, T. Yamanaka, Y. Li, M. Vasudev, V. Sankar, M. Dutta, M. A. Stroscio, T. Rajh and Z.
Saponjic, “Interactions of THz Vibrational Modes with Charge Carriers in DNA: Polaron-phonon
Interactions,” International Journal of High Speed Electronics, 17, 293-309, 2007.
B. Shah, P. Clark, E. K. Moioli, M. Stroscio and J. Mao, “Labeling of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Using
Bioconjugated Quantum Dots,” Nano Letters, 7, 3071-3079, 2007.
M. Dutta, M. A. Stroscio, S. Liao, M. Vasudev and T. Yamanaka, “Blinking Mechanism of Colloidal
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Y. Li, M. Vasudev, K. Sun, M. Dutta and M. A. Stroscio, “Electronic Properties of Organic-inorganic
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6(2) 149-160, 2007.
M. Vasudev, T. Yamanaka, J. Yang, Y. Li, M. Dutta and M. A. Stroscio, “Integrated DNA-Nanoparticle
Complexes: Synthesis,” Electrical and Optical Properties,” ECS Transactions, Vol. 6 on New Bioanalytical
and Biomedical Methods, (15) 53, 2007.
T. Yamanaka, M. Vasudev, M. Dutta and M. A. Stroscio, “Charge Transport Analysis in DNA from the
Aspect of Phonon Scattering,” ECS Transactions, Vol. 6, (15) 45, 2007.
K. Sun, Y. Li, M. A. Stroscio and M. Dutta, “Miniband Formation in Superlattices of Colloidal Quantum
Dots and Conductive Polymers,” ECS Transactions, Vol. 6 (23), Sensors Based on Nanotechnology 3, In
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T. Yamanaka, M. Dutta and M. A. Stroscio, “Simulation of Charge Transport in DNA,” Physica Status
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M. Vasudev, T. Yamanaka, J. Yang, Y. Li, D. Ramadurai, M. A. Stroscio, T. Globus, T. Khromova and M.
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S. Liao, M. Dutta, D. Schonfeld, T. Yamanaka and M. A. Stroscio, “Quantum Dot Blinking: Physical Limit
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T. Inoue, J. Qian, S. Liao, Y. Li, V. Narayanamurty, M. Vasudev, M. Dutta and M. A. Stroscio,
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T.Yamanaka, M. Dutta and M. A. Stroscio, “Monte Carlo Simulation of Polaron Transport in DNA,”
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K. Sun, M. Dutta and M. A. Stroscio, “Transmission Coefficients for Minibands Formed in Quantum Dot
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Daniela Tuninetti
U. Niesen, C. Fragouli and D. Tuninetti, “On Capacity of Line Networks,” IEEE Trans. on Inform. Theory,
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P. L. E. Uslenghi
V. G. Daniele and P. L. E. Uslenghi, “Isorefractive Wedge,” Radio Sci., Vol. 42, RS6S31,
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J. C. Pincenti and P. L. E. Uslenghi, “Incident Field Excitation of Random Cables,” Radio Sci., Vol. 42,
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J. Liang and P. L. E. Uslenghi, “A Paraboloidal Lens Made of Double-negative Material,” Radio Sci., Vol.
42, RS6S14, doi:10.1029/2007RS003701, November-December 2007.
T. M. Larsen, D. Erricolo and P. L. E. Uslenghi, “New Method to Obtain Small Parameter Power Series
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Kaijie Wu
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HungYu Yang
C. Zhou and H.Y. D. Yang, “Design Considerations of Miniaturized Least-Dispersive Periodic Slow-Wave
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Philip Yu
C. Aggarwal and P. S. Yu, “On Static and Dynamic Methods for Condensation-Based Privacy-Preserving
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X. Gu, Z. Wen, P. S. Yu and Z.Y. Shae, “peerTalk: A Peer-to-Peer Multi-Party Voice-Over-IP System,”
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M. Vlachos, K. L. Wu, S. K. Chen and P. S. Yu, “Correlating Burst Events on Streaming Stock Market
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X. Wu, V. Kumar, J. R. Quinlan, J. Ghosh, Q. Yang, H. Motoda, G. J. McLachlan, A. Ng, B. Liu, P. S. Yu,
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K. Hildrum, F. Douglis, J. L. Wolf, P. S. Yu, L. Fleische and A. Katta, “Storage Optimization for LargeScale Distributed Steam Processing Systems,” ACM Trans. Storage, Vol. 3, No. 4, In press.
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MECHANICAL AND INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING
Elodie Adida
E. Adida and G. Perakis, “A Nonlinear Continuous Time Optimal Control Model of Dynamic Pricing and
Inventory Control with No Backorders,” Naval Research Logistics, Vol. 54, No. 7, pp. 767-795, 2007.
Suresh Aggarwal
S. Som and S. K. Aggarwal, “A Numerical Investigation of Methane Air Partially Premixed Flames at
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A. M. Briones, S. Som and S. K. Aggarwal, “The Effect of Multi-Stage Combustion on NOx Emissions in
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A. J. Lock, A. M. Briones, S. K. Aggarwal, I. K. Puri and U. Hegde, “Liftoff and Extinction Characteristics
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2007.
M. Marchionni, I. K. Puri and S. K. Aggarwal, “The Influence of Real Gas Thermodynamics on
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S. Som, A. I. Ramírez, J. Hagerdorn, A. Saveliev and S. K. Aggarwal, “A Numerical and Experimental
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A. J. Lock, S. K. Aggarwal, I. K. Puri and U. Hegde, “Suppression of Fuel and Air Stream Diluted
Methane-Air Partially Premixed Flames in Normal and Microgravity,” Fire Safety Journal, Vol. 43, pp. 2435, 2008.
A. M. Briones, S. K. Aggarwal and V. R. Katta, “Effects of H2 Enrichment on the Propagation
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N. Sedighi, S. Murad and S. K. Aggarwal, “Molecular Dynamic Simulations of Nano-Droplet Wetting on a
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P. Berta, I. K. Puri, S. K. Aggarwal, S. Granata, T. Faravelli and E. Ranzi, “An Experimental and
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Farid Amirouche
T. Johnson, F. Amirouche, “Thermal Behavior During Ionic Polymer Actuation: Empirical Results,”
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T. Johnson and F. Amirouche, “Micropump Technology in Biomedical Applications,” Recent Patents in
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T. Johnson and F. Amirouche, “Multiphysics Modeling of an IPMC Microfluidic Control Device,”
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F. Amirouche, C. Romero, M. Gonzalez and L. Aram, “Study of Micromotion in Modular Acetabular
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F. Amirouche, J. Martin, M. Gonzalez and L. Fergusson, “Experimental Set-up and Sensory Glove
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Prashant Banerjee
P. P. Banerjee, C. Luciano, G. M. Lemole, Jr., F. T. Charbel and M. Y. Oh, “Accuracy of Ventriculostomy
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P. Banerjee, R. Avila, D. He, E. Bechhoefer and S. Wu, “Discriminant Analysis Based Prognostics of
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P. P. Banerjee, R. Yudkowsky, M. Lemole, F. Charbel and C. Luciano, “Using a High-Fidelity Virtual
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G. M. Lemole, Jr., P. P. Banerjee, C. Luciano, S. Neckrysh and F. T. Charbel, “ Virtual Reality in
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H. Liu, H. Darabi, P. Banerjee and J. Liu, “Survey of Wireless Indoor Positioning Techniques and
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Kenneth Brezinsky
R. Sivaramakrishnan, G. Dayma, P. Dagaut and K. Brezinsky, “High Pressure Effects on the Mutual
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B. Culbertson, R. Sivaramakrishnan and K. Brezinsky, “Elevated Pressure Thermal Experiments and
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A. Raman, R. Sivaramakrishnan and K. Brezinsky, “Pyrolysis of Diacetylene at High Pressures Experimental and Modeling Study,” Combustion and Flame, In press.
Elisa Budyn
E. Budyn, T. Hoc and J. Jonvaux, “Fracture Strength Assessment and Aging Signs Detection in Human
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E. Budyn and T. Hoc, “Multiple Scale Modeling of Cortical Bone Fracture in Tension Using X-FEM,”
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L. Henry, T. Hoc and E. Budyn, “Microextensometry and Mechanical Behaviour of Haversian Cortical
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Sabri Cetinkunt
R. Gomm and S. Cetinkunt, “Memory Efficient Real-Time Motion Planning by Dual-Resolution Heuristic
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S. Haggag, A. R. Neto, K. Huang and S. Cetinkunt, “Fault Tolerant Real Time Control Strategy for a Steerby-ire Control System of an Articulated Vehicle,” International Journal of Mechatronics, pp.129-142, Vol.
17, Issue 2-3, 2007.
Soyoung Cha
D. Ludovisi, S. S. Cha, N. Ramachandran and W. M Worek, “Effect of Magnetic Field on Two-Layered
Natural/Thermocapillary Convection,” International Communications in Heat and Mass Transfer, Vol. 34,
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Subrata Chakrabarti
L. Tao, H. Song and S. Chakrabarti, “Nonlinear Progressive Waves in Water of Finite Depth – An Analytic
Approximation,” Coastal Engineering, 54(11), pp. 825-834, 2007.
L. Tao, H. Song and S. K. Chakrabarti, “Scaled Boundary FEM Solution of Short-crested Wave Diffraction
by a Vertical Cylinder,” Computer Method in Applied Mechanics and Engineering, 197(1-4), pp. 232-242,
2007.
S. Chakrabarti, M. Levin, A. Gupta, P. Yaghoubi and S. Abdul, “Design Analysis of Floating Structures
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S. Chakrabarti, “Challenges for a Total System Analysis on Deepwater Floating Systems,” The Open
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S. Chakrabarti, “Instability Analysis of Offshore Towers in Waves,” Journal of Engineering Structures,
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Houshang Darabi
R. Sampath, H. Darabi, U. Buy and J. Liu, “Control Reconfiguration of Discrete Event Systems with
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1, pp 84-100, 2008.
M. Haji1, R. Haji and H. Darabi, “Price Discount and Stochastic Initial Inventory in the Newsboy
Problem,” Journal of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Vol. 1, No. 2, pp. 130-138, 2007.
L. Baghdasaryan, H. Darabi, F. Schuler and A. Schaller, “A Modeling and Optimization Management Tool
for Large-Scale Supply Chain Networks,” International Journal of Industrial and System Engineering, In
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David He
S. Wu and D. He, “Development and Validation of Drive Shaft Diagnostics and Prognostics Using Damage
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P. Banerjee, R. Avila, D. He, S. Wu and E. Bechhoefer, “Discriminant Analysis Based Prognostics of
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Carmen Lilley
Q. Huang, C. M. Lilley, R. S. Divan and M. Bode, “Surface and Size Effects on the Electrical Properties
of Cu Nanowires,” Journal of Applied Physics, In press.
J. He and C. M. Lilley, “Surface Effect on the Elastic Behavior of Static Bending Nanowires,” Nano
Letters, In press.
C. M. Lilley and R. Meyer, Invited Paper, “Surface Effects of Adsorbed Organic Species on Electrical
Properties of Au Nanowires,” Bulletin of the Polish Academy of Science, 55, 2, p. 187, 2007.
Farzad Mashayek
K. K.Q. Zhang, Z. Gao, W. J. Minkowycz and F. Mashayek, “An Introduction to Lattice Grid,” Numerical
Heat Transfer, Part B, 51(5), 415-431, 2007.
P. Gandhi, B. Rovagnati, F. Mashayek and G. B. Jacobs, “Subsonic Compressible Flow in Two-Sided LidDriven Cavity. Part II: Unequal Walls Temperatures,” International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer,
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P. Gandhi, B. Rovagnati, F. Mashayek and G. B. Jacobs, “Subsonic Compressible Flow in Two-Sided LidDriven Cavity. Part I: Equal Walls Temperatures,” International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer,
50(21-22), 4206-4218, 2007.
B. Shotorban, K. K.Q. Zhang and F. Mashayek, “Improvement of Particle Concentration Prediction in
Large-Eddy Simulation by Defiltering,” International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer,50(19-20), 37283739, 2007.
K. Sengupta, K. Russell and F. Mashayek, “Step Geometry and Counter-current Effects in Dump
Combustors. Part I: Cold Flow,” AIAA Journal, 45(8), 2033-2041, 2007.
B. Rovagnati, M. Davoudabadi, G. Lapenta and F. Mashayek, “Effect of Collisions on Dust Particle
Charging via PIC-MCC,” Journal of Applied Physics, 102(7), 073302, 2007.
M. Davoudabadi and F. Mashayek, “Numerical Modeling of Dust Particles Configurations in a Cylindrical
Radio-frequency Plasma Reactor,” Physical Review E, 76(5), 2007.
K. Sengupta, K. Russell and F. Mashayek, “Step Geometry and Countercurrent Effect in Dump Combustor
– Reacting Flow,” Numerical Heat Transfer, Part B., In press.
Constantine Megaridis
A. V. Bazilevsky, K. Sun, A. L. Yarin and C. M. Megaridis, “Selective Intercalation of Polymers in Carbon
Nanotubes,” Langmuir, Vol. 23, pp. 7451-7455, 2007.
I. S. Bayer, C. M. Megaridis, J. Zhang, D. Gamota and A. Biswas, “Analysis and Surface Energy
Estimation of Various Model Polymeric Surfaces Using Contact Angle Hysteresis,” Journal of Adhesion
Science and Technology, Vol. 21, pp. 1439-1467, 2007.
A.V. Bazilevsky, A. L. Yarin and C. M. Megaridis, “Pressure-Driven Fluidic Delivery Through Carbon
Tube Bundles,” Lab on a Chip, Vol. 8, pp. 152-160, 2008.
A. V. Bazilevsky, K. Sun, A. L. Yarin and C. M. Megaridis, “Room-Temperature, Open-Air, Wet
Intercalation of Liquids, Surfactants, Polymers and Nanoparticles within Nanotubes and Microchannels,” J.
Materials Chemistry, Vol. 18, pp. 696-702, 2008.
S. Raman, A. L. Yarin, C. M. Megaridis, A. V. Bazilevsky and E. Kelley, “Desorption-Limited Mechanism
of Release From Polymer Nanofibers,” Langmuir, Vol. 24, pp. 965-974, 2008.
M. K. Tiwari, A. L. Yarin and C. M. Megaridis, “Electrospun Fibrous Nanocomposites as Permeable,
Flexible Strain Sensors,” J. Applied Physics, Vol. 103, Article 044305, 2008.
W. J. Minkowycz
K. K.W. Zhang, B. Rovagnati, Z. Gao, W. J. Minkowycz and F. Mashayek, “An Introduction to the Lattice
Grid,” Numerical Heat Transfer, Part B, Vol. 51, pp.1-17, 2007.
F. Gori, M.De Stefanis, W. J. Minkowycz and W. M. Worek, “Transient Thermal Analysis of Vega
Launcher Structures,” Applied Thermal Engineering, In press.
H. D. Madhawa Hettiarachchi, M. Golubovic, W. M. Worek and W. J. Minkowycz. “Three Dimensional
Laminar Slip-Flow and Heat Transfer in a Rectangular Microchannel with Constant Wall Temperature,”
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M. N. Golubovic, H.D. Madhawa Hetiarachchi, W. M. Worek and W. J. Minkowycz. “Nano Fluids and
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Thomas Royston
M. B. Ozer, S. Acikgoz, T. J. Royston, H. A. Mansy and R. H. Sandler, “Boundary Element Model for
Simulating Sound Propagation and Source Localization Within the Lungs,” J. of the Acoustical Society of
America, Vol. 122, No. 1, pp. 657 – 671, 2007.
S. Acikgoz, M. B. Ozer, T. J. Royston, H. A. Mansy and R. H. Sandler, “Experimental and Computational
Models for Simulating Sound Propagation Within the Lungs,” ASME J. Vibration and Acoustics, Vol. 130,
No. 2, pp. 021010-1 – 021010-10, 2008.
M. B. Ozer, H. N. Ozguven and T. J. Royston, “Identification of Structural Non-linearities Using
Describing Functions and the Sherman-Morrison Method in SDOF and MDOF Mechanical Systems,”
Mech. Sys. & Signal Proc, doi:10.1016/j.ymssp.2007.11.014, 2008.
Z. K. Kusculuoglu and T. J. Royston, “Nonlinear Modeling of Composite Plates with Piezoceramic Layers
Using Finite Element Analysis,” Journal of Sound and Vibration, doi:10.1016/j.jsv.2007.06, 2008.
T. J. Royston, “Leveraging the Equivalence of Hysteresis Models From Different Fields for Analysis and
Numerical Simulation of Jointed Structures,” ASME J. Computational and Nonlinear Dynamics,
doi:10.1115/1.2908348, 2008.
T. H. El-Bialy, R. F. Elgazzar, E. E. Megahed and T. J. Royston, “Effects of Ultrasound Modes on
Mandibular Osteodistraction,” Journal of Dental Research, In press.
Ahmed Shabana
F. Pigorini, A. Gugliotta, T. Sinokrot and A. A. Shabana, “Experimental Validation of Nonlinear
Multibody Railroad Vehicle System Algorithms,” IMechE Journal of Multibody Dynamics, Vol. 221, pp.
505 – 513, 2007.
B. A. Hussein, H. Sugiyama and A. A. Shabana, “Coupled Deformation Modes in the Large Deformation
Finite Element Analysis: Problem Definition,” ASME Journal of Computational and Nonlinear Dynamics,
Vol. 2, pp. 146-154, 2007.
K. Dufva, K. Kerkkanen, L. G. Maqueda and A. A. Shabana, “Nonlinear Dynamics of Three-Dimensional
Belt Drives Using the Finite Element Method,” Nonlinear Dynamics, Vol. 48, pp. 449-466, 2007.
A. A. Shabana, O. A. Bauchau and G. M. Hulbert “Integration of Large Deformation Finite Element and
Multibody System Algorithms,” ASME Journal of Computational and Nonlinear Dynamics, Vol. 2, pp.
351 – 359, 2007.
A. A. Shabana and C. Rathod, “Geometric Coupling in the Wheel/Rail Contact Formulations: A
Comparative Study,” IMechE Journal of Multi-body Dynamics, Vol. 221, pp. 147 – 160, 2007.
H. Sugiyama and A. A. Shabana, “Trajectory Coordinate Constraints in Multibody Railroad Vehicle
Systems,” JSME Journal of System Design and Dynamics, Vol. 1, No. 3, pp. 481 – 490, 2007.
L. G. Maqueda and A. A. Shabana, “Poisson Modes and General Nonlinear Constitutive Models in the
Large Displacement Analysis of Beams,” Journal of Multibody System Dynamics, Vol. 18(3), pp. 375 –
396, 2007.
T. Siokrot, M. Nakhaeinejad and A. A. Shabana, “A Velocity Transformation Method for the Nonlinear
Dynamic Simulation of Railroad Vehicle Systems,” Nonlinear Dynamics, Vol. 51, pp. 289 – 307, 2008.
L. G. Maqueda, O. A. Bauchau and A. A. Shabana, “Effect of the Centrifugal Forces on the Finite Element
Eigenvalue Solution of a Rotating Blade: A Comparative Study,” Journal of Multibody System Dynamics,
Vol. 19 (3), pp. 281 – 302, 2008.
161
A. A. Shabana, R. Chamorro, Rathod and C. Cheta, “A Multibody System Approach for Finite Element
Modeling of Rail Flexibility in Railroad Vehicle Applications,” IMechE Journal of Multibody Dynamics,
Vol. 222, pp. 1-15, 2008.
B. Hussein, D. Negrut and A. A. Shabana, “Implicit and Explicit Integration in the Solution of the Absolute
Nodal Coordinate Differential/Algebraic Equations,” Nonlinear Dynamics, In press.
C. Mellace, A. P. Lai, A. Gugliotta, N. Bosso, T. Sinokrot and A. A. Shabana, “Experimental and
Numerical Investigation of Railroad Vehicle Braking Dynamics,” IMechE Journal of Multibody Dynamics,
In press.
A. A. Shabana and L. G. Maqueda, “Slope Discontinuities in the Finite Element Absolute Nodal
Coordinate Formulation: Gradient Deficient Elements,” Multibody System Dynamics, In press.
L. G. Maqueda and A. A. Shabana, “Numerical Investigation of the Slope Discontinuities in Large
Deformation Finite Element Formulations,” Nonlinear Dynamics, In press.
G. Sanborn, M. Tobaa and A. A. Shabana, “Coupling Between Structural Deformations and Wheel/Rail
Contact Geometry in Railroad Vehicle Dynamics,” IMechE Journal of Multibody Dynamics, In press.
William Worek
H.D.M. Hettiarachchi and W. M. Worek, “The Effect of Longitudinal Heat Conduction in Cross Flow
Indirect Evaporative Coolers,” Applied Thermal Engineering, In press.
H.D.M. Hettiarachchi, M. Golubovic, W. M. Worek and Y. Ikegami, “Optimum Design Criteria for an
Organic Rankine Cycle Using Low-Temperature Geothermal Heat Sources,” Energy- The International
Journal, Vol. 32, pp. 1698-1706, 2007.
H. D. M. Hettiarachchi, M. Golubovic, W. M. Worek and Y. Ikegami, “A Study of the Kalina Cycle
System 11 (KCS-11) for Low-Temperature Heat Sources,” ASME Journal of Energy Resources and
Technology, Vol. 129, No. 3, pp. 243-247, 2007.
D. Ludovisi, S. S. Cha, N. Ramachandran and W. M. Worek, “Effect of Magnetic Field on Two-Layered
Natural/Thermocapillary Convection,” International Communications in Heat and Mass Transfer, Vol. 34,
pp. 523–533, 2007.
M. Golubovic, H. D. M. Hettiarachchi and W. M. Worek, “Evaluation of Rotary Dehumidifier Performance
With and Without Heated Purge,” International Communications in Heat and Mass Transfer, Vol. 34, pp.
785-795, 2007.
F. S. K. Warnakulasuriya and W. M. Worek, “Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop Properties of High Viscous
Solutions in Plate Heat Exchangers,” International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, In press.
Alexander Yarin
A. L. Yarin, E. Zussman, J. H. Wendorff and A. Greiner, “Material Encapsulation in Core-Shell
Micro/Nanofibers, Polymer and Carbon Nanotubes and Micro/Nanochannels,” J. Mater. Chem., Vol. 17,
2585-2599, 2007.
A. V. Bazilevsky, K. Sun, A. L. Yarin and C. M. Megaridis, “Selective Intercalation of Polymers in
Carbon Nanotubes,” Langmuir, Vol. 23, 7451-7455, 2007.
T. Han, D. H. Reneker and A. L. Yarin, “Buckling of Jets in Electrospinning,” Polymer, Vol. 48, 60646076, 2007.
C. J. Thompson, G.G. Chase, A. L. Yarin and D. H. Reneker, “Effect of Parameters on Nanofiber Diameter
Determined From Electrospinning Model,” Polymer, Vol. 48, 6913-6922, 2007.
162
A. V. Bazilevsky, A. L. Yarin and C. M. Megaridis, “Pressure-Driven Delivery Through Carbon Tube
Bundles,” Lab. Chip, Vol. 7, 152-160, 2008.
R. Srikar, A. L. Yarin, C. M. Megaridis, A.V. Bazilevsky and E. Kelley, “Desorption-Limited Mechanism
of Release From Polymer Nanofibers,” Langmuir, Vol. 24, 965-974, 2008.
A.V. Bazilevsky, K. Sun, A. L. Yarin and C. M. Megaridis, “Room-Temperature, Open-Air, Wet
Intercalation of Liquids, Surfactants, Polymers and Nanoparticles within Nanotubes and Microchannels,” J.
Materials Chem., Vol. 18, 696 – 702, 2008.
M. K. Tiwari, A. L. Yarin and C. M. Megaridis, “Electrospun Fibrous Nanocomposites as Permeable,
Flexible Strain Sensors,” J. Appl. Phys., Vol. 103, 044305, 2008.
T. Han, A. L. Yarin and D. H. Reneker, “Viscoelastic Electrospun Jets: Initial Stresses and Elongational
Rheometry,” Polymer, Vol. 49, 1651-1658, 2008.
T. Han, A. L. Yarin and D. H. Reneker, “Pendulum-Like Motion of Straight Electrified Jets,” Polymer,
Vol. 49, 2160-2169, 2008.
D. H. Reneker and A. L. Yarin, “Electrospinning Jets and Polymer Nanofibers,” Polymer, Vol. 49, 23872425, 2008.
163
CONFERENCE PUBLICATIONS
BIOENGINEERING
Michael Cho
A. Kadakia, V. Keskar, R. A. Gemeinhart and M. Cho, “Enhanced Stem Cell Adhesion in a 3-D Hybrid
Scaffold for Bone Tissue Engineering,” The 2007 Tissue Engineering International & Regenerative
Medicine Society Meeting, Toronto, Canada, 2007.
S. Lipsky, S. Sun, I. Titushkin, K. Wary and M. Cho, “Development of Optimal Substrate for Co-Culture
with Multiple Inductive Signals,” The 2007 Annual Fall Meeting of the Biomedical Engineering Society,
Los Angeles, CA, 2007.
A. Kadakia, V. Keskar, R. A. Gemeinhart and M. Cho, “A New Super Porous 3-D Hybrid Artificial Cornea
Enhances Stromal Cell Adhesion,” The 2007 Annual Fall Meeting of the Biomedical Engineering Society,
Los Angeles, CA, 2007.
J. K. Wise, M. R. Cho, E. Zussman, C. M. Megaridis and A. L, Yarin, “Electrospinning Techniques to
Control Deposition and Structural Alignment of Nanofibrous Scaffolds for Cellular Orientation and
Cytoskeleton Reorganization,” in Nanotechnology and Tissue Engineering: The Scaffold, C. Laurencin,
Editor, CRC Press, In Press.
Yang Dai
P. Larsen, E. Almasri, G. Chen and Y. Dai, “Incorporating Knowledge of Topology Improves
Reconstruction of Interaction Networks From Microarray Data,” Proc. Fourth Int. Symp. on Bioinformatics
Research and Applications, Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics, Vol. 4983, Edited by I. I. Mandoiu, R.
Sunderraman and A. Zelikovsky, Springer Verlag, pp. 434-443, 2008.
E. Almasri, P. Larsen, G. Chen and Y. Dai, “Incorporating Literature Knowledge in Bayesian Network for
Inferring Gene Networks with Gene Expression Data,” Proc. Fourth Int. Symp. on Bioinformatics Research
and Applications, Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics, Vol. 4983, Edited by I .I. Mandoiu, R. Sunderraman
and A. Zelikovsky, Springer Verlag, pp. 184-195, 2008.
L. Huang, O. Karpenko, N. Murugan and Y. Dai, “Building a Meta-Predictor for MHC Class II-Binding
Peptides,” in Immunoinformatics: Predicting Immunogenicity In Silico, D. R. Flower, Editor, Humana
Press Inc., Totowa, NJ, pp. 355-364, 2007.
David Eddington
H. Caicedo, J. S. Mohammed, C. P. Fall and D. T. Eddington, “Spatiotemporal Brain Slice Stimulation
Using a Microfluidic Network and Standard Perfusion Chamber,” Biomedical Engineering Society Annual
Meeting, 2007.
D. T. Eddington, J. Higgins, S. N. Bhatia and L. Mahadeven, “Collective Hydrodynamics and Kinetics of
Sickle Cell Vaso-Occlusion and Rescue in a Microfluidic Device,” Biomedical Engineering Society Annual
Meeting, 2007.
I. Papautsky, C. Maltbie, D. Eddington, A. S. Bhagat and H. Caicedo, “Introducing Microfluidics in a
Problem Based Learning Course,” American Society for Engineering Education, 2008.
K. Nam, S. Oppegard and D. T. Eddington, “Independent Control of Gas Concentrations in a Multiwell
Format,” Lab Automation, 2008.
S. Oppegard, P. Anderson and D. Eddington, “Cnidocytes as a Functional Material in Microfabricated
Systems,” Institute of Biological Engineering, 2008.
164
John Hetling
J. R. Hetling, “Electrophysiology of Natural and Artificial Vision,” Artificial Sight, Springer, pp. 355-380,
2007.
Jie Liang
J. Dundas, T. A. Binkowski, B. DasGupta and J. Liang, “Topology Independent Protein Structural
Alignment,” 7th Workshop on Algorithms in Bioinformatics, R. Giancarlo and S. Hannenhalli, Editors,
LNBI 4645, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg, pp. 171-182, September 2007.
Z. Ouyang and J. Liang, “Detecting Positively Selected Sites From Amino Acid Sequences: An Implicit
Codon Model,” Proc. IEEE Eng. Med. Biol. Soc., 1:5302-5306, 2007.
H-M Lu and J. Liang, “Perturbation-based Markovian Transmission Model for Macromolecular Machinery
in Cell,” Proc. IEEE Eng. Med. Biol. Soc., 1:5029-34, 2007.
Y. Cao and J. Liang, “An Optimal Algorithm for Enumerating State Space of Stochastic Molecular
Networks with Small Copy Numbers of Molecules,” Proc. IEEE Eng. Med. Biol. Soc., 1:4599-602, 2007.
James Lin
J. C. Lin, “Radio Frequency Exposure Assessment and Dosimetry,” Proc. Elettra Symposium on Campi
Elettromagnetici E Salute, Electromagnetic Fields and Health, Rome, Italy, pp. 34-50, October 2007.
Andreas Linninger
J. Moon, L. Zhang and A. A. Linninger, “Algorithmic Approaches to Integrated Design and Control Under
Uncertainty,” 2008 Foundations of Computer-Aided Process Operations (FOCAPO) Meeting, June 29-July
2, Cambridge, Massachusetts, In Press.
Hui Lu
G. Feng and H. Lu, “Computer Simulation of I27 Translocation Through ClpY Reveal the Critical Role of
Protein Mechanical Strength and Local Stability,” Proc. IEEE-EMBC, 2007.
G. Zhao, M. Carson and H. Lu, “Prediction of Specific Protein-DNA Recognition by Knowledge-based
Two-body and Three-body Interaction Potentials,” Proc. IEEE-EMBC, 2007.
G. Zhao, M. Carson and H. Lu, “Analysis of the Interdependency of Sequence Features in CpG Islands
Using an Alternating Decision Tree,” Proc. IEEE-EMBC, In Press.
R. Langlois and H. Lu, “MALIBU: A Machine Learning Workbench,” Proc. IEEE-EMBC, In Press.
Richard Magin
R. L. Magin, O. Abdullah, D. Baleanu and X. J. Zhou, “Fractional Order Dynamics in the Bloch-Torrey
Equation,” Biomedical Engineering Society Conference, Los Angeles, California, September 2007.
R. L. Magin and D. Baleanu, “NMR Measurements of Anomalous Diffusion Reflect Fractional Order
Dynamics,” ASME 2007 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences & Computers and
Information in Engineering Conference, Las Vegas, Nevada, September 2007.
R. L. Magin and D. Baleanu, “Fractional Calculus in NMR,” Symposium on Applied Fractional Calculus,
University of Extremadura, Badajoz, Spain, October 15-17, 2007.
R. L. Magin, X. Feng and D. Baleanu, “Fractional Order Solution to the Bloch Equation,” 49th
Experimental Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Conference, Asilomar Conference Grounds, Pacific Grove,
California, March 2008.
165
R. L. Magin, O. Abdullah, D. Baleanu and X. J. Zhou, “Fractional Order Solutions to the Bloch-Torrey
Equation,” 16th Scientific Meeting and Exhibition International Society for Magnetic Resonance in
Medicine, Toronto, Canada, May 2008.
W. Li, L. Hong and R. L. Magin, “MR Assessment of Tissue Engineered Adipose Tissue,” 16th Scientific
Meeting and Exhibition International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, Toronto, Canada, May
2008.
James Patton
J. Burgess, R. Bareither and J. L. Patton, “Bimanual Training Enhances Single Limb Performance,” IEEE
Transactions on Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering, 15 (2), pp. 347-355, 2008.
A. Dvorkin, W. Rymer, K. Settle and J. Patton, “Perceptual Assessment of Spatial Neglect Within a Virtual
Environment,” IEEE Virtual Rehabilitation, pp. 175-179, Venice, Italy, September 2007.
F. Huang, J. Patton and F. Mussa-Ivaldi, “Interactive Priming Enhanced by Negative Damping Aids
Learning of an Object Manipulation Task,” IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Conference
(EMBc), Lyon, France, 2007.
Patrick Rousche
H. Esmailbeigi and P. J. Rousche, “Functional Imaging and Anatomical Variations of Human Auditory
Cortex,” Proceedings of the BMES Annual Fall Meeting, Chicago, IL, October 2007.
D. Gandhi and P. J. Rousche, “Histological Evaluation of Polyimide-Based Flexible Neural Interfaces,”
Proceedings of the BMES Annual Fall Meeting, Chicago, IL, October 2007.
P. Ifft, T. Chiganos and P. J. Rousche, “A Method for Multi-channel Chemical and Electrical Analysis in
the Brain,” Proceedings of the Midwest Sectional Meeting of ASEE, Terre Haute, IN, April 2008.
Michael Stroscio
M. Vasudev, T. Yamanaka, K. Sun, Y. Li, J. Yang, D. Ramadurai, M. A. Stroscio and M. Dutta, “Colloidal
Quantum Dots as Optoelectronic Elements,” in Quantum Sensing and Nanophotonic Devices IV, Edited by
M. Razeghi and G. J. Brown, SPIE, Vol. 6479, 64790I-1-12, 2007.
T. Yamanaka, K. Sun, Y. Li, M. Dutta and M. A. Stroscio, “Spontaneous Polarizations, Electrical
Properties and Phononic Properties of GaN Nanostructures and Systems,” in GaN Materials and Devices
II, Edited by H. Morkoc and C. W. Litton, SPIE, Vol. 6473, 64730F-1-14, 2007.
166
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
Andreas Linninger
J. Moon, L. Zhang and A. A. Linninger, “Algorithmic Approaches to Integrated Design and Control Under
Uncertainty,” 2008 Foundations of Computer-Aided Process Operations (FOCAPO) Meeting, June 29-July
2, Cambridge, Massachusetts, In Press.
167
CIVIL AND MATERIALS ENGINEERING
Farhad Ansari
A. Iranmanesh, S. A., Bassam and F. Ansari, “Damage Evaluation of a 4-Span Concrete Bridge Subjected
to Near Source Ground Motions Using Nonlinear Finite Element Method,” Proceedings of the Concrete
Bridge Conference, St. Louis, MO, 12 pages, May 4-7, 2008.
S. A. Bassam, A. Iranmanesh and F. Ansari, “Structural Health Monitoring of a Concrete Bridge Subjected
to Northridge Earthquake Seismic Motions,” Proceedings of the Concrete Bridge Conference, St. Louis,
MO, 10 pages, May 4-7, 2008.
A. Iranmanesh, S. A. Bassam and F. Ansari, “Evaluation of Damage Identification Algorithms Applied to a
4-span Concrete Bridge Subjected to Near Source Ground Motions Using Nonlinear Finite Element
Method,” Proceedings of the 6th National Seismic Conference on Highways and Bridges, Charleston, SC,
In Press.
S. A. Bassam, A. Iranmanesh and F. Ansari, “Energy Based Approach for Post Seismic Structural Health
Monitoring of a Four Span Bridge,” Proceedings of the 6th National Seismic Conference on Highways and
Bridges, Charleston, SC, In Press.
Y. Dong, F. Ansari and V. Karbhari, “Fatigue of FRP Retrofitted Reinforced Concrete Beams,”
Proceedings of the 5th Middle East Symposium on Structural Composites for Infrastructure Applications,
Hurghada, Egypt, 10 pages, May 2008.
I. Talebinejad, C. Fischer, F. Ansari, L. Giacosa and A. DeStefano, “ Structural Health Monitoring of
Lingoto Cable-Stayed Pedestrian Bridge, Proceedings of SHMII 3, Vancouver, Canada, A. Mufti, Editor, 8
pages, November 2007.
F. Ansari, “Health Monitoring of FRP Strengthened and Post Tensioned Concrete,” Proceedings of the
NSF Workshop on the Applications of FRP to Infrastructure, 8 pages, Workshop on the Applications of
FRP to Infrastructure, Cairo, Egypt, May 19, 2008.
Subrata Chakrabarti
P. Chakrabarti, S. Chakrabarti and T. Olsen, “Dynamic Simulation of Immersion of Tunnel Elements for
Busan – Geoje Fixed Link Project,” 27th International Conference on Offshore Mechanics and Arctic
Engineering OMAE2008-57881, Estoril, Portugal, In Press.
N. Srinivasan, S. Chakrabarti, R. Sundaravadivelu and R. Kanotra, “Hydrodynamics of a SPAR-type FPSO
Concept for Application as a Production Platform,” 27th International Conference on Offshore Mechanics
and Arctic Engineering OMAE2008-57881, Estoril, Portugal, In Press.
N. Srinivasan, S., Chakrabarti, R. Sundaravadivelu and R. Kanotra, “Design of a Non-Ship-Shaped FPSO
for Sakhalin-V Deepwater,” SPE-114882, SPE Russian Oil and Gas Technical Conference, Moscow,
Russia, In Press.
Alexander Chudnovsky
Z. Zhou, A. Caratus, A. Chudnovsky and W. Michie, “Characterization of Slow Crack Growth in HDPE
Under Creep Condition,” ANTEC 2008 ---- Proceedings of the 66th Annual Technical Conference &
Exhibition, Milwaukee, WI, Society of Plastics Engineers, pp. 746-751, May 4-8, 2008.
B-H Choi, R. Paradkar, P-M Cham, W. Michie, Z. Zhou and A. Chudnovsky, “SEM and FTIR Analysis of
PE Pipe Fracture in Accelerated Test Conditions (with) ANTE,” Proceedings of the 66th Annual Technical
Conference & Exhibition, Milwaukee, WI, Society of Plastics Engineers, pp. 2444-2449, May 4-8, 2008.
168
B-H Choi, A. Chudnovsky and K. Sehanobish, “Evaluation of Slow Crack Growth Lifetime of Pipe Grade
Polyethylene,” ICM 10, International Conference on Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Busan, Korea, J.
Key Engineering Materials, Vol. 346, 8, 2007.
A. Chudnovsky, “Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Slow Crack Growth in Polymers,” ICM 10,
International Conference on Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Busan, Korea, J. Key Engineering
Materials, Vol. 346, 8, 2007.
H. Wu, E. Golovin, A. Chudnovsky, J. W. Dudley and G. K. Wong, “Observation of Hydraulic Fracture
Initiation and Propagation in a Brittle Polymer,” Proceedings of the 42nd US Rock Mechanics Symposium,
San Francisco, CA, In Press.
A. Chudnovsky, F. Fan, Y. Shulkin, H. Zhang, J. W. Dudley and G. K. Wong, “Hydraulic Fracture
Simulation Revisited,” Proceedings of the 42nd US Rock Mechanics Symposium, San Francisco, CA, In
Press.
Christophe Darnault
C. J. G. Darnault, S. Boninea, B. Uyusur and P. Snee, “Fate of Quantum Dot Nanomaterials in the Vadose
Zone, Flow and Transport in Heterogeneous Subsurface Formations: Theory, Modelling & Applications,”
Proceedings of the International Groundwater Symposium, Istanbul, International Association of Hydraulic
Engineering and Research (IAHR) Turkey, In Press.
J. Ernesto Indacochea
F. Rumiche, H. H. Wang, J. E. Indacochea and M. L. Wang, “Nanostructured Hydrogen Sensors Based on
Anodized Aluminum Oxide (AAO),” Proceedings of the conference on Smart Structures and Materials
and NDE for Health Monitoring and Diagnostics, SPIE, Vol. 6932, pp. 693230-1 – 693230-9, San Diego,
CA, USA, March 9-13, 2008.
J. E. Indacochea, “Interfacial Aspects of Ceramic-Metal Bonding,” Proceedings of the IURS 2007
Symposium, Hiroshima, Japan, November 29-December 1, 2007.
J. E. Indacochea, S. Hirnyj and M . A l - N a g i , “Formation of ZrAg, CuZr, and CuZr2 Intermetallic
During Brazing of Zirconium with Ag70.5-Cu26.5-Ti3 Filler Metal,” Proceedings of the X International
Conference on Crystal Chemistry and intermetallic Compounds, Lviv, Ukraine, September 17-20, 2007.
Mohsen Issa
M. A. Issa, M. Alhassan and R. Alrousan, “Response of Reinforced Concrete Slabs Strengthened with
Different Types and Configurations of CFRP,” Proceedings of the 8th International Symposium on Fiber
Reinforced Polymer Reinforcement for Concrete Structures, FRPRCS-8, 8 pages, University of Patras,
Patras, Greece, July 2007.
R. Alrousan and M. A. Issa, “Shear Strengthening of Reinforced Concrete Beams Using CFRP
Composites,” Proceedings of the Structural Faults & Repair, 12th International Conference, Edinburgh,
UK, June 10, 2008.
M. A. Issa and R. Alrousan, “High Performance Bonded Concrete Overlays,” Proceedings of the
International Conference on Construction and Building Technology, ICCBT 2008, Kuala Lumpur,
Malaysia, June 16-20, 2008.
Amid Khodadoust
A. Khodadoust, K. Reddy and S. Varadhan, “Transport of Lactate-Modified Nanoscale Iron Particles in
Sand Columns,” Proc. ASCE GoeCongress, pp. 479-486, 2008.
A. Khodadoust, K. Reddy, S. Varadhan and K. Darko-Kyaga, “Transport and Reactivity of LactateModified RNIP in Subsurface Soil,” Proc. Battelle Sixth International Conference on Remediation of
Chlorinated and Recalcitrant Compounds, In Press.
169
Jie Lin
J. Lin and M. Ruan, “Modeling Land Use, Bus Ridership and Air Quality: A Case Study of Chicago Bus
Service,” The ASCE Proceedings of the Transportation, Land Use, Planning, and Air Quality Conference,
Orlando, FL, July 9-11, 2007.
W. Pu, and J. Lin, “Buses as Probes: Archived v.s. Real-Time AVL,” The ASCE Proceedings of the 2008
Advanced Applications of Transportation Technology, Athens, Greece, (recommended for a special issue
journal publication), In Press.
J. Lin and M. Ruan, “An Investigation of Bus Headway Regularity and Service Performance in Chicago
Bus Transit System,” The ASCE Proceedings of the 2008 Advanced Applications of Transportation
Technology, Athens, Greece, (recommended for a special issue of IET/ITS journal publication), In Press.
W. Pu and J. Lin, “An Investigation of Automatic Vehicle Location Data for Bus Probe Studies,” To be
included in the Proceedings of the 2008 IEEE Intelligent Vehicles Symposium - IV'08, Eindhoven, The
Netherlands, In Press.
Abolfazl Mohammadian
J. Auld, A. Mohammadian, P. Nelson and S. Doherty, “Modeling Activity Scheduling Conflict Resolution
Strategies,” Proc. of the ASCE’s 10th International Conference of Application of Advanced Technology in
Transportation, Athens, Greece, May 28-30, 2008.
J. Auld, A. Mohammadian and K. Wies, “Population Synthesis with Control Category Optimization,” Proc.
of the ASCE’s 10th International Conference of Application of Advanced Technology in Transportation,
Athens, Greece, May 28-30, 2008.
S. Yagi and A. Mohammadian, “Analysis and Application of Intra-Household Interaction Rules for an
Activity-Based Microsimulation of Travel Demand,” Proc. of the ASCE’s 10th International Conference
of Application of Advanced Technology in Transportation, Athens, Greece, May 28-30, 2008.
A. Samimi and A. Mohammadian, “Sustainable Development: Examining the Impacts of BuiltEnvironment and Transportation on Public Health,” Proc. of Transport Chicago, Chicago, IL, June 6, 2008.
A. Samimi, A. Mohammadian and M. R. Ghaeli, “Effects of Transportation, Land-Use and Built
Environment on Health,” Proc. of 8th Iranian Conference on Traffic and Transportation Engineering,
Tehran, May 13-15, 2008.
T. H. Rashidi and A. Mohammadian, “Effectiveness of Transit Strategies Targeting Elderly People,” Proc.
of 87th Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board, (CD-ROM), Washington, D.C., January
2008.
J. Auld and A. Mohammadian, “Population Synthesis with Region-Level Control Variable Aggregation,”
Proc. of 87th Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board, (CD-ROM), Washington, D.C.,
January 2008.
Y. Zhang and A. Mohammadian, “Examining Common Distributional Assumptions of Travel
Characteristics for Data Simulation,” Proc. of 87th Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board,
(CD-ROM), Washington, D.C., January 2008.
Y. Zhang and A. Mohammadian, “Microsimulation of Household Travel Survey Data,” Proc. of 87th
Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board, (CD-ROM), Washington, D.C., January 2008.
S. Zargari, M. Araghi and A. Mohammadian, “A Combined Trip Distribution and Assignment Model:
Applications to Mandatory Trips,” Proc. of 87th Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board,
(CD-ROM), Washington, D.C., January 2008.
170
J. Auld, A. Mohammadian and S. Doherty, “Analysis of Activity Conflict Resolution Strategies,” Proc. of
87th Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board, (CD-ROM), Washington, D.C., January 2008.
Y. Zhang and A. Mohammadian, “Bayesian Updating of Transferred Household Travel Data Using
Markov Chain Monte Carlo Simulation with Gibbs Sampler,” Proc. of 87th Annual Meeting of the
Transportation Research Board, (CD-ROM), Washington, D.C., January 2008.
S. Yagi and A. Mohammadian, “Modeling Daily Activity-Travel Tour Patterns Incorporating Activity
Scheduling Decision Rules,” Proc. of 87th Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board, (CDROM), Washington, D.C., January 2008.
S. Yagi and A. Mohammadian, “Joint Models of Home-Based Tour Mode and Destination Choices:
Applications to a Developing Country,” Proc. of 87th Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research
Board, (CD-ROM), Washington, D.C., January 2008.
Krishna Reddy
P. J. Carpenter, S. Grellier, K. R. Reddy, R. Adib, C. Peters and J. Gangathulasi, “Investigating the Interior
of a Landfill Cell with Leachate Injection Using Electromagnetic Conductivity and Ground-Penetrating
Radar Surveys,” Proceedings of the 21st Symposium on the Application of Geophysics to Engineering and
Environmental Problems (SAGEEP), Philadelphia, PA, USA, 2008.
K. R. Reddy and M. R. Karri, “Removal and Degradation of Pentachlorophenol in Clayey Soil Using
Nanoscale Iron Particles,” Geotechnics of Waste Management and Remediation, Geotechnical Special
Publication No. 177, ASCE Press, Reston, Virginia, pp. 463-469, 2008.
A. P. Khodadoust, K. R. Reddy and S. Varadhan, “Transport of Lactate-Modified Nanoscale Iron Particles
in Sand Columns,” Geotechnics of Waste Management and Remediation, Geotechnical Special Publication
No. 177, ASCE Press, Reston, Virginia, pp. 479-486, 2008.
K. S. Richards and K. R. Reddy, “Experimental Investigation of Piping Potential in Earthen Structures,”
Geosustainability and Geohazard Mitigation, Geotechnical Special Publication No. 178, ASCE Press, Reston,
Virginia, pp. 367-376, 2008.
A. Z. Al-Hamdan and K. R. Reddy, “Transport and Speciation of Heavy Metals in Soils During
Electrokinetic Remediation: Influence of Soil Type and Electric Potential,” Geotechnics of Waste
Management and Remediation, Geotechnical Special Publication No. 177, ASCE Press, Reston, Virginia,
pp. 447-454, 2008.
K. R. Reddy, J. Gangathulasi, Hettiarachchi and J. Bogner, “Geotechnical Properties of Municipal Solid
Waste Subjected to Leachate Recirculation,” Geotechnics of Waste Management and Remediation,
Geotechnical Special Publication No. 177, ASCE Press, Reston, Virginia, pp. 144-151, 2008.
K. R. Reddy, “Technical Challenges to In-Situ Remediation of Polluted Sites,” Proceedings of the First Sri
Lanka Geotechnical Society International Conference on Soil and Rock Engineering, Colombo, Sri Lanka,
9 pages, 2007.
K. R. Reddy and M. R. Karri, “Electrokinetic Delivery of Nanoiron Amended with Surfactant and
Cosolvent in Contaminated Soil,” Proceedings of the International Conference on Waste Engineering and
Management, Hong Kong, May 2008.
K. R. Reddy and J. A. Adams, “Conceptual Modeling of Air Sparging for Groundwater Remediation,”
Proceedings of the 9th International Symposium on Environmental Geotechnology and Global Sustainable
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R. C. Vaishya, M. M. Sethy and K. R. Reddy, “Prevention of Groundwater Contamination Through
Reactive Barrier Material (RBM) for Use in Landfill Liners and In Situ Barriers to Immobilize Chromium,”
Proceedings of the 6th International IAHS Groundwater Quality Conference, Fremantle, Western
Australia, December 2007.
K. R. Reddy and M. R. Karri, “Electrokinetic Delivery of Nanoscale Iron Particles for In-Situ Remediation
of Pentachlorophenol-Contaminated Soils,” Proceedings of the International Symposium on GeoEnvironmental Engineering for Sustainable Development, Xuzhou, China, October 22-24, 2007.
K. R. Reddy, A. P. Khodadoust and M. R. Karri, “Electrokinetic Delivery of Nanoscale Iron Particles for
Remediation of Pentachlrophenol in Clay Soil,” Proceedings of the 6th Symposium on Electrokinetic
Remediation, Vigo, Spain, pp.7-8, (Invited), 2007.
K. R. Reddy, “Integrated Electrokinetic Remediation Technologies: Opportunities and Challenges,”
Proceedings of the 6th Symposium on Electrokinetic Remediation, Vigo, Spain, pp. 105-106, (Invited), 2007.
K. R. Reddy and C. Cameselle, “Electrochemical Remediation Technologies for Polluted Soils, Sediments
and Groundwater,” John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, New Jersey, In Press.
K. R. Reddy, M. V. Khire and A. N. Alshawabkeh, “Geosustainability and Geohazard Mitigation,”
Geotechnical Special Publication No.178, ASCE Press, Reston, Virginia, 1203p, (ISBN: 978-0-7844-0971-8),
2008.
A. N. Alshawabkeh, K. R. Reddy and M. V. Khire, “Characterization, Monitoring and Modeling of
Geosystems,” Geotechnical Special Publication No.179, ASCE Press, Reston, Virginia, 1101p (ISBN: 978-07844-0972-5), 2008.
M. V. Khire, A. N. Alshawabkeh and K. R. Reddy, “Geotechnics of Waste Management and Remediation,”
Geotechnical Special Publication No.177, ASCE Press, Reston, Virginia, 856p (ISBN: 978-0-7844-0970-1),
2008.
K. R. Reddy, “Physical and Chemical Groundwater Remediation Technologies,” Chapter 12 in
Overexploitation and Contamination of Shared Groundwater Resources, C. J. G. Darnault, Editor, Springer
Science Publisher, pp. 257-274 (ISBN: 978-1-4020-6984-0), 2008.
K. R. Reddy, “Enhanced Aquifer Recharge,” Chapter 13 in Overexploitation and Contamination of Shared
Groundwater Resources, C. J. G. Darnault, Editor, Springer Science Publisher, pp. 275-288 (ISBN: 978-14020-6984-0), 2008.
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COMPUTER SCIENCE
John Bell
J. Bell, “A Learning Progression to Effectively Implement Virtual Reality as an Educational Tool for K-12
Nanoscience Education,” Proceedings of American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference,
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J. Bell, “Developing Educational Software in an Undergraduate Lab – Serving Education on Two Fronts at
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Tanya Berger-Wolf
S. Sheikh, T. Y. Berger-Wolf, M. V. Ashley, I. C. Caballero, W. Chaovalitwongse and B. DasGupta, “Error
Tolerant Sibship Reconstruction in Wild Populations,” Proceedings of the 7th Annual International
Conference on Computational Systems Bioinformatics (CSB), Stanford, CA, In Press.
S. I. Sheikh, T. Y. Berger-Wolf, A. A. Khokhar and B. DasGupta, “Consensus Methods for Reconstruction
of Sibling Relationships from Genetic Data,” Proceedings of the AAAI Multidisciplinary Workshop on
Advances in Preference Handling (MPREF), Chicago, IL, In Press.
Habiba, T. Y. Berger-Wolf, “Graph Theoretic Measures for Identifying Effective Blockers of Spreading
Processes in Dynamic Networks,” Proceedings of the MLG-ICML Workshop on Machine Learning on
Graphs, Helskinki, Finland, In Press.
C. Tantipathananandth, T. Y. Berger-Wolf and D. Kempe, “A Framework for Community Identification in
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Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining, San Jose, CA, USA., pp. 717 – 726, August 2007.
T. Y. Berger-Wolf, S. I. Sheikh, B. DasGupta, M. V. Ashley, I. C. Caballero, W. Chaovalitwongse and S.
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Ugo Buy
H. Wang, L. Grigore, U. Buy and H. Darabi, “Enforcing Transition Deadlines in Time Petri Nets,” Proc.
IEEE Conf. on Emerging Technologies and Factory Automation, pp. 604—611, September 2007.
Isabel Cruz
I. F. Cruz, R. Gjomemo and M. Orsini, “A Secure Mediator for Integrating Multiple Level Access Control
Policies,” in 12th International Conference on Knowledge-Based and Intelligent Information &
Engineering Systems, Session on XML Security, E. Damiani, Editor, Lecture Notes in Computer Science,
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L. Cirio, I. F. Cruz and R. Tamassia, “A Role and Attribute Based Access Control System Using Semantic
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I. F. Cruz, R. Tamassia and D. Yao, “Privacy-Preserving Schema Matching Using Mutual Information,” in
Database and Application Security XXI, IFIP TC11/WG11.3 21st Annual Working Conference on
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W. Sunna and I. F. Cruz., “Structure-Based Methods to Enhance Geospatial Ontology Alignment,” in
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Bhaskar DasGupta
S. I. Sheikh, T. Y. Berger-Wolf, M. V. Ashley, I. C. Caballero, W. Chaovalitwongse and B. DasGupta,
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S. I. Sheikh, T. Y. Berger-Wolf, A. A. Khokhar and B. DasGupta, “Consensus Methods for Reconstruction
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B. DasGupta, J. Jun and I. Mandoiu, “Primer Selection Methods for Detection of Genomic Inversions and
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B. DasGupta, J. Jun and I. Mandoiu, “Primer Selection Methods for Detection of Genomic Inversions and
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R. Albert, B. DasGupta, R. Dondi, S. Kachalo, E. Sontag, A. Zelikovsky and K. Westbrooks, “A Novel
Method for Signal Transduction Network Inference from Indirect Experimental Evidence,” 7th Workshop
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J. Dundas, T. A. Binkowski, B. DasGupta and J. Liang, “Topology Independent Protein Structural
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T. Y. Berger-Wolf, S. Sheikh, B. DasGupta, M. V. Ashley, I. C. Caballero and S. L. Putrevu,
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P. Berman, B. DasGupta and E. Sontag, “Computational Complexities of Combinatorial Problems with
Applications to Reverse Engineering of Biological Networks,” in Advances in Computational Intelligence:
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Barbara Di Eugenio
S. Ohlsson, B. Di Eugenio, B. Chow, D. Fossati, X. Lu and T. C. Kershaw, “Beyond the Code-and-Count
Analysis of Tutoring Dialogues,” The 13th International Conference on Artificial Intelligence in
Education, pp. 349-356, Marina Del Rey, CA, July 2007.
X. Lu, B. Di Eugenio and S. Ohlsson, “Learning Tutorial Rules Using Classification Based on
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Marina Del Rey, CA, (Poster), July 2007.
D. Fossati and B. Di Eugenio, “I Saw TREE Trees in the Park: How to Correct Real-Word Spelling
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D. Fossati, B. Di Eugenio, C. Brown and S. Ohlsson, “Learning Linked Lists: Experiments with the iList
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C. Kersey, B. Di Eugenio, P. W. Jordan and S. Katz, “Modeling Knowledge Co-Construction for Peer
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X. Lu, B. Di Eugenio, S. Ohlsson and D. Fossati, “Simple But Effective Feedback Generation to Tutor
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Piotr Gmytrasiewicz
P. Gmytrasiewicz, “Interactive Partially Observable Markov Decision Processes,” Proceedings of the
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Andrew Johnson
A. Hill and A. Johnson, “Withindows: A Framework for the Development of Transitional Desktop and
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E. Ito, S. Higgins, P. Morin, C. Jenkins, Y. Cheng, J. Lee, J. Leigh, A. Johnson and L. Renambot, “The
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K. Kirkby, P. Morin, D. Svistula, J. Leigh, A. Johnson, R. Currier and K. Campbell, “Development of a
Visualization Rain Table: A Hard Rain's A-Gonna Fall,” Poster at American GeoPhysical Union Fall
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J. Chen, H. Hur, J. Lee, A. Johnson, J. Leigh, S. Higgings, E. Ito and P. Morin, “The Core Wall Project,”
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Ashfaq Khokhar
X. Chen, D. Schonfeld and A. Khokhar, “Robust Null Space Representation and Sampling for ViewInvariant Motion Trajectory Analysis,” IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
(CVPR), In Press.
X. Chen, D. Schonfeld and A. Khokhar, “Robust Closed-Form Localization of Mobile Targets Using a
Single Sensor Based on a Non-linear Measurement Model,” The Ninth IEEE International Workshop on
Signal Processing Advances in Wireless Communications, In Press.
X. Zhang, H. Wang and A. Khokhar, “An Energy-Efficient MAC-Layer Retransmission Algorithm for
Cluster-based Sensor Networks,” IEEE International Networking and Communications Conference
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S. Ababneh, A. Khokhar and R. Ansari, “A Multimedia-Content Authentication and Recovery Protocol in
Peer-to-Peer Networks,” IEEE Int. Conf. on Electro Information Technology, May 2008.
S. Ababneh, R. Ansari and A. Khokhar, “Scalable Multimedia-Content Integrity Verification with Robust
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S. Djahel, F. Na¨ıt-Abdesselam and A. Khokhar, “An Acknowledgment-Based Scheme to Defend Against
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X. Zhang, A. Khokhar and R. Ansari, “Distortion Analysis for Real-Time Data Collection of Correlated
Fields in Randomly Distributed Sensor Networks,” IEEE International Conference on Communications
(ICC), 2008.
S. Ababneh, R. Ansari and A. Khokhar, “Improved Image Authentication Using Closed-Form
Compensation and Spread-Spectrum Watermarking,” IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech,
and Signal Processing (ICASSP), April 2008.
X. Ma, D. Schonfeld and A. Khokhar, “'Distributed Multi-Dimensional Hidden Markov Models for Image
and Trajectory-Based Video Classification,” IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech, and
Signal Processing (ICASSP), April 2008.
E. Ustunel, X. Chen, D. Schonfeld and A. Khokhar, “Null-Space Representation for View-Invariant Motion
Trajectory Classification –Recognition and Indexing-Retrieval,” IEEE International Conference on
Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing (ICASSP), April 2008.
F. Saeed and A. Khokhar, “Sample-Align-D: A High Performance Multiple Sequence Alignment System
Using Phylogenetic Sampling and Domain Decomposition,” Seventh IEEE International Workshop on
High-Performance Computational Biology (HiCOMB), 2008.
S. Ababneh R. Ansari and A. Khokhar, “A Set-Theoretic Approach for Compensated Signature Embedding
Using Projections Onto Convex Sets,” SPIE Proceedings of Electronic Imaging: Science and Technology,
Conference on Visual Communications and Image Processing, San Jose, California, 2008.
X. Ma, D. Schonfeld and A. Khokhar, “Image Segmentation and Classification Based on a 2D Distributed
Hidden Markov Model,” SPIE Proceedings of Electronic Imaging: Science and Technology, Conference on
Visual Communications and Image Processing, San Jose, California, 2008.
X. Ma, D. Schonfeld and A. Khokhar, “Distributed Multidimensional Hidden Markov Model: Theory and
Application in Multiple-Object Trajectory Classification and Recognition,” SPIE Proceedings of Electronic
Imaging: Science and Technology. Conference on Multimedia Content Access: Algorithms and Systems,
San Jose, California, 2008.
W. Ahmad, A. Khokhar and cHawk, “A Highly Efficient Biclustering Algorithm Using Weighted Bigraph
Crossing Minimization,” International Workshop on Data Mining in Bioinformatics, Vienna, Austria, (In
Conjunction with VLDB2007), 2007.
W. Ahmad and A. Khokhar, “Privacy Preserving Collaborative Filtering in Ubiquitous Computing
Environments,” International Workshop on Databases, Information Systems and Peer-to-Peer Computing
(DBISP2P2007), Vienna, Austria (In Conjunction with VLDB2007), 2007.
W. Ahmad and A. Khokhar, “Phoenix: Privacy Preserving Biclustering on Horizontally Partitioned Data
Amid Malicious Adversaries,” ACM SIGKDD International Workshop of Privacy, Security and Trust in
KDD, San Jose, 2007.
W. Ahmad and A. Khokhar, “Privacy Preserving Collaborative Filtering on Web Portals,” The Third
International Symposium on Information Assurance and Security (IAS), Manchester, UK, August 2007.
H. Wang, X Zhang and A. Khokhar, “Efficient “Void” Handling in Contention-based Geographic Routing
for Wireless Sensor Networks,” IEEE Globecom 2007.
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Correlated Fields in Sensor Networks,” IEEE Globecom, 2007.
H. Wang, X. Zhang, A. Khokhar and F. Nait-Abdesselam, “DPS-MAC: An Asynchronous MAC Protocol
for Wireless Sensor Networks,” International Conference on High Performance Computing (HiPC), Goa,
India, December 2007.
L. Abusalah and A. Khokhar, “TARP Performance in a Mobile World,” IEEE Globecom, pp. 700 – 704,
November 2007.
X. Ma, D. Schonfeld and A. Khokhar, “A General Two-Dimensional Hidden Markov Model and its
Application in Image Classification,” IEEE International Conference on Image Processing, San Antonio,
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Ajay Kshemkalyani
Z. Zhang, A.D. Kshemkalyani and S. M. Shatz, “Multi-Root Multi-Query Processing in Sensor Networks,”
International Conference on Distributed Computing Issues in Sensor Systems (DCOSS), LNCS 5067,
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Jason Leigh
V. Vishwanath, L. Zuck and J. Leigh, “Specification and Verification of LambdaRAM - A Wide-Area
Distributed Cache for High Performance Computing,” Sixth ACM-IEEE International Conference on
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V. Vishwanath, T. Shimizu, M. Takizawa, K. Obana and J. Leigh, “Towards Terabit/s Systems:
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Y. Tsukishima, A. Hirano, N. Nagatsu, W. Imajuku, M. Jinno, Y. Hibino, Y. Takigawa, K. Hagimoto, X.
Wang, L. Renambot, B. Jeong, J. Leigh, T. DeFanti and A. Verlo, “Lambda Sharing Demonstration via
Traffic-Driven Lambda-on-Demand,” Proceedings of the 33rd European Conference and Exhibition on
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John Lillis
H. Kim and J. Lillis, “A Framework for Layout-Level Logic Restructuring,” Proc. International
Symposium on Physical Design, pp. 87-94, 2008.
C. K. Cheng, J. Lillis, S. Lin and N. Chang, “Interconnect Analysis and Synthesis,” John-Wiley, 2000,
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Bing Liu
X. Ding, B. Liu and P. S. Yu, “A Holistic Lexicon-Based Approach to Opinion Mining,” First ACM
Conference on Web Search and Data Mining, 231-240, 2008.
N. Jindal and B. Liu, “Opinion Spam and Analysis,” WSDM: 219-230, 2008.
X. Li, B. Liu and S.-K. Ng, “Learning to Classify Documents with Only a Small Positive Training Set,”
ECML: 201-213, 2007.
N. Jindal and B. Liu, “Analyzing and Detecting Review Spam,” ICDM: 547-552, 2007.
Y. Zhang and B. Liu, “Semantic Text Classification of Disease Reporting,” SIGIR (Poster paper): 747-748,
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X. Ding and B. Liu, “The Utility of Linguistic Rules in Opinion Mining,” SIGIR, (Poster paper): 811-812,
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Thomas Moher
T. Moher, “Learning and Participation in a Persistent Whole-Classroom Seismology Simulation,” Proc.
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E. Shipley, B. Lopez-Silva, S. Daly, E. Wischow, T. Moher and J. Pellegrino, “Using Construct-Centered
Design to Revise Instruction and Assessment in a Nanoscale Self-Assembly Design Activity: A Case
Study,” In Members of the NCLT, “Using Construct-Centered Design to Align Curriculum, Instruction,
and Assessment Development in Emerging Science,” Proc. International Conference of the Learning
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P. Malcolm, T. Moher, D. Bhatt, B. Uphoff and B. Lopez-Silva, “Embodying Scientific Concepts in the
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T. Moher, B. Uphoff, D. Bhatt, B. Lopez-Silva and P. Malcolm, “WallCology: Designing Interaction
Affordances for Learner Engagement in Authentic Science Inquiry,” Proc. ACM Conference on Human
Factors in Computing Systems, (CHI 2008), pp. 163-172, 2008.
B. Lopez-Silva, F. Anggoro, M. Bernasconi and T. Moher, “How to 'Catch' a Virus: Representational
Affordances in a Middle-School Introduction to Nanoscale Self-Assembly,” Proc. Annual Conference of
the American Educational Research Association, 2008.
B. Uphoff, D. Bhatt, B. Lopez-Silva, M. Frack, P. Malcolm, V. Cain and T. Moher, “WallCology: Studying
Ecology using a Distributed, Persistent Virtual Ecosystem in the Classroom,” Proc. Annual Conference of
the American Educational Research Association, 2008.
E. Shipley, T. Moher and B. Lopez-Silva, “Instructional Framing for Nanoscale Self-Assembly Design in
Middle School: A Pilot Study,” Proc. Annual Conference of the American Educational Research
Association, 2008.
Peter Nelson
B. M. Cerny, C. Zhou, W. Xiao and P. C. Nelson, “Probabilistically Guided Prefix Gene Expression
Programming,” The Second International Workshop on Nature Inspired Cooperative Strategies for
Optimization (NICSO 2007), Acireale, Sicily (Italy), November 8-10, 2007.
F. Vafaee, P. C. Nelson, C. Zhou and W. Xiao, “Dynamic Adaptation of Genetic Operator’s Probabilities,” The
Second International Workshop on Nature Inspired Cooperative Strategies for Optimization (NICSO 2007),
Acireale, Sicily (Italy), November 8-10, 2007.
Q. Zhang, C. Zhou, W. Xiao and P. C. Nelson, “Improving Gene Expression Programming Performance by
Using Differential Evolution,” The Sixth International Conference on Machine Learning and Applications
(ICMLA'07), December 13-15, 2007, Cincinnati, OH, USA, pp. 31-37.
B. M. Cerny, C. Zhou, W. Xiao and P. C. Nelson, “Using Differential Evolution for Symbolic Regression
and Numerical Constant Creation,” Genetic and Evolutionary Computation Conference (GECCO-2008),
July 2008, Atlanta, GA, USA, In Press.
Sol Shatz
X. He, L. Chang, S. Shatz and J. Li, “Applying a Nested Petri Net Modeling Paradigm to Coordination of
Sensor Networks with Mobile Agents,” International Workshop on Petri Nets and Distributed Systems
(PNDS), Xi'an, China, June 2008, In Press.
Z. Zhang, A. Kshemkalyani and S. M. Shatz, “Multi-Room, Multi-Query Processing in Sensor Networks,”
4th IEEE International Conference on Distributed Computing in Sensor Systems (DCOSS-08), June 2008,
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L. Chang, J. Ding, X. He and S. M. Shatz, “A Formal Modeling Approach for Software Agents
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J. Li and S. M. Shatz, “Toward Using Node Mobility to Enhance Greedy-Forwarding in Geographic
Routing for Mobile Ad Hoc Networks,” International Workshop on Mobile Device and Urban Sensing
(MODUS 2008), St. Louis, MO, pp. 1-8, April 2008.
H. Xu, S. M. Shatz and C. K. Bates, “A Framework for Agent-Based Trust Management in Online
Auctions,” Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Information Technology: New Generations
(ITNG 2008), E-Commerce Track, Las Vegas, Nevada, pp. 149-155, April 2008.
S. Tian, S. M. Shatz and Y. Yu, “A Framework for Querying Sensor Networks Using Mobile Devices,”
Proceedings of the 1st International Workshop on Distributed Sensor Systems (DSS’07), Honolulu, Hawaii,
August 2007.
J. Lian, S. M. Shatz and X. He, “Component Based Multi-Agent System Modeling and Analysis: A Case
Study,” Proceedings of the International Conference on Software Engineering Research and Practice
(SERP), Las Vegas, Vol. 1, pp. 183-189, June 2007.
A. Prasad Sistla
K. Mehra, S. Rajamani, A. P. Sistla and S. Jha, “Verification of Object-Relational Maps,” Fifth IEEE
Symposium on Software Engg and Formal Methods, London, September 2007.
A. P. Sistla and A. Srinivas, “Monitoring Temporal Properties of Stochastic Systems,” 9th International
Conference on verification, Model checking and Abstract Interpretation, VMCAI 2008, January 2008.
A. P. Sistla, V. Venkatakrishnan, M. Zhou and H. Branske, “CMV: Automatic Verification of Complete
Mediation for JAVA Virtual Machines,” ACM Symposium on Computer, Communication and Information
Security, Tokyo, March 2008.
R. Chedda, A. P. Sistla and M. Viswanathan, “On the Expressiveness and Complexity of Finite State
Probabilistic Monitors,” IEEE Symposium on Logic in Computer Science, Pittsburgh, June 2008.
Robert Sloan
R. H. Sloan and P. Troy, “CS 0.5: A Better Approach to Introductory Computer Science for Majors,” Proc.
39th SIGCSE Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education, pp. 271–275, 2008.
M. Langlois, R. H. Sloan, B. Szörényi and G. Turán, “Horn Complements: Towards Horn-to-Horn Belief
Revision,” Proc. Twenty-Third AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence (AAAI-08), In Press.
J. Goldsmith and R. H. Sloan, “The AI Conference Paper Assignment Problem,” Proc. AAAI 2007
Workshop on Preference Handling for Artificial Intelligence, online proceedings, 2007.
Jon Solworth
M. Radhakrishnan and J. A. Solworth, “Quarantining Untrusted Entities: Dynamic Sandboxing Using
LEAP,” in Proc. of the Annual Computer Security Applications Conference (ACSAC), pp. 211{220. ACSA,
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J. A. Solworth, “Instant Revocation,” in EuroPKI'08, 2008.
J. A. Solworth, “Robustly Security Computer Systems: A New Security Paradigm of System
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M. Radhakrishnan and J. A. Solworth, “Netauth: Supporting User-Based Network Services,” Usenix
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Patrick Troy
R. H. Sloan and P. Troy, “CS 0.5: A Better Approach to Introductory Computer Science for Majors,” Proc.
39th SIGCSE Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education, March 2008.
Jeffrey Tsai
Y. Luo and J. J. P. Tsai, “A Framework for Extrusion Detection Using Machine Learning,” Proceedings of
the 11th IEEE Symposium on Object/Component/Service-oriented Real-time Distributed Computing
(ISORC08), May 5-7, 2008.
C.Y. Hsu, R. M. Hu, R. M. Chen and J. J. P. Tsai, “IHCread: An Automatic Immuohistochemistry Image
Analysis Tool,” Proceedings of 11th SDPS Transdisciplinary Conference on Integrated Design and Process
Science, June 1-6, 2008.
C. H. Wu, R. M. Chen and J. J. P. Tsai, “Sharing Cancer-Related Genes Research on Peer-to-Peer
Network,” Proceedings of 11th SDPS Transdisciplinary Conference on Integrated Design and Process
Science, June 1-6, 2008.
J. W. Ou, R. M. Chen, R. M. Hu and J. J. P. Tsai, “A Systematic Genes Expression Explorer Tool for
Multiple and Paired Chips,” Proceedings of 11th SDPS Transdisciplinary Conference on Integrated Design
and Process Science, In Press.
Z. Yu and J. J. P. Tsai, “A Framework of Machine Learning Based Intrusion Detection for Wireless Sensor
Networks,” Proceedings of the 2nd IEEE International Conference on Sensor Network, Ubiquitous, and
Trustworthy Computing (SUTC2008), June 11-13, 2008.
D. Hecht, R. M. Hu, R. M. Chen, H. W. Hsiao, A. Ng, J. J. P. Tsai and P. Sheu, “Biosemantic System:
Applications of Structured Natural Language to Biological and Biochemical Research,” Proceedings of the
1st IEEE Ambient Semantic Computing Workshop (ASC2008), June 11-13, 2008.
V. Devarashetty, J. J. P. Tsai, L. Ma and D. Zhang, “Modeling of Secure Sensor Networks Using an
Extended Elementary Object System,” Proceedings of the 7th IEEE Int’l Conf. on Cognitive Informatics,
Stanford University, CA., In Press.
V. N. Venkatakrishnan
M. T. Louw, J. S. Lim and V. N. Venkatakrishnan, “Extensible Web Browser Security,” Fourth GI
International Conference on Detection of Intrusions & Malware, and Vulnerability Assessment
(DIMVA'07), Luzerne, Switzerland, July 2007.
A. P. Sistla, V. N. Venkatakrishnan, M. Zhou and H. Branske, “CMV: Automatic Verification of Complete
Mediation for Java Virtual Machines,” ACM Symposium of Information and Communications Security
(ASIACCS), Tokyo, Japan, 2007.
S. Bandhakavi, P. Bisht, P. Madhusudan and V. N. Venkatakrishnan, “CANDID: Preventing SQL Injection
Attacks Using Dynamic Candidate Evaluations,” ACM Conference on Computer and Communications
Security (CCS), Alexandria, Virginia, November 2007.
M. T. Louw, J. S. Lim and V. N. Venkatakrishnan, “Extensible Web Browser Security,” Fourth GI
International Conference on Detection of Intrusions & Malware, and Vulnerability Assessment
(DIMVA’07), Luzerne, Switzerland, July 2007.
M. T. Louw, P. Bisht and V. N. Venkatakrishnan, “Analysis of Hypertext Markup Isolation Techniques
for XSS Prevention,” Web 2.0 Security and Privacy Workshop (W2SP), Oakland, California, 2008.
180
P. Bisht and V. N. Venkatakrishnan, “XSS-Guard: Precise Dynamic Detection of Cross-Site Scripting
Attacks Fifth GI,” International Conference on Detection of Intrusions & Malware, and Vulnerability
Assessment (DIMVA'08), Paris, France, In Press.
W. Sun, R. Sekar, Z. Liang and V. N. Venkatakrishnan, “Expanding Malware Defense by Securing
Software Installations,” Fifth GI International Conference on Detection of Intrusions & Malware, and
Vulnerability Assessment (DIMVA'08), Paris, France, July 2008. In Press.
Ouri Wolfson
B. Xu, O. Wolfson, N. D. Rishe, C. Naiman and R. M. Tanner, “A Feasibility Study on Disseminating
Spatio-temporal Information via Vehicular Ad-hoc Networks,” Proc. of the Third International Workshop
on Vehicle-to-Vehicle Communications (V2VCOM), 2007.
A. Barreto, B. Wongsaroj, T. M. King, T. Cameron, S. V. Diaz, J. Cilli, A. Muqueet, S. D. Bullard, M.
Adjouadi, O. Wolfson, S. Graham and N. Rishe, “Evaluation Criteria for Self-Management in DBMSs,”
Proc. of the International Conference on Enterprise Information Systems and Web Technologies, pp. 14-20,
2007.
N. Rishe, O. Wolfson, B. Wongsaroj, D. Small, M. Alarcon, N. Lorenzo, R. Koller, S. Kundu, S. Graham,
K. Alexander and M. Adjouadi, “Schema Based XML Compression,” Proc. of the International
Conference on Enterprise Information Systems and Web Technologies, pp. 1-6, 2007.
M. Tanizaki and O. Wolfson, “Randomization in Traffic Information Sharing Systems,” Proc. of the 15th
ACM International Symposium on Advances in Geographic Information Systems (ACM GIS 2007), pp. 2330, 2007.
Y. Luo, O. Wolfson and B. Xu, “The Role of Auto-ID Technologies in Mobile Databases for ECommerce,” (Vision Paper) Proc. of the International Workshop on RFID Data Management, pp. 108-109,
2008.
T. Zhong, B. Xu and O. Wolfson, “Disseminating Real-Time Traffic Information in Vehicular Ad-Hoc
Networks,” Proc. of the IEEE Intelligent Vehicles Symposium, In Press.
Y. Luo, O. Wolfson and B. Xu, “Mobile Local Search via P2P Databases,” Proc. of Portable 2008: the 2nd
IEEE International Interdisciplinary Intersociety Conference on Portable Information Devices (PIDs), In
Press.
Clement Yu
L. Shu, W. Meng and C. Yu, “Querying Capability Modeling and Construction,” 8th International
Conference on Web Information Systems Engineering (WISE), pp.13-25, Nancy, France, December 2007.
H. Zhao, W. Meng and C. Yu, “Mining Templates from Search Result Records of Search Engines,” 13th
ACM International Conference on Knowledge Discovering and Data Mining (SIGKDD 2007), pp.884-893,
San Jose, California, August 2007.
W. Zhang, S. Liu, C. T. Yu, C. Sun, F. Liu and W. Meng, “Recognition and Classification of Noun Phrases
in Queries for Effective Retrieval,” CIKM 2007: 711-720, November 2007.
W. Zhang, C. T. Yu and W. Meng, “Opinion Retrieval from Blogs,” CIKM 2007: 831-840, November
2007.
Philip Yu
M.Y. Yeh, K. L. Wu, P. S. Yu and M. S. Chen, “LEEWAVE: Level-Wise Distribution of Wavelet
Coefficients for Processing kNN Queries Over Distributed Streams,” Proc. VLDB Conference, In Press.
181
W. Fan, K. Zhang, H. Cheng, J. Gao, X. Yan, J. Han, P. S. Yu and O. Verscheure, “Direct Mining of
Discriminative and Essential Graphical and Itemset Features via Model-based Search Tree,” Proc. ACM
KDD Conference, Las Vegas, NE, In Press.
Y. Xu, B. Fung, K. Wang, J. Pei and P. S. Yu, “Anonymizing Transaction Databases for Publication,” Proc.
ACM KDD Conference, Las Vegas, NE, In Press.
H. Tong, S. Papadimitrioiu, J. Sun, P. S. Yu and C. Faloutsos, “Colibri: Fast Mining of Large Static and
Dynamic Graphs,” Proc. ACM KDD Conference, Las Vegas, NE, In Press.
B. Long, M. Zhang, P. S. Yu and X. Xu, “Clustering on Complex Graph,” AAAI Conference, Chicago, IL,
In Press.
B. Gedik, H. Andrade, K. L. Wu, P. S. Yu and M. Doo, “SPADE: The System S Declarative Stream
Processing Engine,” Proc. ACM SIGMOD Conference, Vancouver, Canada, In Press.
X. Yan, H. Cheng, J. Han and P. S. Yu, “Mining Significant Graph Patterns by Scalable Leap Search,”
Proc. ACM SIGMOD Conference, Vancouver, Canada, In Press.
X. Gu, S. Papadimitriou, P.S. Yu and S. P. Chang, “Toward Learning-based Failure Management for
Distributed Stream Processing Systems,” Proc. IEEE Intl. Conf. on Distributed Computing Systems,
Beijing, China, In press.
B. Long, P. S. Yu and M. Zhang, “A General Model for Multiple View Unsupervised Learning,” Proc.
SIAM Intl. Conf. on Data Mining, Atlanta, GA, April 2008.
H. Tong, S. Papadimitrioiu, P. S. Yu and C. Faloutsos, “Proximity Tracking on Time-Evolving Bipartite
Graphs,” Proc. SIAM Intl. Conf. on Data Mining, Atlanta, GA, April 2008.
C. Aggarwal and P. S. Yu, “On Indexing High Dimensional Data with Uncertainty,” Proc. SIAM Intl. Conf.
on Data Mining, Atlanta, GA, April 2008.
C. Aggarwal and P. S. Yu, “Outlier Detection with Uncertain Data,” Proc. SIAM Intl. Conf. on Data
Mining, Atlanta, GA, April 2008.
Z. Xing, J. Pei, G. Dong and P. S. Yu, “Mining Sequence Classifiers for Early Prediction,” Proc. SIAM Intl.
Conf. on Data Mining, Atlanta, GA, April 2008.
J. Ren, X. Shi, W. Fan and P. S. Yu, “Type Independent Correction of Sample Selection Bias via Structural
Discovery and Re-sampling,” Proc. SIAM Intl. Conf. on Data Mining, pp. 565-576, Atlanta, GA, April
2008.
J. Ren, Z. Qiu, W. Fan, H. Cheng and P. S. Yu, “Forward Semi-Supervised Feature Selection,” Proc.
Pacific-Asia Conference on Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining (PAKDD 2008), Osaka, Japan, May
2008.
B. Gedik, K. L. Wu and P. S. Yu, “Efficient Construction of Compact Shedding Filters for Data Stream
Processing,” Proc. IEEE Intl. Conf. on Data Engineering, Cancun, Mexico, April 2008.
C. Aggarwal and P. S. Yu, “A Framework for Clustering Uncertain Data Streams,” Proc. IEEE Intl. Conf.
on Data Engineering, Cancun, Mexico, April 2008.
H. Cheng, X. Yan, J. Han and P. S. Yu, “Direct Discriminative Pattern Mining for Effective
Classification,” Proc. IEEE Intl. Conf. on Data Engineering, Cancun, Mexico, April 2008.
182
S. Chen, H. Wang, S. Zhou and P. S. Yu, “Stop Chasing Trends: Discovering High Order Models in
Evolving Data,” Proc. IEEE Intl. Conf. on Data Engineering, Cancun, Mexico, April 2008.
J. Cheng, J. X. Yu, B. Ding, H. Wang and P. S. Yu, “Fast Graph Pattern Matching,” Proc. IEEE Intl. Conf.
on Data Engineering, Cancun, Mexico, April 2008.
B. Gedik, K. L. Wu, P. S. Yu and L. Liu, “MobiQual: QoS-aware Load Shedding in Mobile CQ Systems,”
Proc. IEEE Intl. Conf. on Data Engineering, Cancun, Mexico, April 2008.
J. Xie, J. Yang, Y. Chen, H. Wang and P. S. Yu, “A Sampling-based Approach to Information Recovery,”
Proc. IEEE Intl. Conf. on Data Engineering, Cancun, Mexico, April 2008.
C. Aggarwal and P. S. Yu, “LOCUST: An Online Analytical Processing Framework for High Dimensional
Classification of Data Streams,” Proc. IEEE Intl. Conf. on Data Engineering, Cancun, Mexico, April 2008.
C. Lucchese, M. Vlachos, D. Rajan and P. S. Yu, “Rights Protection of Multidimensional Time-series
Datasets with Neighborhood Preservation,” Proc. IEEE Intl. Conf. on Data Engineering, Cancun, Mexico,
April 2008.
C. Aggarwal and P. S. Yu, “On High Dimensional Indexing of Uncertain Data,” Proc. IEEE Intl. Conf. on
Data Engineering, Cancun, Mexico, April 2008.
X. Gu, S. Papadimitriou and S. P. Chang, “Online Failure Forecast for Fault-Tolerant Data Stream
Processing,” Proc. IEEE Intl. Conf. on Data Engineering, Cancun, Mexico, April 2008.
C. Lucchese, M. Vlachos, D. Rajan and P. S. Yu, “Ownership Protection of Shapes with Geodesic Distance
Preservation,” Proc. EDBT, Nantes, France, March 2008.
J. Cheng, J. X. Yu, X. Lin, H. Wang and P. S. Yu, “Fast Computing Reachability Labelings for Large
Graphs with High Compression Rate,” Proc. EDBT, Nantes, France, March 2008.
N. Agarwal, H. Liu, L. Tang and P. S. Yu, “Identifying the Influential Bloggers,” Proc. 1st ACM Intl. Conf.
on Web Search and Data Mining, Stanford, CA, February 2008.
X. Ding, B. Liu and P. S. Yu, “A Holistic Lexicon-based Approach to Opinion Mining,” Proc. 1st ACM
Intl. Conf. on Web Search and Data Mining, Stanford, CA, February 2008.
Lenore Zuck
S. Bensalem, D. Peled, H. Q., S. Tripakis and L. D. Zuck, “Test Case Generation for Ultimately Periodic
Paths,” Haifa Verification Conference, pp. 120-135, 2007.
A. Cohen, J. W. O'Leary, A. Pnueli, M. R. Tuttle and L. D. Zuck, “Verifying Correctness of Transactional
Memories,” FMCAD, pp. 37-44, 2007.
V. Vishwanath, L. Zuck and J. Leigh, “Specification and Verification of LambdaRAM: A Wide-area
Distributed Cache for High Performance Computing,” Memocode, (IEEE/ACM), 2008.
A. Cohen, A. Pnueli and L. Zuck, “Mechanical Verification of Transactional Memories with NonTransactional Memory Accesses,” CAV, In Press.
F. Logozzo,,D. Peled and L. D. Zuck, “Verification, Model Checking and Abstract Interpretation,” 9th
International Conference VMCAI, San Francisco, USA, January 7-9, 2008, Proceedings Springer, 2008.
183
ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING
Rashid Ansari
I. Yildirim and R. Ansari, “A Robust Method to Estimate Time Split in Second Heart Sound Using
Instantaneous Frequency Analysis,” Proc. 29th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering
in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBS 2007), pp. 1855 - 1858, Lyon, France, August 22-26, 2007.
S. Ababneh, A. Khokhar and R. Ansari, “Compensated Signature Embedding Based Multimedia Content
Authentication System,” Proc. IEEE International Conference on Image Processing (ICIP 2007), Vol. 1,
pp. I-393 – I-396, San Antonio, TX, September 16-19, 2007.
G. Chen and R. Ansari, “Frame Expansion Based Peak to Average Power Ratio Reduction in MIMO
OFDM Systems,” Proc. IEEE Workshop on Signal Processing Systems (SiPS 2007), Shanghai, China, pp.
61 – 66, October 17-19, 2007.
A. M. Bagci, R. Ansari and M. Shahidi, “A Method for Detection of Retinal Layers by Optical Coherence
Tomography Image Segmentation,” Proc. IEEE/NLM Life Science Systems and Applications Workshop
(LISA 2007), Bethesda, MD, pp. 144 – 147, November 8-9, 2007.
S. Ababneh, R. Ansari and A. Khokhar, “A Set-Theoretic Approach for Compensated Signature
Embedding Using Projections Onto Convex Sets,” Proc. SPIE Conference on Visual Communications and
Image Processing (VCIP 2008), January 2008.
A. M. Bagci, R. Ansari and M. Shahidi, “Automated Retinal Layer Segmentation in Optical Coherence
Tomography Images,” Proc. SPIE Medical Imaging 6914: Image Processing, February 2008.
S. Ababneh, R. Ansari and A. Khokhar, “Improved Image Authentication Using Closed-Form
Compensation and Spread-Spectrum Watermarking,” Proc. IEEE International Conference on Acoustics,
Speech, and Signal Processing (ICASSP 2008), Las Vegas, NV, pp. 1781 – 1784, March 30 - April 4,
2008.
S. Zhao, D. Tuninetti, R. Ansari and D. Schonfeld, “Multiple Description Coding Over Correlated
Multipath Erasure Channels,” Proc. IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech, and Signal
Processing (ICASSP 2008), Las Vegas, NV, pp. 2153 – 2156, March 30 - April 4, 2008.
T. S. Vajaranant, A. M. Bagci, R. Ansari, R. Zelkha, J. T. Wilensky, D. P. Edward and M. Shahidi,
“Validation of a Newly-Developed Macular Sectioning Algorithm with Stratus Optical Coherence
Tomography in Glaucoma,” Proc. Mtg. Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO),
Fort Lauderdale, FL, April 27-May 1, 2008.
A. M. Bagci, M. Shahidi, R. Ansari, N. Blair, M. Blair and R. Zelkha, “An Image Processing Method for
Quantitative Thickness Measurement of Retinal Layers Imaged by Optical Coherence Tomography,” Proc.
Mtg. Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO), Fort Lauderdale, FL, April 27-May
1, 2008.
X. Zhang, H. Wang, A. Khokhar, R. Ansari and G. Chen, “Distortion Analysis for Real-Time Data
Collection of Correlated Fields in Randomly Distributed Sensor Networks,” Proc. IEEE International
Conference on Communications (ICC 2008), Beijing, China, May 19-23, 2008.
S. Zhao, D. Tuninetti, R. Ansari and D. Schonfeld, “Multiple Description Coding Over Erasure Channels,”
Proc. IEEE International Conference on Communications (ICC 2008), Beijing, China, May 19-23, 2008.
I. Yildirim, R. Ansari, J. Wanek, I. S. Yetik and M. Shahidi, “Retinal Oxygen Tension Estimation in
Phosphorescence Lifetime Images Using Regularized Least Squares,” Proc. IEEE Int. Conf. On
Electro/Information Technology, Ames, IA, May 18 - 20, 2008.
184
S. Ababneh, A. Khokhar and R. Ansari, “A Multimedia-Content Authentication and Recovery Protocol in
Peer-to-Peer Networks,” Proc. IEEE Int. Conf. On Electro Information Technology, Ames, IA, May 18 20, 2008.
S. Ababneh, R. Ansari and A. Khokhar, “Scalable Multimedia-Content Integrity Verification with Robust
Hashing,” Proc. IEEE Int. Conf. On Electro/Information Technology, Ames, IA, May 18 - 20, 2008.
L. LoMonte, A. M. Bagci, D. Erricolo and R. Ansari, “Spatial Resolution in Tomographic Imaging with
Diffracted Fields,” XXIXth URSI General Assembly, Chicago, Illinois, USA, August 9-16, 2008, In Press.
Jezekiel Ben-Arie
Q. Wu and J. Ben-Arie, “Hybrid PCA Based Shape from Shading for 3D Head Reconstruction,” IEEE
2007 Electro/Information Technology Conference, EIT2007, Chicago, IL, pp.407-411, July 2007.
Q. Wu and J. Ben-Arie, “View Invariant Recognition by Hybrid PCA Based Head Reconstruction,”
Proceedings of 2007 IEEE International Workshop on Analysis and Modeling of Faces and Gestures
(AMFG), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, pp. 46-57, October 14-21, 2007.
Masud Chowdhury
A. Roy and M. H. Chowdhury, “Effects of Coupling Capacitance and Inductance on Delay Uncertainty and
Clock Skew,” Proceedings of 44th IEEE/ACM Design Automation Conference (DAC) 2007, pp. 184 – 187,
June 4-8 2007.
J. Xu, P. Khaled and M. Chowdhury, “Fast Bus Waveform Estimation at the Presence of Coupling Noise,”
Proceedings of the 2008 IEEE Great Lake Symposium on VLSI (GLSVLSI), Orlando, Florida, USA, May
4-6, 2008.
S. Rahaman and M. Chowdhury, “Improved Bit Error Rate Performance in Intra-Chip RF/Wireless
Interconnect Systems,” Proceedings of the 2008 IEEE Great Lake Symposium on VLSI (GLSVLSI),
Orlando, Florida, USA, May 4-6, 2008.
J. Xu and M. H. Chowdhury, “Full Waveform Accuracy to Estimate Delay in Coupled Digital Circuits,”
2008 IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems (ISCAS) Seattle, USA, May 18-21, 2008, In
Press.
M. Chowdhury, J. Gjanci and P. Khaled, “Controlling Ground Bounce Noise in Power Gating Scheme for
System-on-a-Chip,” Proc. IEEE Computer Society Annual Symposium on VLSI (ISVLSI 2008), Montpellier,
France, April 7-9, 2008.
J. Xu and M. H. Chowdhury, “Optimization Technique for Flip-Flop Inserted Global Interconnect,” 2008
IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems (ISCAS), Seattle, USA, May 18-21, 2008.
S. Rahaman and M. Chowdhury, “Hybrid Bus-Invert Coding for RLC Coupling-Aware On-Chip Buses,”
Proc. of IEEE CCECE'08: Symposium on Circuits, Devices and Systems, Niagara Falls, Canada, May 4-7,
2008.
M. H. Chowdhury, J. Gjanci and P.Khaled, “Innovative Power Gating for Leakage Reduction,” 2008 IEEE
International Symposium on Circuits and Systems (ISCAS), Seattle, USA, In Press.
A. Roy and M. H. Chowdhury, “Analysis of the Impacts of Signal Rise/Fall Time and Skew Variations in
Coupled-RLC Interconnects,” 2008 IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems (ISCAS)
Seattle, USA, In Press.
S. Rahaman and M. H. Chowdhury, “Time Diversity Approach for Intra-Chip RF/Wireless Interconnect
Systems,” 2008 IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems (ISCAS), Seattle, USA, In Press.
185
P. Khaled, J. Xu and M. H. Chowdhury, “Dual Diode-Vth Reduced Power Gating Structure for Better
Leakage Reduction,” IEEE MWCAS 2007, Proceedings of IEEE Midwest Symposium on Circuits and
Systems (MWSCAS) 2007, August 5-8, 2007.
S. Rahaman and M. H Chowdhury, “BER Performance Comparison between CDMA and UWB for
RF/Wireless Interconnect Application,” IEEE EIT 2008, Ames, IA, In Press.
S. Krishnamoorthy and M. H. Chowdhury, “Compact Thermal Network Model: Realization and
Reduction,” IEEE EIT 2008, Ames, IA, In Press.
S. Rahaman and M. H Chowdhury, “Joint Coding for RLC Coupling-Aware on-Chip Buses,” 2008 IEEE
Midwest Symposium on Circuits and Systems (MWSCAS), Knoxville, TN, USA, In Press.
A. Roy, S. Jha and M. H. Chowdhury, “Accurate Analysis of Switching Patterns in High Speed On-chip
Global Interconnects,” Proceedings of the 2007 14th IEEE International Conference on Electronics,
Circuits and Systems (ICECS), pp. 705-708, December 11-14, 2007.
S. Rahaman and M. H. Chowdhury, “Multi-Carrier CDMA-Interconnect for Inter- and Intra-ULSI
Communications,” Proceedings of the 2007 14th IEEE International Conference on Electronics, Circuits
and Systems (ICECS), pp. 1059-1062, December 11-14, 2007.
J. Xu and M. H. Chowdhury, “Accurate Delay Estimation in the Presence of Coupling Noise Using
Complete Waveform Accuracy,” Proceedings of the 2007 14th IEEE International Conference on
Electronics, Circuits and Systems (ICECS), pp. 166-169, December 11-14, 2007.
S. Krishnamoorthy and M. H. Chowdhury, “Analysis of Spatial Temperature Distribution in ICs,”
Proceedings of the 2007 14th IEEE International Conference on Electronics, Circuits and Systems (ICECS),
pp. 1272-1275, December 11-14, 2007.
Shantanu Dutt
S. Dutt and H. Ren, “Algorithms for Simultaneous Consideration of Multiple Physical Synthesis
Transforms for Timing Closure,” Proc. of Int’l Conference on CAD (ICCAD), In Press.
H. Ren and S. Dutt, “A Network-Flow Based Cell Sizing Algorithm,” 17th International Workshop on
Logic & Synthesis, June 2008.
H. Ren and S. Dutt, “Constraint Satisfaction in Incremental Placement with Application to Performance
Optimization Under Power Constraints,” Proc. IEEE Int’l Conf. on Computer Design, pp. 251-258, 2007.
Mitra Dutta
M. Vasudev, T. Yamanaka, K. Sun, Y. Li, J. Yang, D. Ramadurai, M. A. Stroscio and M. Dutta, “Colloidal
Quantum Dots as Optoelectronic Elements,” in Quantum Sensing and Nanophotonic Devices IV, Edited by
M. Razeghi and G. J. Brown, SPIE Vol. 6479, 64790I-1-12, 2007.
T. Yamanaka, K. Sun, Y. Li, M. Dutta and M. A. Stroscio, “Spontaneous Polarizations, Electrical
Properties and Phononic Properties of GaN Nanostructures and Systems,” in GaN Materials and Devices
II, Edited by H. Morkoc and C. W. Litton, SPIE Vol. 6473, 64730F-1-14, 2007.
M. Dutta “Optoelectronic Properties of Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Systems for Sensing Applications,” SPIE
Vol., 2007.
M. Dutta, K. Sun, Y. Li, V. Narayanamurthy, K. Reinhardt and M. A. Stroscio, “Colloidal Quantum Dots
(QDs) in Optoelectronic Devices --- Solar Cells, Photodetectors, Light-emitting Diodes,” in Handbook for
Self-Assembled Semiconductor Nanostructures for Novel Devices in Photonics and Electronics, Edited by
M. Henini, Elsever Publ., In Press.
186
Danilo Erricolo
S. M. Canta and D. Erricolo, “Improvements on the Fractal Approach for Sea Clutter Generation,” North
American Radio Science Conference, URSI - CNC/USNC, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, July 22-26, 2007.
H. T. Hayvaci, D. Erricolo and D. D. Vaccaro, “Design Of A Multi-element Multi-polarized Antenna that
Enables Applications Based on Polarization Diversity,” North American Radio Science Conference, URSI CNC/USNC, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, July 22-26, 2007.
L. Lo Monte, B. Elnour, A. Rajagopalan, G. Gupta, D. Erricolo and G. Lazzi, “Circularly and Linearly
Distributed Narrowband Vector Antennas for Direction of Arrival Applications,” North American Radio
Science Conference, URSI - CNC/USNC, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, July 22-26, 2007.
M. Albani, A. Toccafondi, C. Della Giovampaola and D. Erricolo, “An Incremental Theory of Diffraction
Formulation for the Scattering by a Thin Elliptical Cylinder, a Strip, or a Slit in a Conducting Surface,”
North American Radio Science Conference, URSI - CNC/USNC, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, July 22-26,
2007.
C. M. Butler, A. W. Schreiber and D. Erricolo, “Coupling Through a Slot in a Screen to a Cylinder in a
Semi-Elliptic Backing Channel,” North American Radio Science Conference, URSI - CNC/USNC, Ottawa,
Ontario, Canada, July 22-26, 2007.
L. Lo Monte, B. Elnour and D. Erricolo, “Distributed 6D Vector Antenna Design for Direction of Arrival
Applications,” International Conference on Electromagnetics in Advanced Applications, Turin, Italy,
September 17-21, 2007.
D. Giuli, F. Cuccoli, G. Biffi Gentili and D. Erricolo, “Ad Hoc Receive Sensors for Multiparameter &
Multichannel Multistatic Radar Operation for Surveillance of Limited Critical Areas,” International
Conference on Electromagnetics in Advanced Applications, Turin, Italy, pp. 476-479, September 17-21,
2007.
L. Lo Monte, B. Elnour and D. Erricolo, “Distributed Narrowband Vector Antennas for Direction of
Arrival Applications,” The 22nd International Conference, on Advanced Science and Technology, (ICAT
2007), Chicago, IL, USA, November 3, 2007.
G. Carluccio and D. Erricolo, “Exact Analytic 2d Solution to Obtain Optimal B1 Excitation Field in UltraHigh Field Mri Applications,” National Radio Science Meeting, Boulder, Colorado, January 3-6, 2008.
S. M. Canta and D. Erricolo, “Exact 2D Scattering Analysis of a Slot Backed by Cavity and Covered by a
Multilayer Diaphragm,” National Radio Science Meeting, Boulder, Colorado, January 3-6, 2008.
D. Erricolo, R. D. Graglia, T. Stoia and P. L. E. Uslenghi, “A Radar Target for Calibration and for Codes
Validation,” 2008 IEEE Radar Conference, Roma, Italy, May 26-30, 2008.
L. Lo Monte, D. Erricolo and M. C. Wicks, “Propagation Model and Receiver Design for RF
Geotomography,” 2008 IEEE Radar Conference, Roma, Italy, May 26-30, 2008.
Ashfaq Khokhar
X. Chen, D. Schonfeld and A. Khokhar, “Robust Null Space Representation and Sampling for ViewInvariant Motion Trajectory Analysis,” IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
(CVPR), In Press.
X. Chen, D. Schonfeld and A. Khokhar, “Robust Closed-Form Localization of Mobile Targets Using a
Single Sensor Based on a Non-linear Measurement Model,” The Ninth IEEE International Workshop on
Signal Processing Advances in Wireless Communications, In Press.
187
X. Zhang, H. Wang and A. Khokhar, “An Energy-Efficient MAC-Layer Retransmission Algorithm for
Cluster-based Sensor Networks,” IEEE International Networking and Communications Conference
(INCC), 2008.
S. Ababneh, A. Khokhar and R. Ansari, “A Multimedia-Content Authentication and Recovery Protocol in
Peer-to-Peer Networks,” IEEE Int. Conf. on Electro Information Technology, May 2008.
S. Ababneh, R. Ansari and A. Khokhar, “Scalable Multimedia-Content Integrity Verification with Robust
Hashing,” IEEE Int. Conf. on Electro/Information Technology, May 2008.
S. Djahel, F. Na¨ıt-Abdesselam and A. Khokhar, “An Acknowledgment-Based Scheme to Defend Against
Cooperative Black Hole Attacks in Optimized Link State Routing Protocol,” IEEE International
Conference on Communications (ICC), 2008.
X. Zhang, A. Khokhar and R. Ansari, “Distortion Analysis for Real-Time Data Collection of Correlated
Fields in Randomly Distributed Sensor Networks,” IEEE International Conference on Communications
(ICC), 2008.
S. Ababneh, R. Ansari and A. Khokhar, “Improved Image Authentication Using Closed-Form
Compensation and Spread-Spectrum Watermarking,” IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech,
and Signal Processing (ICASSP), April 2008.
X. Ma, D. Schonfeld and A. Khokhar, “'Distributed Multi-Dimensional Hidden Markov Models for Image
and Trajectory-Based Video Classification,” IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech, and
Signal Processing (ICASSP), April 2008.
E. Ustunel, X. Chen, D. Schonfeld and A. Khokhar, “Null-Space Representation for View-Invariant Motion
Trajectory Classification –Recognition and Indexing-Retrieval,” IEEE International Conference on
Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing (ICASSP), April 2008.
F. Saeed and A. Khokhar, “Sample-Align-D: A High Performance Multiple Sequence Alignment System
Using Phylogenetic Sampling and Domain Decomposition,” Seventh IEEE International Workshop on
High-Performance Computational Biology (HiCOMB), 2008.
S. Ababneh R. Ansari and A. Khokhar, “A Set-Theoretic Approach for Compensated Signature Embedding
Using Projections Onto Convex Sets,” SPIE Proceedings of Electronic Imaging: Science and Technology,
Conference on Visual Communications and Image Processing, San Jose, California, 2008.
X. Ma, D. Schonfeld and A. Khokhar, “Image Segmentation and Classification Based on a 2D Distributed
Hidden Markov Model,” SPIE Proceedings of Electronic Imaging: Science and Technology, Conference on
Visual Communications and Image Processing, San Jose, California, 2008.
X. Ma, D. Schonfeld and A. Khokhar, “Distributed Multidimensional Hidden Markov Model: Theory and
Application in Multiple-Object Trajectory Classification and Recognition,” SPIE Proceedings of Electronic
Imaging: Science and Technology. Conference on Multimedia Content Access: Algorithms and Systems,
San Jose, California, 2008.
W. Ahmad A. Khokhar and cHawk, “A Highly Efficient Biclustering Algorithm Using Weighted Bigraph
Crossing Minimization,” International Workshop on Data Mining in Bioinformatics, Vienna, Austria, (In
Conjunction with VLDB2007), 2007.
W. Ahmad and A. Khokhar, “Privacy Preserving Collaborative Filtering in Ubiquitous Computing
Environments,” International Workshop on Databases, Information Systems and Peer-to-Peer Computing
(DBISP2P2007), Vienna, Austria (In Conjunction with VLDB2007), 2007.
188
W. Ahmad and A. Khokhar, “Phoenix: Privacy Preserving Biclustering on Horizontally Partitioned Data
Amid Malicious Adversaries,” ACM SIGKDD International Workshop of Privacy, Security and Trust in
KDD, San Jose, 2007.
W. Ahmad and A. Khokhar, “Privacy Preserving Collaborative Filtering on Web Portals,” The Third
International Symposium on Information Assurance and Security (IAS), Manchester, UK, August 2007.
H. Wang, X Zhang and A. Khokhar, “Efficient “Void” Handling in Contention-based Geographic Routing
for Wireless Sensor Networks,” IEEE Globecom 2007.
X. Zhang and A. Khokhar, “Distortion Analysis for Real-Time Data Gathering of Spatially-Temporally
Correlated Fields in Sensor Networks,” IEEE Globecom, 2007.
H. Wang, X. Zhang, A. Khokhar and F. Nait-Abdesselam, “DPS-MAC: An Asynchronous MAC Protocol
for Wireless Sensor Networks,” International Conference on High Performance Computing (HiPC), Goa,
India, December 2007.
L. Abusalah and A. Khokhar, “TARP Performance in a Mobile World,” IEEE Globecom, pp. 700 – 704,
November 2007.
X. Ma, D. Schonfeld and A. Khokhar, “A General Two-Dimensional Hidden Markov Model and its
Application in Image Classification,” IEEE International Conference on Image Processing, San Antonio,
Texas, 2007.
Sharad Laxpati
K. J. Kaczmarski, S. R. Laxpati and W. R. Stone, “Antenna Array Fault Identification Using an “Exact”
Discrete Inverse Method,” Proceedings of the 2008 URSI National Radio Science Meeting, Boulder,
Colorado, January 2008.
K. J. Kaczmarski, S. R. Laxpati and W. R. Stone, “Inverse Source Reconstruction Using an “Exact”
Discrete Inverse Method,” Proceedings of the North American Radio Science Meeting, Ottawa, Canada,
July 2007.
Gyungho Lee
Y. J. Park, Z. Zhang and G. Lee, “An Efficient Hardware Supports for Control Data Validation,” Proc.
IEEE 18th Application-specific Architectures, Systems and Processors (ASAP 2007), Montreal, Canada,
July 2007.
James Lin
J. C. Lin, “Radio Frequency Exposure Assessment and Dosimetry,” Proc. Elettra Symposium on Campi
Elettromagnetici E Salute, Electromagnetic Fields and Health, Rome, Italy, pp. 34-50, October 2007.
Derong Liu
X. Lin, Z. Zhang and D. Liu, “Temperature Control in Precalcinator with Dual Heuristic Dynamic
Programming,” Proc. INNS-IEEE International Joint Conference on Neural Networks, pp. 344-349, 2007.
Z. Pang, D. Liu, N. Jin and Z. Wang, “Neural Network Strategy for Sampling of Particle Filter on the
Tracking Problem,” Proc. INNS-IEEE International Joint Conference on Neural Networks, pp. 254-259,
2007.
N. Jin, D. Liu, Z. Pang and T. Huang, “Wavelet Basis Function Neural Networks,” Proc. INNS-IEEE
International Joint Conference on Neural Networks, pp. 254-259, 2007.
F. Tan, X. Guan and D. Liu, “The Consensus Protocol for Multi-Agent Systems Based on the Algebraic
Connectivity,” Proc. IEEE International Conference on Networking, Sensing and Control, pp. 310-313,
2008.
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D. Liu and Z. Pang, “Epileptic Seizures Predicted by Modified Particle Filters,” Proc. IEEE International
Conference on Networking, Sensing and Control, pp. 351-356, 2008.
J. Ma, T. Yang, Z.-G. Hou, M. Tan and D. Liu, “Dual Heuristic Programming Based Neurocontroller for
Vibration Isolation Control,” Proc. IEEE International Conference on Networking, Sensing and Control,
pp. 874-879, 2008.
Z. Pang and D. Liu, “Seizure Prediction Using A Dynamic Model with Hidden Variable,” Proc. 2nd
International Conference on Bioinformatics and Biomedical Engineering, 2008.
Sudip Mazumder
S. K. Mazumder, “A Novel Hybrid Modulation Scheme for an Isolated High-Frequency-Link Fuel Cell
Inverter,” Invited NSF Panel Paper, IEEE Power Engineering Society Conf., Pittsburgh, In Press.
S. K. Mazumder, S. Pradhan, J. Hartvigsen, D. Rancruel, M. von Spakovsky and M. Khaleel, “A
Multidiscipline and Multi-Rate Modeling Framework for Planar Solid-Oxide Fuel Cell Based PowerConditioning System for Vehicular APU,” Summer Computer Simulation Conference, San Diego, July
2007.
S. K. Mazumder, K. Acharya and M. Tahir, “Network Reconfiguration of Distributed Controlled
Homogenous Power Inverter Network Using Composite Lyapunov Function Based Reachability Bound,”
Summer Computer Simulation Conference, San Diego, July 2007.
S. K. Mazumder, K. Acharya and M. Tahir, “Pseudo-Decentralized Control-Communication Optimization
Framework for Microgrid: A Case Illustration,” IEEE Power Engineering Society Conference, Chicago,
April 2008.
K. Acharya and S. K. Mazumder, “Optimal Sequence-Based Control Of Switching Power Converters with
Periodic Disturbances,” IEEE Power Electronics Specialists Conference, Rhodes, Greece, In Press.
S. K. Mazumder and R. Huang, “A Low-Cost Single-Stage Isolated Differential Cuk Inverter for Fuel Cell
Application,” IEEE Power Electronics Specialists Conference, Rhodes, Greece, In Press.
R. Huang and S. K. Mazumder, “An Isolated Soft-Switching Three-Phase Inverter with Six-Pulse
Modulated Pulsating Dc Link,” IEEE Industry Applications Soc. Conf., Alberta, Canada, In Press.
S. K. Mazumder, et al, “A Low-Cost Single-Stage Isolated Differential Cuk Inverter for Fuel Cell
Application,” IEEE Power Electronics Specialists Conf., Rhodes, Greece, In Press.
S. K. Mazumder, et al, “Single-Stage Low-Cost And Energy-Efficient Isolated Phase-Shifted HighFrequency Inverter Followed by a Forced Cycloconverter for Universal Residential Fuel Cell Power
System,” IEEE International Conf. on Electro/Information Technology, Ames, Iowa, In Press.
Vitali Metlushko
N. Jahedi, J. Sautner, L. Fumagalli, A. Zohar, D. Bolotin, D. Yemelyanov and V. Metlushko, “Tunable
Magnetic Landscape,” Physica C: Superconductivity, In Press.
A.V. Silhanek, N. Verellen, V. Metlushko, W. Gillijns, F. Gozzini, B. Ilic and V.V. Moshchalkov,
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Roland Priemer
H. Nguyen and R. Priemer, “Multiresolution Quantization-Based Image Watermarking,” IEEE
Electro/Information Technology Conference, 2007.
190
T. Magee and R. Priemer, “Developing an Objective Measure of Infant Crying,” National Association of
Pediatric Nurse Practitioners Conference, 2008.
Wenjing Rao
W. Rao and A. Orailoglu, “Towards Fault Tolerant Parallel Prefix Adders in Nanoelectronic Systems,”
Proc. IEEE Design, Automation and Test in Europe (DATE’08), pp. 360-365, 2008.
W. Rao, A. Orailoglu and K. Marzullo, “Locality Aware Redundancy Allocation in Nanoelectronic
Systems,” Proc. IEEE/ACM Int. Symposium on Nanoscale Architectures (NANOARCH’08), pp. 56-63,
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W. Rao, A. Orailoglu and R. Karri, “Towards Nanoelectronics Processor Architectures,” in Emerging
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Dan Schonfeld
X. Shi and D. Schonfeld, “Video Classification and Mining Based on Statistical Methods for CrossCorrelation Analysis,” IEEE Statistical Signal Processing Workshop, Madison, Wisconsin, 2007.
P. Pan and D. Schonfeld, “Multi-Dimensional Image Reconstruction and Field Estimation from Randomly
Scattered Sensors,” IEEE Statistical Signal Processing Workshop, Madison, Wisconsin, 2007.
X. Chen, D. Schonfeld and A. Khokhar, “Localization and Trajectory Estimation of Mobile Objects with a
Single Sensor,” IEEE Statistical Signal Processing Workshop, Madison, Wisconsin, 2007.
N. Bouaynaya and D. Schonfeld, “Non-Stationary Analysis of Genomic Sequences,” IEEE Statistical
Signal Processing Workshop, Madison, Wisconsin, 2007.
L. Gong, N. Bouaynaya and D. Schonfeld, “Information-Theoretic Bounds of Evolutionary Processes
Modeled as a Protein Communication System,” (Invited Paper), IEEE Statistical Signal Processing
Workshop, Madison, Wisconsin, 2007.
X. Ma, D. Schonfeld and A. Khokhar, “A General Two-Dimensional Hidden Markov Model and its
Application in Image Classification,” IEEE International Conference on Image Processing, San Antonio,
Texas, 2007.
J. Yang, D. Schonfeld and M. Mohamed, “Robust Focused Image Estimation from Multiple Images in
Video Sequences,” (Best Student Paper Award), IEEE International Conference on Image Processing, San
Antonio, Texas, 2007.
P. Pan and D. Schonfeld, “Optimal Particle Allocation in Particle Filtering for Multiple Object Tracking,”
IEEE International Conference on Image Processing, San Antonio, Texas, 2007.
W. Qu, D. Schonfeld and M. Mohamed, “A Distributed Architecture for Collaborative Real-Time Video
Tracking,” IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics, Montreal, Canada, 2007.
C. Chen, D. Schonfeld and M. Mohamed, “Distributed Pose Estimation from Multiple Views,” SPIE
Proceedings of Electronic Imaging: Science and Technology, Conference on Visual Communications and
Image Processing, San Jose, California, 2008.
H. Hong and D. Schonfeld, “Attraction-Repulsion Expectation Maximization Algorithm for Image
Processing and Sensor Field Networks,” SPIE Proceedings of Electronic Imaging: Science and Technolog,
Conference on Visual Communications and Image Processing, San Jose, California, 2008.
X. Ma, D. Schonfeld and A. Khokhar, “Image Segmentation and Classification Based on a 2D Distributed
Hidden Markov Model,” SPIE Proceedings of Electronic Imaging: Science and Technology, Conference on
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P. Pan and D. Schonfeld, “Resource Management in Particle Filtering for Multiple Object Tracking,” SPIE
Proceedings of Electronic Imaging: Science and Technology, Conference on Visual Communications and
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J. Yang, D. Schonfeld and M. Mohamed, “Focused Video Estimation from Defocused Video Sequences,”
SPIE Proceedings of Electronic Imaging: Science and Technology. Conference on Visual Communications
and Image Processing, San Jose, California, 2008.
X. Ma, D. Schonfeld and A. Khokhar, “Distributed Multidimensional Hidden Markov Model: Theory and
Application in Multiple-Object Trajectory Classification and Recognition,” SPIE Proceedings of Electronic
Imaging: Science and Technology. Conference on Multimedia Content Access: Algorithms and Systems,
San Jose, California, 2008.
S. Zhao, D. Tuninetti, R. Ansari, and D. Schonfeld, “Multiple Description Coding over Erasure Channels,”
IEEE International Conference on Communications, Beijing, China, 2008.
X. Ma, D. Schonfeld and A. Khokhar, “Distributed Multi-Dimensional Hidden Markov Models for Image
and Trajectory-Based Video Classification,” IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech, and
Signal Processing, Las Vegas, Nevada, 2008.
H. Hong and D. Schonfeld, “A New Approach to Constrained Expectation-Maximization for Density
Estimation,” IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing, Las Vegas,
Nevada, 2008.
C. Chen, D. Schonfeld and M. Mohamed, “Robust Pose Estimation Based on Sylvester’s Equation: Single
and Multiple Collaborative Cameras,” IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech, and Signal
Processing, Las Vegas, Nevada, 2008.
P. Pan and D. Schonfeld, “Adaptive Resource Allocation in Particle Filtering for Articulated Object
Tracking,” IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing, Las Vegas,
Nevada, 2008.
E. Ustunel, D. Schonfeld and A. Khokhar, “Null-Space Representation for View-Invariant Motion
Trajectory Classification-Recognition and Indexing-Retrieval,” IEEE International Conference on
Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing, Las Vegas, Nevada, 2008.
S. Zhao, D. Tuninetti, R. Ansari and D. Schonfeld, “Multiple Description Coding Over Correlated
Multipath Erasure Channels,” IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing,
Las Vegas, Nevada, 2008.
N. Bouaynaya and D. Schonfeld, “Emergence of New Structure from Non-Stationary Analysis of Genomic
Sequences,” IEEE International Workshop on Genomic Signal Processing and Statistics, Phoenix, Arizona,
In Press.
X. Chen, D. Schonfeld and A. Khokhar, “Robust Null Space Representation and Sampling for View
Invariant Motion Trajectory Analysis,” IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition,
Anchorage, Alaska, In Press.
X. Chen, D. Schonfeld and A. Khokhar, “Robust Closed-Form Localization of Mobile Targets Using a
Single Sensor Based an a Non-Linear Measurement Model,” IEEE Workshop on Signal Processing
Advances in Wireless Communications, Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil, In Press.
X. Chen, D. Schonfeld and A. Khokhar, “Robust Multi-Dimensional Null Space Representation for Image
Retrieval and Classification,” IEEE Conference on Image Processing, San Diego, California, In Press.
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P. Pan and D. Schonfeld, “Visual Tracking Using High-Order Monte Carlo Markov Chain,” IEEE
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Michael Stroscio
M. Vasudev, T. Yamanaka, K. Sun, Y. Li, J. Yang, D. Ramadurai, M. A. Stroscio and M. Dutta, “Colloidal
Quantum Dots as Optoelectronic Elements,” in Quantum Sensing and Nanophotonic Devices IV, Edited by
M. Razeghi and G. J. Brown, SPIE, Vol. 6479, 64790I-1-12, 2007.
T. Yamanaka, K. Sun, Y. Li, M. Dutta and M. A. Stroscio, “Spontaneous Polarizations, Electrical
Properties and Phononic Properties of GaN Nanostructures and Systems,” in GaN Materials and Devices
II, Edited by H. Morkoc and C. W. Litton, SPIE, Vol. 6473, 64730F-1-14, 2007.
Daniela Tuninetti
H. T. Hayvaci, D. Erricolo, D. Tuninetti and M. Rangaswami, “Multistatic Radar: Relation between the
Green Function and the Ambiguity Function,” The XXIX General Assembly of the International Union of
Radio Science (Union Radio Scientifique Internationale - URSI), In Press.
D. Tuninetti, “Cooperation in Interference Networks,” The XXIX General Assembly of the International
Union of Radio Science (Union Radio Scientifique Internationale - URSI), In Press.
Y. Weng and D. Tuninetti, “Gaussian Fading Interference Channels: Power Control and Outage
Probability,” The XXIX General Assembly of the International Union of Radio Science (Union Radio
Scientifique Internationale - URSI), In Press.
D. Tuninetti and Y. Weng, “On Interference Channels with Mixed Interference,” IEEE International
Symposium on Information Theory, ISIT 2008, Toronto, Canada, In Press.
J. Perret and D. Tuninetti, “Repetition Protocols for Block Fading Channels that Combine Transmission
Requests and State Information,” IEEE International Communication Conference (ICC 2008), Beijing,
China, May 2008.
S. Zhao, D. Tuninetti, R. Ansari and D. Schonfeld, “Multiple Description Coding over Correlated
Multipath Erasure Channels,” IEEE International Conference on Acoustic, Speech, and Signal Processing
(ICASSP 2008), Las Vegas, USA, April 2008.
S. Zhao, D. Tuninetti, R. Ansari and D. Schonfeld, “When to Use Multiple Description Coding over
Multiple Erasure Channels,” IEEE International Communication Conference (ICC 2008), Beijing, China,
May 2008.
E. Yang and D. Tuninetti, “A New Achievable Region for Interference Channels with Generalized
Feedback,” 42TH Annual Conference on Information Sciences and Systems (CISS 2008), Princeton, NJ,
USA, March 2008.
D. Tuninetti, “Repetition Protocols and Channel State Information in Block-Fading Channels,”
International Zurich Symposium (IZS08), Zurich, Switzerland, March 2008.
D. Tuninetti, “Transmitter Channel State Information and Repetition Protocols in Block Fading Channels,”
IEEE Information Theory Workshop (ITW2007), Lake Tahoe, CA, USA, September 2007.
P. L. E. Uslenghi
T. Stoia and P. L. E. Uslenghi, “Scattering by Isorefractive and DNG Spheres,” URSI North-American
Radio Science Meeting, Ottawa, Canada, July 23-26, 2007.
T. Stoia and P. L. E. Uslenghi, “Scattering by a Penetrable Sphere Equatorially Intersected by a Metallic
Disk,” Special session in memory of L.B. Felsen, URSI North-American Radio Science Meeting, Ottawa,
Canada, July 23-26, 2007.
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J. Liang and P. L. E. Uslenghi, “A Metamaterial Lens: The DNG Paraboloid,” Proc. Intl. Symposium on
Electromagnetic Theory, Ottawa, Canada, July 26-28, 2007.
P. L. E. Uslenghi, “Scattering by a Metallic Sphere Concentric with a Metallic Disk,” Proc. Intl.
Conference on Electromagnetics in Advanced Appls, (ICEAA’07), 3 pages, Torino, Italy, September 17-21,
2007.
P. L. E. Uslenghi, “Frequency - Domain Integral Equations in Linear Electrodynamics,” Proc. Intl.
Conference on Electromagnetics in Advanced Appls. (ICEAA’07), 7 pages, Torino, Italy, September 17-21,
2007.
V.G. Daniele and P. L. E. Uslenghi, “Scattering by a DNG Wedge,” Proc. Intl. Conference on
Electromagnetics in Advanced Appls. (ICEAA’07), 3 pages, Torino, Italy, Sept. 17-21, 2007.
P. L. E. Uslenghi, “Exact Geometrical Optics Scattering by DNG Metamaterial Structures,” National Radio
Science Meeting, Boulder, Colorado, January 3-6, 2008.
D. Erricolo, R. D. Graglia, T. Stoia and P. L. E. Uslenghi, “A Radar Target for Calibration and for Codes
Validation,” 2008 IEEE Radar Conference, 3 pages, Rome, Italy, May 26-29, 2008.
P. L. E. Uslenghi, “Optical Behavior of Two-Dimensional Elliptical Lenses Made of DNG Metamaterial,”
IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society Intl. Symposium and URSI Meeting, San Diego, California, July
7-11, 2008.
T. Stoia and P. L. E. Uslenghi, “Analytical and Numerical Behavior of a Penetrable Sphere Containing a
Concentric Metallic Disk,” Proc. XXIX General Assembly of the International Union of Radio Science
(URSI), Chicago, Illinois, August 11-15, 2008.
T. Stoia, D. Erricolo, R. D. Graglia and P. L. E. Uslenghi, “Analytical, Numerical and Experimental
Scattering by a Metallic Disk-Sphere Target,” Proc. XXIX General Assembly of the International Union of
Radio Science (URSI), Chicago, Illinois, August 11-15, 2008.
O. Akgol, D. Erricolo and P. L. E. Uslenghi, “Electromagnetic Behavior of an Elliptical Lens Made of
DNG Metamaterial,” Proc. XXIX General Assembly of the International Union of Radio Science (URSI),
Chicago, Illinois, August 11-15, 2008.
D. Monopoli, D. Erricolo, P. L. E. Uslenghi and R. E. Zich, “Scattering by a Slotted Semielliptical Channel
Containing DNG Metamaterial,” Proc. XXIX General Assembly of the International Union of Radio
Science (URSI), Chicago, Illinois, August 11-15, 2008.
P. L. E. Uslenghi, “Electromagnetic Analysis of the Veselago-Pendry Lens,” Proc. XXIX General Assembly
of the International Union of Radio Science (URSI), Chicago, Illinois, August 11-15, 2008.
P. L. E Uslenghi, “Analytical Scattering and Diffraction,” Radio Science, Special Section, Vol. 42, No. 6,
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Kaijie Wu
R.Stern, N. Joshi, K. Wu and R. Karri, “Register Transfer Level Concurrent Error Detection in Elliptic
Curve Crypto Implementations,” FDTC, 2007.
Hung-Yu Yang
J. Liang and H. Y .D. Yang, “Full Cross-Section Eigen-Analysis for the Design of Dipole Antennas over an
Artificial Complex Ground Plane,” URSI Conference, Ottawa, CA, July 8-11, 2007.
Y. Zhang and H. Y. D. Yang, “Novel Ultra Slow-Wave Structures Using 3D Substrate Metallization,”
Digest of IEEE Int. Microwave Symposium, Atlanta, GA, June 17-19, 2008.
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J. Liang and H. Y. D. Yang, “Reconfigurable Patch Antenna on a Tunable EBG Substrate,” 2008 IEEE APs International Symposium Digest, San Diego, CA, In Press.
Y. Zhang and H. Y. D. Yang, “Novel Ultra Slow-Wave Structures Using 3D Substrate Metallization,” 2008
IEEE AP-s International Symposium Digest, San Diego, CA, In Press.
Y. Zhang and H. Y. D. Yang, “An Ultra Small Integrated Monopole Antenna Using High-Density Periodic
Substrate Metallization,” 2008 URSI Assembly, Chicago, IL, In Press.
J. Liang and H.Y. D. Yang, “Multi-Band Frequency Reconfigurable Planar Inverted-F Antenna Designs,”
2008 URSI Assembly, Chicago, IL, In Press.
Yingwei Yao
D. Xu and Y. Yao, “EM-Based Distributed Estimation in Cluttered Environments,” Proc. IEEE EIT 2008,
Ames, IA, In Press.
Y. Yao, “Group-Ordered SPRT for Distributed Detection,” Proc. IEEE ICASSP 2008, Las Vegas, NV,
March 30--April 4, 2008.
H. Liu, X. Luo and Y. Yao, “Two Manifold Learning Techniques for Sensor Localization,” Proc. IEEE
SMC 2007, Montreal, Canada, October 7--10, 2007.
Y. Yao and T. He, “On Performance of Order-Statistics-Based Collusion Attacks,” Proc. IEEE Statistical
Signal Processing Workshop, Madison, WI, August 26--29, 2007.
Philip Yu
M.Y. Yeh, K. L. Wu, P. S. Yu and M. S. Chen, “LEEWAVE: Level-Wise Distribution of Wavelet
Coefficients for Processing kNN Queries Over Distributed Streams,” Proc. VLDB Conference, In Press.
W. Fan, K. Zhang, H. Cheng, J. Gao, X. Yan, J. Han, P. S. Yu and O. Verscheure, “Direct Mining of
Discriminative and Essential Graphical and Itemset Features via Model-based Search Tree,” Proc. ACM
KDD Conference, Las Vegas, NE, In Press.
Y. Xu, B. Fung, K. Wang, J. Pei and P. S. Yu, “Anonymizing Transaction Databases for Publication,” Proc.
ACM KDD Conference, Las Vegas, NE, In Press.
H. Tong, S. Papadimitrioiu, J. Sun, P. S. Yu and C. Faloutsos, “Colibri: Fast Mining of Large Static and
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B. Long, M. Zhang, P. S. Yu and X. Xu, “Clustering on Complex Graph,” AAAI Conference, Chicago, IL,
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B. Gedik, H. Andrade, K. L. Wu, P. S. Yu and M. Doo, “SPADE: The System S Declarative Stream
Processing Engine,” Proc. ACM SIGMOD Conference, Vancouver, Canada, In Press.
X. Yan, H. Cheng, J. Han and P. S. Yu, “Mining Significant Graph Patterns by Scalable Leap Search,”
Proc. ACM SIGMOD Conference, Vancouver, Canada, In Press.
X. Gu, S. Papadimitriou, P.S. Yu and S. P. Chang, “Toward Learning-based Failure Management for
Distributed Stream Processing Systems,” Proc. IEEE Intl. Conf. on Distributed Computing Systems,
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B. Long, P. S. Yu and M. Zhang, “A General Model for Multiple View Unsupervised Learning,” Proc.
SIAM Intl. Conf. on Data Mining, Atlanta, GA, April 2008.
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H. Tong, S. Papadimitrioiu, P. S. Yu and C. Faloutsos, “Proximity Tracking on Time-Evolving Bipartite
Graphs,” Proc. SIAM Intl. Conf. on Data Mining, Atlanta, GA, April 2008.
C. Aggarwal and P. S. Yu, “On Indexing High Dimensional Data with Uncertainty,” Proc. SIAM Intl. Conf.
on Data Mining, Atlanta, GA, April 2008.
C. Aggarwal and P. S. Yu, “Outlier Detection with Uncertain Data,” Proc. SIAM Intl. Conf. on Data
Mining, Atlanta, GA, April 2008.
Z. Xing, J. Pei, G. Dong and P. S. Yu, “Mining Sequence Classifiers for Early Prediction,” Proc. SIAM Intl.
Conf. on Data Mining, Atlanta, GA, April 2008.
J. Ren, X. Shi, W. Fan and P. S. Yu, “Type Independent Correction of Sample Selection Bias via Structural
Discovery and Re-sampling,” Proc. SIAM Intl. Conf. on Data Mining, pp. 565-576, Atlanta, GA, April
2008.
J. Ren, Z. Qiu, W. Fan, H. Cheng and P. S. Yu, “Forward Semi-Supervised Feature Selection,” Proc.
Pacific-Asia Conference on Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining (PAKDD 2008), Osaka, Japan, May
2008.
B. Gedik, K. L. Wu and P. S. Yu, “Efficient Construction of Compact Shedding Filters for Data Stream
Processing,” Proc. IEEE Intl. Conf. on Data Engineering, Cancun, Mexico, April 2008.
C. Aggarwal and P. S. Yu, “A Framework for Clustering Uncertain Data Streams,” Proc. IEEE Intl. Conf.
on Data Engineering, Cancun, Mexico, April 2008.
H. Cheng, X. Yan, J. Han and P. S. Yu, “Direct Discriminative Pattern Mining for Effective
Classification,” Proc. IEEE Intl. Conf. on Data Engineering, Cancun, Mexico, April 2008.
S. Chen, H. Wang, S. Zhou and P. S. Yu, “Stop Chasing Trends: Discovering High Order Models in
Evolving Data,” Proc. IEEE Intl. Conf. on Data Engineering, Cancun, Mexico, April 2008.
J. Cheng, J. X. Yu, B. Ding, H. Wang and P. S. Yu, “Fast Graph Pattern Matching,” Proc. IEEE Intl. Conf.
on Data Engineering, Cancun, Mexico, April 2008.
B. Gedik, K. L. Wu and L. Liu, “MobiQual: QoS-aware Load Shedding in Mobile CQ Systems,” Proc.
IEEE Intl. Conf. on Data Engineering, Cancun, Mexico, April 2008.
J. Xie, J. Yang, Y. Chen, H. Wang and P. S. Yu, “A Sampling-based Approach to Information Recovery,”
Proc. IEEE Intl. Conf. on Data Engineering, Cancun, Mexico, April 2008.
C. Aggarwal and P. S. Yu, “LOCUST: An Online Analytical Processing Framework for High Dimensional
Classification of Data Streams,” Proc. IEEE Intl. Conf. on Data Engineering, Cancun, Mexico, April 2008.
C. Lucchese, M. Vlachos, D. Rajan and P. S. Yu, “Rights Protection of Multidimensional Time-series
Datasets with Neighborhood Preservation,” Proc. IEEE Intl. Conf. on Data Engineering, Cancun, Mexico,
April 2008.
C. Aggarwal and P. S. Yu, “On High Dimensional Indexing of Uncertain Data,” Proc. IEEE Intl. Conf. on
Data Engineering, Cancun, Mexico, April 2008.
X. Gu, S. Papadimitriou and S. P. Chang, “Online Failure Forecast for Fault-Tolerant Data Stream
Processing,” Proc. IEEE Intl. Conf. on Data Engineering, Cancun, Mexico, April 2008.
C. Lucchese, M. Vlachos, D. Rajan and P. S. Yu, “Ownership Protection of Shapes with Geodesic Distance
Preservation,” Proc. EDBT, Nantes, France, March 2008.
196
J. Cheng, J. X. Yu, X. Lin, H. Wang and P. S. Yu, “Fast Computing Reachability Labelings for Large
Graphs with High Compression Rate,” Proc. EDBT, Nantes, France, March 2008.
N. Agarwal, H. Liu, L. Tang and P. S. Yu, “Identifying the Influential Bloggers,” Proc. 1st ACM Intl. Conf.
on Web Search and Data Mining, Stanford, CA, February 2008.
X. Ding, B. Liu and P. S. Yu, “A Holistic Lexicon-based Approach to Opinion Mining,” Proc. 1st ACM
Intl. Conf. on Web Search and Data Mining, Stanford, CA, February 2008.
Zhichun Zhu
J. Lin, H. Zheng, Z. Zhu, E. Gorbatov, H. David and Z. Zhang, “Software Thermal Management of DRAM
Memory for Multicore Systems,” Proc. of the ACM SIGMETRICS International Conference on
Measurement and Modeling of Computer Systems, In Press.
H. Zheng, J. Lin, Z. Zhang and Z. Zhu, “Memory Access Scheduling Schemes for Systems with Multi-Core
Processors,” Proc. of International Conference on Parallel Processing, In Press.
197
MECHANICAL AND INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING
Edodie Adida
P.-C. DeLaurentis, E. Adida and M. Lawley, “A Game Theoretical Approach for Hospital Stockpile in
Preparation for Pandemics,” Proceedings of the 2008 Industrial Engineering Research Conference (IERC),
In Press.
E. Adida, “Dynamic Pricing and Inventory Control - No Backorders under Uncertainty and Competition,”
Publisher VDM Verlag, Dr. Mueller e.K., 2007.
Suresh Aggarwal
S. K. Aggarwal, “Combustion and Emission Characteristics of Bio/Renewable Fuels,” International
Workshop on Advances in Combustion Science and Technology, IIT, Kanpur, India, December 31-January
2, 2008.
S. K. Aggarwal, “A Review of Syngas Combustion and Emission Research,” Paper AIAA-2008-1447, 46th
Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit, Reno, NV, January 7-10, 2008.
A. Briones and S. K. Aggarwal, “Characteristics of Flame Quenching and Blowout Mechanisms,” 46th
Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit, Reno, NV, January 7-10, 2008.
S. Som, A. Ramirez and S. K. Aggarwal, “Structure and NOx Characteristics of High-pressure Syngas (H2CO) Flames,” 19th National and 8th ISHMT-ASME Heat and Mass Transfer Conference, JNTU
Hyderabad, India, January 3-5, 2008.
A. Ramirez, S. Som, S. K. Aggarwal, A. Kastengren, E. El-Hannouny, D. Longman and C. F. Powell,
“Quantitative Measurement of Diesel Fuel Spray Characteristics in the Near-Nozzle Region of a Heavy
Duty Multi-Hole Injector,” 21st Annual Conference on Liquid Atomization and Spray Systems, Orlando,
FL, May 18-21, 2008.
S. K. Aggarwal, “Combustion and Emission Characteristics of Bio/Renewable Fuels in Frontiers in
Combustion,” Science and Technology, IIT-K, 2008.
Farid Amirouche
T. Johnson and F. Amirouche, “Thermal Behaviour of an Ionic Polymer Actuator for Microfluidic
Control,” Proceedings of the Microfluidics 2006 Conference, Toulouse, France, December 2006.
B. Valero, F. Amirouche, A. Mayton and C. Jobes, “Comparison of Passive Seat Suspension with Different
Configuration of Seat Pads and Active Seat Suspension,” SAE World Congress, Detroit, Michigan, USA,
2007.
Prashant Banerjee
C. Luciano, P. Banerjee and S. Rizzi, “GPU-Based Elastic-Object Deformation for Enhancement of
Existing Haptic Applications,” Proceedings of 3rd Annual IEEE Conference on Automation Science and
Engineering, Scottsdale, Arizona, 146-151, 2007.
S. H. Rizzi, P. P. Banerjee and C. J. Luciano, “Automating the Extraction of 3D Models from Medical
Images for Virtual Reality and Haptic Simulations,” Proceedings of 3rd Annual IEEE Conference on
Automation Science and Engineering, Scottsdale, Arizona, 152-157, 2007.
P. P. Banerjee, C. Luciano and S. Rizzi, “Virtual Reality Simulations,” in Anesthesiology Clinics, Editors,
A. Kofke and V. Nadkarni, 2008.
198
Kenneth Brezinsky
S. Garner, R. Sivaramakrishnan and K. Brezinsky, “The High Pressure Pyrolysis of Saturated and
Unsaturated C7 Hydrocarbons,” Proceedings of the 32nd International Symposium on Combustion, 2008.
Elisa Budyn
E. Budyn, T. Hoc and J. Jonvaux, “An X-FEM Statistical Approach to Assess Fracture Strength in Human
Cortical Bone Microstructures,” 8th WCCM, Venice, Italy, June 30-July 4, 2008, In Press.
T. Hoc, E. Budyn and S. Uzel, “Local Toughness in Human Cortical Bone Microstructures by an X-FEM
Imaging Technique,” 8th WCCM, Venice, Italy, June 30-July 4, 2008, In Press.
F. J. Vernerey, W. K. Liu, E. Budyn, J. H. Kim and A. To, “Multiresolution Mechanics for Nano/MicroStructured Materials,” Computational Mechanics, ISCM2007, Beijing, China, July 30-August 1, 2007.
E. Budyn, J. Jonvaux and T. Hoc, “A Multi-Scale Modeling for Aging and Failure Mechanism in Human
and Bovine Cortical Bone,” CFRAC-ECCOMAS Thematic Conference, Nantes, France, June 11-13, 2007.
E. Budyn and T. Hoc, “Fracture Strength Assessment and Aging Signs Detection in Human Cortical Bone
Using an X-FEM Multiple Scale Approach,” USNCCM IX, Berkeley, California, July 22-26, 2007.
Sabri Cetinkunt
N. R., V. Bhaskar and S. Cetinkunt, “Operator Assistance System for Articulated Vehicles Using an
Interactive GUI,” International CAD Conference and Exhibition, Honolulu, Hawaii, June 25-29, 2007.
Soyoung Cha
Z. Feng and S. S. Cha, “Development of the Experimental System for Measuring Three-Dimensional
Large-Scale Parachute Flow,” 19th AIAA Aerodynamic Decelerator Systems Technology Conference and
Seminar, Paper 2007-2570, In Press.
D. Ludovisi, S. S. Cha, N. Ramachandran and W. M. Worek, “Effect of Magnetic Fields on
Thermocapillary and Buoyancy Driven Flow of Two Immiscible Liquids,” 45th AIAA Aerospace Sciences
Meeting and Exhibit, Paper 2007-0742, 2007.
Subrata Chakrabarti
P. Chakrabarti, S. Chakrabarti and T. Olsen, “Dynamic Simulation of Immersion of Tunnel Elements for
Busan – Geoje Fixed Link Project,” 27th International Conference on Offshore Mechanics and Arctic
Engineering OMAE2008-57881, Estoril, Portugal, In Press.
N. Srinivasan, S. Chakrabarti, R. Sundaravadivelu and R. Kanotra, “Hydrodynamics of a SPAR-type FPSO
Concept for Application as a Production Platform,” 27th International Conference on Offshore Mechanics
and Arctic Engineering OMAE2008-57881, Estoril, Portugal, In Press.
N. Srinivasan, S., Chakrabarti, R. Sundaravadivelu and R. Kanotra, “Design of a Non-Ship-Shaped FPSO
for Sakhalin-V Deepwater,” SPE-114882, SPE Russian Oil and Gas Technical Conference, Moscow,
Russia, In Press.
Houshang Darabi
M. Haji and H. Darabi, “Petri Net Based Supervisory Control Reconfiguration of Project Management
Systems,” Proceedings of the 3rd Annual IEEE Conference on Automation Science and Engineering, pp.
460-465, 2007.
H. Wang, L. Grigore, U. Buy and H. Darabi, “Enforcing Transition Deadlines in Time Petri Nets,” 12th
IEEE Conference on Emerging Technologies and Factory Automation, pp. 604-611, 2007.
199
David He
D. He, S. Wu and R. Li, “Drive Shaft Prognostics Using Data Mining Approaches,” Proceedings of the
2008 Industrial Engineering Research Conference, In Press.
R. Li and D. He, “Hilbert-Huang Transform Based Gearbox Fault Diagnosis,” Proceedings of the 2008
MFPT Conference, Virginia Beach, VA, 2008.
Y. Liu and D. He, “Damage Mechanics Based Bearing Prognosis Using HUMS Condition Indicators,”
Proceedings of 2008 MFPT Conference, Virginia Beach, VA, 2008.
D. He and E. Bechhoefer, “Development and Validation of Bearing Diagnostic and Prognostic Tools Using
HUMS Condition Indicators,” Proceedings of IEEE Aerospace Conference, Big Sky, MT, 2008.
D. He and E. Bechhoefer, “Bearing Prognostics Using HUMS Condition Indicators,” Proceedings of the
2008 AHS Forum, Montreal, Canada, 2008.
S. Wu, D. He and E. Bechhoefer, “Development and Evaluation of Shaft Diagnostics and Prognostics
Using Damage Dynamic Simulation,” Proceedings of the 2008 AHS Forum, Montreal, Canada, 2008.
Carmen Lilley
J. He and C. M. Lilley, “Influence of Surface Stress on Bending Nanowires with Different Boundary
Conditions,” IEEE Nano 2008, Arlington, TX, In Press.
Q. Huang, C. M. Lilley, M. Bode and R. S. Divan, “Electrical Properties of Cu Nanowires,” IEEE Nano
2008, Arlington, TX, In Press.
C. M. Lilley and R. Meyer, “Surface Effects of Adsorbed Organic Species on Electrical Properties of Metal
Nanowires,” IEEE Nano 2007, Hong Kong, August 2007.
Farzad Mashayek
G. Al-Ahmad, J. S. Shrimpton, E. L. Ergene and F. Mashayek, “Atomization of High-Viscosity Organic
Oils Using the Charge-Injection Method,” in The Volume of Extended Abstracts of the 21st Annual
Conference on Liquid Atomization and Spray Systems, Orlando, FL, May 2008.
K. Sengupta, G. B. Jacobs and F. Mashayek, “Direct Numerical Simulation of Turbulent Flows Using
Spectral Method,” AIAA Paper 2008-1450, January 2008.
K. Sengupta, K. Russell and F. Mashayek, “The Effects of Subsonic Microjets on Turbulent Properties in
Cold Flow in Dump Combustors,” AIAA Paper 2008-1167, January 2008.
K. Sengupta, K. Russell and F. Mashayek, “Shear Flow Control in Dump Combustor Using Microjets,”
Proceedings of the 20th ONR Propulsion Meeting, Washington, DC, December 12-14, 2007.
Constantine Megaridis
K. Sengupta, K. Russell and F. Mashayek, “Shear Flow Control in Dump Combustor Using Microjets,” in
Nanotechnology and Tissue Engineering: The Scaffold, Taylor and Francis, Proceedings of the 20th ONR
Propulsion Meeting, Washington, DC, December 12-14, 2007.
W. J. Minkowycz
M. Golubovic, H. D. Madhawa Hettiarachchi, W. M. Worek and W. J. Minkowycz, “Critical Heat Flux in
Nano-Fluids,” Proceedings United Kingdom Heat Transfer Conference, Edinburgh, Scotland, September
10-11, 2007.
H. D. Madhawa Hettiarachchi, M. Golubovic, W. M. Worek and W. J. Minkowycz, “Slip-Flow and
Conjugate Heat Transfer in Rectangular Microchannels,” Proceedings of the ASME Summer Conference on
Heat Transfer, August 10-14, 2008, Jacksonville, Florida In Press.
200
Thomas Royston
T. J. Royston, “Leveraging the Equivalence of Hysteresis Models from Different Fields for Analysis and
Numerical Simulation of Jointed Structures,” Proc. ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference
Symposium on Nonlinear Dynamics, Optimization and Reliability of Mechanical Systems, DETC200734212, 9 pages, 2007.
S. Acikgoz, T. J. Royston, H. A. Mansy and R. H. Sandler, “Experimental and Numerical Simulations of
Percussive Diagnosis of Lung Pathologies,” Proc. ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference
Symposium on Applications of Vibration and Acoustics in Biomedical Engineering, DETC2007-34578, 10
pages, 2007.
Laxman Saggere
S. Krishnan and L. Saggere, “Design of a Compliant Micro-clasp Mechanism for Micromanipulation
Tasks,” The 1st International Conference on Micro- and Nanosystems, ASME Design Engineering
Technical Conferences, Las Vegas, NV, 10 pages, September 4–7, 2007.
Ahmed Shabana
B. Hussein, H. Sugiyama and A. Shabana, “Coupled Deformation Modes in the Finite Element Absolute
Nodal Coordinate Formulation,” Proceedings of the 2007 IFToMM World Congress, Besancon, France,
June 17 – 21, 2007.
L. G. Maqueda, O. A. Bauchau and A. A. Shabana, “Effect of the Centrifugal Forces on the Finite Element
Eigenvalue Solution of Rotating Blades: A Comparative Study,” Proceedings of the 2007 ECCOMAS
Thematic Conference on Multibody Dynamics, Milan, Italy, June 25 – 28, 2007.
L. G. Maqueda, O. A. Bauchau and A. A. Shabana, “Effect of the Centrifugal Forces on the Finite Element
Eigenvalue Solution of Rotating Blades: A Comparative Study,” Proceedings of the 2007 ECCOMAS
Thematic Conference on Multibody Dynamics, Milan, Italy, June 25 – 28, 2007.
G. Sanborn, J. Heineman and A. A. Shabana, “A Low Computational Cost Nonlinear Formulation for
Multibody Railroad Vehicle Systems,” Proceedings of the 2007 ASME Design Engineering Technical
Conferences, Paper # DETC2007-34522, Las Vegas, Nevada, September 4 – 7, 2007.
G. Sanborn, J. Heineman and A. A. Shabana, “Implementation of Low Computational Cost Nonlinear
Formulation for Multibody Railroad Vehicle Systems,” Proceedings of the 2007 ASME Design
Engineering Technical Conferences, Paper # DETC2007-34525, Las Vegas, Nevada, September 4 – 7,
2007.
C. Mellace, A. Gugliotta, T. Sinokrot and A. A. Shabana, “Simulation of Dynamic Braking of Railroad
Vehicles Using Trajectory Coordinates,” Proceedings of the 2007 ASME Design Engineering Technical
Conferences, Paper # DETC2007-34016, Las Vegas, Nevada, September 4 – 7, 2007.
William Worek
D. Ludovisi, S. Cha, N. Ramachandran and W. M. Worek, “Effect of Magnetic Fields on Thermocapillary
and Buoyancy Driven Flow of Two Immiscible Liquids,” 45th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and
Exhibit, Reno, NV, January 8-11, 2007.
N. Corral, W. M. Worek, J. Aardsma, M. J. Chimack and A. Sheaffer, “Cause and Effect: Increased
Efficiency in the Plating Industry Benefits the Automobile Industry,” SAE World Congress, Detroit, MI and
SAE Transactions, April 16-19, 2007.
W. M. Worek, M. Golubovic and H. D. M. Hettiarachchi, “Critical Heat Flux in Nano-Fluids,” United
Kingdom Heat Transfer Conference, Edinburgh, Scotland, September 10-11, 2007.
201
M. Golubovic, H. D. M. Hettiarachchi and W. M. Worek, “Nano-Fluids and Critical Heat Flux,” ASME
Micro/Nanoscale Heat Transfer International Conference, Tainan, Taiwan, January 6-9, 2008.
202
PhD GRADUATES
This chapter reports on PhD students graduated during Summer 2007, Fall 2007 and Spring 2008.
Graduates are listed with their starting or current employment, if known.
BIOENGINEERING
Hongfeng Chen, “CHARACTERIZATION AND MANIPULATION OF DIFFERENTIAL INTEGRIN
DYNAMICS IN THE MESENCHYMAL STEM CELL MEMBRANE”
Placement: Post-doc Fellow, University of Chicago
Advisor: M. Cho
Dongpyo Lee, “KINEMATIC RULES UNDERLYING UNRESTRICTED AND RESTRICTED
REACHING MOVEMENTS”
Placement: Post-doc Scholar, University of California in San Diego
Advisor: D. Corcos
Vidya Rao, “CHARACTERIZATION OF REAL TIME CALCIUM DYNAMICS IN NEURONAL
CELLS IN RESPONSE TO RF AND MW RADIATION”
Placement: Post-doc Fellow, University of Chicago
Advisor: M. Cho
Yogendra Shastri, “SUSTAINABLE SYSTEM MANAGEMENT”
Placement: Post-doc Research Associate, Univ of IL- Urbana
Advisor: U. Diwekar
Patrick L. Axtell, “CHARACTERIZATION OF THE ELECTRICALLY-EVOKED
ELECTRORETINOGRAM IN WILD-TYPE AND P23H RATS”
Placement: U.S. Food and Drug Administration
Advisor: J. Hetling
Ayman I. Hamed, “CHARACTERIZATION AND MODULATION OF NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHESIS BY
PHYSIOLOGICAL ELECTRICAL STIMULATION”
Placement: Attending pharmacy school
Advisor: M. Cho
Yevgeniya Emre Koshman, “TECHNOLOGICAL ADVANCES FOR UNDERSTANDING CARDIAC
MUSCLE FUNCTION”
Placement: Post-doc Fellow, Loyola University, Dept of Medicine
Advisor: B. Russell
Dinesh K. Shukla, “MULTI-MODAL MR IMAGING OF RELAPSING-REMITTING MS PATIENTS
TREATED WITH PIOGLITAZONE”
Placement: Post-doc Fellow, San Diego State University
Advisor: D. Feinstein
Saadet Ulas, “UNCERTAINTIES IN CHEMICAL, BIOLOGICAL AND MOLECULAR SYSTEMS AND
OPTIMAL CONTROL”
Placement: UOP LLC, Des Plaines, IL
Advisor: U. Diwekar
203
Yirong Yang, “QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS AND IMPROVEMENT OF RETINAL IMAGE
QUALITY”
Placement: Post-doc Fellow, Northwestern University
Advisor: M. Shahidi
Kedar Mohan Kulkarni, “MATHEMATICAL MODELING, PROBLEM INVERSION AND DESIGN OF
DISTRIBUTED CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS”
Placement: Process Engineer, Air Liquide, Houston, TX
Advisor: A. Linninger
Xiaoyan Li, “EFFECTS OF CHANGES IN BODY MASS DISTRIBUTION ON FEED-FORWARD
POSTURAL CONTROL”
Placement: Unknown
Advisor: A. Aruin
Sam E. Senyo, “DIFFERENTIAL MYOCYTE RESPONSES TO STRAIN VECTORS AND RATE FOR
CARDIAC HYPERTROPHY”
Placement: Post-doc Fellow, Harvard University
Advisor: B. Russell
Suraj Serai, “MRI STUDIES OF IN-VITRO PERFUSED PANCREATIC ISLET CELL ACTIVATION:
CORRELATION WITH STUDIES OF RAT MODELS”
Placement: Post-doc Fellow, University of Chicago
Advisor: B. Roman
Nitin Bhardwaj, “A COMPREHENSIVE BIOINFORMATICS STUDY OF THE INTERACTION
BETWEEN PERIPHERAL PROTEINS AND MEMBRANE”
Placement: Post-doc Fellow, NIH, Bethesda, MD
Advisor: H. Lu
Gang Feng, “THE MOLECULAR DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS OF FORCE RELATED PROTEIN
UNFOLDING AND UNBINDING”
Placement: Bioinformatician, Northwestern University
Advisor: H. Lu
Zhengdeng Lei, “GENOME-WIDE COMPUTATIONAL PREDICTION OF PROTEIN
LOCALIZATIONS”
Placement: High Throughput Computational Analyst, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
Advisor: Y. Dai
Ognjen Perisic, “THE IMPROVEMENT OF THE NONEQUILIBRIUM FREE ENERGY
RECONSTRUCTION USING STOCHASTIC PULLING PROTOCOL”
Placement: Post-doc Fellow, New York University
Advisor: H. Lu
Ronald R. Jackups, “PREDICTION OF TRANSMEMBRANE BETA-BARREL STRUCTURE”
Placement: MD Resident, Barnes-Jewish Hospital, St. Louis, MO
Advisor: J. Liang
Robert E. Langlois, “MACHINE LEARNING IN BIOINFORMATICS: ALGORITHMS,
IMPLEMENTATIONS AND APPLICATIONS”
Placement: Visiting Asst. Professor, UIC BioE Dept
Advisor: H. Lu
204
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
Ramarajesh Katamreddy, “STRUCTURAL AND INTERFACIAL STUDIES OF ATOMIC LAYER
DEPOSITED HIGH-K MATERIALS ON SI”
Placement: Air Liquide (DE)
Advisor: C. Takoudis
Amjad S. Rasul, “SOLUTION PROCESSED HIGH PERMITTIVITY NANOCOMPOSITE DIELECTRIC
FOR PRINTED ELECTRONICS APPLICATIONS”
Placement: Motorola (IL) & University of Saudi Arabia
Advisor: C. Takoudis
Ling Jiao, “THE SYNTHESIS OF HIGHLY DISPERSED NOBLE AND BASE METALS OVER
MICROPOROUS AND MESOPOROUS SILICA”
Placement: Chevron (CA)
Advisor: J. Regalbuto
Rogelio Lopez, “BLOOD RHEOLOGY USING A BROWNIAN DYNAMCS SIMULATION OF BEAD
SPRING RING WITH A CONSTANT AREA”
Placement: Unknown
Advisor: L. Wedgewood
Ashwin Raman, “ROLE OF DIACETYLENE IN SOOT FORMATION - EXPERIMENTAL AND
MODELING STUDY”
Placement: General Electric (India)
Advisor: K. Brezinsky
Xuemei Song, “FUNDAMENTAL STUDIES OF TITANIA-BASED HIGH DIELECTRIC CONSTANT
MATERIALS”
Placement: Air Products (NY)
Advisor: C. Takoudis
Hui Xu, “THERMAL DISSOCIATION AND RELAXATION IN VINYL FLOURIDE, 1,1DIFLUOROETHANE AND 1,3,5-TRIAZINE”
Placement: Princeton University (NJ), Postdoc
Advisor: J. Kiefer
Yuhui Zha, “THE RATIONAL PREPARATION OF NIOBIA PROMOTED AND SUPPORTED
PLATINUM CATALYSTS”
Placement: Transmediair Inc., Hillsborough (NJ)
Advisor: J. Regalbuto
Prodyut Majumder, “FUNDAMENTAL STUDIES OF DIFFUSION BARRIERS FOR CU
METALLIZATION AND ATOMIC LAYER DEPOSITED HIGH-K FILMS”
Placement: Applied Materials (CA)
Advisor: C. Takoudis
Lixiao Zeng, “THE STUDY OF KNOB FORMATION MECHANISM IN PLASMODIUMFALCIPARUM INFECTED ERYTHROCYTES”
Placement: Nalco (IL)
Advisor: C. Takoudis
205
CIVIL AND MATERIALS ENGINEERING
Amy E. Landis, “THE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS OF BIOBASED PRODUCTION”
Placement: Assistant Professor in Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Pittsburgh
Advisor: T. Theis
Mohammad A. Alhassan, “PERFORMANCE-BASED ASPECTS AND STRUCTURAL BEHAVIOR OF
HIGH PERFORMANCE FIBROUS BONDED CONCRETE OVERLAYS”
Placement: Assistant Professor in Civil Engineering, Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne
Advisor: M. Issa
Liang Long, “MODEL-BASED SYNTHESIS OF GEOGRAPHICALLY VARIABLE HOUSEHOLD
TRAVEL DATA IN SMALL- OR MID-SIZE AREAS”
Placement: Transportation Modeler, Cambridge-Systematics Inc., Washington D.C. Office
Advisor: J. Lin
Pratibha Naithani, “LEACHING CHARACTERISTICS OF ARSENIC FROM AGED ALKALINE COAL
FLY ASH”
Placement: STAT Inc., Chicago
Advisor: A. Khodadoust
Ravikumar S. Srirangam, “ENHANCED ANAEROBIC BIODEGRADATION OF PCBS IN
CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS USING HYDROGEN”
Placement: The Adventus Group, NJ
Advisor: A. Khodadoust
Seyed Asadollah Bassam, “A DAMAGE ASSESSMENT METHOD FOR POST SEISMIC
STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING OF CONCRETE BRIDGES”
Placement: Unknown
Advisor: F. Ansari
Georgette Hlepas, “STABILIZED FINITE ELEMENT METHODS FOR POROUS MEDIA FLOWS”
Placement: US Army Corps of Engineers, Chicago District, Geotechnical Section
Advisor: A. Masud
Yong-Ping Zhang, “HOUSEHOLD TRAVEL DATA SIMULATION: APPLICATION OF SPATIAL
TRANSFERABILITY OF SURVEY DATA”
Placement: Senior Transportation Engineer, Wilbur Smith Associates, Lisle, IL
Advisor: A. Mohammadian
COMPUTER SCIENCE
Xin Lu, “EXPERT TUTORING AND NATURAL LANGUAGE FEEDBACK IN INTELLIGENT
TUTORING SYSTEMS”
Placement: North Side Inc., Montreal, Canada
Advisor: B. Di Eugenio
Thomas Peterka, “DYNALLAX: DYNAMIC PARALLAX BARRIER AUTOSTEREOSCOPIC
DISPLAY”
Placement: Argonne National Lab
Advisor: A. Johnson
Hongwei Zhu, “COMPUTATION OF THE MINIMUM DATA STORAGE FOR MULTIDIMENSIONAL SIGNAL PROCESSING SYSTEMS”
Placement: ARM, Inc., Sunnyvale
Advisor: F. Balasa
206
Alex S. Hill, “WITHINDOWS: A UNIFIED FRAMEWORK FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF DESKTOP
AND IMMERSIVE USER INTERFACES”
Placement: Post doc, Northwestern University
Advisor: A. Johnson
Jiexin Lian, “A COMPONENT-BASED MULTI-AGENT SYSTEM MODELING METHODOLOGY”
Placement: Amazon.com, Inc.
Advisor: S. Shatz
Zhenwei Yu, “AN ADAPTIVE AUTOMATICALLY TUNING INTRUSION DETECTION SYSTEM”
Placement: Unknown
Advisor: J.P. Tsai
Chong Zhang, “OPTISTORE: AN ON-DEMAND DATA PROCESSING MIDDLEWARE FOR VERY
LARGE SCALE INTERACTIVE VISUALIZATION”
Placement: FactSet, Chicago, IL
Advisor: J. Leigh
Peng Fan, “DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF CLUSTERING FRAMEWORKS IN VEHICULAR AD-HOC
NETWORKS”
Placement: Unknown
Advisor: P. Nelson
Xun Luo, “A FRAMEWORK FOR PERSONALIZED VISUALIZATION AND SCALABLE HUMAN
COMPUTER INTERACTION”
Placement: Motorola, Inc.
Advisor: R. Kenyon
William G. Sunna, “MULTI-LAYERED APPROACH TO ALIGNING HETEROGENEOUS
ONTOLOGIES”
Placement: Compact Solutions LLC, Oakbrook, IL
Advisor: I. Cruz
Zhiguo Zhang, “ENERGY-EFFICIENT QUERY-INFORMED ROUTING FOR QUERY PROCESSING
IN SENSOR NETWORKS”
Placement: Yahoo!
Advisor: S. Shatz
ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING
Ntsanderh Christian Azenui, “MINIATURIZED PRINTED CIRCUIT ANTENNAS FOR MULTI- AND
ULTRA-WIDE BAND APPLICATIONS”
Placement: Radio Frequency Eng. Dept.
Advisor: H.Y.Yang
Nidhal Bouaynaya, “ANALYSIS OF PROTEOMICS AND GENOMICS BASED ON SIGNAL
PROCESSING AND COMMUNICATION THEORY”
Placement: University of Arkansas at Little Rock
Advisor: D. Schonfeld
Waseem Ahmad, “EFFICIENT BICLUSTERING AND ITS APPLICATIONS AMID PRIVACY
CONSTRAINTS”
Placement: Amazon
Advisor: A. Khokhar
207
Yang Li, “ELECTRONIC PROPERTIES OF ORGANIC-INORGANIC HYBRID STRUCTURES”
Placement: Unknown
Advisor: M. Dutta
Zhongyu Pang, “SLEEP DISORDER CLASSIFICATION AND EPILEPTIC SEIZURE PREDICTION BY
NEURAL NETWORKS AND PARTICLE FILTERS”
Placement: Eagle 7 Trading LLC
Advisor: D. Liu
Yixin Shi, “ARCHITECTURAL SUPPORT TO SECURE PROGRAM EXECUTION”
Placement: Google Inc.
Advisor: G. Lee
Chengzhi Zhou, “RF PASSIVES AND ANTENNAS ON 3D METALIZED SUBSTRATES”
Placement: Max Linear, Inc.
Advisor: H.Y. Yang
Konrad Kaczmarski, “AN "EXACT" INVERSE SOURCE RECONSTRUCTION”
Placement: Northrop Grumman
Advisor: S. Laxpati
Jing Liang, “FREQUENCY RECONFIGURABILITY ANALYSIS OF ELECTRICALLY SMALL
ANTENNA”
Placement: Alico System Inc.
Advisor: H.Y.Yang
Shubhrangshu Mallick, “DESIGN, FABRICATION, AND CHARACTERIZATION OF MID
WAVELENGTH INFRARED AVALANCHE PHOTODIODE”
Placement: EPIR Technologies Inc.
Advisor: S. Ghosh
Panayiotis C. Tzanos, “INFORMATION THEORETIC MOTION ALGORITHMS FOR BIOCHEMICAL
SOURCE LOCALIZATION”
Placement: Unknown
Advisor: M. Zefran
Shangming Wei, “A COMPUTATIONAL FRAMEWORK FOR CONTROLLER DESIGN FOR HYBRID
ROBOTIC SYSTEMS”
Placement: CNH America LLC
Advisor: M. Zefran
Takayuki Yamanaka, “PHONON PROPERTIES IN NANOSTRUCTURES FOR BIOMOLECULAR
CONJUGATION SYSTEMS”
Placement: Northwestern University
Advisor: M. Stroscio
208
MECHANICAL AND INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING
Alejandro M. Briones, “A NUMERICAL STUDY OF STABILIZATION AND EMISSION
CHARACTERISTICS OF TRIPLE FLAMES”
Placement: Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, OH, Research Engineer
Advisor: S. Aggarwal
Daniele Ludovisi, “MAGNETIC EFFECT ON THERMO-FLUID-DYNAMICS OF TWO-LAYERED
FLUID SYSTEMS: SIMULATIONS AND EXPERIMENTS”
Placement: Nuclear Power Technology Business Group, Associate Nuclear Plant Analysis
Advisor: W. Worek
Yun Xing, “COMPUTER MODELLING METHODOLOGY FOR SHREDDING OF END OF LIFE
CONSUMER ELECTRONIC DEVICES”
Placement: Unknown
Advisor: M. Scott
Xiaoyan Bian, “TOWARDS SIMULATION OF CHARGING AND BREAKUP IN ELECTROSTATIC
ATOMIZERS”
Placement: CCS Global Tech., San Diego, CA
Advisor: F. Mashayek
Luis Gonzaga Maqueda Sanchez, “USE OF NONLINEAR CONSTITUTIVE MODELS IN THE
ABSOLUTE NODAL COORDINATE FORMULATION”
Placement: Unknown
Advisor: A. Shabana
Shenliang Wu, “DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF MACHINERY HEALTH MONITORING,
DIAGNOSTIC AND PROGNOSTIC METHODOLOGY AND TOOLS”
Placement: Cash America International, Senior Risk Analysis
Advisor: D. He
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FACULTY AWARDS AND HONORS
This chapter reports on a sample of significant faculty awards and honors received in research and
professional service during the period July 1, 2007 to June 30, 2008.
BIOENGINEERING
John Hetling
“Mapping Retinal Function Using Corneal Electrode Array,” J. Hetling, T. Ban, S. Rahmani, US Patent
7384145, June 2008.
Jie Liang
Elected Fellow, American Institute of Biological and Medical Engineering, 2007.
Michael Stroscio
G. Belenky, M. Dutta, M. Kisin, S. Luryi, and M. Stroscio, “Intersubband Semiconductor Lasers with
Enhanced Subband Depopulation Rate: Devices,” U.S. Patent No. 7,310,361, December 18, 2007.
Best Paper Presentation Award for Novel Sensor Functionality Sessions, M. Vasudev, J. Yang, Y. Li, D.
Ramadurai, M. A. Stroscio, T. Globus, T. Khromova and M. Dutta, “Optoelectronic Signatures of Hybrid
Nanostructure-DNA Ensembles,” presented at NANO-DDS, Crystal City, Virginia, June 2007.
Selected for an Outstanding Paper Award, M. Vasudev, T. Yamanaka, J. Yang, Y. Li, D. Ramadurai, M.
A. Stroscio, T. Globus, T. Khromova, M. Dutta, “Optoelectronic Signatures of Biomolecules Including
Hybrid Nanostructure-DNA Ensembles,” IEEE Sensors Journal, in press (2008).
Christos Takoudis
Invited Speaker, International Conference from Nanoparticles and Nanomaterials to Nanodevices and
Nanosystems, Chalkidiki, Greece, June 16-18, 2008.
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
Sohail Murad
Chicago-Shanghai Sister’s City Geothermal Project Award, 2007.
John Regalbuto
X. Hao, X. and J. R. Regalbuto, “Method for Preparing Highly Dispersed, Highly Loaded Platinum on a
Carbon Substrate,” U.S. Pat. 7312174, September 14, 2007.
Christos Takoudis
Invited Speaker, International Conference from Nanoparticles and Nanomaterials to Nanodevices and
Nanosystems, Chalkidiki, Greece, June 16-18, 2008.
CIVIL AND MATERIALS ENGINEERING
Abolfazl Mohammadian
National Academies, Transportation Research Board, Fred Burggraf Award for the Outstanding Research
by Young Researchers, 2008.
National Academies, Transportation Research Board, Charley Wootan Award for the Outstanding Research
in the Field of Policy and Organization, 2007.
Krishna Reddy
Keynote Presenter, Containment Wall Construction at DNAPL-Contaminated Site, Hong Kong Institute of
Engineers-Environmental Division, HKIE Headquarter, Hong Kong, May 29, 2008.
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Keynote Presenter, Chemical Oxidation and Reduction of Environmental Pollutants: An Integral
Component of Green Remediation, Industry Workshop on Integrated Environmental Remediation
Technologies, Schaumburg, Illinois, March 27, 2008.
Keynote Presenter, Nanotechnology for Contaminated Site Remediation, International Symposium on GeoEnvironmental Engineering for Sustainable Development, Xuzhou, China, October 23, 2007.
Invited Presenter, Technical Challenges to In-Situ Remediation of Polluted Sites, First Sri Lanka
Geotechnical Society International Conference on Soil and Rock Engineering, Colombo, Sri Lanka, August
9, 2007.
COMPUTER SCIENCE
Sol Shatz
University Scholar Award, University of Illinois, 2007 – 2008.
Jeffrey Tsai
Keynote Speaker, National Computer Symposium, Taiwan, December 2007.
V. N. Venkatakrishnan
Best paper mention: “Detection of Intrusions, Malware and Vulnerability Assessment,” July 2007.
Philip Yu
“System and Method for Providing Service for Searching Web Site Address,” B. Hailpern, P.S. Yu, US
Patent 7,383,299, June 3, 2008.
“Systems and Methods for Resource-Adaptive Workload Management,” G. Luo, P.S. Yu, US Patent
7,379,953, May 27, 2008.
“Methods for Dynamic Classification of Data in Evolving Data Steam,” C. Aggarwal, P.S. Yu, US Patent
7,379,939, May 27, 2008.
“System and Method for Peer-to-Peer Multi-Party Voice-over-IP Services,” X. Gu, Z. Shae, Z. Wen, P.S.
Yu, US Patent 7,379,450, May 27, 2008.
“Systems and Methods for Structural Clustering of Time Sequences,” M. Vlachos, V. Castelli, P.S. Yu, US
Patent 7,369,961, May 6, 2008.
“Method and Apparatus for Web Farm Traffic Control,” J.L. Wolf, P.S. Yu, US Patent 7,356,592, April 8,
2008.
“Methods and Apparatus for Clustering Evolving Data Streams through Online and Offline Components,”
C. Aggarwal, P.S. Yu, US Patent 7,353,218, April 1, 2008.
“System and Method for Performing Structural Joins for Answering Containment Queries,” S. Chen, K.L.
Wu, P.S. Yu, US Patent 7,346,625, March 18, 2008.
“Systems and Methods for Sequential Modeling in Less Than One Sequential Scan,” W. Fan, H. Wang,
P.S. Yu, US Patent 7,337,161, Feb. 26, 2008.
Best Paper Award, H. Tong, S. Papadimitrioiu, P. S. Yu, and C. Faloutsos, “Proximity Tracking on TimeEvolving Bipartite Graphs,” SIAM Intl. Conf. on Data Mining, Atlanta, GA, April 2008.
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ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING
Jezekiel Ben-Arie
J. Ben-Arie, “Method for Recognition of Human Motion, Vector Sequences and Speech,” US Patent
7,366,645 B2, Date of Patent Issue: April 29, 2008.
J. Ben-Arie, “Dispenser for Flow-Able Materials,” US 61/066,410 Awarded: March 5, 2008.
Mitra Dutta
G. Belenky, M. Dutta, M. Kisin, S. Luryi, and M. Stroscio, “Intersubband Semiconductor Lasers with
Enhanced Subband Depopulation Rate: Devices,” U.S. Patent No. 7,310,361, December 18, 2007.
Best Paper Presentation Award for Novel Sensor Functionality Sessions, M. Vasudev, J. Yang, Y. Li, D.
Ramadurai, M. A. Stroscio, T. Globus, T. Khromova and M. Dutta, “Optoelectronic Signatures of Hybrid
Nanostructure-DNA Ensembles,” presented at NANO-DDS, Crystal City, Virginia, June 2007.
Outstanding Paper Award, M. Vasudev, T. Yamanaka, J. Yang, Y. Li, D. Ramadurai, M. A. Stroscio, T.
Globus, T. Khromova, M. Dutta, “Optoelectronic Signatures of Biomolecules Including Hybrid
Nanostructure-DNA Ensembles,” IEEE Sensors Journal, in press (2008).
Derong Liu
Best Paper Award, Z. Pang and D. Liu, “Seizure Prediction Using A Dynamic Model with Hidden
Variable,” 2nd International Conference on Bioinformatics and Biomedical Engineering, 2008.
Sudip Mazumder
S. Mazumder and George Bialecki, “Room Monitoring and Lighting System,” USPTO Patent # 7268682,
Awarded in September 2007.
Outstanding Paper Award, M. Tahir and S. K. Mazumder, “Markov Chain Model for Performance Analysis
of Transmitter Power Control in Wireless MAC Protocol: Towards Delay Minimization in Power-Network
Control, IEEE International Conference on Advanced Information Networking and Applications (AINA07), Niagara Falls, Canada, pp. 909 916, May 21-23, 2007.
Roland Priemer
“Extraction of One or More Discrete Heart Sounds from Heart Sound Information,” USP 7,351,207, issued:
April 1, 2008.
Dan Schonfeld
Coauthor of Best Student Paper Award, J. Yang, D. Schonfeld and M. Mohamed, “Robust Focused Image
Estimation from Multiple Images in Video Sequences,” IEEE International Conference on Image
Processing, 2007.
Michael Stroscio
G. Belenky, M. Dutta, M. Kisin, S. Luryi, and M. Stroscio, “Intersubband Semiconductor Lasers with
Enhanced Subband Depopulation Rate: Devices,” U.S. Patent No. 7,310,361, December 18, 2007.
Best Paper Presentation Award for Novel Sensor Functionality Sessions, M. Vasudev, J. Yang, Y. Li, D.
Ramadurai, M. A. Stroscio, T. Globus, T. Khromova and M. Dutta, “Optoelectronic Signatures of Hybrid
Nanostructure-DNA Ensembles,” presented at NANO-DDS, Crystal City, Virginia, June 2007.
Selected for an Outstanding Paper Award, M. Vasudev, T. Yamanaka, J. Yang, Y. Li, D. Ramadurai, M. A.
Stroscio, T. Globus, T. Khromova, M. Dutta, “Optoelectronic Signatures of Biomolecules Including Hybrid
Nanostructure-DNA Ensembles,” IEEE Sensors Journal, in press (2008).
212
Philip Yu
“System and Method for Providing Service for Searching Web Site Address,” B. Hailpern, P.S. Yu, US
Patent 7,383,299, June 3, 2008.
“Systems and Methods for Resource-Adaptive Workload Management,” G. Luo, P.S. Yu, US Patent
7,379,953, May 27, 2008.
“Methods for Dynamic Classification of Data in Evolving Data Steam,” C. Aggarwal, P.S. Yu, US Patent
7,379,939, May 27, 2008.
“System and Method for Peer-to-Peer Multi-Party Voice-over-IP Services,” X. Gu, Z. Shae, Z. Wen, P.S.
Yu, US Patent 7,379,450, May 27, 2008.
“Systems and Methods for Structural Clustering of Time Sequences,” M. Vlachos, V. Castelli, P.S. Yu, US
Patent 7,369,961, May 6, 2008.
“Method and Apparatus for Web Farm Traffic Control,” J.L. Wolf, P.S. Yu, US Patent 7,356,592, April 8,
2008.
“Methods and Apparatus for Clustering Evolving Data Streams through Online and Offline Components,”
C. Aggarwal, P.S. Yu, US Patent 7,353,218, April 1, 2008.
“System and Method for Performing Structural Joins for Answering Containment Queries,” S. Chen, K.L.
Wu, P.S. Yu, US Patent 7,346,625, March 18, 2008.
“Systems and Methods for Sequential Modeling in Less Than One Sequential Scan,” W. Fan, H. Wang,
P.S. Yu, US Patent 7,337,161, Feb. 26, 2008.
Best Paper Award, H. Tong, S. Papadimitrioiu, P. S. Yu, and C. Faloutsos, “Proximity Tracking on TimeEvolving Bipartite Graphs,” SIAM Intl. Conf. on Data Mining, Atlanta, GA, April 2008.
MECHANICAL AND INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING
Suresh Aggarwal
Keynote Lecture: International Workshop on Advances in Combustion Science and Technology, IIT,
Kanpur, India, December 31 - January 2, 2008.
Member of the International Advisory and Scientific Committee-International Green Energy Conference,
Beijing, China, 2008.
Elisa Budyn
USACM Travel Fellowship to the WCCM 8 for young investigator, 2008.
NSF International Workshop on Innovations and Advanced Studies Fellowship Award, 2008.
Houshang Darabi
Distinguish Speaker Seminar Series at Northern Illinois University, November 2007.
Carmen Lilley
US-Japan Young Researchers Exchange in Nanotechnology Funded by NSF and MEXT, 2007.
Farzad Mashayek
Summer Faculty Fellowship, National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA), 2007.
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