...

Document 1194965

by user

on
Category:

logistics

1

views

Report

Comments

Transcript

Document 1194965
speciAL
coLLectioNS
t)OUQLAS
LibRARy
queeN's UNiveRSiiy
AT kiNQSXION
kiNQSTON
ONTARiO
CANADA
1„.
A
FULL
and
CANDID
Vo'-"^^
-r
ANSWER
To
PAMPHLET,
a
entitled,
CONSIDERATIONS
ON 'the
German War.
Prefent
Saplentes, PacisCaufa, bellum gerunt; et Labores, fpe
otii,
SallusT.
fuftentaiit.
t
0'
N D
N:
Pridden, at the Feathers, near Fleet-bridge;
Burp, near Temple-bar, Fleet-llrcet ; atid
J. CretTON, in old Bond-ftreet,
Printed for J.
J.
M,DCC,LX,
'
f-
o -
rr\^^{\.
I
TOQ.r^i
speciAL
coLLecrioNs
.rn
OouqLas
LifeRARy
queeN's UNiveRsiry
AT kiNQsxroN
kiNQSTON
ONTARIO
CANADA
I
'.
;iniJ13^ rrdiUsd ^fiiii^O
FULL
A
and
CANDID
ANSWER,
TT
is
not to be expefted that an
Anfwer
"- profcfled invcftive againft the king
will
&c.
to a
of Pruflia
out with any fevere refledions againft
fct
The author
that monarch.
of the Confiderations
has introduced his pamphlet with a quotation
from a
refcript,
faid to
be delivered and printed
at the
fame time by the PrufTian minifter
don
the
;
fum
of which
is,
**
at
Lon-
that his Pruflian
majefty hopes the Englifh nation will not meddle
affairs of the empire ;" and
wiih the domeftic
the author archly applies this to the prefent con-
duct of the court of London.
I fhall not take
advantage of an obfervation which every man,
who knows
the turns of ftates,
may make upon
the inconfiftencles which the moft: fteady govern-
ments,
refts
fometimes,
vary
:
I
fhall
of the refcript
is
run into,
only fay,
when
their inte-
that the quotation
by no manner of means appliThe em-
cable to the purpofe of the Confiderer.
pire of
Germany
is,
public of fovereigns,
properly fpeaking,
a re-
and each fovereign that
a 2
forms
4
(
forms
ror,
has
it,
a right,
make what
to
tbcr r)vercigns
;
)
independent of the empe-
alliances he
fiderrd as domeftic affi'rs
time
plcafes with o-
nor can fuch alhances be con-
of the empire.
PfufTian majefty publifhed
his
the affair he hints
in queftion,
meafurc be looked upon
ar,
At
the
rcfcript
tlie
might
in
iome
em-
as domeftic to the
becaufe a difputc lay between the princes of
pire,
the-empirr and the
Great-Britain had
elc(5ior^.
no right to intt-rfere in fuch a difpute; GreatBritam did nor interfere in it at the fame time,
if his Prulfian mi^jeityi was author, of tto jer
:
jfcript,
he might perhaps, with greater propriety,
have made.:uie.jc>f
-tiie
wofd oeconomical, than
domeftic' f!<0 3ri: ^o ":o;!ju;.:
r'
Tiv.1:
The author of the Confiderations fpends
:
.
.
,
-
,
.
lirfl fi^
pages of
tiody will
his
difpute,
pamplet
in
that France
;
and he brings Voltaire,
writer, but a moiV miferablc author, to
XIV.
armies that Lewis
va,ft
But
the author of the Confiderations
principles.
firft
and Agincourc,
Poi^^iers,
lifhmen,
The
a
good
vouch
for?
kept on foot.
the
in his
to,
and number,
iGreat»Britain in extent of territory,
of inhabitants
fuperiof
is
the,
what no,
proving,
battles
is
millaken
of Creflyj
were gained by E,ng=
and Engliflimen alone
:
the battle of
Minden, which, every thing confidcred, was
more glorious than all the three, was gained by
Britons,
them,
with a mereconfefled fuperiority againll
Edward
Henry the Sixth.
There
than there was againft the fon of
the Third,
or the father of
5
(
There
Is
)
undoubtedly a principle of political,
as well as of commercial, arithmetic
•,
but the
data of the former are extremely hard to be fettled.
fide
The Confiderer goes to work in the Cheapway he polls his books, he ftrikes his ba;
but he does not give weight for inches,
lance,
mod
though he brings forth
a
I will venture to fay,
that hiftory cannot pro-
duce
a period of glory that
tion,
if thofe
is
plaufible account.
not liable to excep-
mechanical calculations are to take
" From the time,fays the Confiderer,when
the whole of France was united to the crown, and
place.
the liberties of the dates and nobility abfolutely
fubjeded to
its
power, the kingdom of France
has been, in the extent of
ber of
inhabitants,
its
revenue,
France,
fuperior
in
number of
its
inhabitants,
is
its
country,
its
num-
revenue
its
country,
and the
fuperior to Greatis
equal,
I totally
Great-Britain, properly fpeaking, has no re-
venue that
is
fixed or fettled.
And
fiderer authenticate the revenues
jchefe
the
I admit that
to Britain.*'
the extent of
Britain; but that
deny.
its
and the greatncfs of
two years
part,
let the Conof France for
and reduce the revenue, or
rather the expences of our government, during
that time,
French money
to
moll: ignorant
is
the
I
richell:
;
let the
people.
am aware
of a prodigious and popular ad-
vantage the Confiderer has taken
tulation
-,
meaneft and
reader he has, pronounce which
and, at the fame time,
in
I
point of cal^'
will be
cajf>-
did
6
(
did cnoup^h to fay,
that
)
mittcd, he might have carried his
He
farther than he has done.
jxrhaps better in not doing
lays
But
firft
I totally
de»
**
principles.
I
two
read the hiftory of the
he,
which were formed by king
grand alliances,
againft the
William
ferves his purpofc
it.
ny and difclaim his data, or
never,
be adargument much
his data are to
if
growing power of France,
without feeling the warmefl: fentiments of
tude to the great deliverer of Europe.
gratir
Never-
did king of England appear with greater dignity
than he did in that great congrefs held at the
Hague
in the year 1691, when the emperor tnd
empire, the kings of Spain, Sweden, and Den-
mark, by
their levcrai
amba0adors, the electors
of Germany by their particular minifters, and feveral of them in their own pcrfons, with at leaft
fifty of the greateft princes of Germany, all attended to hear him plead the caufe of Europe i
and
all
joined in one
common
league and decla"
ration againft France.'*
It
is
undoubtedly
difagreeable, to
now that
Tory are
a task equally
the ridiculous diftin<5lions of
fo juftly
Whig
exploded, a public writer
fair
is
the glorious confederacy
;
and
may
hearing. I do not pre-
tend to deny that king William was
its
it
combat rooted prejudices; but
have fome chance for a
my
bold as
at the
head of
but I will, with both
hands, deny, that that confederacy fulfilled
engagements
they produced
:
they brought troops upon paper;
them not
in the field
;
they h'lred
armies
'(
I
)
England paid them.
armies, but
am
7
tQ revive party dillinftions,
I
Unwilling
as I
atn forry to fiy,
never yet law, though
of pains
I have taken a great deal
the enquiry, a full and a fair anfwer
in
to .he charge brought
by the Tory minidry
a«
Whigs, at'the tirtieof the peace of XJ.
trecht, that the whole ftrefs of the war lay oa
gainft the
the fhoulders of Great-Britain, and that her
had
failed
in,
allies
almuft, every point of their en-
gagements, as to men, money, knd operations of
every kind: this, I fay, is
charge that the boldia'
eft
Ss
a
Whig
writer never attempted to anfvver.
chargewhich theGerman andDutch
and they had
in all their
at that time the ablcft in
warm
It
minillers,
Europe,
memorials and reprefentarionis*
to refute.
It is a charge whim
brought tne grear prince Eugene over to England ;
but far from aniwering, he endeavoured to paili-
nc-ver offered
are
it.
The
com pbfed
land ever
of,
rival minifters, in thofe times,H?'erc
perhaps, the greateft
men
faw under any government
Whigs indilpiuably had
that
;
Eng-
but the
refolution, talents, iand
penetration fuperior to their antagonifts.
They
never pretended to difpute the fad, that GreatBritain was lett in the lurch for the blood and
trealure that
was expended
'
-
-
in the war,
-i.cii^ C...
Let not therefore declamation or bold
:/:,;
afienioos
common fenle. Let ws,
not imagine, becaufe we are now in a war with
Germany, we fight in the
France, carried on
fmaileft degree on greater difadvantage, than' wc
drive us out of the fort of
iii
diJ
M
9
(
in the times
1 Ihall, in
}
of king William and queen Annej
the courfc of this paper, proves ih^t
We now
the terms, on which
carry on the war^,
ure, nationally fpeaking, infinitely preferable to
which we fought before
thole on
I will
j
not ex-
sept even the lad war againfl: France.
•'i> Ji^u-:
Had
,jil^'jiJ
the Confiderer been a candid oppofer of
the prcfent meafures of our government, he
would
not have gonf fo far back as the reign of king
William, for an alliance of llrength and dignity againft France.
The
late
king George was united
with the houfe of Apftria, and
Dutch to take part with him,
queen might have been
cis.
faid to f^ght
In what a dreadful fituotion
brought the
the emprefs-
pro arts
is
^ fo^
an Engliflv
There was not, wheti we entered irrto*
war with France, io popular a topic in the
minifter
that
at laft
when
!
.world, as the expediency
matic fanftion.
Its
of maintaining the prag-
popularity,both within and with-
out doors, arofe next tomadnefs
miniftry given
way
borne down the barriers of
in the event,
were we,
civil
ate with us in the cabinet
by
" Every
ten<is to let
vvould have
government, But,-
?
?
bettered
by
.Did they ntgoci;
Were
their cowardice ?
by
it
Did the DUtch and Aur
ftrians fight for us in the field
councils betrayed
and had not the
as a people,
that illuftrious alliance ?
ors butchered
;
to the torrent^
not our foldi-
Wer€
their perfidy J
)-.
not
hw
',
meafure, fays the Confiderer, which
the ftates of
Germany, Holkad, and
England
9
(
England, either
at
)
war with each
other, or a-
montrft themfclves, muft be a mfafure calculated
good of France, and the prejudice of oFor the fame realon,
ther powers of Europe.
for the
every meafure tending to the continuance or intreafe of iuch a war, muft be for the bciefit of
France, and the prejudice of Europe
IS
a
weakening
ing thofe powers at variance, from
can have nothing to
I
have given
prehend that
will difcover
whom
France
fear but in the union.'*
this paltage at large,
becaufe
I
ap-
the corner flone of the Confiderbut a very fmall difcufTion of fafts
j
its
Will the Confiderer fay;
never to make war with
futihty.
that Great-Britain
France,
it
it is
er*s reafoning
till
becaufe
:
of the rivals of France, and keep-
is
fuch time as
are united againfl: her
?
all
the
That
powers
time,
Europe
in
it is
believed,
never will come, and that time never was. The
confederacy of which king William was the head.
Was the ftrongeft union ever formed againflFrance:
but what did it avail England ? fhe was left to
bear the brunt of the day ; fhe was obliged to
pay the
minal
troops, and fight the battles of her nor.
allies.
After
all,
the
William proved,
gainfl;
fand.
twift
confederacy formed
as all contederacies
by king
mufc be
a-
one capital power, to be a mere rope of
Its continuity was preferved until a certain
came, which difTolved
it.
Holland and
Germany would undoubtedly have been
B
pleafed
had
(
had we continued
and
10
day to pay the troop?,
to this
they would
battles;
figlu their
)
cheap manner have muflered
in
very
a
and
their armies,
regulated iheir contingencies upi'n paper: but
moment
own
that
intcrcfl:,
of
fenfe
Great Britain came
then
came
in
to talk
thfe
of her
the dfinocr.itic non-
public faith, the liberties
of Europe,
prior engagements, national honour, and a thou-
fand
ney, nothing but
It
may
tion,
mo-
fuch terms, which meant nothing but
Britifh blood, or Britifh m(!ney.
to fomc, perhaps,
fecm too bald an
(but nothing can be too bold that
is
a(Ter-
found-
ed on truth and experience) that had Great-Britain, in all
wars fhe ever had with France,
the
been fingle and alone, her expence would
been
lefs,
have
her fuccefs would have been greater.
The fum
that France
of the Confiderer's reafoning
is
more populous,
and
is,
therefore
more powerful than Greac-Sritain. This puts
in mind of the reafoning of the honourable
admiral who was fo defervedly (hot for his
cov/ardice, and who, after weighing a French
cannon-ball, hung it up in a cabbage-net at the
me
fhrouds of
his fhip.
and demonftrated, as clearly
as that three and twa makes five, that had. he
come within reach of that cannon-ball, he and
.
his fliip rn
ft
have been torn to
defy the Confjdcrer, from
I will
the experience of
man, ever had, to produce a
two nations going to war with
reading, he, or. any
(Ingle inftance of
all
pieces.
upon
.one another
me
brings
fuch
and
principles:
to coiiie to clofer quarcers
this
with the
CoaliJerdr.
In
two
private
life it
go
parties
is
but too
common, when
by-
for a
to VVeftminfter-hall,
ftanJer, from the weight of their piirfes, to form-
a Ihrewd guefs which
Tne
end.
territory,
will
have the better
the
Confiderer looks upon the extent of
and numbers of men, when two
ons go to War, the fame as a long purfe
two
in
parties
go
law.
to
be of that opinion
I
is
nati-
when
can by no means
and I can fcarcely dip into a page of hillory, which docs not convince
me that it is ill founded. Parties who go to law
are fubjecled
to
Nations
purfes.
;
its
who go
tory but the fword.
to be as
ftate)
to
which drain
war, have no
?
can
make
fovereign
(fuppofing Corfica to be a
ihc to bear an infult
Sovereign
direc-
a po\A^er as Cor-
from
ing power, becaufe that neighbour
tua
their
Bat allowing Gieat-Britain
mean and contemptible
fica itfelf ;
is
forms,
ftates
a neighbouris
a
Garagan-
have no appeal that they
to their fuperiors;
but a wife
ftate,
ever fo feeble, will make a ftruggle in defence of
its independency, be its enemy ever fo powerful.
confideration, therefore, of inequality of
power between Great-Britain and France muft
The
drop to the ground, unlefs it can be proved that
the caufe in which we fight is unjuft j a task
which.
12
(
)
which, I apprehend, the Confiderer himfelf wiU
be far from atrempting.
The
Corfidertr, as ifronfcious thar his general
reafoniiig
the two
upon the incquaHty of force betvveea
cecds to
to carry on
war
a
in
Germany
introduce this
to
cerrain
faft, as well as
of reafon,
is
in
pro-,
wrong
the
againft France.
lays
he
reafoning,
maxims, every one of which in
in fpeculatlon, are falfe and trite.
Every Ichool-boy knows
ag'^'n
tell
fhew that Gre;it-Britaln
In order
down
cannot bear the
ftates
that France, formerly,
and again defended rhe hberties of Ger-
many. The Confiderer has flourilhed upon that^
but has he inf -rm-d the public againfl who.n Ihe
defended thofe
trymen, that
it
liberties ?
Has
he told his coiin-
was againft the enc'oachm jnts
and ufurpations of the houfe of Auftria
rannical poy»'er, which the government
Britain and her allies
that ty-
;
of Great-
are endeavouring, at this
very time, to wirhftand ? Had the Confiderer
been candid enough to explain this matter, it
might' have faved himfelf and me, and perhaps
He has taken all
the public, no little labour.
advantages of reafoning from the former fyflems
that prevailed in Europe, but he has not told us
that thofe
fyfbems
exifl
been ingenuous enough
no more.
He
has not
to fiy, that there
period in hiflory, before the
prefenr,
in
the houfes of Bourbon and Auftria, like
and Pontius
Pilate,
is
no
which
Herod
agreed in the crucifixion of
public
«3
C
public liberty
:
nor
is
)
there in
all his
pamphlet,
a (ingle paragraph upon that fubje£l, though it is
the only fair, the only candid, the only contlitu-
upon which a Confiderer on the preIf he profect German war ought to proceed.
ceeds not upon that, he fays lefs than nothing.
Jf he proceeds upon that^ tl^e conduft of GreatBritain, and her government muft at prefenC
tional, topic,
appear irreproachable and unblamcablc.
The
Confiderer, therefore,
upon
iPternity
metic
but
;
his
if
may
comparative and
the fadls
figure
away
to
political arith-
upon which
his
Data are
founded have no longer exiftence, which is the
cafe, to what does his reafoning tend, but to feduce weak minds, and to break that unanimity,
which at preient forms the pride, the glory,
and ftrength of the Britifli empire ?
Were
the Confiderer to bring a million of inftances
of
France has done,
what
or
what
Britain
has fuffered in former times, cut bono ? What
can it avail him, if thofe inftances are not apprefent
to the
plicable
jundure? and appli-
cable they cannot be, unlefs he can, from hifto-
The
ry, produce a fimilarity of circumftances.
Confiderer,
pofes
two
with a true polemic fpirit, fuppowers of Germany at warj " if
France, fays he, to keep up the conteft, fhould
take the weaker
force
jcvil is
is
fide,
eight, fo
and add
not lefi'ened, but
England be
fo
to the
power whofe
as to be fuperior to ten,
made
greater.
the
Should
unfortunate as so join in the conteft.
14
C
tc^,,
and
fenc!'
)
Jand forces of
ii?s
fifty into
the
and France thereupon fend a force of eighty,
ihc party affiited by England would be but little
wtrr,
by the
benefited
"ftill
alliance; the
be ^he weaker
much
dimin>fhed fo
be advantaged.
This
kind of rea oning
a
is
in
all ages."
J
of fach reafonin^g
jjil in
that not a lingle particle
ever held good
would
Europe be
the more, and France only
which mult hold Invariably
fay,
EngliOi
the force oF
fide,
any age, and there never was ^
tnore bare faced infulc, than luch reafoning
is
up-
on the public underllanding.
According
to
France, by the
differences in
wi(h
or defire.
the
Confiderer*s apprehenfion,
difpofitions^
of the powers and
Europe, has every thing flie can
She has had it for thele four or
ever fince we carried our
rmany. Wuat has been the confe-i
five years, at lead,
troops into
quence
?
fuccefsful
tain?
G
Is
France a greater, a richer, or more
power, through the blunders of Bri-
Has
Ihe enlarged her territory
cncreafed her revenue
marine
?
Has
•Britilh councils
?
folios
France, wirh
?
Has
fhe
repaired her
fhe didated, as formerly, to the
?
No.
I will give the Confider-
er an anf^er, that, in one
hends
Has
(he
(i
gle word,
compre-
of logic, and reams of reafoning.
all
the advantages vvhich the milta-
kcn policy of Great-Britain has given her, is
nowa declared bankrupt to alf Europe, and flie
has declared herfelf luch. Let the Confidercr get
over the fad, and then
«
To
(
dinner with what appetite he
To
*
"
>
1^
don't determine,
I
may/
the Confiderer,
fays
foon to agree
whether the Germans
and much in unldpg
together in any one point
with England and the States- General in a; war
but till they do thus agree, Engwith France
land has nothing to do with their littfe internal
are l|kely
-,
:
Mr. or my
Lord, Confiderer ; but I dp: and. I fay and affirm from palt experience,. (I care not what pre-r
You
quarrels."
don*t determine,
.
may
pbfleflions
fewer
ed thofe
lie
againft the doOrine) that
England has
allies
allies, as his
PruiTian Majefty certainly
are hearty in the caufe.
is,
gainer;
Great Britain
the end of her
fees
ftic
the:
againft France, provid-
is
a
cxpence, fhe
knows the extent of her operations ; which
more than fhe did iti any coi;vtipental war flie
i§
§t
ver embraced.
The Confidqr^r aflfefts
«
German
phler
is
part in
the
civil
war^,
levelled
it.
I
deny,
to call
and t^e
againft
in
the prefent war
vyljiole
of his
patii-
Great-Britain taking
the.moft
dire(ft
war betv/een the King of
terms, that
PrufTia
and the
houfe of Auftiia, or rather Lorrain, can with
thi^
leaft propriety,, either
of fpeech or reafoning, be
termed a
The
civil
war.
quSirrel
betvyeen" the
of PruflTia and the queen of Hungary has
not in the fmalleft or moft remote degree, a relation to that fyftem of-politLcal.confederacy which
kinQ[
conftitutes
I^
(
)
conftltutes the kings of Great-Britain or Pruffia
members ; or,if the fanguine Confiderer
rubje<5ls,
3t,
ihort, either the gooci or
'
fidcrer, that the pofitioa
muft
his
eftablifh
whole appears
of PrufTia,
he lays down,
and
5
more
fo,
if
is,
in
admitted*
if difputed,
as
is
the
The king
fallacious.
a$ a fovereign {)rince,
ent, perhaps
It
bad fortune of theCon-
doftrines
futile
Have
will
of the Germanic body.
independ-
than the emprefs-queeri
is^
"Were the Ccnfiderer to be allowed his own fway,
he undoubtedly would carry every thing before
him, by the
Great Britain
fupport one
plain
is
felf.evident
worfe than
little
German
mad
maxim,
that
to pretend to
prince,
againft
the.
Germanic body*
But here
ciples,
I ntufl
again
haV^^6' rfec'Bufte
to
priri-^
and again obierve that our Confiderer*s
principles are fundamentally
The king
wrong.
ofPruflla*s dominions undoubtedly are in Gef-*
many, and our Confiderer takes advantage of that
to treat him, through the whole of his pamphlet^
as a
German
tates
of the emperof, than the laws of the em*
How different muft the reafoning fefulting
pirc.
fromfuch
prince,
fubjcd rather to the dic-
pofitions appear,
when we
confider his
Pruffian majefty equal, at leaft in dignity, to the
Vandemount
family, and in himfelf an independ-
ent fovereign, at the head of the Protcftant
reft
left
upon
there for Great-Britain
•ns of
inte-'
the continent, and the only natural ally
Germany
?
Were the
to be examined,
it
conftituti-
would be
found
17
(
found that both the
of Hanover, and the
Brandenburgh, without changing their
tleftor ot
religion,
eIe<ftor
)
good a
the husband ot
have
as
empequeen of Hungary,
ride to be cholen
ihe
ror,
as
who,
cotregenlUjui'i;, has.
Will the Confidertr be mean or wicked e-
hough
to lay, that Great-Britain ar this junfture,'
ougiit la
abandon
all-
the (yltem and principles of
policy upon wh.ch her power and independency^
is
lormcd?
If ihe does net, let the boldeft advo-
cate for anti-continental mealurcs ftep iorth,
point out what
ferent
'^
from what
res temporis a5li
Confidcrer ring
hx\i whilft;
and
courfe fhe could have fteered dif-
has done? Let the laudato-
flie
declaiin as they pleafe
his
the power of France exifts,
the
not Great-
is
Britain to guard againft her ambition?
power of France
let
-,
changes upon former meafureSjj
cxifls, is the bafis
That the
of our Confi-
That we have not purfued the
derer's doctrine.
war upon the principles and meafures that directed us in former times,^mufl: ecjually be admitted.
But
tor that reafon objefls'are
changed
;
the fame
fyltem no longer exifts; and the balance of power,
inthe point where
a non- entity.
it
Upon
his
whole tabrick.
is
now
the fuppofition of this ba-
theC
lance being an entity,
dour would have
formei'ly Vibrated,
"niiderer has raifed
Tlic fmailtn. Ipark of cantai
ght him,
..that
when king
William formed the grand confederacy, the Tup*
port of the houfe of Auftria, upon the continent,
^
was
his great objcfl.
Why
C
was
tliat his
obje6l
?
Becaufe
«8
)
(
Becaufe he reafonably thought that the houfe of
Auilna was the grand counterpoize, upon the
continent, to the ambition of the houfe of Bour-
bon ; and the houfe of Bourbon was the power
which England r^.nd Holland hac* then the greateft realbn to dread. Had they dreaded the houfe
of Aiiftria, king WilJiam, like
would have
queen Elizabeth,
and formed
Anftria and Bourboa
directed his attention,
his alliance accordingly.
are only founds, the
is
danger refuiting from cither
the matter.
If the danger refuiting
from the houfe of Authe iiberiies of Europ' , was an objedl of
attention in quf^en Elizabeth, t.iat has done immortal honour to her memory; if the forming an
alliance againd the boufe of Bourbon, has done
the fame to the memory of king William, and
to the Whig adminiftration under queen Anne
;
ftria to
if tlic boldeft
advocates for anti-continental mea-
Turcs, never ytt pretended
power
in
Europe was
a
that die balance
chimera
j
how
is
Britain, in the ^:refent jundture, to behave,
the houfcs of Auftria and
in one
common
intereft
*^
of
Great-
when
Bourbon are embarked
caufc, the ruin of theproteftant
?
But, fays the Confiderer,
we happen
one nominal proteftant prince on our
to
fidt^ ;
have
and
therefore the proteftant intereft has been fpecioufly held out to ©ur view.
\vc
But
in the laft
war
were fighting for the queen of Hungary, and
the
19
(
)
the proteflant prince had only a popiHi king of
France
Did we think then the
for his defender.
concerned in that war
proteltant intereft at
all
And why
in this
Ihould
we
?
This great cham-
?
pion of proteftantifni was then univerlally decri-
ed by
man
us, as a
void of faith, religion, ande-
very good principle.*'
Drained as the nation has been of late to the
very drege of political wricing, I know no man
fo great a dunce, or Quixoic, as to imagine that
every prince, and every poc:entaie,does not purfue
his own inrereft, if he tan iee it, or if he thinks he
fees
A great and a
it.
fenfible prince
br^cau'e
principle but intercft,
true intereft to adopt a
can have no
never can be his
ftem of fraud perfidy,and
,
with Lewis the
If,
injuftice.
ly
it
XIYth
of France,
be fliall adopt fuch a fyftem, he no great prince.
His greatnefs is temporary, and, like that of Lewis
is, it
muft have an end
But
let
a
own
life-time.
us not be deceived by bold founds and
alTertions.
more
in his
I
deny
that
our
illuftrious ally is
nominal proteftant, than the heads of the
houfes of Auftria and Bourbon are nominal pa-
The
pifts.
perly
ftiled
George
king ofFruOia cannot be
a
nominal proteftant,
the lu, lid, or Illd can be.
fiderer can prove,
what
I
more prothan
king
If the
Con-
think has been never
yet attempted to be proved, that the interefts he
had
in
view were fundamentally
falfe,
unjuft,
and injurious to any other power, he would then
fay
20
(
)
fay ibmewliat to the piirpofe.
connexions, and
But
if
both his
ofGrcat-Briiain, were only, as they certainly were, accidenral, and not
fyftematical, the Confiderer is as much wrong
ihofc;
in his rcafoning, as he
'
is in his facfts.
The ccnnexions of Great-Britain with the houie of Auitria, in the times which he hints at,
were occa-
fioned by accidents, viz the deatn of Charles
the
of Germany, and the violence which
jance
offered to htr own guarantee of the [ragniatic
Vlth
;
fanaion.
Independent of thofe confiderations,
his PrufTian Majefly had, as
we muft fiippofe he
thought, 4 .claim of right upon certain dominions, which lie not, as the Confiderer fays,, in
an
oblcure corner of Germany, hut are well known
to every one who knows the fmallefl title
of
enough toremember when this claim was llaned, and when
it was made good. His
ruflkn majefty fupport-.
cd it by what I muft call uncontroverted,
and theregeography or hidory.
I
am
old
i
fore
for
muft fuppofe uncontrovertible,
reafons ^
never iaw a icrap from the houfe
of Au-*
I
I
ftria that
pafts,
difputed the
fafts
of the family
upon which the claim was founded,
com^
h is
thtrtforc, infamous to infmuace,
that becauferhe
intertft of PrulTia happened
at that time to lead
her to fide wirh France, that
therefore th,s proteftant prince
had only
for his defender: the
ed
his
i
and
all
a popiili
fad
is fa Ife
king
ol
Fiance
end unfupport-
the Confiderer poffibly can
gain
mfmuations andaffcrtions,
is
what
I
believe
by
no
mortal
{
morml
is
?I
)
W;
prQteftant fm aHQ
princ-s,
tTiat,
ery,
amf^ngfl
ar>d-ii> facT:,
words that (pmeiimcs
are
on,
re''
r
wea"k enons;h to d'fpute,
fignify no-
thing.
Bur though
fine,
I
rc'y think,
that in the ca-
binc^ts ot lov.reigns the popifh or proteftant re-
are words cnat neither have, nor ought to
|ig,i';n
have, any meaning, yet
profcH^nr
intertfts
think the popifli or
I
terms that not only have
a'-e
meaning, but are of the moll dtcifive importance
men and EniTliih.-nen. Accidents, as I
have alrtady hinted, may fom^times interfere,
and give a th(ick to the vehicle, but it muft ftill
to us, as
in
time return to
its
true anci
its
natural pofition.
England weak enough to doubt,
that while Great-Britain was fighting in conjunclion with the houfe of Auftria, the heads of
Is there a
man
in
wee
that houfe
not ihe moll miferable bigots
that ever polluted an aliar
by
fuperftition
?
And
yec thofe bigots, though nor of the proteftant religion, fought for the prote'lant inrerefl:, that is,
for the
independency of
That
as a
man
It
is
er affirms,
is
as
an
equally
fet
out
enemy
equally falfe,
to
is
fo,
in
a
moft execrable
that we,
this
falf-
as the Confider-
war with confidering
our Proteftant elcftorate.
that
by
void of faith, religion, and
every good principle,
him
Britain.
the king of PruflTia was ever decried
this nation,
hood.
Germany and
we hired an army
It
of Ruffi-
ans to invade hini.
§uis
22
)
^h tarn
Ferreus ut teneat fe ?
" What
has
at
fays the Confiderer, -then, that
is it,
once changed him
of
defpifer
protcftant
Bjt not to
?
man of common
ny degree of
fenfc
our opinion, from a
Can
on this."
infift
and honeriy
a
witha-
fit,
and hear fuch infamous
patience,
was
fpeweo forth,
invetTtlves
fty
in
to the defender of the
all religion,
his Prurtian
maje-
The
no more than a private gentleman?
Confidercr pretends, that
time of the
the
at
breaking out of the prefent war, the Proteftant
religion
Germany
much as
in
argument
as
ening
was
i'.)
I will contradl
(for
pofTible,
Confider-
Csn he produce
cr amufes us with founds.
refcript,
The
no danger.
in
a
can he produce a fcrap of writing from
his PrulTian majefty, or ar.y Protcftant
the v/orld, that ever pre.endcd
But 1
his
without weak-
will
venture to
and
fay,
it
was
power
in
defy
will
in
danger?
all
man-
kind to prove the contrary, that the Protcftant
intereft was in danger.
It may, however, be
neceffary to clear
up the
tween the Protcftant
intereft.
This
I
ing that a power
feftes
in
though they
make
be-
and the Protcftant
cannot do better than by (uppof
now
Proteftantifm,
and Auftria
diftin£l:ion I
religion,
exifts in
Europe
and yet
fides
this prefent
may pray
war.
that pro-
with France
Such powers,
with Proteftants, undoubtedly
;
23
(
doubtedly
for Papifts
a<3;
though they are of
they are not in the Pro-
the Proteftant religion,
Popery and Prote-
In (hort,
teftant incereft.
ftantifm,
)
;
unltC applied to the great concerns of
civil as well as religious liberty,
are
mere words
to gull the populace, and our Confidercr has ap-
plied
them accordingly.
I fhall not inipofe fo far
upon the reader
as to
quote the identical words of the Confiderer, when
he endeavours
boured pages)
as
l)ut
how does
man
fo
la-
war, religion
in the prefent
out of the queflion.
an England, a
many
to prove (as he does in
that,
There is not,
weak to believe
I
believe,
it is
not
the Confiderer endeavour to impofe
as if the experience of our hi-
upon weak minds,
llory did not
tells us,
that Proteftants
may
may
fight
fight
and that Papifts
A king in his clolet, or
his chapel, may make no difPercnce between one
religion and another ; and he may even defpife
for a Popifh intcreft,
for a Proteftant one?
all
religions,
and yet
true policy,
grain of religion interfering,
may
without one
oblige
him
to
adopt religion as the caufe of fighting.
In the pfefent cafe,
this conlideration turns,
perhaps, decifively againft our author, and he
himfelf has given
rife to
the obfervation.
I fliall
fuppofe the king of Pruflia to be void of religion,
but
if
the king of PrulTia has enemies
who
are
wrong-headed enough to carry religious windmills in their brain,
he and
his allies
have a right
to
H
C
to repel
)
fuch cnthufiaflic attacks, in the mofl
all
cffc^nal manner*
In fhort, the whole of our
Cnnfi icrer^ argument upon
ed only
there ncidief
this
head
weakeit of minds
the
for
nor can b
isj'
,
:
is
calculat-
he
knows
the rmallcil foun-
dation for fuch mfineiations,
though he has en-
deavoured to
them.
The
avail himfelf of
Confidefer pfoceeds,
as
he docs from the
beginnifigto the end of the pamphlet,
granted,
the empire,
" An
is
H
rights,
it.
favs he,
Germanic
and
of
conftitation.
king of France to make himfelie
r,
every
electorate,
not to be annihilated but by the
deflrudlion of the whole
a
take for
matters that are no other than unfup-
porttd allegations.
For
to'
eje6t a
would be
member
-
r
whole family but of
lb great
o^
itS
an aft of violence, that
in the elnpire would
rife
a^einft
Sweden and Denmark could not but take thd
alarm
at
»>
it.
A writer
who
grounds
his
reafoning on fuch
infamous falfhoods, which he endeavours to |3alni
upon
his readers as uncontrovertible
,
at the gallows.
and he remain; fufpendcd.
from under him,
there the
and indiipu*
mc in mind of a malefaflor
Draw the cart, or kick the ftool,
puts
table truths,
(matterer in hiftory,
lighrefl:
who
Is
is
ig*
norant that eleft'Tates, politically fpeaking, have
been annihilated
?
witnefs the Palatine,
on, and the Bavarian eleftoratesj
I
was going
to fay,
w^i thin
tut-
Sax-
fome of them>
our own memory, or
that
25
(
)
without Sweden or Den-
that of our fathers,
or any other power in Europe,
mark,
The
the fmalleft effort in their favour.
derer,
I
am
afraid,
who
fuade any man,
life,
will never
Confi-
be able to per-
has the leaft experience in
that every
to believe
making
or,
fubje(5l,
indeed
every prince, in Germany, has adequate ideas
of his own interefts. The iUtes of Greece, a
much
Icfs
complicated confederacy than that of
Germany, had
" England,
not.
fays the
have any reafon
to
would not
Confiderer,
envy France the impra£ticable
task of defending a country, furrounded with t-
hemies, land fepatated from
But
nions.
rope makes
all its
other domi-
in reality, the conftitution of Euevery thing of this kind abfolutely
All that France can propofe, after
the greateft fuccefs there, can be only to take a
impoflible.
temporary pofTefiion of the country during the
war, to hold it in depofir, as the king of Pruilia
'did the eledlorate of Saxony.'*
Here again happens to be a fmall miftake in point of
overrhrov.'S the v/hole
fa6l,
which
of the Confiderer's reafon-
and will appeal to every man
of reaibn and candour, that in the prefent, un-
ing.
I
afflrm
it,
precedented, conjunfture, when the head of the
empire and the French king, are rivetted in a
confederacy againft the Proteftant interefl, the
eleaorate of Hanover, if wreltcd from the houfe
of Brunfwick, may be beftowed on whom they
pleafej and perhaps it would nor be going too
V
far.
26
(
fhould
far,
ibme
fuppofc,
Should
that,
even
at this time,
princes of the empire. arc cafting
eye to
wifliful
a
we
Prottrftaiit
)
fill
this fucceedy
the feat of an elfOorate^
it is
no more than has
alrea-
dy happened.
Page 25. the Conflderer
as his
it,,
is
at
pains,
infinite
he fecms to pique himfelf upon
indeed,
(and,
we
to prove that
fort':
and aftually the vvhoJt Proceftant
hurt Hanover,intcrclt in
Ger-
many, by making that electorate the feat of war.
Here, again, I mull affirm, that the fadl is falfe;
and I abloJutely deny and defy any man to prove,
t]iat
Great-Britain has, in the lead, contributed to
make
that eleftorate the feat of war.
juftly attacked
by France
and
;
all
It
was un-
the fophidry
pf mankind cannot pretend, that Great-Brita-in
has nol afted a juft, and therefore, a wife part,
in
endeavouring to protect that electorate.
the Confiderer and
his friend,
cur to prudential, bur
fay,
that a
flronger,
weaker
if
pitiful principles
ftate is to
j:
lee
What
doeft thou
This obfervation brings me
of our .Obferver's realoning.
?
to the m;iln beans
He
has not endea-
to prove, that his Pruflian majefty
riginally
them
be oppreflcd by a
and that no intermediate power oug|i6
to fay to the latter.
voured
Let
they pleafe, re-
wrong
in
to war; he has not prefumed
The
went
to fay, that Great-
Britain had not juft provocations to
upon France,
was o-
the caufes for which he
make war
Confiderer has not thrown
out
27
r
out
)
to infinuate, that
a fingle fyllable
Hanover
was not artacked entirely on account of the
French quarrel with Great-Britain in America.
This being the cafe, to what abfurdities muft our
Coniiderer be reduced
condemning
even to that, not only of
?
the pradtice of the greateft and vvif-
princes in former ages, but of abolifhing out
eft
of the fyftem of the world,
right and wrong, and
and injury are
ftice
er
avow
all
between
refinance, where injuall
diftinftions
Will the Confider-
offered.
hope he
that dodlrine? I
will not
j
I
may
almoft venture to fay, that he dares nor; and yet,
muft be avowed, before any one of
that do(5lrine
his pofitions can
be conclufive. Tho* romance and
could the moft inventive head
have devifed a traft, which Great- Britain, keeping Hght of common fenfe and common honour,
realities differ, yet,
could have followed, but what fhe has done
The
Conflderer
what?
the light
In
to violence, fraud
Should that doctrine take place,
of the fun may be faid to be extinguifli-
injuftice
ed.
.^
a profeffed advocate for fub-
Su'^mifllon to
miffjon.
and
is
this
?
men and communities do not differ
The law of nature, as Cicero
in their relations.
has
fenfibly
explained
it,
if he confults his
ty of the whole.
than private
own
Are
men
didtates
And
ples of felf-prefervation.
the princi-
every individual,
fafety, will confulr the fafe-
dates to be opprefled
arc,
more
meerly becaufe they are
Does not common intereft, as well
common honefty, call upon one ftate to aflifl
weak
?
nodier
-'
when opprefied? For what
D
2
as
a-
are focieties
formed.
28
(
.
)
formed, and alliances made, but to defend the
weaker
againft
would
be,
far
it
the
ftronger
was Great-Britain
more confiderable than
How
?
allied
herfclf,
infamous
with
power
a
and bound by
every tye ol gratitude and faith to fupport her,
fhould that power
courfe, to give
little
way
dragooning
her, that
tell
it
to fuperior force,
do her no
will
is
her beft
and that a
difiervice, be-
caufe the fmart will foon be over, and that,
was
ihe to receive any afTiftance, her cafe would be
worfe.
But
,
in faft,
the public of Great-Britain
is
a-
bufed in nothing more, than in that way of rea-
which
fbning,
-
Where
is
is
adopted
by the Confiderer.
the nation in the world that ever
wouM
.hare done any thing great, any thing glorious,
or indeed wife, had her government made her intereft the e«/y ftandard
of her honour?
A
great
people knows, that honour, reputation, and dignity,
form
at this
their intereft
-,
nor could Great-Britain
time have arrived to the pitch of power
and riches fhe now
pofTefles,
ways mercenary enough
to
had
flie
been
al-
have made her dignity
fubfervient to any confideration whatfoever.
*'
A
fmall ftate, fays the Confiderer, (p. 25.) which
is
invaded by the armies of one infinitely greater
than
all
itfelf, is
refinance
.ftate,
/c.
ufelefs,
But
but fubmit.
misfortune
doubtlels under a great misfortune;
is
s
there
and that
is
and
it
has nothing to do
a way of doubling this
by having another great
is
ahnoft equal to the invader, undertake the
defences
29
(
j3efence of
:
one army
If the country fubmit,
it.
to maintain,
and
up terms, which
yield
defended,
)
may
beginning
tolerable; but
is
has then two armies in
it
has but
it
in the
and
it,
Had
fure to be opprefTed by them both."
be
if it
is
I not
given the quotation fairly in the Confiderer*s
words, a reader
who
has the fmalleft fentiment of
virtue and humanity, miglit have doubted,
ther fuch ituff could have fallen
any writer
who wears
the (lamp of
manhood
the whole of the performance
reality,
anf.vering
ought to have been
for France; nor
the end of
it,
is
there,
whe-
from the pen of
intitled.
1
5
in
am now
An
apology^
from the beginning to
a fingle principle,
but that Great-
Britain ought to diflblve every tye of
humanity
andjuftice, and leave France and Auftria the un-
molefted lioerty of dcfolating Europe, and
of enflaving Britain
\
for there is not an
at laft
argument
Hanover's fubmitting to France brought by
for
the Confiderer, that
is
not with equal, nay great-
er reafon, applicable to
has an army in her
Great Britain.
If fbe
bowels, fhe ought to fubmit;
own mifery by innumber of mouths fhe has to main-
fhe ought not to double her
creafing the
tain, or
by adding hands
ed monflcr, too apt of
to war, that
itfelf to
many
head-
devour the moft
innocent and the moft unoffending.
But
it
unfortunately happen?, that the Confi-
derer*s ta£ls are as falfe as his reafoning.
not,
is,
by any manner of means,
at prelent,
fee that
I can-
Hanover
oppreffed by prince Ferdinand's
army.
X
'30
;
ariny, I can fee the Britifh natiou making glo--
and not unrucceisful
jrious,
etforts, for iaving
an
eledtorate that has been almoll ruined for the
0ke
" Did the
of Great-Britain.
fays the
fun,
Coofiidcrer infultingly, refule lo lliine, or the
ver ceaie to flow,
of Hanover ?"
when France was
Phiiofophers will
did not; becauie injuftice
is
ri-
in poirelTion
him, they
tell
the worft inverfion
of nature's courfc. As a Politician I anfwer, that
neither of thofe
Phenomenas woald have happenLondon,
ed, had the French been in polTefTion of
as well as of
The
Hanover.
fame infuk"
"ing ftrain, to upbraid the Hanoverians lor breaking the convention of Clofter-Seven. Here again
is
is
Cortfiderer proceeds, in the
a material miltake in point of
fa<5^,
for
a moft infamous fairhood to fay, that the
tioverjans did break
majefty's refcripts
His
that convention.
and manifeQbs made
ic
Halate
plain,
it
without the pofllbih'ty of contradifton, that the
French broke
it
thcmfelves, by inflftmg npoh
terms of oppreflion and injuftice, which were not
fttpularedih the convention.
that the
eager
as
French minrftry
they W^re at that
to coniradifl
city was
;
This
truth,
a
is
thenifelves,
keen and
tim6,'di'd not pretend
and his late majefty, whofe vrra-
perhaps as irreproachable and unim-
peachcd
as that of any prince whoever br^athtd,
had the glory and fatisfa(5lion to lee his condnft,
in
I
rcfuming
his
arms, approved of by
all
Europe.
can fcarcely except -the court of France
iticlf.
Before
31
.(
))
Before the Confiderer had thrown out agamft his
late raajcfty a charge ot breaking a conventroh,
made under
tender circumltances as that of
liich
Cloiler-Seven was, he ougtit to have deiGended
and to have refuted the
to particulars,
ons
in his late
publiflied
on that occafion.
therefore,
upon the whole, jwd^e of
who offers fuch
aninfult to
nerable head that
own
allegati-
majefty'a memorials and nn3n.jreftos
is
now
Let the public,
memory
riie
art
amk^r
of that vt-
laid in the dwfti^f Infinfy
known judicial fentertces pifl
of die memory of King WiU
hfetime I have
aigainfl;
the revilers
i^m^ 40.
memory
years, after his death; but here
of the greateft and the
befl:
is
the
monarch
thaE
ever Britain had, infuked before his afhes are
cold in the grave that ret.eives them.
je(5t
difpenfes with
The
ceremony, and even with forms
of writing; the' faft
falfe;
is
His late majerty did
not break the convention of Clotter Seven.
latemajefty
fub-
avowed
his
fied that refumprion,
refuming arms
;.
TL's
he joff i-
and the Confiderer crahnot,
Withoiit incurring the cenfute^'^ciFrhe 'blackeft'if^l
tumny, maintain his aflt-rtioit, that hrs late rrHJefty was guikjTx df a moft fcandaloas breach of
m":; it'll
faifh^
.cii.i;'1
10
,oIl;;
,vii:u^o.>fi
TheConfiderer thinks himfdf exceffively Rrbbg
impeachment of thekirag of PruiFia*s€4nduft
in his
when he mentions
the great hard (hips whS^h- the
of Saxony underwent, when it %ii^'m
podeflionof thePrufTians.Who doubts it? bitr^hb
ele«ftorate
was
l
to
blame
?
Has theConfidcrcr
offered afingle
argU'
3^
(
)
argument, to prove,that the king of PrufTia wa§
well founded, in jultice as
riot
well as prudence,
in his
Has he
offer-
proceedings againft that eleftorate
?
ed a colour of reafon to prove, that, had not the
king of.Pruflia afted
Germany, muft have been
teftanr intereft in
tally ruined
Is
?
he did, he and the Pro-
as
to-
any power, elpecially an inde-
pendent power, to a».lwer for th^confequences of
another's injuftice? Iftheeleftor of Saxony,
by
his iniquitous combination againft the ele£tor
of
Brandenbourg,
obliged the latter to put the citi-
zens of Leipfic under a fevere contributiiDn, the
eleftor of
Saxony, and not the ele^or of Brandea-^
bourg, was to blame.
Delirant reges, phSiumur AchiiA*
Talkfng as men, what heart does not feel foir
lofles, aid misfortunes of fuhy'eAs,
the miferies,
through the
of
injuflice
the princes.
I
never fee
a French prifoner, without confidering
him
as
the innocent viftini of his fovereign*s perfidy. All
arguments, therefore, drawn fromconfiderations
of humanity, when inhumanity is pradifed, are unneceffary, idle, or fuiile.
prince,
makes
it
If the injultice of one
neceflary for another to proceed
with feverity againft the innocent
ther
is
power
-,
he
who
to blame, and alone
quences.
Princes
do
nother's perfons or
fubji^fts
of ano-
gives the provocation alone
is
anfwerable for
all
confe-
make war upon one arpalaces.
The moft generous
not
and humanCj and moft virtuous princes that ever
lived
S3;
(
have been obliged,
lived,
l
in juftice to their
o\Vn
fubjeds, to proceed againft ihole of another, in a
manner
The
which their nature
ao-ainll:
has' revolted.
molt underllanding reader in Europe, per-
haps, therefore, will be puzzled to find out the
meaning
ot the Confiderer's reafijning
tiie 3irt ii"d
38 piges of
has any meaivng,
Hanover lie
Germany.
in
Again, the
it is,
between
his Confiderations;-if
he
that Great Bruain, did not
Germ.iny, would have.no army ia
faft is falfe, £br
before the eleftors
of Hanover were kings of Great-Britain, GreatBritain had armies in Germany ; nay what was
more expcnfive, they had armies
ftill
in Spain,
what reafon ? undoubtedly
balance
of the power in Europe,
the
to maintain
and, in whatever quarter that balance is endangered, the Britilh arms ought to find bufinefs.
and
in i^ortugal
?
for
•This is-reafohing that uever yet has been difputed,
it
is
fter,
tier
what has been adopted by every wife miniand by every patriot that ever England had,
do I remember
a j.roftitute
don*d, as to contradid:
The
of the pen
fo
aban-
it.
Confiderer enjoys an imaginary jflumph,
when he pretends to
lliow that Great- Britain fights
at a vafl diladvantage with France in Germany,
and
that the preietvation
of Hanover ought not
to be an object of our concern, nor
French attack
it,
did
we
E
not defend
would the
it.
He feems
1,0
34
C
^
to
upon thofcr
them down in a mul-
laid the fort ot his reafoning
have
principles, and he has laid
of words; but as ufual, every fa6t
tiplicity
The French,
falfe.
bciore the preient war, have
again and again, through the
and wantonnefs of ambition,
The
eleftorates.
is
liberties
mere
power,,
luft ot
laid wafte
German
of Europe wt re then
endangered, but kfsth^n they are now, and^^reatBrirain interpofed at a greater expenccjandwith Jcfs
efficacy than
(lie
does now.
If,
inltead,
of the
deflorate of Hanover, a dunghill was the fpot,
where
the fate of public liberty was to be difput-
we mud: forfeit
we abandon it
fhould we give k i>p.
ed and decided,
tons,
fhould
curfe us,
" How,
The
;
name of
pofterity
fays the Confiderer, did the
fcene in
emprels queen.
And
war beginB
in
the king of
under the encouragement of France,
to invade the e
te
we look.-
a,
was threatening
ed over
Bri-
would
Germany opened with our being
alliance with the
P
the
all
:
the other parts of Europe in vain, and
fent to the fartheft north, and agreed to give five
hundred thoufand pounds to the court of Ruflla,
to
march
fifty five
thoufand
men
into
order to find that prince employment
Were
in the
P
at
in
the reward of a thoufand pounds publillied
news papers,
to
outdo the
falfities
ed
England would be found hardy enough
in the foregoing quotation, fcarce a
it.
a,
home."
Our
alliance with the
no manner of
rife to the
contain-
man
in
to attempt
emprefs queen gave
prefent fcene in
Ger ma-
many
i
35
i
many;
fia
off
)
accidents had thrown the intereft of Prufits
While the natural fyftem of the
Europe fubfilted, the houfes of Bour-
hinges.
politics of
bon and AuffrialivM,
if not at
at leaft in perpetual jealoufy
•king of Pruflia
perpetual variance,
of one another.
had the ftrongeft reafons to appre-
hend, that the houfe of Auftria never would
give his depriving
it
fought to ftrengthen
that power,
The
whofe
of Silefia.
hirafelf,
intereft
it
He
for-
naturally
by an alliance with
was, that the houfe
of Auftria fhould be kept low, and that power,
which was France, as naturally embraced the
His late Majefty, George the fecond,
occafion.
during all this time, was purfuing the fixt, and
till then unvaried maxims of public liberty, by
fupporring the houfe
x)fAufl:ria.
France, whole
always will be, that Germans fhould cut
intereft
one anothcrs throats, moft officioufly offered to
it
march an army
into the
his Pruffian majefty.
empire, in fupport of
Had
Hie done
it,
there
is
no manner of doubt, that the liberties of the Germanic body, muft have received their finifhing
Great-Britain was fenfible of that, and
ftroke.
her miniftry ftrove to prevent
it,
by entering
in-
to one of the cheapeft contracts, that perhaps e-
ver was
at the
made with
time
picaled
all
RulTia; and a contracfl, which,
it was made, aftonifhed France,
but
Europe befides. But with what front
hath the Confiderer
defigned to invade Pruffia
an allegation,
were
what term does fuch
faid that thole Ruffians
;
fo bafe, fo injurious, a :d (o
unfup-
ported, dcferve? His late majefty, by that cone 2
trad
36
(
)
tra6V With RufTia, prov'd hinifelf equally the fa-
ther of European,
as
ot
Biiiilh
liocrty.
The
fchemcs of the French were thus dilconccrted,
and
his Prulfian niajcfly,
with equal v>ifdom and
magnanimity, d eclarcd that he
w.^s
ready to draw
his fvvord againft foreign troops, be they Ruffian,
who
or be they French,
Ihuuiu enter G-raiuny.
This was the point precifcly, which his late maaimed ar, and was the true bafis of that io.
jefty
much
vviQied
f-or,
fo
much applauded
reco'cilia-
which happened between him and his Prufltan majefly. If the Confiderer had the finallcfl
tion,
grain of candor, or the leafl fpark of information,
he would have informed the public, that the violence of the court of Vienna had difgufled his
late majefty, long before the diff^^rences between
France and England broke out. Like a wife and
great prince as he was, he concealed the nakednefs of the ancient ally of his people and family,
as
long as he could, confiftently with his public
faith
and
common
But the demands of
all moderation.
I
difTcmble, that the court of London
juflice.
the court of Vienna out-run
Ihall not:
perhaps did give the emprefs-queenfome hopes of
made king of the Romans, and unEurope appeared to
doubtedly
be at that time circumftanced, it was extremely
feeing her fon
as the intercll of
natural for his late majefty to attempt fuch a measure.
could
it, and perhaps
have been carried into execution, without
Perhaps he did attempt
it
tearing the fundamental conditutionof
Germany
to
37
.(
he might have
^0 piec€s,
)
effe(5led
it.
But the
court of Vienna never had the imallert regard for
that confide ration
ed
;
the expence of
at
majtijly's ptnrtration
her ambition niuft be gratifi-
Germanic hbctty.
and
His
late
prthac con-
tcnc:Mn<.(h
and the impatience of the emprefij-
fidcration,
auecn, made him
fee
what he Icarcely could
h.ive
believed, that the .^ioafe of AullrianoAr aite-d up-
on
[-rinciples inconfiftcnt
with
ajJ
their lormtr en-
gagcmaitSj and that the emprefs-queen, like anorhc'r JjiiOj
Ei'
fa id,
cureji n q
i.eo
/uteres, achf^ronta moveho.
It I cai nof tiring
with
me
liberty,
joiri
will
I
am (ure, wiii bt glad
Let Germany be ravaged, Ictner
French, who, I
to ftconJ me.
conllituiion
I
pubhc
in the dtllruftion ot
call in the
ftri
the king ot England to
be ruined,
be great, and
let
tiUt
let
the
houfe of
Au-
her ride in the vi'hirl-wind of
public calamity.
1 CO many
red,
to
circumftances at that time concur-
flatter
this
prefumption: circumftances
that are without parallel in hiftory.
by the weakel-, but,
frantic
,
at the
The French,
fame time, the moft
conduct ever known, took fteps to drive
the fubjefbs of Great-Britain
of North America.
of France.
out of the empire
Such was the ruling
paffion
That of the emprefs-queen was,
to
have her fon ele£led king of the Romans, and to
be revenged upon the king of Pruflia.
inc^ paffions
The
'in
both parties coincided
in
The
rul-
one point.
fricndfhip of Pruflia was of lefs confiderati-
on
38
(
on
to France, than the
The
was.
)
empire of Nort h-AmerIca
regaining Silefia was thought of
more
importance by the court ot Vienna, than all her
former engagements, than every tye of gratitude
and honour, and, when rightly confidered, of
in-
Thus an unnatural combination was form-
terell.
ed againft the liberties of Europe.
The
had
objects
which Great-Britain and Prufiia
in their eyes,
were, the prelervation of the
and of the
former's empire in North-America,
ktter's poffefllon
of
Silefia.
The Germanic
con-
ftitution, and the balance of power, were obje£ls
In
common
Ought
to both.
j^afoning, to be fupprefled by
felf a
fuch fa6ts, or fuch
one who
Confiderer on the prefent
Could any, but the moll
have asked
Pruffian n^iajtlly's
queAion
*'
?
done
?'*
ho ever
\A
faid
it
bufinels have Britons in the affair?
a treacherous
a
fervice
was, or what
A
deep
laid
in
which
rht-
elec-
His Prufmajtfty prevented the execution of fo infa-
tor ot
fian
his
combination was form-
ed againft the king of PrufTia,
Saxony had
Was
having fallen upon a prote-
and drftroying Saxony,
fcheme, and
?
of all writers,
flant electorate,
to Britain
him-
German war
prollitute
ihe following
calls
mous
a prir
a confederacy
j
cipal concern.
nor does
it
matter
a fingle
ftraw, whether the confederates againft him were
protfftants or papifts
undoubtedly
doubted
that,
is
;
theeltr£lor of
a papift; and
when he
it
is
Saxony moft
equally un-
gives the nod, the fub-
jefts of his electorate muftfightin apopifli quarrel.
Here
39
(
Here I am aware oFa
obje^ion; the head,
)
poor, though plaiifible,
may
it
graviatc of Heffe-Caffel,
is
be faid, of the land-
not a proteftant. True,
but thanks to the care of his
patriorilm of his ftates, he is
late majefty,
and the
a proteftant
power^
and the proteftant intereft in his elcftorate,
cured
fo as not to be
is fe-
affeded by any temporary
or private fyftem of rehgion, that he has emIs that the cafe with Saxony? No, the
braced.
immaterial forms of worftiip, are not the barrior indeed characteriftics,
ers,
In fhort,
nothing
Saxons did, and
is
may
more
-<f
proteftantifm.
certain, than that the
and
fight in a popifh caufe,
and I look upon the barons of England, though they undoubtedly believed in the {>ope, to have been the beft pro-
upon popifh principles
teftants that
;
ever breathed, when they obliged a
tyrant to give them their
Magna
Charta.
Page 38, &c. The Confiderer takes pains to
money we pay to hisPrufllan ma-
prove, tnat the
jefty,
it is
is,
properly fpeaking, a tribute. It
is
falfe
;
the cheapeft bargain Great-Britain ever made,
and the moft honourable,
principles of the
been
as well as wife.
The
Britifh conftitution have ever
for her maintaining, for her defending, for
her adopting the raule of the public liberty,
o-ainft
the oppreffors of
fubfifts,
mankind
the fame condu<5l
like confequenres
is
;
obferred,
muft follow,
if
a-
the famecaufc
and the
Britons are not
traitors to themfelves.
I
44
(
I fhould
T
know of the
be glad to
moft fanguiric
patron or abettor the Confiderer has,
and whac
confcquencts nnuft have be^n,
Europe,
at this time, mLl<^
r^ce
have preiervtvd, had
not England atted as (he has done.
by whiih
the proreftaiit intereft,
what the
1
M^ilt not;
mean
public,
have been abolifhed on the continent?,
liberty,
Muft not every pcTt in Europe haVe been ihut
up againR Britifh fhips, and muft not evtjy cabiner have excluded Bntifh councils,
declared
agaitift Bfirifh irifertfts
in^ brought
king of
b)/
Pru/Tia,
war,
is
tion,
and
reafbn-*
the ''^nnfidercr, to prove. that the
during the whole
if pofiible,
Jefs
cou'rfe.
who know what
of this
mere declamathan nothing.
TherQ'
afting only for hlraiel!,
is
never was an allrance formed, bet ween
ers,
and have
The
?
they are about,
one of them did not mak«itsown
two
in
pow<^
which
intereft his firft
confidcration, and afted accordingly. I will even
go faither^and
fay, that in the
preient war, the
more ieiffb, and the more felfintctefted his
PrufTian majefty is, be is of the more fervrce to
Britain, becaufe he thereby the more weakens
her declared enemies.
But, Tays the Confiderer, and his advocates,
arguments in the ftrongeft
(for I will place their
point of light) while Grear-Britain has io
felt, fo
acknowledged
fhould fhe
embark
a
in a
fuperiority
by
German war?
home-
fe.a,
why
Bjt.cati
the Confiderer, with' the fmalleft fhc w of propriety
41
(
ty
rcafon,
t)r
have had that
)
prove that Great-Biitain v^ould
had France been at
lliperiority,
liberty to have
employed
againft Britain
thofe
number of two hundred and
thoufand men, have, fince tlie commence-
troops, that to the
fifty
ment of this war, found their graves in Germany ? In fad:, where does our boafted fuperiby
ority lie;
fea
:
No
;
there never was Hv leafl
doubt of the fuperiority of Great Britain bv
fince this
war commenced
;
fea,
the unexpefted and
we have gained over France,
by
land.
We have difpoflTefTed them
have been
of North- America, and a more certain fa6t was
never laid down upon paper, than this, that had
boafted advantages
France been
at
hberty to fend the tenth part of
the troops to America, that (he has buried in Ger-
many, the Englifn nation would
not,
time, have poffefled a fingle foot of
by
this
Land upon
that continent.
*'
The Hanoverians,
come
juftly
;
may
but for that
we
ought to feparate our caufe from
becaufe they are far removed out of our
very reafon
theirs,
fays the Confiderer,
within our companion
Could
protection.
make
the elt^dlorace ever have been
and to be thus
tender to us as the apple of our eye ; it would
defigned to
a part
of
u«:,
have been placed under the guard
of our front,
and not out of the reach even of our hands."
This
is
a
way of reafoning
that
has
more than
once brought Great-Britain to the very verge of
ruin.
The principles upon which
F
it
is
founded,
is
42
(
is
)
dire6lly inconfiftcnt with,
flft
Can
of fetilement.
all
tiie
a libel
who formed
William, and the patriots
did not forfee
and
upon the
be fuppofed that king'
it
that aft,
inconveniencies that have
from making an eleftor of
Hanover king of Great. Britain ? They, without
arifen, or can arife,
manner oi doubt, faw that the eledorace of
Hanover would always be confidcred by France
all
conduft of Great -Britain.
as a depofic for the
But
that confideration rather
confirmed them
than deterred them from their refolution
;
in,
they
kept their eye upon one great objefl, which was
of the Germanic
that of maintaining the liberties
body
;
or they thought that their having a Ger-
man eIe£lor to be king of Great-Britain, flrength*
ened the common caufe. They were not deceivthe event proved they were not ; and while
ed
•,
Britons continue faithful to themfelves, their rea-
Toning mull: hold good.
But, fays the conliderer, the two houfes of
parliament, it is faid, have promifed that they
**
will defend the electorate.
prudent
as to
found
to be impoffible
be
it
in the
If they were fo im-
promife fuch a thing,
making fuch
non-performance of
it
;
;
a
we have now
the fault therefore mufl
promife, and not in the
becaufe no promife binds-
to impoflibilities.**
Here our Confiderer
takes for granted that
which he ought previoufly to have proved, and
it opens for him a field of declamation and invective.
43
(
^ive, which,
Jiis
He
own
little
for that of the
lefs
German war
the prelent
money
iiiore
and
credit,
tells us,
)
admitted, would be very
if
for
nation.
alone cofts
than the whole fca and land fervice
the duke of Marlborough's campaigns.
coll in
Though
fad
this
we
extremely difpgtable, nay
is
include our fervices in Spain, and
falfe,
if
make
proper allowances for the differences of the
value of
money
in
duke of Marlborough's
the
time and the prefenr, yet
what he
I fhall for
once admit
But how different are
two wars ? In the duke of
fays to be true.
the complexions of the
Marlborough's campaigns, the Englidi had nothing to hf)pe for themfelves, but to maintain the
balance of power.
In the prefent war they have
indeed the fame objedt, but another, and a folid,
confideration
is
to be
Hienfe acquifitions
added
to
it,
that
the im^
is
the nation has -made in trea-
which I can by no means
admit (he would, or could have made, had it not
been for the diverfion which' our arms gave to
fure, trade
and
territory,
our enemies on the continent of Europe. *' The
time may come, fays the Confiderer, when the
nation, being exhaufted
by
the
German
perhaps intimidated by that prince
holding,
quefts
to
may
be forced to give up
buy him
a peace."
I
war, and
now upown con-
it is
its
own
I
neither
underhand the propriety, nor the meaning of this
fentcnce.
How
is
this
nation likely to be
midated by a prince, for
buy
a
peace
?
fiderer's drift a
whom
fhe
is
I can as little under (land the
few lines
inti-
forced to
Con-
after, that the pra6licablc
way
44
C
way
)
of defending Gcrniany,
Frt^ncli
indcmnificarioh for that
which alone we ought
Hoc Ithacui
:'
But
velitt et
to
part
hands oF the J^rench,
;
of Germany, for
magnp mercentur Airida.
perhaps, what a
ft Is,
by attacking the
have any concern.
liament, and people, were
'r'eafonable
is
and thereby fccuring an ample
iflands,
Briti-fh
prince, par-
Hanover now
might
think quite fo
n; t
efpecially as the.Gonfiderer has bet-n
at fo great pains to prove", that the ele^J-orate
very
confequence to France
little
i:he
iii
whi^h, perhap!r,
if
is
of
a po^rion,
;
not carried to extravagaiice,
is
the Jnort defeofible of any in his book.
Frorri tHfe
tfidcref
4^th page of
emptoys
g'reat
the
pamphlet, the Con-
paiAs to prove that no ^d: of
parii'ament has engaged
'pf.rt
this
i-he
public faith to thelup-
of the prefcnt war; and belabours tolliew that
>v<^'"ds
of the addrel's of thecommoiis to
rnajefty, plits 'the parliament
and
nis late
Britilli
nation
'llnderno rnahner ofobligatiGn, becaufe they
Triifcd
what was impofllbje and impradicable
he brings the opinion ofGrotius to prove,
der fuc'li ci'rc'umllances, all ties are void.
•appeal to the Confiderer hitnlelf,
reprefentati'on
liim juftice
;
of
his reafoning,
and now I
fl:iall
bound
in
I
un-
may
in
my
have not done
give the words of the
addrefs, quoted by the Confiderer.
ourfelves
and
;
that
whether,
1
pro-,
gratitude to
alTifl:
"
We
think
your majef-
ty againft the infults and attacks that
may be
made
(
45
made upon any of your
)
majefty's dominions, thp'
not belonging to the crown of Great- Britain, in
refencment of the part your majefty has taken in
a caiile, wherein tne intcreits of this
fo
kingdom
is
immediately, and io ellentially concerned."
be the fate of any ftate or prince,
Hard mqll
depending upon that Britifh honour, which has
be&n always held
He
trine to take place.
reign concerns,
were fuch
inviolable,
fo
who does
mull
not
know
know,
little
a doc-
of
that for
fo-
two
hundred years pad, the Ipeeches of the kings of
England to their parliaments, and the addrelTes
of chofe parliaments in anlwer, have been, as it
were, the pole ftars, that have diredtcd the con-
dud
Can any man read
of Europe.
the words of
the addrels, as quoted ab6ve, and doubt that
does not amount to an abfoiute promife to
fend the electorate
ral, as
i*
And
it
de-^
they give a good mo-
well as political, reafon tor
it,
" becaufe of
niagnanimous behaviour," a reafon
that can be applied to notning lefs than what I
his majelty's
have mentioned.
*'
But, fays the Confiderer,
we
have taken upon ourfelves the whole and abfoiute defence of them •,*' and here he is at ereat
pains to find out a drfference between affiftinghis
m
jcJty,
and doing the thing ourfelves, and he
has laid out the point, to a degree of the molt
fhanielefs chicane.
cafe?
No,
But has
torate to have contributed
9wn
that really
been the
the Confiderer himfelfadnpits the elec-
defence
-,
what
if fo, if Jiis late
it
can towards
its
majefty was ever
reduce(J
46
)
reduced to borrow, upon
his
(
own
private credit,
two hundred thoufand pounds, which he employed upon the defence of that elc6lorate ; it the
Hanoverians rifqued, not only
their properties,
and the entire defolation of their
reluming their arms, after the
upon
country,
French had broken the convention of ClofterScven J if his late majefty, as elector of Hanover,
buv their
avowed
which
lives,
that ftep, and if great part of the troops,
fo
gloriouQy drove them out of that elec-
were
torate,
they were
;
in
Hanoverian pay,
Hanover be
cari
as
undoubtedly
faid to
have dona
Or does what we have done
more than the addrefs contains ?
nothing for herfelf ?
tor her
,
Had
amount
to
not the parliament given his majefty the
furances they did, I
am
far
af-
from faying, that by
his condutfl, he would not have equally qonfulted
But I
the honour and intereft of Great-Britain.
will be bold to fay, that, without hurting eithet;,
fuppodng Great
Britain to ftand
upon her own
bottom, he could have avoided rifquing, as he did,
his very property in that eledtorate,
other place
in
Germany,
But upon
and
every
the affuranc^;
of parliament, he bravely fuffered it
without referve, in the fame common
As
in
to embark^^
caufe.
to our author's ftrengthening his reafoning
from Grotius. in the firft place I take Grotius
to be no authority that is to dire<5l the councils
and condudl of Great-Britain
^place,
without waiting
my
;
and
in the
next
readers time in crab-
bed quotations, Grotius declares
flatly againft
the
whole
+7
f
)
'^hole oF his do^lrine, as applicable to the prefenC^
At
circumftanccs of Great-Britain and Hanover.
the time
tlie
of Ruflia and the landgrave
treaties
of HefTe were debated
Conliderer,
*' all
dom."
1
a
candid enough to own,
altered
(and
treatif^s,
no
is
man
out of the king-
cannot fay, that I remember any luch
exprefs declaration from
of thofe
parhament, fays the
parties exprefly declared, that
would not fend
they
in
all
parties
;
but
that the profeffed
how
that
view came
fecret to the public^
was
to
and thus
which was
a meafure,
and then neceflary.
fiderer will
ftory,
in
to
be
Ob-
nay, fome were annihilated j
not, at that time,
perhaps, thought of, became afterwards,
pedient,
view
present
our fending our troops out of the kingdom,
jefts often varied,
am
I
firft
ex-
In
fliort, the Conbe puzzled to find any period ofhi-
which councils are not influenced by
circumftances, and that materially too, under the
I cannot, however, help
firmeft adminiftrations.
whole of our Confidcrer*s
b^jafted ftrength falls to the ground, by one Hngle obfervation, which is, that it was not regardob'.erving,
that the
ing the king of Pruifia,
but againfl the
power of
France, thaf the declaration in queftion was made.
was fomewhat apprehenflve
ot the conncclion between France and Rufija,
but every man of knic in England at that tiuje
The
nation, indeed,
that all danger from the king of PruHia
muff vanilh by the very meafure purfued by.
knew,
Great-Brirain.
at
firft
was not
Ir
is
true,
his
Prufllan
explicit as to his defigns
majefty
;
bur, in
that.
48
(
)
that, he afted'as every wife prince in his fituation
would have done, and the
fia
and Great-Britain
between Pruf^
him to his
alliance
foon reduced
true intereft, which was,
his fuffering
againfl:
who they will,
moment he refuled
ny foreign troops, be
the empire, and the
the afTiftance of France,
to
fear.
admit
Htno-
the eleftorate of
ver had nothing more to
a«»
to entef
But
this
matter
tell
us,
" that
has been already explained.
The
Confiderer proceeds to
when we promifed
to defend the electorate againft
the king of Pruflla and the French, the reft of
the empire
was
to
have been with
from being the cafe,
the meafure met with
fo far
tion
from
the queen of
This
us.'*
is
that the great oppofiin
Hungary
arofe
the houfe,
beingr unable,
and
tha other princes of the empire b -ing unwilli .g,
loalTift us \ nor had we the fmali. ft t-ncojrage-
ment
hope
to
promife,
that, that
cafe.
t!:e
**
The
continues the Confiderer, was to pay
Ruffians to fight againft
P
would be
P— — ns
;
is
ns to fight againft Ruffians,
Again I deny, chat
performance?"
the paying
due
we
to rhe
did pro-
mife to pay Ruffians to fight againlT Pruffians,
but
we
certainly did promife to defend theelec-
means of Ruffians; and when thofe
means were taken from us, we, in jufiice and
honour, were obliged to have reconrfe to other
means, which we are now purfuing.
torate by
The
reader
is
to obferve,
that I
am now
tempting a vindication of the conduct of
his
1
at-
ue
majcfty
49
(
?najefl-y
)
and theBritifh miniftry
•,
nor
is
ht toexpeft
that lanitv) ftep out of the way to vindicate theHa-
noverian chancery
truth was
known,
according to the
be doomed as
own
part,
in
what they
th'
Perhaps, ifthe
did.
y looked upon thcmfelves,
Itatc'-of parties
then in England, to
popular outcry. For my
never could approve of the rancour
I
vi<5lims to
and virulence with which that poor eieftorate was
.then treated.
I'he con^'ention of Cloder-Seven
took its rife from an apprehenfion, the Hanoverian chancery had,
that
of their lovercign,
to
it
was not
in the
power
proted them from the miferies that threatened them.
This, were it proper and decent, would be no very difficult
maCter to
that,
prove.
ic is
I will even go
more than probable,
on of things, the regency, or
fo
far as
in fuch
to fay
a fituatl-
as the Confiderer
them, the chancery of Hanover, confidered the intereft of the eledor, and themfelves, in
calls
a very different light from thofc of Great-Britain
and
its
The
fovereign.
Confiderer,
about the 55th, 56th, and
the fubfequent pages of his pamphlet,
what he
calls his
comes
to
mod
important point, which is
neither more nor l-fs than to prove,
that we
ought to carry on the war with France by fca;
" by which means, fays he, we will realife
tj
this nation a
ver,
at
revenue of
fiv^s
millions a year for e-
our enemies expence, and
totally difable
France hereafter from raifing a marine power,
which can never be in any degree formidable to
G
Bri-
5,0
{
The
Britain."
extremely obliged
where
iflands,
'
to the ConfiJerer, if
out to them
point
)
public of Great-Britain would
it
was never worth
livres to the
its
But
are
flrefTmg the French
means Mar-
If he
five millions
crown of France, and
arofe chiefly from
Guadaloupe.
French
thofe five millions, even fuppof-
ing them French livres, grow.
tinico,
of the
the fituation
hc
he would
its
of French
importance
vicinity to the illand
we
upon
not,
at this time,
that ifland
?
of
di-
Have wc
not the ftrongefl reafon to fay, that our governnient
is
doing the very thing,
lb injudicioufly
and
"unfeafonably pointed out by' the Confiderer, with
no view, but to impofe upon the ignorant, and
inflame the unwary ? If he means, that we are
to attack the French part of Hifpaniola,
make
trufl:
a conqueft of
for our allies,
it
it
for ourfelves,
and to
though in
would not be long before
more pernicious war, even than what he has
reprefented the Germanic war to be, might be
a
French
on that ifland are known to be undef
carried onagainlt Great-Britain, fince the
pofTefllons
the protection of Spain, and to be held only in
If he means the paultry diFrench
hold at the mouth of
(lant pofTefTions the
the Mifllfippi and in Louifiana, the}^ are no ob-
fuflrerance
from
her.
armament; and they could
fcarcely indemnify the expence of a fmall fquadron of privateers, were they to undertake the
jedts
of
conqueft.
all
a
national
In fhort,
I will
venture to fay, that
thofe pofTtfiions puttogether, never were worth
to the
crown of France, and never can be worth
to
51
(
;
to US, the twentieth part of the fum, at which
the Confiderer has rated them.
But, after
all
what authority Iiath the Confuppofe, that any of thofe attempts
that has been faid,
fidercr
to
have been neglected by our being engaged
German war
As
?
in
a
to the irrctriveable dellruftioii
of the French marine, has not that been a.€tuMy
effcdled
fees
And
?
derer to
them make
liberty
at
it
French
time enough for the Confi-
is
government, when he
againft our
rail
to
a peace
France
that (hall leave
re-eilablifli
In (hort,
it.
iflands can bring, either to
if
the
them or to
Great-Britain, five milllions fterling a year, they
are of
more worth, than
France
itfelf.
*'
In the
firft
half the
revenue of
place, fays the Confiderer, this
is
a war, in which Britain (lands fingle and alone,
And how much
to contend at land with France.
we may
Soever
flatter
ourfelves with the notion
of our own ftrength, and the French weaknefs,
France
is
and
at this time,
it
has been for a cen-
This
tury paft, fuperior to us at land."
fum of what
the Conliderer has faid
which takes up feveral pages of
Ihall,
for once,
onl}^, that
on
his
not difpute this fa6t,
is
the
this head,
pamphlet. I
if he means
France can bring much greater armies
into the field than Great-Britain can; but I muft
2nd
will
afiirm, that thofe armies are nothing
comparable
in
a day
of a6lion
to Britifh troops",
nor have they ever been found to be fo; and in
affirming this, I have on
G
2
my
fide the credit of all
hiftory,
s^
(
when
hiftory,
)
two nations ever
the rroops of the
fought with one another,
the rniallelV terms of
in
I ihail allow the advantage in point
equaliiy.
military difcipline,
tadics,
ons, to have been, at certain
of the French
•,
in polTelfion ot
have been
for
bat
of
and mihtary operatitiiTics,
on the fide
totally deny, that they are
1
thofe advantages ar prefent, or
lome
y.^ars.
allow, that the llrength
A (_andid
of
wricer muft
war does
llate in
a
own natives fiie
The Carthaginians
not confiftin the number oi her
intp the
can bring
ficrid.
could bring but few
;
com-
yet by the help of
merce they were enabled, at a much greater diftance than Germany is from England, to bring
Rome
I muft add, that
the brink of ruin.
to
though one
ftate
numyet the latter may
may exceed another
ber of national troops by land,
have
valt advantages in
number
if,
to a reafonabie
of brave national troops, (he
a marine too ftrong tor
ways add
forces in the world,
to look
war,
in the
it
when
in the face,
tne naval
all
colledted into one titer^
which
The
fhali like-
prefent
at
Confidcrer
is. the
may
of Great-Britain.
away upon former events that happened
of France.
The
in
cafe
flouriih
favour
prefent time ought to be the
only fubjeft of his confideration
-,
and he can pro-
duce no period tnat can be brought in the lead parallel with it, whether we conlider our own internal ftrength, the glory acquired by our troops,
the force ot our marine, the
conqueft?, and, what
i^thc
is
imp
irtance of
of more weight than
unanimity of the nation
j
a
our
all,
confideration,
which
:
53
(
which dcftroys
)
parallels that can be formed,
all
with icgard to ihe circu-altances of this nation,
fince the days
of queen Elizabeth to the prcfent.
which the French power fultained
As
to the iols
by
the battles ot
Blenheim and Ramillies, exag-
gerated as they arc by the Confiderer, they are
in
degree com^'arable, fctting afide the ha-
;,o
vock
ot tac I'woid, to the
number they have
loft
in '.jormany by dileaics, fatigue, famine, and e-
very
kmd
ot indigence,
In pages 60 and 61 of the Confiderations, our
author employs fome very
prove, that
Prullia,
he
is
**
we made
a vry oad bargain with
we
are an ally to him,
treaty
with him, lays tne
In tact, thou^ii
Our
none to us.
reaioning, to
fiiinly
ConliJcrer, will not oblige him to turnifh us either witn
ever
to
money
or tro.ps, ih.>uld
No
much.'*
we wane them
body was ever wrong-headthe treaty was
made
ed enough to imagi
le
any inch purpole;
was made to prevent
it
tiiC
folutc deltrudion of the i''rotcftant interelt
the continent, and
it
for
ab-
upon
has mtherto aniwered that
purpole, notwithllanding tne tormidable and un-
expeftcd traverfes
**
What
it
has met with.
then (fays the Confiderer in the next
page) have we gained by tnis
the one
is,
to enable
ally ?
Two
the being obliged to pay
him
to fight his
own
things
him money
battles againft e-
nemi;s which Britain has no quarrel with
other
is,
the driving the reft of the
German
j
the
prin-
ces
(54
)
CCS into n clofer union with France, and
ourfelves obnoxious to
Can
ally.
Wronger
it
Europe
be fuppofed, that Brirain
for either
round queftions,
of thefe
I
fay,
?**
making
for fupporting this
the
is
In anfwer to thofe
that Brirain always has
had, and that fhe always ought to have, a quarrel
with thole powers
liberties ot
Europe.
who attempt to
deftroy the
Suppofing the confederacy
tctween the courts of Vienna, France, Saxony,
and Ruffia, who
and
to
is
is
neither Papifl nor Proteftanr,
be confidered rather
as
an Afiatic than an
European power, had been carried into execution, what muft have been the confequence ? By
have fuggefted, how can the prevention
drive the German princes into a clofef union
what
of
it
vyith
I
France, while the latter
is
(6 intimately
con-
iieded with the houfe of Auftria, which has
Vavs been
their opprefiors,
Ft-ance for refuge?
when they
The extindion
al-
fled to
of the Prote-
Germany, it is to be feared, would
"have extinguifhed the Germanic conftitution itfelf, while that ambition and bigotry, which has
always dilVinguiflied the houfe of Auftria, was
fupportcd and abetted by the guarantees of- the
What fupported the Ir'treaty of Weftphaha.
berties of Germany, and confequently of Europe,
before the prefent war broke out, but the enmiftant intereft in
ty between the houfes of Bourbon and Auftria
That enmity
?
being diftblved, the former balance
of power vaniflied, and the honour, dignity, and
intereft
another.
done
it
of Great-Britain called upon her to form
She has done it, and flie could have
by no other means than
{no.
has purfued.
The
yy
(
The
)
which the Confidcrer has em-,
whole of his pamphlc^t,
ployed
and which he carries on to an amazing degree
greateft art,
through the
from
the 6 2d to the 68ih. page,
king of Pruffia
as a lelf-interefted prince.
my own
I to fpeak
private thoughts,
the greater his lelt-intereit
uleful
and the more
fhall
find
it
he will be the more
is,
after
his
what has happened,
to
iritereil
depart.
fpeak nothing of gratitude or honour
.while the prelent war
to
Were
muft fa^,
I
faJthtul ally to Great-Britain;
from whofe rnendfhip,
he never can
to reprclent the
is
abandon
lafts,
can
it
lieve, even, the Confiderer will not be
cough
bur
;
be his interelt
Great-Britain?
his alliance with
-I
be-
I
hardy
e-
Suppofing a peace was to
take place, would he, after what has happened,
to affirm
it.
throw himfell into the arms of France
muft be fenfible, that while there is a
of
a
tain
?
No
;
he
poffibility
mifunderflandmg arifmg between Great-Briand France, his danger recurs, and then he
would be
condition than ever, throu^Th
in a vvorfe
the renewed connexions between Auftria
and
Bourbon. This mull hereafter always be the
cale.
No
peace can
make
claims upon Silefia
;
Aullria lofe light of her
or France of hers,, for the
damage we have done her
territories
confiderations which,
I think,
in this
we have taken from
however
abfolutely deftroys
employed by our author
.with Pruffia.
fiderer has
The
all
war, and the
her.
Thefe are
plain and iliorr,
the declamarion
againft
our connexion
perfonal inveftives the Con-
thrown out againft him,
are as void
(
of
56
)
truth, as they are of decency, and deferve
no
anfwer.
The
Confiderer next returns to his old topic of
the inequality between France and England
land-war between them, on
repnients
all
eft coffeeiia
powers
tl.e
Verlc to the caule
we
tiie
continent
Europe
in
as
•,
in
a
and he
being a-
The mean-
arc fighting in
ho ule politician knows the rea on. Ruf-
has claims,
Sweden has claims upon Rudla,
which have been long quieted by
arc therefore
unjuft.
The
treaties,
fituation
and
of the king
of Denmark, between Ruflia and Sweden, with
regard to Hoiftein, has been very
becoTiing more
him
fo
every da
with a fingle
to part
,
ticklifli,
and
does not admit
frcnn the de-
fubjt-<5t
Tne
own dominions.
death of the
of
princefs
and
Orange
have given the
prince
fence of his
Dutch government back
on,
who
think,
that
it
to the Loveftein facti-
is
their inrerefl to ioin
with France, and fecretly to abett her againft
the rivals of her commerce.
hope
of fharing in the fpoils
eleftorates,
princes,
refts,
Ambition, and the
and dignities o^two
have driven fome of the German
even proteftants, from their true inte-
and others are over-awed by the thunders
oftheaulic council, fupporced by the power of
France.
As
to the protefiants of Saxony,
who
have taken iervice with our enemies, perhaps
their
numbers
will
not be f und"'ro he ve^^y great,
when we
coifider that :he inhabirants, at leaft of
one
of Saxony, are papifts.
half,
But, be that as
(
57
no prince, when
will,
It
me;ital]y righr,
t^nenccs.
As
and our
allies
thei-e, as
France
is
)
condudt
his
is
funda-
obliged to anlwer for confe-
to Switzerland,
I apprehend,
we
have the fame right to recruit
lias,
and
a
much
better
title,
be-
caufewe have more money to ',)ay them. As to
Italy, Germany, and Flanders, France can recruit in
no part of them, but
the territories of
in
emprefs-queen, which we may
the
reafonably
prefume, are already fufficienily exhaufted.
Page 69 and 70 of the ConHderations
ployed
in iliewing,
is
em=
that the
French have more
funds to carry on war than Great-Britain has.
But as the Confiderer has his inf »rma ion only
from one gentleman,
and
whom
he does not name,
the diftrefled ftate of France and
as
even to
nances,
known, and
French treafury
Confiderer
bankruptcy,
him.
to
be polTefTed of the fums the
let us, with the Spanifh
and examine where
Britain laid the aX to
by
fions
is
all this is
ilate
it ?
Is
all
take the
the root
Has
from
not Great-
not abfolutely cuC
it
the lofs of her marine,
in
fi-
weil
mentions,
which thofe treafures grow.
off
is
the argument certainBut even fuppofina the
ambaffador in the treafury of Venice,
candle,
her
indifputable,
againft
ly lies
a profeflfed
trade, and pofTef-
pans of the world
?
The reverfe of
Look at the
the cafe of Great-Britain.
of French prifoners
in England, read the
remonllrances of French parliaments, confult the
beft accounts of the ftate of their provinces,
peo-
pled by inhabitants, fo difpirired through want,
H
that
that they think
kfs
lingering
whole of this
derer, in the
it
5-8
(
)
a luippinefs ro be carried to thtf
bu tchery of the field. But the*
poirrt is lb much againil: our Confi-mind of every man in England, ex-^
cepting a few ollernatious, deiperate, advocatea
for the caufe efpoufcd by the Confiderer, that f
am
fafe in refting
it
here.
" Every one who
has thought on the fub--
muft have confidered the three different kinds of it
a war of offence, a war of equality, and a war of defence.
And every one
jeci of war,
:
knows, that of thefe the
laft is
moft difadvan^a-
geous, and the mofl difficulr." Thefe are founds,
drawn from
ors,
fpeculation,
and caftle-building
paper-ftaining warri-
poliLicians
but they are
;
difclaimed by pradiceand experience.
in
its
own
pretences
Every war
nature becomes offenfive, whatever the
may have
been, upon which
was o-
it
army of defence, can
riginally founded. If an
of*
fend the enemy, the means of offence becomes
the moft effedlual principle of defence.
or weaknefs, courage or condufl, are
fiderations
Strength.'
the con--
all
generals have, whether they
a war of offence,
a
war of equalit)'-, or
fight in
a
war of
defence, and the meaning of thefe words vanifh,
The
according to events.
Confiderer fays, that
duke of Cumberland, nor prince Ferdinand, could force the French to a pitched batneither the
tle.
I
underftand the
been a pitched
battle,
French
it
to fight
in
battl-e
of Minden to have
and that
the
we
manner
whether the French were forced
it
did force the
was fought v
to fight at
Ha-
ftenbeck.
jR:enbeck, I
know
(
59
not.
But
fuperior as they were
)
I
am
convinced, that,
his royal higiinefs,
.to
in
numbers and artillery had one halFofthe troops
under him been Britifh, he muft have been
decifively victorious
As to the argument the
i
,
Confiderer lb long dwells upon, and fo atFedcdly
draw out greater armies
Mindcn anfwer,
produce
fo good troops.
whether they can
In
fliort, the number that France can bring co the
repeats, that France can
than we can,
the battle of
let
can be proved to be better
they
field, unlefs
troops than thofe of Great-Britain,
is
an argu-
jnent againft our going to war, that
is
below
contempt.
all
there in this refped a greater dif-
Is
parity between France and Great-Britain,
than
there was between the Greeks and the Perfians,
than there was between the Romans and Barbarians, thofe anceftors of the prefent
ftrians
"
?
Suppofe us,
the Confiderer,
faj'-s
compleat vi6tory,
is
;
This
all
that follows
on
is,
we
that
fwer
gain
all
to gain a
there any fruit of
reaped in Germany."
on
French and AiJr
it is
we
is
his
it
to be
main quefci-
but flonrifh.
My
an-
propofed, the freeing
aproteftant eledorate, expofed to
all
the horrors
we weaken the power
we blunt the fvvords that
liberties ot^ mankind, and we
of war upon our account
•,
of Europe's opprv^iTors,
are
drawn
apainlt the
are, at leafr,
one (Kp near er towards procuring a
peace, which
rope
to
may
rcltore Great-Britain
freedom and
tranquillity.
H
2
The
and Euideal rea-
fonings
(
6o
)
fonings that follow the imaginary triumph of die
auriior,
'
upon
.ibovc qucftion,
th(^
defcrves no an-
fwer, hccaulc the fa^ls, fuppofcd in
it,
never can
have any cxifrence, and can have no relation to
prclcnr qiitftion.
the
It
cannot be irnagined,
the prelcnt government,
that
could be
mad
e-
nough ro purfue fuch a fchcme as the Confider-
down
cr lias laid
rations.
for the future plan of their ope-
are not to follow an ene-
Britifli troops
m
into quarters, where B/itiili money is already
more efficacioufly employed; the observations
ftate of
1 have already made, of the exhaufted
France, deftroy all probability of the French
leading us
into thofe wild-goofe chaces the au-
thor has fuppofed.
TheConfidercr has thrown out farcafms againft
our employing a foreign general or generals, in
the
German
war.
tqted words for
But, as ufual, he has
realities.
didly confidtred,
is
The
fubfti-
prelent v/ar, can-,
no farther, on our parr,
a
Ger-
war, than as we fight for our allies in Germany, againil our enemies there. We attack
noGermanprince,wc fupportnoGcrman meafures,
man
farther than as the fupport of
and independency
is
German freedom
connected with the intereft
of Great Britain, which
it
always has been.
Page 90, the Confiderer falls with great reaas I thinV, upon the abufe of pubic news
writing in England
I fubfcribe to all he fays on
that head.
But, at the fame time, I muft make
fon,
;
a
di-
6i
(
g diftinftion
of thole
of the prefs, and the authority
liireliMgs
and even the parliament
of the government,
IF
fclf.
)
between what comes from the pens
fome pragmatical
fund brokers,
railed againft the
man
king of
it-
bufy
politicians, or
Pruflia,
England, who
did not bewail the untowardly fyftem that kept
there was
not a
him and us divided.
that there was nor,
of fenfe
The
in
in
Hnows
Confiderer
well,
both houfes of parliament,
more frequently mentioned, than the ex-
a topic
pediency of clofing,
almofl: at
any
rate,
with his
Pruffian majefty, and thereby forming a firm barrier,
and
tereft.
a natural defence, for the proteftant in-
Did the Confiderer, or any of his friends,
in thofe times, ftand
litions, as
up and difpute
thofe propo--
they were affented to, even by the mi;
nlflers, againil
whom
they were obliquely aimed.
Mr.Pclhamhimfelf was again and again heard todeclare, that
when the circumftances of affairs could
moment Ihould be loft, in compleat-
admit, not a
ing fo defirable
a
connexion
;
and
all
the other
minillers (eemed to be of the fame mind.
When
the connexion was formed, the government of
England, perhaps,
no time, entered into a
at
meafure, that met with
on.
It
fo univerfal
an approbati-
may be improper for me to mention, that
who is now no more, always
the great pcrfonage,
fpoke with regret of the circumftances that kept
him
at a diftance
from
nephew, and has been
fharpnefs, to check the
his
known, with an unufual
officious courtiers about
his perfon,
when they
fpoke difrefpcftfully of him.
Even
(2
(
Even when
)
being
his PrufTian majefty (w!io,
an inland power, was not extremely well acquaint-
ed with maritime affairs) fent over the famous
memorial, complaining of the confifcation of his
of
by order of the court
the anfwer returned,
fliips;
London, was penned with
all
the politenefs
alliance with us.
due
to a fo\7ereign prince,
Has
the Confiderer forgot what happened after
in
upon the fame iubje6t ? The anfwer that
went from London, was fuch as convinced his
PrufTian majefly ofthe re£titude of our court of
this,
admiralty's proceedings, and his Britannic majefty's
He
intentions.
What
was the confequence
?
dropped his remonftrance, and he kept his
faith, in paying the interell: on the Silefian loan.
XJpon the whole, therefore, he muft have been
born but yefterday, who can be impofed upon
by the fo many repeated aflertions in the Confi-
derations, of the dcteftation his PrufTian majefty
was formerly held
in,
by the Bridfli nation. Im-
pertinentsin politicks
we have many,whofe know-
ledge
arife
out of the fumes ofcofTee and tobacco^
but the talk of fuch never can be conftrued into
the (enfe of the people of Britain.
differ
much from our
a certain ribband and
I
fhall
not
Confiderer, with regard to
title
beftowed; but
I
cannot
was beflowed, on account of vulgar pre.
pofTefTions, and on the report of idle, ignorant,
newsmongers-, they were bellowed at a time
think
it
was thought proper and prudent to give
exemplary rewards, eyen to the Jbeiv of refoluti-
\^
hen
it
on and refinance.
The
63
<
The
)
falling of our Conficleref at the RufTiafi
and thread-bare, and yet h,e
ingenuous enough to own(page 94,)that it was
made lolely ro keep all foreign troops our of the
treaty,
is
frivolous
is
Undoubtedly,
iempire.
fore,
it
was.
But
as
we have obferved
as certain,
be-
before
the treaty was made, the court of France, un-*
known
fty,
is
it
either to his Britannic, or Pruffian miije-
was faradvanced
nay,
it
that,
was
then
as
in
of Vienna
the treaty
good
as
concluded, and
;
we
very foon founds from the chevalier Douoria[s'^
ncgociations, on the part of France, at the court
of Petersburg, too much reafon
that if the RufTlan
to
apprehend,
troops had got footing in the
empire, even upon our requifition, they would
have
infifted
upon
their
own
terms, before
they
That the Ruffians were hired
had evacuated it.
to defend the electorate of Hanover, againft all
That they were hired to
invaders, is admitted.
ravage the Pruffian dominions, or that the king of
Pruffia intended to invade
is
Hanover
at that
time,
denied.
Having faid
to own,
nough
made,
thus much, I muft be candid
before the treaty of
his late majefly
London
e-
vyas
(though he wifely kept
it
to him(elf) had-great reafons to fufpevft the inten-
tions of the
court of Vienna, and her motives,
or rather encouragement, for makins; certain de-
mands upon him, which in honour and confcicnce
What mud become
he could not comply with.
of
<?4
(
)
ofour author's! reafoning) If it fliould appear fhaL
Ibme of thoib demands regarded even the king of
PrufTia ? Did not the natural fealon, the optcmda
diest
then prefent
and what treatment
itfelf,
nniuil;
his majefty's minifters have met with irom the
pubhc, had they not joined the national voice, and
concluded the treaty of London.
**
We
had been
ufed to think, lays the Conhderer, (page 95,)
the king of Pruflia, (I don't lay rightly) had
ihown
anions, a neglecl ot
in his
gation, and
Who
religious principle.'*
Confiderer
all
moral
obli-
in his writings, a contempt of every
clafs
are
we
?
Does the
himfelf with the officious fhatter-
brains of cofifee-houfes
The
?
people of England
never thought fo of the conqueror of
Silefia
;•
they never fpoke thus of the author of the Antt-
Machiavel. Every
man
of fenfe and candor fpok^
and thought the reverfe.
They
faw the king of
difagreeable neccflity of main-
PrufFia under the
taining his alliance with France, through the injuftice
and obftinacy of the court of Vienna,
forced
him
offered, again
and again, to
join in keeping the
provided
upon
flie
Silefia.
French out of the Empire,
would do him
juftice fn his claims-
Thofe claims were,
of England, problematical
ther could,
who
though he
renounce it, and ta
to maintain that alliance,
at lead,
to the people
and they nei-
nor did, give them difguil, far
lefs
deteftation.
Tn
all
ed, (aiui
political writings,
I
think
I
when
fa6ls are
have anlwered every
anfwerfa£^
ad-
vanced
H
(
)
vanced by the Confiderer) the
declamation.
The charges
own
That
is
what
reft
I
go
mufl:
for
cannot anfwer.
againft his Pruflian majefty, and our
minirtry, are repeated over
and over again,
hundred and thirty-feven
pages, with an acrimony void of fpirit
argu-
jand fpuii through a
-,
ments, that are deftitute of reafon
fupported by truth
;
charges, un-
founded on
and tautologies, which prove the writer to
His declamations
to be no admirer of Tacitus.
and definitions upon continental connexions, and
fads
allegations, not
;
upon the
ought
and
;
difficulty
of underltanding them as ihey
to be underftood, are metaphyfical,
idle.
Every
cobler,
was going
I
vague,
to fay,
knows what a continental connexion is, as well
as any member of either houfc of parliament ;
and though our author reprefents his fplittings oF
new and uncommon, yet there
has not been perhaps a more hackneyM topic in
the queftion to be
politics, fince the
upon
Revolution
;
nor has he fallen
a fmgle divifion or fubdivifion, that has not
been brufhed thread-bare by Tories and Jacobites
in their writings againft the afl of Settlement,
and
for the treaty of Utrecht.
prove (and then he
connexions with
will fay
Let the author
fomething) that our
Prufila, or, if
he pleafes, with the
continent, at this time, are not as well founded,
and
as jaftifiable,
and perhaps more neceffary,
than thofe formed by king William, by that
liance
al-
which the Confiderer has employed fuch
a needlefs
pomp
of language to amplify.
Our
Confiderer, again and again, mentions our being
I
without
66
(
)
which king William an4
I have given tlie plain and
queen Anne had
true realon why we are witnuut thenn, and prowithout thofe
allies,
:
bably mull: be without them,
theyProteflant
till
confederacy has broken the chains oi Europe. I
am
from detracting from the merits or abilir
Bur what has iiis
of our great delivtrer.
far
ties
condu(ft or charafter to do with the prelenc queftion, unlefs he
can fhew, that Great-Britain and
Europe were in lc(s danger, at
ty of London was figned, than
the time the trea?
it
was
at
the time
the grand alliance was formed by king William
J
am
?
even afraid our Confiderer has oyer-ftraincd
memory of that monarch.
moft pompous account of the
his complaifance to the
He
has given us a
congrefs
in
and Tuch
which the grand aihance was formedj
com poled
a meeting,
them enemies
ftrious parries, all of
known
ver perhaps was
willing to fay
but
it,
of fo
in
it is
illur
to France, ne-
Europe.
a well
many
I
am
known
uiit
truth,
frequency of that meeting,
of king William's
misfortune
greateft
the
was
It fuggefted to his enemies, a natural and
reign.
that the fplendor and
a puzzling queilion.
tates are to
go
to
If fo
many mighty
war againft France,
land to pay a greater proportion,
ces of that war, than
put together
pence
or
let
;
for
?
all
in
poten-:
is
Eng-
the expcn?
thofe mighty potentates
nay, in faft, the
man's
why
fiefh (unlefs
whole of the
when
it is
ex-r
hired,
out) nas always been very cheap on the con-
tinent, efpecially in
Germany.
While
(
While
I
«7
)
this
head,
am upon
which
touched with the utmoil reluctance,
that our Conficiercr's calculation
I
I
have
am
lorry
our expence
ot"
during king William and queen Anne's wars, obliges
me
to repeat an oblervation I
before, tnat
it is
of the public,
lums
to array the
gainft the prelent
;
now
in Great-Britain
interell
which money, bears
one
is
mean, may be
I
oi:
the fenfe
thole times a-
becaufe the intrinfic value of
money
cial
have made
upon
a j^rofs impofition
in
commer-
a Itate, a
which
called the pulfe,
body-
•indicates the health or indifpofition of the
politic.
money,
cent.
a
The government
in
thofe times gave for
nay
f.
onetimes more, per
fix
At
half.
or feven,
this
time they give
from
I fhall nor,
mod
at
three
in fpecie that fhe had
queen Anne; but
paradoxical
money
doubly able
forming
venture to fay, howeVer
appear,
fhe
is
talk, fays the Confiderer,
a
connexion with
is
that,
tinent connected in
France,
(page
which
is
1
14) of
in itfelf
a contradiction in terms.*'
Was
profefledly a gingle of words.
in
at this time
to bear the expences.
uneonnefted,
is
under king William, or
I will
may
it
aad
conclude, that
this,
(Great-Britain has, at prefenc, double the
" To
The
diminifbed.
itfelf,
I
mean, even again il
queen Anne's time
William, even before
This
the con-
his death,
?
Did not king
break thofe con-
nexions, ror which our author ib pompouily ap-
plauds him,
fo that
queen Anne,
in the
beginning
of her reign, found Europe as unconnedted
I
2
as ir
is
68
(
is
now
?
The empire
the dcfedion of one of
from the common
were more covertly
)
its
caufe,
mod
powerful eledors
them
Sweden fo
while others of
triends to France.
near declaring againft us, that
have recourfc
by
torn in pieces
in itfelf,
we were
obliged to
of that mo-
to gratifying the pride
narch, by fending the duke of Marlborough tohim
to work upon his private pafllons, which he did in
a manner not altogether becoming the dignity of
his miftrefs
and
his country.
greatelf part of Italy in
All Spain, and the
arms againft
us,
and even
the duke of Savoy our friend, only becaufe Bri^
was the
tain
more
mod
capable to be
his,
againft the
than infoience of the French monarch
what was worfe than
all,
;
and
Great-Britain, by be-
ing then unconne6led in herfelf, gave the
enemy
double advantages.
Why, fays the Confiderer, (page 1 16) fhould
any pare of the war, which, as the prefent war be«*
gan with a conteft about foreign fettlements, have
its courfe diverted into a land war in Germany,
for
we were always
victorious at fea
?'*
in
power, but
in fortune
;
1
don't
I
difpuce our being always fuperior to France
by
fea
cannot admit we have been fo
neither
do
I think,
that the experi-
ments of defcents we have made upon the French
coafts, have in any degree anfwered the plaufible
principles on
which tiiey were founded. The
Confiderer himfelf furnifhes the ftrongeft reafon
why they have not; becaufe France is extremely
.
popolous, and has always a militia, independent of
her
fi9
(
)
If To, fuch pelting defcents,
hef army.
which are
attended with infinite trouble and fatigue to our
be oppofed by
foldiers, will alway<i
who
are very
This, at
gulars.
their i-nilltia,
to their re-
at all inferior,
liTcle, if
the
leaft, is
way we argue
in
tngland, becaufe the great end of our militia was
to guard our coalh againft defcents, arid leave
our army
at
liberty to a6t elfewhere.
Our Au-
*'
that if out
thor goes on to flicw, (page 119)
war
an
in
Germany
war of
is a
of the
obje<5ls
ilanding
all
diverfion,
Diverfion
eligible divcrfion."
German
of our
is
not
is
it
one
certainly
war, and notwith-
our author's fine-fpun arguments, the
meafure has hitherto been fucceisful. What can
Waritfelf is not
he mean by eligible diverfion ?
when peace can be equitably preferved.
But has our Author pointed out where we could
have made a more eligible diverfion, or has he
eligible,
? *'
proved that no diverfion was proper
he, (page 120) our
at all for the
in the
and
German war
French
forces,'*
fame breath, that
I will ad'^, it
witnout the
a
man
fo miferably
i
out
reafoning of his, the Confidercr
Frencn leave not
Yes,
them likeways, even
of the fword
To make
are they fupplicd.
no diverfion
is
though he owns
employs them.
it
deftroys
airiftance
But, fays
this
tells
notable
us, that the
fewer upon their coafts
on account of thrir army in Germany.
?
But the Confiderer will
they have
Who
find
it
fays
no
cafy task to prove, that fince the beginning of the
war they hdvc
many, which
not fuffrred a
lofs
of
men
in
Geiv
the popuJoufnefs of France (great
7<3
(
as
it Is)
He
)
will not be able for
many years to repair
who has his
never can perluade any man,
ienfes about him, that France has not
national bankrupt,
by her war
in
become a
Germany
that, had (he not found divrrfion, or,
if
or
;
the Con-
Sderer pleafes, employment, for her troops in
Germany, (he might not {till have found meanj
to have triumphed over us in America.
It
will
be impoflible to perfuade the world, that France
ean keep a hundred and twenty thoufand men in
a country,
always has been, and
that
with as
grave of the French,
blood and treafure, as they are
in quarters orgarnfons in their
w ich
time of peace,
themfelves
in
little
is
now, the
expence of
when they are
own country, in a
at,
admits oi their employing
manufactures and agriculture, and in
repairing thofe calamities of their country, which
are fo feelingly
let
forth by the remonftrances of
their parliaments.
Our Author, by
his
own
that the latter pages of his
confefTion,
recapitulation, or rather a repetition, of
had
faid before
;
fuch, I
(ball not
1 have,
ftep
by
and
as
thinks^
pamphlet contains a
what he
they undoubtedly are
pretend to arifwer them, bfcaufe
ftep,
anfwered every argument,
•without employing
that declamation, which
has fo induftrioufly
made
prefent
ufe
government of England,
al abufe,
he
of to decry the
to
throw perfon-
even in defcending to pcrfonalities,
gainft our illuftrious ally.
FINIS.
a-'
Fly UP