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Document 1228682
speciM
coLLecuoNS
t)OUQlAS
LibRAKT
queeN's uNiveRsii:?
AT kiNQSHON
kiNQSTON
ONTARIO
CANADA
THOU
G
HTS
O N T H E
Difmiffion
CIVIL
of
Officers,
MILITARY
or
FOR THEIR
CONDUCT
in
PARLIAMENT.
LONDON:
Printed for J.
Almon,
oppofite Burlington^
Houfe in Piccadilly,
1765,
iii
[
]
PREFACE.
TH
E
writer of the following pages
thinks proper
to premife, for the
fatisfadion of the reader
no
feat
in
niftration in
no
ejje
intereft
office,
civil
no acquain-
men
of the majo-
no knowledge of tho
minority
fecret tranfadions or fecret
party-
he has
with any admi-
or in pojfe
tance with any leading
rity or
no
parliament
or military'
that
views of either
and, in fhort, no other right to
addrefs himfelf to the public or any political fubjecft,
than that which
ceives to belong
Englishman,
he con-
by inheritance to every
who
is
acquainted with fueh
fundamental principles of the conftitution
•
of
PREFACE.
IV
of
his country,
as
Englifhman not
it
a
is
difgrace to an
comprehend, or
clearly to
not duly to prize.
The reader therefore
curious
anecdotes,
nor the refinements
and myfteries of policy
negyric or
invedlive
fons.
If he
fenfe,
and a few
to expecfl neither
is
:
on
much
lefs
pa-
particular per-
meets with a
little
fubflantial reafons,
plain
found-
ed in a true apprehenlion of the nature of
the Britifh conftitution
;
the writer's
end
will be fully anfwered.
THOUGHTS
TU BrTjsWfirwTKnrnMBf-ttrjtr-ww'-wrBr-Bjiu-'w
^
THOUGHTS
O N T H E
Dismission of OfficerSj &^c.
K^^^k^y^ HAT
H^ Wh
S^"^^^
-p
the crown
^bfolute right of
over fuch of
has an
difmiilion
its
fervants
hold
not
and
^^%^^ji?
officers,
places under
fome other fecurity than the
royal pleafure
•
is
as
a proportion in appear-
ancealmoft identical, and, indeed,
fined
tlieir
to a certain fenfe, not to
if
con-
be con-
troverted.
This
right
often compared to that,
which a mafter of a family pofTefles,
of
is
^
parting
6
(
j^^rting
)
With his feivants,
loon as they
(o
begin to be difagreeable to him, without
being bound to give any account of his
rcafons for fo
The
doing.
comparifon
way
holds tolerably well, in a loofe eafy
pf applying
But
it.
I
would beg
hint to the next perfon
proper
to
that there
any great
lay
is
who
at
leave to
think
fli^H
upon
ftrefs
itj
a flight difference in
leafl:
tli£
two cafes,
of
diflind;ion not always attended to.
from
arillng
a circutn fiance
If
the fervant of a fubjed: be difcharged, he
new
provides himfelf with a
he cannot,
Bat
felf
?
to
Services
them
through his
whom
own
the public
fliall
fault.
be
dif-
he betake him*
His duty to the public and to
Sovereign,
vices,
is
fervant of
if a
placed,
it
or if
fervice,
and
remain,
his obligation
tho'
to hinrfelf,
be
to general
his particular
and the emolument
his
arifing
fer-
from
extincTt,
Wh at
(
7
)
Whatever advantages he enioyed
poflefTion of his
them,
place,
he
vt'ithout receiving
penfation, and without a
deprived of
is
any
in the
vifible
com-
power of obtain*
ing any
by an application elfewhere. This
perhaps
is
not the only
might be mentioned
diflindtion that
it is
circumllance of
which
the only one with
I
think
;
but
it
ne-^
ceiTary to trouble the reader.
The
matter of right then being taken
as an uncontrovertible principle,
be proper to enquire a
right this
is ?
are called
fo,
in a ftri(^
and
which
little,
For there are
it
what kind of
rights,
which
only becaufe they are
legal fenfe
are confiftent
the moft tender
may
wrongs
;
not;
rights,
with the violation of
and facred regards, of
the laws of equity, honor, and humanity.
Now,
if
there fhould appear any reafor^
to fufpe<ft,
is
of
this
that the right thus
kind
with (landing
;
agreed on
there will remain, x\oU
fuch
P)
agreementj an ample
2
add
8
(
)
the matter before us, in
iield for dlfcu fling
a moral, as well as a political view.
A
favor granted without confideration
of any
or fuppofed claim,
real
merit, in the receiver, and
title,
or
by the term^
or nature of the grant, merely dependent
on the
will of the granter
and
I
think
no
other,
may
drawn
fairly
and
juftly,
without the
;
fuch a favor,
be withal-
legation or pretence of any default in the
But, tho'
receiver.
abfolutely at will
;
it
be held never fo
yet, if
it
be efteemed
or fuppofed to be, in any degree, either
a reward of fervices, or dependent on
for
it
its
continuance
;
the withdrawing of
fome difcovery or fome change
implies
to the difcredit of the perfon
it
that either
To
is
one of thefe caufes
attributed
j
who
he was not
ing as he appeared, or
fo.
them
fo
enjoyed
deferv-
become
it
lefs
muft be
except where a third fuppofi-
tion chances to ojptrude itfelf
upon us
.
that
(9)
he both was, and continues
that
to
meritorious as ever he appeared
as
fome
thro'
that
fatal
or
mifapprehenfion,
j
be,
but
mifreprefentation,
other
extraordinary
accident or change of circumftances, his
plea of merit
Now
it
is
over-ruled.
would be highly
wifdom of government,
to the
pofe that
offices
of
truft
title
to
them by
were expected
by the
as,
to merit,
had gained
to be ferviceable in futuro,
cident to their offices.
fuch
as
their paft fer vices, or
of the duties
faithful difcharge
are not to
fup-
to
were ever be-
flowed on others than fuch
a
difrefpedlful
And
be confidered
if fo
meer
as
;
in-
they
favors,
being beftowed without regard
may
be withdrawn
at pleafure,
without any reafon given, and w^ithout
caufeor colour of complaint.
It
may
be no
violation ofanyabfolutc andperfed: right;
it
may
ful
not, ftridly fpeaking, be an
and injurious
a(5t,
fo
to
unlaw-
withdravi^
them
;
(
them
rules
:
but
may
it
)
be
contraiy
of equity or prudence.
is
is
feated
of every thinking man.
in the bread
From
Such mea-
except that which
judicature,
the
to
amenable to no court of
iures indeed are
there
10
the jurifdidion of that
no authority on earth
And
exempt them.
rence I pay to
it
court,
that can
hope the defe-
I
will not be conftrued as
contempt of the court
a
of King" i Bench, or
any other court in the world.
Taking
it
then for granted, that fuch
power
cxercifes of miniflerial
be looked upon merely
as
a^fts
are not to
of power;
but that the propriety, and even the rectitude of
bate
;
them, are proper fubjedls of de-
I proceed to the
examination of thp
following queftion.
Whether
to
difplace
it
an
be equitable and
officer,
civil
or
politic,
mili*
tary
(n)
tary,
lolely
ment
?
I
.
And
firfl,
condu6l
his
for
parlia-
in
for the equity
of the mea--
my
fetting out,
fure.
Here
of the
am
1
antiquated
lead me.
I forefee
liged to fpeak
will
be ob-
that I fhall
and
when
of thofe,
of
honor
is,
:
a lan-
to refined politi-
from
contemptible, or,
unintelligible.
is
their
ufed in the difciiffion
political queflion,
cians, either
who
fubjed
pique themfelves on their patriotifm,
guage which,
ufe,
my
in the language
their confcience,
of a
and method of
ftyle
which
into
reafoning,
who
aware, at
The
dif-
reader therefore,
this fuperior caft, will
which
do well
treats
of
the equity of the meafures in queflion.
I
to pafs
over this
may
poffibly
felf
more
fubfcquent.
mk
article,
have the honor to adapt
my-
to his ideas of things in
the
But, in the
mean
time, I beg
leave
12
(
recommend one
leave to
me
for
beflowing a few pages on
antiquated
thefe
hint to his con-
lead he niould altogether de-
iideration,
fpife
)
That,
notions.-
however chimerical they may appear
the
of this enlightened
firft-rate politicians
age,
maintain fome
fpcO:
to
popular
thought prudent to
generally
is
it
and
of outward
degree
them;
that they
plaufible
credit to a caufe,
to
are at
Icaft
that they
;
re-
give
and are fometimes em-
ployed, and that by no inconiiderable mafters in
the
fcience, as ufcful auxiliaries,
where they can be made
fome more important
The
iervcD
iirft
his
duty
fubfervient to
objed:.
of every man,
country as one of
fentatives in parliament,
public good.
is
its
who
repre-
to confult the
All private obligations
to
a minifter, or even to his fovereign, are
of an inferior nature.
intereft
Indeed, as the real
of prince and people are
efleptial"
'3
f
Iv
)
and invariably the famej
promote the one without
to
fible
who
Every man
other.
impof-
is
it
the lupport and
folicitous
is
man
for
of govern-
prefervation
ment, which every
the
public Na-
in a
ought to be, will concur with
tion
the
meafures of an adminiflration, whenever
his
fober judgment informs
him
are likely to contribute to this
But, whether
his
left to
To
to be' determined.
him of that
liberty,
is
a
private
controul
of private judgment,
his exercifc
deprive
main end.
they be fo or not,
queflion that muft be
judgment
that they
to
is
without which
he cannot difcharge the duties he owes
to the
To
public.
punifli
king ufe of fuch liberty,
denial
to
is
for
him
fuppofes
declare
to
ma-
an implied
of that independency, which
conftitution
is
him
poflefs
the
:
it
war againd the freedom
of parliament, which
againfl arbitrary
is
the great
government.
of being deprived
bulwark
The
fear
of fuch emoluments
C
as
(
from the favour
he enjoys
as
crown,
the
own
the
which he thinks
detrimental
him
to the dif-
public, reduces
dilemma of renouncing
agreeable
his
of
confequence of his oppolition
in
to mcalures
to
H)
private
(and
interefl:
either
that in
tender a point as parting with what
has actually in polTeflion) or the
of
fo
he
intereft
Happy is the man who
enough to make the former
But an honeft man ought
his country.
has virtue
his choice
!
not to be expofed lightly to fuch a temptation.
The
cannot
aflerting
inflidlion
be
of
punifhmcnt
by
other wife, than
juftified
the oppoiition to have proceed-
ed from corrupt views
an error of judgment
be
this
red:ified
by fo
the minifler a
that
violent
But who has a right
to
requires
a
aflert
proper judge in
where he himfelf
is
from
or, at leaft,
;
a party
?
to
remedy.
this
a
If
?
Is
caufe
fo,
it
mufl
)
'5
(
mufl be on fome principle widely
from the ordinary and eftablifhed
ferent
A
rules of equity.
ment
of
member of
parlia-
condu6l
anfvverable for his
is
God and his
that capacity only to
He
in
country.
appointed by that country as one
is
guardians
its
againft
incroachments,
from
they proceed.
If
that he
difcovers,
wrongs and
all
whatever
quarter
he difcover, or think
any
tendency in
evil
the condu(5l of an adminiftration
bound
to
oppofition
oppofe
And
it.
he incurs
if
he
3
is
by fuch
the refentment of
hurt of his fortune
the miniftry, to the
and embarralTement of
public has reafon to
as
dif-
his
affairs
^
complain of
an unjufl attack upon
its
the
this,
moll facred
privileges.
Perhaps
reafoning
minifter
it
will be faid,
concludes
equally
endeavouring
member of
that the
to
fame
againft
a
influence
a
parliament by any luccative
C
2
con-
i
confideratlon
it
would be
j6
)
Indeed,
at all.
prov^e
difficult to
am
1
afraid
any inea-
fure of that kind ftridtly defenfible.
But there
a
is
man
the tempting a
punifliing
him
wide difference between
to
be difhoneft, and the
The one
for being honefl.
and caufes us to
excites our indignation,
lament, that the bulinefs of government
fhould be carried on by fuch ignoble means
5
means tending, tho' perhaps by flow degrees,
to deftroy the balance
with
it
the govern me
--^f
'
alarms us with the ap
evil
tendency has beg
the
mafk
clared in
is
government, and
'tfelf.
^,
other
^enfion that fuch
)
already pt^iled
form
The
take effed:, that
off,
and war de.
againff our liberties.
But gratitude obliges every man
to
com-
ply v/ith the meafures of the court,
who
enjoys advantages from
does
fo,
its
favor.
where fuch compliance
leads
It
not
a breach of the facred trufl rcpbfcd in
to
him
by
(
his country.
he
may be under
It
)
For whatever obHgations
by
greater to
>7
is
under
the pubhc.
may be
urged, that
where
will not allow
him
adminiflration,
he ought to
where he not
duty
his
with the
to concur
bound by
is
particular
promifes, fubfift no longer than the
nifter adls
an upright part
are inferior
he
lies
tereft,
To
refign.
obHgations to a mi-
this I anfwer, that his
nifler,
he
to the courts
and fecondary
that they
to thofe
under to his fovereign
;
as I obierved before,
is
withthat of his people
mi-
which
whofe
in-
the fame
and that he
is
not obliged, by refigning, to flrengthen the
hands of a party,
whofe views he has
reafon to think dangerous to the public.
The
above reafoning holds with pecu*
liar force,
in the cafe
of that
joys no advantages, but
man who
en-
what he has earned
in the fcrvice of his country.
Every
of-
ficer
i8
(
ficer in
the
advanced
army
in
)
or navy,
who
the courfe of fervice, has
right to enjoy the dignity and
till
them by fome breach of
litary duty, or
fome crime
upon him againfl: the
ilate.
a
emoluments
confequent on his advancement,
forfeited
has been
his
lav^^fully
And
he has
mi'
proved
if,
with*
out the allegation or even pretence of any
fuch milbehaviour, he be degraded from
his honor, and defpoiled of his
country,
his
for his
frayed
which
fervices,
indebted
is
income
to
;
him
and has chearfuUy de^
the expence of his rewards, be-
holds with a juft indignation a ilep that
tends to quench the ardor, and check the
emulation of all
who
are defirous of tread-
ing in the fame honorable fteps.
It
is
not to be denied, that every fer-
vant of the crown,
who
indecently, or in
a
manner
with the reverence due
which he
behaves fadioufly
inconfiftent
to that
power from
derives his honors
and advantage^
>9
(
may, with
tages,
)
be dimifled
propriety,
from
its
may
be juflly inflided, in cafes which
fervice
and that luch punifhment
:
come not under
the cognizance of the laws
But
of the land.
feems to me, that
it
how
no parliamentary oppofition
foever, if it be
violent
condudled without a breach
©f the refpedl due to the perfon and
fa-
cred character of the fovereign himfelf,
ought ever to be confidered
in that light.
For the freedom of parliaments
facred than the
tnd
it
dom,
is
an
is
authority of the
eflential
no
lefs
crown
branch of that
free-
to cenfure without referve, and
oppofe without
a miniflry.
niflers
reftraint,
It is
a
:
to
the meafures of
common
thing for m.i-
to intrench themfelves behind the
K>yal authority, to reprefent the oppofition
to
them
and
to
cd*ous
But
in
as
an
brand
titles
all
attack
upon government?
inflances of
it
with the
of difloyalty and difaffedion.
fo doing, they are guilty
traying the
power
that lupports
of be-
them,
and
20
(
)
fufpicions of their fidelity
find excite jufl
to the truftrepofed in them.
lay claim to
right to, an
claim
what even
If a minifter
unlimited acquiefcence
views than
the
ferving either
or his country, and
power
;
his
he has other
unconftitutional,
is
no
his mafter has
is
his
king
dangerous in
his hands.
I will not affront either the underftanding,
or moral fenfe of the
has borne
pofing
it
me company
thus
neceffary to enlarge
of the queftion
;
but
fliall
reader
far,
who
by fup-
on this branch
proceed to ex-
amine the matter before us
in a political
view.
2.
But
£rll, let
me
premife, that Ipre-
fume not to interfere with, or to argue about,
that myfterious
objed: of
which
and abftrufe policy, the
is,
the fupport and con-
tinuance of an admini/lration.
only of that policy, whofe
I
obje(51:
fpeak
is,
to
fecure
21
•
(
prince that juft proportion
fccure to the
of power, which
quately to
fill
)
his
may
him ade-
enable
department
in the
com-
monwealth, without incroaching on the
privileges
of the people.
am aware
I
that
experience will be alledged in fupport of
the meafure in queftion
with which
it
and the fuccefs
j
has been pradifed will be
pleaded, as an inconteftible proof of
utility.
For
this rcafon,
I
muflbeg
leave
which
have
to adhere to the diftindlion
laid
down, between
policy.
A
minifterial
diftindlion
its
which,
I
and kingly
hope,
I
is
not altogether without foundation.
For, altho' a minifter
who ads
as a
faithful fervant to his fovereign, has rea-
fon to expedlall the countenance and fupport in return,
which
it is
confident with
the character of a fovereign to give;
cannot be fuppofed that the
ged to defcend from
ing into
all
his dignity,
the intrigues,
O
latter
is
it
obli-
by enter-
which the minifter
(
nifter
may
ing his
22
)
think proper for the
intereft,
eftabliili-
and fecuring the continu-
The
ance of his power.
balance of the
in fuch a ftate as ours,
feveral parties
is,
or ought to be, in the hands of the king:
and fhould he fubmit
to adopt the private
views of any one of them, he would give
up
a moil: ufeful
his
royal
averfe to the difficulties
AfFe(5lion to thofe,
fidelity
him
and
change of minif-
agitations that attend a
ters.
may
Indolence
prerogative.
him
render
and honorable part of
whofe
he has experienced,
zeal
may
and
incline
to wifh for the continuance of their
fervices.
But there are conjunftures, when,
in fpite
of indolence or
be neceflary for him
to
affe(5tion,
it
will
throw the admini-
itration into other hands.
A
very unpopular minifter can hardly
be a good one.
cure a footing
jealoufies
and
Knowing on how
he
ilands,
fufpicions.
he
And
is
infe-
full
thus
of
cir-
cum-
(
23
)
cumftanced, he mufl be poffefTedof a very
uncommon {hare of virtue and public fpiand
rit, if he make ufe of none but fair
honeft means, to enlarge his influence and
ftrengthen his party.
is
the people
to
difagreeable
In proportion as he
3
they,
their turn, are averfe to his meafures
fpirit
of oppofition prevails
falutary
the
and his moft
fchemes are rendered ineffectual
When
and abortive.
this pafs
:
:
in
)
he
is
things are
no longer
ed with the condudl of
imputation will
lie
fit
come
to
to be entrufl-
And no
fovereign, who
affairs.
on the
complies fo far with the defires of the
people, be they well or ill-founded, as to
take the adminiflration out of the hands of
a
man, who,
fo
long as
he remains in
power, mufl neceffarily involve his fovereign in the
odium which he has fallen un-
der himfelf.
It
may feem
hard, thus to facrifice
an
who
has
innocent man, nay, one perhaps
D
2
de-
)
(
H
dcfcrvcd well of the public, to popular pre-
judice
But the hardfhip of the cafe ren-
:
ders not the facrifice
is,
in this cafe,
neceffary. Merit
lefs
and
a private
fingle confi-
deration, not to be put in the balance
public
flate,
a
utility.
and one
a
of the
fervant
important a ftation as
in fo
becomes
minifler,
whether
When
wih
for
unfit
fervice,
be by his fault or his misfor-
it
tune; no pad: fervices will juftify the con-
him
tinuing
in place.
And
parent hardfliip of the cafe
as to the
j
it
confjdered, that every minifter
his fetting out,
nure he
minifter
is
is
to
by
how
hold
is
be
to
knows
at
precarious a te-
that the fervice of a
not a dry and fruitlefs
and that he can fcarcely have
rcafon to complain, that he
quit the field which
ap-
is
fervice
much
obliged
to
he has been labouring,
and to leave the harveft ungathered.
Nor
has the fovereign reafon
hend any formidable
to
appre-
difhculties in fupply-
ing
(
25
There
ing his place.
)
is
always good
florc
And
of adive and ambitious men.
if
fovcreign betray not an improper levity,
a
by
changing his fervants before the urgency
of the
cafe requires
it j
there will not
wanting peifons of reputation and
whom the
poflibly
deiire
a
of
ployment,
ability,
of fame, and
profit or
more honorable motive,
difpofe to enter with
will
on an em-
alacrity
once gainful,
at
be
illuftrious
and
important.
If a fovereign, on the other hand, de-
fccnd fo low, as to be a partizan of a miniflry
and
j
he acknowledges himfelf
is in
effect,
cefTity that
their flave.
to be,
For the ne-
he fancies himfelf under, of ad-
hering to their caufe, will be bonds
fetters to
to
draw
him
;
as tight as poffible,
picions in his
jects
well
which they
who
mind
are not
againft
and
will hardly fail
by
all
raiiing fuf-
thofe fub-
of their party, however
affe^cd to his perfon and govern-
ment
;
26
(
mentj and by
)
and feducing him
terrifying
into fuch meafures as tend to alienate their
Nay, they
affedions from him.
will not
be content with acquiring a power, fo
monftrous
it
in its nature
:
they will render
more monfirous> by
ftill
And
in a tyrannical manner.
vereignty
is
as the fo-
prince himfelf be-
comes a meer pageant, a piece of
and ceremony, a
the midft of
The
it
thus tranllated from the prince
minifters, the
to his
exerciiing
ilave
ftate
and a prifoner in
homage and magnificence.
only method a fovereign has to
fecure his independency,
is,
not to attach
himfelf to any minifler or junto of miniiters,
in
afraid of
fuch a manner as either to be
them, or by placing his whole
confidence in them, to a6t as if he were
afraid
of his
vernment
5
fubjedts.
In a defpotic go-
a minifter blindly devoted to
a monarch, and a
monarch blindly
at-
tiched to a minifter, are according to the
natural
(
27)
natural courle of things
but
:
wife, in a free ftate like ours.
fterial abilities,
or
miniiterial
King of Great
give a
a dignity
far
other-
Nominican
zeal,
Britain a fecurity
and
equal to that, which he will
gain by fuch an open and fpirited con-
dud,
as (hall indicate a
mind
the affedtionof his people.
limited confidence, that a
Britain can
fatisfied
The
of
only un-
King of Great
place without danger,
is
in a
free parliament.
The
people of this country are
much
difpofed to be zealous and affectionate to-
wards
of
their Ibvereign.
their affedion
Nor can any proof
be defired, that
is
for
the honor and advantage of the fovereign^
which they
are not ready to give.
No-
thing can cool the ardor of their zeal for a
good
prince, but the appreheniion of his
being too
ence.
if
he
much under
And it would
(hould be
miniflerial influ-
be a lamentable thing:
reduced to depend on
mi-
:
(i8
)
when he might
rninirterial artifice,
carry
every point which fuch a prince can aim
without any
at,
I
artifice at ^11.
hope enough has been
tojuftify
faid,
the diftindtion above laid downj between
the poHcy that
is
the poHcy that
is
and
proper for a king, and
among
ufual
myfelf, that I
I flatter
my
thought unjuft to
minifters
fubjed:,
be
not
fliall
if,
in the
further courfe of this examination, I refer
wholly to the former.
Now,
it
certainly
Is
for the interefl
of
the prince, to be on good terms with his
If unpopularity be a bad quality
people.
in a
minifter,
king.
dinary
It
may
it
feems
flill
worfe
in
a.
not indeed hinder the or-
bufmds of government, from go-
ing on in
its
accuftomed channel
:
it
may
be fome time before any fenfible mifchief arife from
or difficulty, or
it.
But
when
in
time of danger
the prince
is
re-
duced
;
(
to fuch a
Uuccd
afliftance
who
need the
fituation as to
of his people
will appear
lelTed
29
a
j
wide difference
between the prince
who is
pof-
of the hearts of his fubjeds, and hitn
is
The
not.
people are not only folicitous for the
fupport and prefervation of a prince
whom
they love, but jealous for his honor.
They
fubmit chearfuUy to the burthens and ex»
pences of war
and are ready to
j
antici-
cipate his widies, in contributing to every
meafure that tends to make his
fpe6table, his
alliance
enmity formidable.
where they
name
defirablcj
On
the
re-
and his
contrary,
are fufpicious of the prince
^
him with
furnifhing him
they are backward in entrufting
any degree of power, or
with even the neceflary fupplies
:
they
embarrafs him, both in his domeflic and
exterior policy
:
they are carelefs of his
reputation, they render
him
inconfiderablQ
:
30
(
amongfthis
allies,
)
and contemptible
to his
enemies.
Now, of all the
can
make
meafures which a prince
ufe of to llrengthenthe hands of
his miniflers, perhaps
more
to render
meafure
in
no one contributes
him unpopular, than the
For
queftion.
thofe fufpicions,
it
excites
which the minds of a
people jealous of their
liberties
are apt to
conceive again fl thofe in pov/er.
the appearance,
all
at leaft,
It
has
of an infringe-
ment of one of
the moft important pri-
vileges vefted in
them by
the conflitution
of the kingdom i the right of fpeaking and
voting freely by their reprefentatives.
Under
a popular difcontent fo juftly
founded, the feeds of
all
have time and
-to
fhelter
pand themfelves
turity.
The
extinguiHied,
kinds of mifchief
take root, and ex-
into full ftrength
fpirit
and ma-
of difcontent
by being
for
a
time
is
not
fup-
prelTed
(
prefled
)
tunity to break forth
fail
oufly
has been
it
it
blazes
obliged to give
the
:
ftate
way
is
of tranquillity,
crown
-,
is
change
is
of
embarralTed;
and a change of
unavoidable, at a time
poffibly fuch a
furi-
to the violence
the public in confusion
miniflry
more
tlie
the party which has been
3
triumphant during a
oppofition
the
flified,
furnifh
to
Then^
with fuch an opportunity.
longer
is
and times of pu-
;
can hardly
blic perplexity
it
.
waits but a favorable oppor-
it
:
3'
when
extremely hazard-
ous both to prince and people.
It
may
perhaps be thought, that by
maintaining the parliament in a
conftant
dependence on the crown, which
object aimed at
tion, the
by the meafure
is
the
in quef-
confequence abovementioned of
unpopularity in a king or a miniftry
be prevented.
may
But, fuppofe never fo great
an influence to be obtained over the parliament, and never fo ftrong an aifurance
E
2
of
30
(
ot their obrequioLifnefs to the
what
court
minifter will undertake to
the whole body of the people
that
is
effedually
accompliflied,
remains of the anticnt
tin(ft
he has done
5
For,
perfedly.
?
corrupt
and
till
and
all
and
ex-
Britifh fpirit
im-
his bufinefs very
when once
people
the
are alarmed with the apprehenfion,
their rights
yet
:
liberties
that
are in danger of
being betrayed by their reprefentatives
;
the party in oppofition will encourage the
alarm
to
j
and the parliament will be obliged
comply with the clamors of
flituents,
till
their con-
the caufe of difcontent be
remo.ed.
Nov/j
ings
nothing but arbitrary proceed-
as
on the
fpirit
fide
of the court can
raife
of difcontent to fuch an height
;
the
in
order to quell the clamour and oppo/ition
which they have occafioned, the crown
will in
all
probability be enforced to
ccmceflions,
by which
it
will lofe
make
fomething
(
33
)
more than the advantages
thing
For the caufe of
gained.
encroachments made upon
the
exert
itfelf.
what
it
ftill
And when
firfh
will
it
has
liberty gains
by
when once
it,
of liberty has found means to
fpirit
ccfs,
it
fought
it
has obtained
encouraged by fuc-
;
hardly be content without
farther proofs of its vi(ftory, in reprifals
on the adverfe party.
On
the other hand, fo long as the
maintains
the
fevers^l
ways
its
independence, with regard to
contending
will fubfift
fo far as
al-
under a free government,
not to render
pens to be in power
itfelf
accountable for
;
which hap-
their violence
always be fpent on each other
in
which
parties,
the mifmanagements of that
will be
crown
:
the
will
crown
no danger of fuffering by their
mutual fhocks
;
and
its
powers and pre-
rogative will remain undifputed and un-
touched.
Befides
34
(
)
Befides the unpopularity of the meafure
in quefllon
the refentnient which
;
turally exxites in the
and of
ate fufferer,
with him by
St
mind of the inimedi-
all
who
are conoecfted
intereft or afredion, renders
of very dangerous tendency.
effedis
ment
of
is
permanent,
are
it
na*
it
As
the
the refent^
not likely to fubiide very fpeedily.
And, akho'
the
odium may
on the minifler
blow was
flruck
at
•
whofe
yet, as
fall
primarily
inflio'ation
it
was the
of an authority fuperior to the
the
av5l
jminiilers,
even the removal of the minii^er will not
heal the wound.
be
fatisfied in
The
feeing a
public indeed
may
man removed from
the royal counfelsj wlit»fe meafures they
difapproved
fufferings
amidfl: the
a change
thi& be
2;
;
of
and their refentment of the
particulai's
may be
forgotten
pleafing profp$6ts v/hich fucb
opens
upon them
:
But will
fufEcient confolation to the manj,
wha
35
(
)
who labors under the lafling
privation
which he
has not merited
fenfe
?
of a de-
eiledls
confcious that he
is
Time may
alleviate his
of the wrong he has received
and
of duty, prudence, or public
principles
fpirit,
;
may
prevent
breaking out
its
the refentmentof an injured perfon
is
:
But
never
to be defpifed.
There
another conlideratlon, which
is
feems more peculiarly to
mlitmy
his majefty's
be granted,
confequence
I
apprehend
fervants
in their
it
to promotion
department
to
on
fpcak of defert'm
is
it
will
offome
at
leafl,
be ferved in this departreft their
whole claim
their deferts.
3.
When
I
military officer; I in-
tend that only, which
all
as
of
then to be for the intereft
ment by men, who
of
:
fuppofe, that merit
I
of the crown,
crcife
afFed: the cafe
arifes
from the ex-
of his military functions, excluiive
other collateral merit.
For, prefer-
36
(
ferment that
)
from any other
conferred
is
than this fingle
coniideration, can
help to kindle
that
which makes brave
on the contrary,
guifh
who
it
And,
it.
wifhes to
laudable
foldiers
ambition,
and feamen
:
tends dired:ly to extin-
if the
rife
never
ardor
of a man,
by the
in the fervice
mofl honorable methods,
is
in
danger of
being damped by the apprehenfion, that
his claim of merit
feded
is
may
by another of a
poffibly be fuper-
lefs
no fuch confequence
worthy kind
likely
to
.
cnfue
from the apprehenfion of being degraded,
after
he
fhall
have arrived
at the
higheft
point of his ambition, and of being deprived of
all
the fruits of his fervices, ex-
cept the confcioufnefs and the reputation
of having performed them
——and
no other crime than refufmg
glory acquired in the field, by
ly in the fenatc
all
for
to tarnifli his
adiing
mean-
>
This
37
(
Thisconlideration
attention, becaufe
who
refpecfls thofe chiefly
it
the fervice
to diflinguifli
men
:
of ftrong
and of an adive, enterprizing
parts,
Thefe
are the
fpirit.
which enable
qualities
a
to iliine, either as a warrior or as a
fenator.
feffed
more worthy of
the
mofl Hkely
are the
themfelves in
man
is
)
It
is
natural for one
who
is
pof-
of them, to be inftigated by a two-
fold ambition
;
firft
of
as
him, in the
his merits can carry
military
rifing
high as
fcale
of
advancement 3 and then, of crown-
ing his glory, in the charader of a ftatef-
man and
Two
a patriot.
fuch animating ideas, interwoven
in the breafl of a brave
man, muft on
all
occafions that offer of fignalizing himfelf,
fire
it
him even to
enthufiafm.
not be a pity, would
concern to every one
it
not give a fenfible
who
F
And would
wilhes well to
the
(
38
)
the fervice, if the union of
defigns were ever to
which
it
muft
prove
cliinierical
if ever things lliould
i
reduced to that
two fuch noble
pafs,
that the foldier,
?
be
who
has been ufeful to his country in his miHtary capacity,
and wifhes
to
be no
lefs fo
in
his poHtical, fhould of courfe find himfelf
in this
his
dilemma;
either to be degraded
mihtary honors, or to fubmit
worfe degradation
-that of
to a
from
much
becoming a
fubaltern to a miniflcr.
I
have reverentially refrained fromentring
into any conliderations regarding that
abflrufe and refined policy,
to minifters of ftate.
ated into
its
can difcover
which belongs
Yet, tho' not initi-
myfteriesi thus
—
more
much
that the minifter
I
think I
who endea-
vors to fupport himfelf by fuch meafures as
that
we have examined,
can never juftly be
charged with an unreafonable timidity, or
a faulty modefty
and that
if,
in
the
end,
.
39
(
even
C.J,
him;
meafures
thele
he has
)
a
leafl
at
fliould
fail
to
this
title
complement
MiigJiis
tamen exxidit AUSIS.
FINIS.
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