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Document 1194970
speciAL
collecxiONS
OouqLas
LibRAR^
queeN's UNiveRsiry
AT kiNQSXTON
klNQSTON
ONTARiO
CANADA
A
GENUINE
SUCCINCT
and
RRATI
O
F
LIBEL,
WOMAN,
ESSAY
A
fcandalous, obfcene, and exceedingly profane
ENTITLED,
An
on
AS ALSO, OF
#
rOETICAL PIECES,
Other
The
moil
CONTAINING
atrocious Blasphemies,
Submitted to the Candor of the
By the Rev. Mr.
Reclor of ILrne
to the
hi
R °ht
:
K I D G E L L, A.M.
Surry, Preacher of Berkley Chapel, and Chaplain
Hon.
LEGE
March
the Earl of
In Vitium
Dignam
PUBLIC,
regi.
LIBERTAS
*
.
and Ruglen.
incidit et
,
vim
Hor
m
'-
It*
L O
Printed for
Princels
N
!
i
D OW:
James Roesox, Bookfdler to her Royal Highnefs the
Dowager of Wales, in New Bend-Street; and
Wilkis,
J.
in St. Tcul's
Church Yard.
[Price
Six-Pence.]
X
The
violated
The
abufed
LAWSLIBERTY,
AND THE
Infulted
RELIGION
This
authentic
IS
of our Country,
NARRATIVE
INSCRIBED.
MDCCLXIII.
A GENUINE
and
SUCCINCT
NARRATIVE,
[T^ROM
•*-
gE
;
of the extenlive Utility
a Perfuafion
of every focial Virtue, and a perfect Senfe
of Obligation to the moft unexceptionable Go-
vernment in the World,
lam
conftrained to re-
queft the Attention of the Public to a Narrative,
by which
Men
I
hope to deferve
the*
Thanks of good
of every Circumftance- and Degree.
Being about the Beginning.of
Houfe of Mr. William FacUnStreet,
he
mewed me a Part
of a Poem, entitled,
An
"July laft, at the
Printer in
of a certain Proof-Sheot
Woman, which
Essay on
had a few manufcript Corrections
B
Fleets
,
in
the. Margin.
This
6
]
This he communicated to
me
[
voluntarily, without
any Manntj of Application from me, or
Know-
ledge of his Defign.
As
the faid Proof-Sheet contained a Specimen of
mod
the
horrid Impiety and Profanenefs that
had
ever yet difgrnced our Religion, our Language,
our Laws,
or
I
had the Curiofity
•know the Origin of
to deiire
to
an Inftance of the
fo daring
Abufe of both the Liberty of the
and the
Prefs,
Protection of the Government.
Mr. Faden, who did not think
in
me
the
to enquire,
had been
one of
accidentally
his
communicate
the Office,
it
it
brought
Journeymen, who
being induced, by the Singularity of
to
impertinent
un refer vedly informed me, that
faid Proof-Sheet
to his Houfe, by
it
its
Contents.,
to his Fellow- Workmen
very naturally
fell
into
the
in
Hands
of Mr. Faden.
As
I
am
convinced that Mr. Faden, with
£ have been many Years acquainted, had a
whom
fincere
Abhorrence
7
I
]
Abhorrence of the Publication of
infamous a Libd,
I
propofed to him an Endeavour
and Succefs of
to defeat the Influence
Ties
obfcene anci
fo
in a Se-
it,
of Letters, which mould be communicated to
the Public, by the Afliftance of a daily Paper,
of which Mr. Faden
The
the Printer.
is
Propofal being agreed to on his Part,
mained
to obtain, if fuch a
Thing was
it
re-
poflible, the
Remainder of the Work by the fame Hand which
'had produced this extraordinary
a Performance, which
out
its
Equal
But
which
in the
reflecting
I
I
believe
Fragment of
and hope,
had formed
in
deliberately
my
been unavoidably requifite for
and
to
;
a Defign,
me
it
would have
to repeat the
and confidering
my
perfon-
maintain fo Angular an Argument,
fearing, really, the
-exjpofe to
upon
Temerity, of publifh-
ing a Series of Letters, in which
al Inability to
with-
World.
more
grolTeft Indelicacies
is
it;
Confequence of an Attempt
public Scorn and Cenfure, a
Work,
8
[
of the Progrefs of which
count to give,
I
came
I
]
had
to a Refolution of advif-
Right Honourable Personage, of
ing with a
whofe Benevolence and Candour
convinced, and whofe Chaplain
I
who was
Lord,,
was
I
fufficientlj
have the Honor to
have been almoft: from the Day of
My
an Ac-
fo imperfect
my
Ordination;
extremely offended at the
fcandalous Indecency of thefaid Proof-Sheet, which
I
laid before
him, allured
me
of
his Affiftance in
any Defign. which* I might think expedient to
countenance
fo
fhameful an Undertaking
he would acquaint me. of the Refult of
Thoughts
at
his Lordfhip's
me
Lordihip
to
;
his
this
Converfation,
Commands by an
my
I
maturer
received
Exprefs which was
Hcufe. in Surry ; to. attend his
when he was
pleafed to
give
pnderftand, that proper. Meafures would
be taken, for the Difcovery and the
fo
faid
fome favourable Opportunity.
In a few Days after
lent
and
;
dii~
avowed an Enemy
to Society,
me
to
'infallibly
Punimment of
as the
Author of
fa-
9
[
prophane
fo
which
this
a
As
Libel.
who
the
it
is
now
are
hoped that the Pub-
me
an abiblute Declaration from
Author
of
it is,
till
the
Law
has taken
Cognizance of the Matter.
farther
In
Work was
more ample Manner,
under Consideration,
will excufe
Meafures by
thofe
and fhameful
iniquitous
difcovered in a
lic
]
the
site, in
mean Time
Vindication of
I
think
it
abfolutely requi-
my own Honour,
Veracity,
and good Intention, to fubmit to the
ferious Per-
ufal of the injured Public,
Account of
this
abominable Work,
cy as
I
a fuceinct.
as conliitently
with Decen-
can,
This Effay on iVomahxs a Parody on Mr. P&pps
EJfay on Ma?!, almofi Line for Line, printed in red.
The
Frontifpiece, engraved curiouflyon
contains the Title of the'Poem,
man;
A Motto,
Way of Decoration,
the Greek
Essay on
very fuitable to a Work which
culated to depreciate the Sex ;
by
An
Copv
Wo-
is
A mod obfcene Pr
:r,
i
cal-
x
r
under which b engraved in
and Character^
Language
to
C,
The Saviour
OF
™
[
World.
of the
}
Beneath that Infcriptionjfomething
too fcandalous and defamatory of private Character,
And
to endure a Repetition.
it is
added, (with an
Effrontery and ungentleman-like Scurrility, which
myfelf
I confefs
mour
too' dull to
of) that there
which
alfo a
Name
affixed the
is
is
comprehend the Hu-
Commentary,
oi a Perfonage,
to
one of
the moft diftinguiihed and eminent for Learning,
and Character,
The
tled,
Title
is
To
in
is
welcome and
fouled of
is
all
England.
and Defign^
Advcrtifeme?it
pare a
in
fucceeded by a few Pages enti-
Degree of Decency
which
Day
this
which
in
renounced, in Order to pre 1
*
familiar Reception to
iicredible:
every Page, and
fhameful and
almoft every
obfcene, without
Concealment or Refer ve
levvdeft
the
Language, and a Species of Impiety
Exprefilons, throughout the whole
To
e very-
in
any
of
it,
Manner of
:
a moft defcriptive
Thoughts
Word
Work,
Reprefentation of the
Nature
:
T©
**
C
To
Scurrility
upon
tions
beyond
ail
Precedent
:
To
Refac-
iairSex, opprobrious, immodefc, in-
th
fuking, and infinitely
To
3
.ervations
degrading:
upon Animal
impure, defending even
Increafe, ineffably
to the Minutenefs of a
Nudities of Bcafts
D.efc ipticn truly brutal, of the
and Reptiles
fo
;
and
this in a Stile
and Language of
copious an Indelicacy, that the (lender Share oi
Praife
which the buxuriancy of the Author's Ima-
gination might expecl:,
is
taken from him by the
Excefs of his Impurity.
In the Variations and Notes upon
Parody, the Holy Scriptures are
tuted to illuftrate the
this
obfeene
illiberally profii-
grofs Ideas of a libidinous
Blafphemer.
The
is
of
tion.
Prophanenefs throughout the whole
a mocking,
Many
Paffages-
low
of the
new,
Work
and wonderful Inven-
mod
ferious
and interefting
of the Gofpel are dishonoured to ferve the
lafcivious
Purpofe of
an
impure
double
ENTENDRE,
entendre, wKich
excufe me,
if I
particularly
a
is
am
perfuaded the Reader will
do not
]
defile
that pathetic
;
thy ViSiory !
Signification,
brutal
might
«
Death where
Paul,
where
I
[
Pen with
More
:
Exclamation of Saint
thy
is
is
my
Sting
Grave
!
impioufly debafed into
which
at
infernal
Angels
rejoice.
In another of
ral Abilities
his horrid Elucidations, the
of the Afs are
made
natu-
the Subject of his
unclean Description, the blamelefs Scripture be*
Then with
ing Hill hawled in to be refponfible.
Degree of Confidence unheard of
in
any Protefiant
Community, the unknowing Reader
that
" that
" Eiieem,
Animal
once
is
held
informed,
in
great
but that fince he had been the Vehicle
Godhead
tf
of the
"
ridiculous/''
To
was
a
crown
Prophanenefs
this
•
into Jerufalcm, he
united Effort
was become
of Obfcenity and
the Senfe of the Unherfal Prayer,
written by Mr. Pcpe,
is
perverted to ferve the
vilefr.
Purpofe
'3
[
Purpofe of Unchaflity
]
and that memorable
;
quy of the Emperor Adrian, which Mr.
sidered in a Paraphrafe, as the
without a
And,
7 he Dying Lover
BlulTi,
as if
A?/:£ has con-
Words of
Chriftian to his Soul, this fhamelefs
Solilo-
the dying
Author
to his
entitles
Pudenda.
he was determined experimentally to
be convinced to what an Extravagancy of Infult
the
the
Lenity of
Government,
ef the Public, and the Mercy of
God
the
Candor
himfelf
may
be abufed, he boldly prefumes upon an inimitably
prophane. Paraphrafe of Veni Creator, which he
ludicrously
Here
affec"ls
is
Abilities to
to call the Maid's Prayer.
the fupreme Exertion of his original
The
blafpheme.
tributes of the
DEITY
ampled Manner
;
holy
Name
and At-
are vilified in an unex-
the blessed
Spirit of
God
is
ludibrioufly infulted by a Repetition of the moft
carnal Gbfcenities in the
and
Form of a Supplication
that facred Expreffion,
GLORIOUS TRINITY,
D
;
THRICE BLESSED
is
compelled,
by an
impious
»4
[
convey
to
impious Similitude,
]
an
Idea to
the
Reader, impure, aftonifhir.g, and horrible.
With
this
extreme Hyperbole of Lewdneis and
an Affectation of Vivacity* and
Impiety, behold
Humour,
of the un-
faline Effluvia
the volatile,
chafle Imagination of a prurient Debauchee.
Is
there that one Individual in the
fo loft to every Senfe
of Goodnefs, as even to wifh
Encouragement and Succefs
proftituted
Author
The
?
Kingdom
Pen of
the
to
Age ?
Evil Genius of the
If any-> fp ca k j for ^m I ^ ave jfcn ded'
Deliberately, and in a few Words
this
I afk,
For
what one valuable Consideration upon Earth,
would a
fertous
or
Hour's Perufal of
Children
within
?
I
my own
to believe that
happen
sioft
to
a
this
reafon
Breaft
for
what
from
could
permit an
EiTay
execrable
but
;
Man
good
I
to
I
his
feel
be perfuaded
fuch a Misfortune would probably
a Child of mine,
aflMed .Parent
in the
I
fhould
be
the
World.
Was
'5
[
Was
ous to
]
actually uoffible that a Libel To injuri-
it
Ranks and Conditions of Men,
all
Government under which we
o-ood
all
the bleffed Religion which
by
fo
uncommon
and that
I
an Accident
live,
we
fall
to the
and above
profefs,
mould
my
Hands,
into
could innocently promote by an unfca-
fonable and paiTive Silence, the Impunity and the
Succefs of
it ?
Circumftance,
under fuch a
Such a Proceeding,
my own
Heart allures would be
criminal.
Would
live
to
it
not be
an unfpeakable Difficulty
under the perpetual
Lam
of, the
blai-
pheming Pen of a moil obfcene Defamer, withRedrefs
from the Legifla-
natural Protectors
of 'Difcipline, the
out
Hope of Aid
ture
?
The
or
Guardians of Liberty, and of the Laws
When
Authority,
^Efficacy to
human and
tender and
Honor and
divine, has loft
its
perfuade, what are the moft precious
and intimate Connexions
the
?
in
Nature
the profefTed
Interefts of .the
?
Where
Regards
Nation
?
for
are
the
Whither are
difperfed
*6
r
difpcrfed the
]
Thoughts of public Virtue, whilst
Jufticc eluded bears the Scales,
Sword
the
If we,
in vain
and the Magiftrate
!
under the gracious Government of the
mod virtuous
Prince
Eur ope
in
>
are to be mifera-
bly expofed to the Deftroyers of every fecial Virtue
j
if
one
Man
under Pretence of Privilege,
is-
pcrmittcd to obtrude upon an abufedNATioN, what
no one
Printer, except hirnfelf,
fidence to undertake
;
If
had ever the Con-
Perfonages of fupreme
Distinction
are to be characterized with an In-
decency which
is
phemies,
the
which
Tongue than
incapable of Controul
it
;
if Blaf-
were a happier Choice to
utter,
are to be forced
lole
upon the
Publick with Impunity^ farewel dear Liberty
for ever
1
No Kingdom
under the Sun
£ncerely to be pitied as Great
Laws of
bertines,
it
her Country (hall
will
be fo
Britain, when the
become a Prey
to Li-
and (O Grief of Griefs!) the Religion of
to Infidels
!
FINIS.
LETTER
T O
K
J.
D G E L
I
L.
CONTAINING
A
Answer
full
The
to
his
Narrative.
THIRD EDITION.
—**
—
**
v*
r \J^ 1
&
i
k.
>
M
LONDON:
Printed
for
J.Williams,
next the Mitre Tavern,
MDCCLXIII.
[Price
ONE
SHILLING.]
Fleetjlrcet,
I
5
]
LETTER
T O
K
J.
D G E L
I
L.
SIR,
TH
E
firft
of the
time
it
;
but
thing that prefents
leaft notice,
I confefs I
after a perufal
at a lofs to
of the pamphlet,
muft take
it,
(as it
was obvious enough
fix-pence
;
into the world
mould fccm
your fordidnefs iufpedted the bookfeller
For fome
underftand the meaning of
it
never was fuch an arrant catch-penny ufhered
fore every reader
your narrative, worthy
your name in manufcript.
is
was
itfelf in
to be
:
j
meant) that
might cheat you of
a Jingle
and, to prevent any fraud of that kind, you thought
B
for
there-
it
necefFary
6
(
But
neceffary to Jign j'ourname.
ture
The
?
had
me
laid a tax
in
alfo to the
it
mind of
him with
the
money by any means.
it
So you,
body can fuppofe any thing
phemous book,
do
to
to pocket the produce
piece
piece of money that
firft
fmelled of urine
in the affirmative, Vefpafian
We
need
it
nor do
a
his
;
and then,
own hand
(for
to fign his
clergyman,
name
them
may
who
I
that your
am
do thofe begging cheats
own
who
;
can
in order to gain a few'
with
it ?)
mould defraud him
perfuaded the moft libertine
act.
proper character,
in the ftreets,
get a good livelihood by following
fhall
I
it.
can pay an higher veneration to the clergy than
they ceafe to adt in their
as I
no-
can write his
mention
to
the bookfeller
left
clergyman would be afhamed of fuch an
when
(for
this blaf-
other reafon can be given for
of the profits of a fingle book.
None
mews
title
he fhould blufh
what
wonder
longer
the very
for
harangue on Jucb a fubjecl to the publick,
pence
money
you have any fcruple
I believe
not therefore any
a performance,
to
Titus could not
have made a handle of
have but an indifferent opinion of
name
as
collected,
urged the necefiity of obtaining
chufing to obtain
fir,
elfe)
:
?
was
of the gain made by obfcenity and blaf-
a catch-penny,
is
of
the ftory of Vefpafian and Titus. Vefpafian
and aiked him, if he thought
phemy.
air
manufcript.
upon urine; which Titus thinking highly indecent, Vef-
pafian prefented
anfwer
not add reverend to the figna-
name, might, with the fame felf-affumed
to his
importance, have added
This puts
why
parfon, fuppofed to be in his fenfes, that ever printed
firft
reverend
)
fome
who
folicit
I
do
I
;
but
defpife
alms, and
ufeful labour.
This
7
(
This defect
rative
there
;
in
is
name
is
)
not the only one which I find in your nar-
another which appears
as
the ridiculous dedication, which though
words,
yet contrived
is
pamphlet.
It
This
make
to
it
a leaf,
of the
being defervedly abhorred by
(being a Scot) to leave
Mac
all
printer,
panies
for an Englifhman,
The
Scot.
if
;
he called him-
when
the Scots
Englifhmen,he found itisintcreft
out of his name, and
William Faden; thereby hoping,
in Fleet-ftreet.
for fo
laft Scottijh rebellion
true
nineteen
order to eke out the
in
mould have been Mr. William Mac Faden,
felf until the fupprefiion
turned over
only confifts of
Mr. William Faden,
is,
we have
foon as
call
himfelf plainly
he couid not pafs in all com-
he mould not be
at
lead fo con/picuous a
very idea of a Scot was then odious as
it is
now; be-
caufe few, the Pretender's folks excepted, thought themi'elves fafe
if
near one; and the
change
change
to
his
:
name,
firft
I
motive which induced Mr.
fuppofe,
ft 11
influences
when
his
countryman was
have feen him refume his long
commend
hirq to
fome of
But the views of gain
only
loft
:
to
adhere to that
faced catch-penny production,
alfo.
When
make no doubt
publicly at the
Mac,
but
among
it
affairs,
would
re-
which, of
the Scots.
by the written name
formed of another part of
we
we mould
head of
in hopes that
are not manifested
for if a clear idea can be
apparent there
I
that plunder of the Englifh,
has been fb amply diftributed
late,
to
otherwife, if the Scots had gained their point in being
able
domineer over every Engliihman,
long ago,
him
Mac Faden
this bare-
(hall find they are at leaft equally
you had ken a proof-Zheet of the EfTay
on
(3
Woman,
on
obtained
honeftly,
let it
by the
arfiilance
ter."
This
of
know
could not have been
would) you propofed to
it
to defeat the influence and fuccefs of
which mould be communicated
in a feries of letters,
{late
come from where
Mr. Mac Faden "
the £ud
)
(which by the bye you mutt
to the public,
of a daily paper, of which Mr. Faden
paper
daily
is
the
now
and
obfcurity,
is
the prin-
Public Ledger, which being
continue
to
likely
it,
was
fo,
in a
to
be
brought forth into public view, and introduced into private jamilies,
by
on the fubjefts of obfcenity and blafphemy
letters
by a clergyman,
them
and
at
was vojign
his
leaft
;
I
own name,
greatly in
cannot think,
of
would
it
was
all
prevent counterfeits.
And
when
I
it
Mac
upon Mr.
the proprietors,
the
to
ought
I
to, as
tji'e
have agreed
of the paper
I
make
not the
;
fir,
which indeed {lands
it.
He
had therefore
was you
to get f for
the trouble to write a series
be upon the footing of a
?
—
1
mould
common
fufpect that
fcheme
Faden's not being able to anfwer for
laying iuch an additional expence upon the
paper, without their concurrence;
for
likewife hope,
look upon your catch-penny pamphlet, that
fcribe, aljhe JhUlings a letter
laidafide,
might
paper
what, reverend
Was
nothing.
the head of
to
I
acquiefced in the fcheme, be-
ferve the
undertake to give yourfelt
letters for
hackney
to
need of fome thing to recommend
his iritereft in view.
ycu would
be added
to
Mac Faden
doubt but that Mr.
caufe he thought
I
hope that was
the bottom the reverend gentleman,
written
;
which perhaps had
know) communicated
fni;
11
profits anfing
would not bear
it.
to
it
been (as
from the inconfiderable
When
it
them, they would not
this
paltry
fale
fcheme was
formed
9
E
]
formed, only one fheet of the work had been obtained
how
But before they could put
"
thus we
make money of
ready one, if not two honejl men, were to
fcheme
their
to obtain, if fuch a thing
was
" of it."
By what
«
in execution,
poffible, the
by the fame hand, which had produced
:
It
remainder of the work
this extraordinary
means, Reverend Sir, did you think
fragment
it
could be
fheet
Mac
den, as a printer, muft be perfeclly acquainted.
Reverend
" malt not
fteal,"
honestly
could not be
it
who
Sir,
as
it is
Fa-
In fhort, you mini
got; and would you,
have fo often read the commandment, "
and ought,
Thou
your indifpenfible duty
fo to
do, to enjoin with your utmoft power, the
exact obedience of
perfuade a finner
There
is
againft
which
who had
a refpect
which
broke
it,
due
to
is
it.
remained
obtained?— You could not be a flranger to the
manner the
which you had feen, muft have been obtained
and Mr.
;
both know, that
fee
it,
to repeat the offence? I hope not.
your character
clergyman,
as a
would not willingly offend: but I confefs am utJ
terly at a lofs what conftruction to put upon
the above paffage. For
your own fake, fir, I hope you will explain it for
in its prefent
I
:
ambiguous
exceed
ftate,
man muft
every bonefi
the warrant by
which Mr. Wilkes was
pers alio, in order to
fifh for
ing can be put upon
it,
evidence againft
it is,
that a fervant,
proof fheet, was afterwards, to ferve
a
whole book.
I
ftagger at
him
it.
fsized,
:
to
feems to
and his pa-
for if
who had
a purpoie,
It
any mean-
ftolen only a
fteal,
if pofible,
fhould not be furprifed if I was next to hear,
that
he had given information of there being a very handfome
dleftick in his matter's houfe,
which
^
filver
his mafter comtantly ufed
can-
when
writing.;
io
(
writing
and
;
he muft
that, if pofpble,
king's meffengers entered
)
When
fteal that alfo.
Mr. Wilkes's
they did
honfe,
it
the-
hy force
and what they took, they had the appearance of fome kind of authority for
;
though
and the
hors,
it is
This was honeft
what they
yet
it,
manner attempt
good master,
that
houfe,
man,
men
if there are
individual has
know
ably entrufls
in the
;
fome
to jujiice
How
fecrets,
w orld who
j
were
would
to ihefafefy
eminent, as thofe in middle
truft
to divulge
him
%mojl ex-
to lay his
me
all
more
life,
hand upon
fafe in his
in
any manner, or
Almofl every
who
of
it
keeps fervants, unavoid-
which he does not mean or
communicated to any
be of the happinefs, and per-
many
perfons, as well the moft
if their fervants
were
they know, and fhould
?
in thinking,
is
him.
will,
I
to betray their
fteal
papers, in
Could any thing be
injurious to fcciety in general; or can honejl
hearts abhor any thing
fire
in
with an intent to
no man
order to authenticate their malicious affertions.
more
him
who
which he does not intend the public
certain matters,
deftrudtive
haps even dangerous
for
his fervants to rob
and every gentleman,
them with
:
r
intend, fhould through any channel, be
body else.
to
trifle,
doubt not, will concur with
I
to have been brought
on any pretence, encourage
fhould
him,
Inftead of encouraging or rewarding fuch a fervant,
injure him.
every honelt
will not call that
to vindicate
had behaved
traordinary generous manner, of the minutefl
he ought
did, they did openly.
But furely you
in than, at leafl.
fervant honeft, nor in any
fecretly robs a
of authority which this country ab-
a kind
exercifers of
men from
their
appeal to every candid man, and de-
his breafl,
and afk
his
own
confcience,
whether
II
(
)
whether he does not think fuch a crime
not big with the deftruclion
is
of the peace of every family; and whether he would not, inftead of
encouraging fuch a fervant to proceed, immediately acquaint his
mailer with
it;
and however he might
detefr.
the offence (if
not murder) which his mailer had been guilty
first have had
When the
of,
done to the fervant for his treachery f
juflice
fcheme was
laid afide
was no doubt thought would
that
had he
"
you mewed
to
do with
of publifhing aferies of letters in
help the fale of the paper,
proof meet to the
this
it?
— Why, "
He was
earl
which
!
How
could
my
if any
meaning
For the fame perfon
fee ?
like wife
inform you, that
justice to his lordfhip, if
From
you
to
this
mufl be the meaning
what the
that procured
it
was not
public
"
fociety,
we
as the
was never
published; and
it
was in-
you did not inform him of that fact
and the punishment of
author of fo prophane a
:
alfo.
until his lordfhip gives
fo
infallibly
but not a word
be taken,
avowed an enemy
libel."
can juft gather, that the book, or at
to have been procured
to
you a proof meet, could
to be
underftand, " That proper meaiures would
for the difcovery
now
has)
Was there
lord concur in any expedient
we hear no more of it,
time
"
fenfe
it
What
any expe-
to concur in
to difcountenance in the public opinion (for that
of the pafTage,
it
you inform
of March.
dient to difcountenance fo fhameful an undertaking."
ever fuch an abfurdity
was
he would not
the Ledger, oh the fubjedls of obfcenity and blafphemy,
us,
it
leafl
is
From
this
more of
mentioned
it,
to
nonferns
as to the
arts.
12
(
)
Strange, that a clergyman,
means.
who
fo full
is
of piety, and
has fuch a regard for law and juftice, as you exprefs, mould
pafs over another act of wickednefs
!
I appeal to yourlilf,
you did not then know, and whether you do not
obtained by an act, which the law deems
with that love of
juftice
to poflefs, fpeak fully
it
?
And do you
?
both, in the eyes
Why
your extreme regard for juftice
all
offenders
profefs, that while
fcreens another,
of
caufe
As
it
God
;
fort
?
and man, highly
his offence,
where
as
is
with an impartial
of juftice
that
is
which you
punifhment on one offender,
has been guilty of nearly as bad a crime, be-
anfwers a purpofe ?
to the author,
who
one fhould underftand
fender you mean, if the world
he has been dead fome
fore be
one to be fcreened
is
Juftice deals out
?
but what
ftrives to inflict
it
who
was
not,
take upon you to pardon one? If you do,
mould feem by your not even mentioning
hand upon
it
why
believe,
If fo,
?
and religion which you would be underftood
of all delinquents
Are not the crimes of
offenfive
ftill
theft
filently
whether
infallibly
from the Dead
?
—
I
is
years ago.
but furely fuch ftark nonfenfe
is
the execrable of-
rightly informed concerning
What proper
taken for his punifhment ?
am afhamed
is
Was
to be ludicrous
enough
to
him,
meafures could there-
he to be
raifed
on fuch a fubjed
make even
;
the graveft
prelate crack his fides with laughing.
As
to the publication, if in that light the offence
I think, it
appears by your book, theperfon
is
who ftole
to be confidered,
the meet, as
Mr.
Mac
!3
[
Mac
Faden and
were
yourfelf,
hand; which by the
And if it be
perfons to
true, that
Mac
Mr.
whom that bafe
odium
I
that
it
Mac
know him
it,
are not the
Faden and
yourfelf, not only as
yourfelf to reflect on the
I leave to
to remonftrate
;
but for you,
which we pay
leifens,
your order ; and
to
vine, even in the
It
it
I
omv
he mult be confidered as
As
with him, for
fir,
to
Mr.
I neither
your character
clergyman, mould have kept you facred from even the
for fuch an imputation.
as a
leaft caufe
greatly leffens the veneration
am
perfuaded that no good di-
moments of his warmefl
zeal for the chriflian re-
ligion, will thank you for the fervices you have attempted to do
nor will he think the
production.
becaufe
it
clerical order
with the
has received any honour by your
hangs out to mockery and fcorn, paffages from
profligate,
may have
hope he did
;
to fee the light.
Such paffages
?
a
work,
as
muff,
weak, and unwary, add to the infamous prejudice,
already entertained againfl religion.
duty of a parlor
I
it;
All good men, and true friends to religion, deteft it;
which was never intended
they
it
called publication.
on the name of an informer.
catt
do not intend
do, nor defire to
is
Faden and yourfelf
fervant fhewed
publifhers alfo, but as informers.
univerfal
principally concerned in
of the law
Ariel; letter
thecM/publifher, and Mr.
Mac Faden,
at
gone backwards and forwards, from hand
for the faeetfeems to have
to
]
firfl
Did
and yet
Was
this
the
he by this means intend to ferve religion
I
wifh
I
had better proofs of
it
?
than any the
narrative contains.
D
If
H
(
we
If
room
confider
it
tion
feem to be thefe
The
caufe
formance.
to
rob
is
but
ill
human
name
fie
!
O
t>y this publication,
To what
detefl: it.
there
fenie,
is ftill
abundant
moftfeajible motives for the publica-
penny
was
authority
is
;
and to defame Mr. Wilkes.
to derive benefit
itmade
fcandalous
!
nature execrate more
Upon
?
fromfuch a per-
a fervant
bribed
what crime, murder exI did not expect to fee
?
written to any thing relative to this bafe trans-
The caufe which you
action.
when,
ferved, that
O
his matter.
a clergyman's
political
to get a
;
Upon what
cepted, can
its
The two
cenfure.
for
in
)
have efpoufed, and intended to ferve
becomes injured by
All honeft
it.
wicked means, fay they, are
in order to opprefs the
its
men now
abettors reduced,
man, who has publicly flood forth
in
defence of the con ftitut tonal liberties of his country, they corrupt
fervants
his
an
act,
what they could not obtain by
procure,
to fecretly
arbitrary power and openforce?
and however they
may
Can the people of England behold fuch
detefl:
and abhor the means by which
the Eflay on
it
Woman,
was procured
and you
?
bringing that into the world, which otherwife, in
would never have feen the
now
friends to your party, will
Was
its
it
unconvicted
I
you
man
unfeemly
mud
in the
add
fliall
of thofe
be afhamed of
in a divine,
to
be
fummoned
whom
it
as
charity
fir,
for
probability,
who
have been
let
the law take
attempt to injure an
How
is
>
uncandid
this
?
the greatefl ornament
?
?
an effort to
to decide the matter
all
detefl:
it.
this unnecefTary
minds of the people
hope you did not mean
one
Many
not enough, with regard to the book, to
courfe, but
how
light.
not
biafs a jury,
for I
would
whenever
entertain
more
i5
[
more humanity and benevolence
Yet,
fir,
I will
1
the
for
be plain enough to
tell
you, that the publication of
name written
that abfurd and indecent pamphlet, with your
unbecoming you
as a
gion and fociety.
clergyman
I wifh,
I
But
I heartily give
them
as
to
it, is
very
;
very indecent, as a friend to reli-
mod
earneftly wifh, for your oivnfake,
and the refpect to which your profeffion
not appeared.
of your order.
meehnefs
entitles you, that
party, which
for the
it is
meant
it
had
to ferve,
that in the
joy of it; being firmly perfuaied,
opinion of the candid public, nothing can do them fo irreparable an
Nothing could give the public
injury.
when
unanfwerable a proof, that
fo
they had failed by arbitrary means to
they had recourfe to the moft
illegal
and
crush
difhoneft
their antagonist,
means, to procure
papers from his houfr, which were never intended for publication, and
make
them
ufe.of
as evidence againft
lengths, the public are fure not to efteem
;
of abetting and countenancing a crime of this
what
fort
elfe
may
they
do.
It
is
Men who
him.
and
if they
fort,
there
not fafe for any
can go thefe
can be guilty
is
man
no knowing
to
have any
of papers in his houfe, which he would wifh to hide from any
inuividual.
If, fir,
you had written
a grave, ferious addrefs to the public, againfr.
Blafphemy and obfeenity
ation relative to
a clergyman
good
ligion
;
in general, abflradled
Mr. Wilkes,
it
and honeft men,
intentions,
who would
would have thanked you
and decency.
The
from any confider-
would have been becoming you,
as
plainly have feen your
for fuch a defence of re-
timeing of the thing
would have been
a
fufficient
tf
(
fiijficjent amplication.
Mr. Wiikes
There needed no ungenerous
nor any attempt to injure
;
public; for that
is
tempt
mould
Let the law take
poifon
to
jurv.
If that,
him
infinaations againft:
in the opinion of the
ungentieman-like, and uncharitable; the appear-
once of both of which you
rative.
)
at leaft
its courfe.j
have preferred in your nar-
but do not add to law, an at-
the opinions of mankind, and biafs the minds of a
fir,
was your aim, by the
your
feveral infinuations in
pamphlet againft Mr. Wilkes, you will find yourfelf miltaken
;
your narrative, inftead of railing a popular cry againft him,
for
ferving your caufe,
thereby
and
has done exactly the reverfe.
has had a quite contrary effect from
now
It
The pub-
what you intended.
enemies have taken to opprefs him
fee
what meafures
his
they
abhor
thofe meafures
;
will
reap no honour by having brought forth the contents and feve-
lic
ral extracts
from
it
fhould fee the light
;
;
and you,
any part of which
and becaufe the
fervant
was bribed
whatever name you
thing
elfe
'action.
fervant
.zeal
;
for
extracts P
;
will,
to
were
made
betray him.
never
ufe of to do
You may
but the public do, and ever will detefl the
why
intended
was taken
that
whole trans-
prompted you, why not detect the
religion,
why
—Thefe
things were not expected
publifh the content^ and go fo far as to
was fitter
by
or any
not give an account of his actions in the narrative
jionfenfe and ribaldry
it
and
it,
call this
love of juftice, zeal for religion,
If love of juftice
;
have feen the book
Jlriclejl care
lhould not, every infamous means were
his
who
fir,
to be read to
fire club at Oxford, for there
it
from
a clergyman.
?
If
make
Such
your friends of the hell
might have given pleafure; than
published
i7
[
publimed
to the
ferred in a
new
world
at
large,
]
where
edition of that obfcene book, called
which the bifhop of London was going
Or
in-
The Card,
for
abominated.
is
it
excommunicate the Re-
to
verend author.
But
take
it
if
by defaming Mr. Wilkes you were
for granted promotion
not a mitre
actions
:
;
for
mitres
was
to
hope are
I
to ferve
be your reward.
I
your caufe,
hope
I
was
it
be obtained only by better
to
they would be cheap indeed,
—
if
your paltry pamphlet was
the price of one of them, or indeed any preferment in the church.
I
wifh to fee preferments made for laudable merit, not for a catch-
penny pamphlet.
enjoy
it,
it is
That
the low traffic of bookfellers
is
their bread:
you
fliould
have been above
was determined upon publishing fuch a
to
have prudence enough to have
What
reader in his fenfes
" Deliberately, and
"
ration
in a
is
them
let
and
pamphlet, you ought
kept your name a
fecret.
I afk,
what valuable confide-
a
good man permit an
ferious or
this execrable effay to his children? I reafon
" from what
within
"
my own
to believe that fuch a misfortune
" of mine,
I
fliould
be the
ev~r mortal read fuch Jluff!
read to his children
?
Was
breaft
?
for
" hour's perufal of
I feel
you
if
not aftoniflied at this paragraph
few words
upon earth, would a
foolifli
at leaft
;
it;
;
for could I
but
beperfuaded
would probably happen
to a child
mod afflicted parent in the world." Did
What parent ever intended it fliould be
not the
E
Jiricleft care
taken to keep
it
as
much
i8
[
mucha fecret
as poffible
any part of
it
your narrative
?
]
Why therefore did you
into the world
?
—
I
am
bring the contents, or
perfuaded no parent
to be read to his children.— But
^/K?
v/il!
you intended
think
to
cafl:
an odium on Mr. Wilkes by your publication, and, to your mortification,
it
has had juit a contrary effect
rative as they
The
all
is
this
"
:
Was
it
live,
fhould by fo
It is
and above
uncommon
your nar-
we
are
good government under
which we. pro-
an accident, fall into
over-ftraining the matter
my
hands, and
by an unfeafonable and
it
much,
paffive
?"
to conftrue th
ra libel
ranks and conditions of men, which was never intended to
be fecn by the public.
Do
to the
the bleffed religion
all
the impunity and the fuccefs of
againfr. all
it?
deteft
actually poffible, that a libel fo injurious
that I could innocently promote,
filence,
good men
itfelf.
ranks and conditions of men,
which we
fefs,
for
next piece of abfurdity and nonfenfe, with which
prefented,
to
would the book
;
you
wifli to fee
And what
have the government to do with
fuch an arbitrary one eftablifhed, as fhall take
cognizance of what every
man
The
has in his houfe?
people of Eng-
They abhor all modes of tyranny and
land will not fufFer
it.
undermining craft.
They know
they are free
;
and they will pre-
fervc that freedom which their anceftors purchafed with their blood.
How do we
flemmed
admire a Ruffel, a Hambden, and
a Sidney,
who
bravely
the torrent of arbitrary power, and oppofed thofe pliant
court fycophants,
that aimed at cnjl-aving their country.
It
would
be
*9
[
be an ungrateful age, that did not
Thanks
fo dearly purchafed.
leaft:
]
fet a
very high price on
to heaven,
there
is
not
fpark of ingratitude amongft the freeborn people of England.
But how was your
aftranger to the
confequently
fenfe this
it
filence to
number
promote the fuccefs of it f
faid to
contents of
phemous; and
may
he may, by
for the
defiinely
non-
it ?
this
is
may hang
may
deemed
publifh with
obfeene
it
:
it
it
:
to a
if
he
law, and attempt to biafs the minds
man's fervant
may
be bribed, to clan-
his matter, papers to be
am, Reverend
made
uie of as evi-
Friend
to
Law.
Sir,
Your humble
A Real
blaf-
make extracts from
impute the crime of
dence againft him; then farewell Religion, Liberty, and
I
and
out to the public what was never intended
if a
away from
is
convicted of any thing relative to
foreftall the
public eve;
take
book which
the ftrongeil infinuation,
means
if he
a
likewife go fo far as to
gentleman, before he
;
What
Are not you promoting the fuccefs of it, by publishing the
!
impunity, the
of a jury
cannot be
be printed, which was only Twelve,
If a man, a clergyman, under the veil of religion,
may by
You
could not be intended for publication.
contents and different parts of
if
its liberties,
at this time, the
fervant,
RELIGION
and to
JUSTICE.
POSTCRIPT.
20
(
)
POSTSCRIPT.
What you
fay relative to the
The Saviour
llate
literatenefs
of the
Greek
World,
and ignorance, that though
upon recolle&ion,
in iilence, yet,
I
which you
infcription,
fo fully demonftrates
I at firft
tran-
your
intended to pafs
it
il-
over
muft mention one word of your
You ought, Sir, to have known, that
the words SdTHP KoSMoT, which you have tranflated The Saviour of the World, have no refpecl to chriftianity, and theretotal
want of
fcholarihip.
fore the allufion
thor of th
is
EJ/ay
a
blafphemy of your own, and not of the au-
large in
in
to the
&c.
Chauflee's
1692,
Pope
The
work,
De La
late
who>
;
has not
bafi
found upon an
antiquity than
infcription
account of this antique
Mufeum Romanum,
BY HIS
fuppofe,
is
OWN
may be
printed
feen at
Rome
at
PERMISSION,
Christian
a
Germana quadam
in
dedicated
prince.
Antiquitatis erudite Monumenta,
fcrupled to give the following fhort account of
illuftrari
apud caufceum priapi
" ornatum,
"
I
is
much more remote
reverend and learned Dr. Middleton, in that valuable
entitled,
" Quod quidem
'*
and,
That
a date of
The
the birth of Chrift.
folio
Woman.
c?i
phallus, of
ancient
roftxi
litteris
quodammodo
efBgiae,
videtur a fymbolica
it
quadam
cui Galli Gallinacei caput crifta
vero loco, fafcinum ingens
Gratis infcriptum legitur
datur
:
cujufque in
SdTHP K0SM0T. Ser" VATOR
21
(
«
Qms omnia
vator Orbis.
fcilicet,
''dan;
avem
foil facram
pudendumque
tuod a conjunct
atum
et
ides
folis
vir
)
doaus
rta
interpreter
:
Galium
generatricis facultatts
efe; Jblemque
-civile
Galiinaceo capiti adjunclum
pr^
denotarc,
genus omne procrcpriapique viribus, anhnalium
qnoddam Ariflotehs ax#ma,
canfirvatum fih ficundum phyficum
Homo hominem
generat et
fol.
N
•
V
;-
i'.v'
/
x<
^4
H II
mm
f
m^.
^^ m*«<&
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