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2016 ­ 2017  HIGH SCHOOL COURSE GUIDE    TABLE OF CONTENTS 

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2016 ­ 2017  HIGH SCHOOL COURSE GUIDE    TABLE OF CONTENTS 
 2016 ­ 2017 HIGH SCHOOL COURSE GUIDE TABLE OF CONTENTS ADVANCED STANDING PROGRAMS (Including COLLEGE CREDIT PLUS) ENGLISH DEPARTMENT THEATRE DEPARTMENT FOREIGN/WORLD LANGUAGES MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT SCIENCE DEPARTMENT SOCIAL STUDIES DEPARTMENT BUSINESS & MARKETING INTEGRATED TECHNOLOGY ART DEPARTMENT MUSIC DEPARTMENT HEALTH DEPARTMENT PHYSICAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT SERVICE LEARNING CAREER ELECTIVES Advanced Standing Programs Ohio law requires all state public high schools provide students with “Advanced Standing” programs. These are designed to present students with the opportunity to earn college credit toward a degree or career certification during their high school years. The Pickerington Local School District offers two separate forms of Advanced Standing programs: Advanced Placement and College Credit Plus. What are the differences between College Credit Plus and Advanced Placement Programs? College Credit Plus Advanced Placement Duration of class One semester (half year) Two semesters (one full year) Credit awarded 1 high school credit 1 high school credit Weighted credit 5.0 A 5.0 A How college credit Course credit earned for class is automatically Students must take AP exam for awarded transcripted to colleges chance for credit Cost None $92 Application Must qualify for college admission No application required College Credit Plus (CCP) College Credit Plus courses are taught by teachers who hold credentials as adjunct instructors at an Ohio college or work directly with college faculty members. Successful completion of coursework in the CCP program will earn students college credit that is accepted by all of Ohio’s universities and colleges and many out­of­state and private institutions. Location, manner of delivery, and scheduling of courses may vary. ​
These are ​
not​
high school courses – these are college courses offered for concurrent high school credit. P
​arents and students should expect differences in process and plan accordingly​
. o Students must meet qualifying grade point averages and ACT (or equivalent) scores to take CCP courses. As these are college courses, qualifications are set by the university or college awarding credit and vary between courses and programs. o Courses follow the same schedule as their college counterparts and are a semester long. o Students taking CCP classes do not take a national exam at the end of the course and, by state law, are not charged for participation in the program. Advanced Placement (AP) Advanced Placement courses are taught by teachers using a curriculum approved by the College Board. Successful completion of coursework in the AP program allows students the opportunity to take an exam in May. Students who earn a passing score on the AP exam receive credit that is accepted by all of Ohio’s public universities and colleges. The number of credits and how they apply towards a degree vary depending on the test and the college. Students can only receive such credit if they take the AP test. Private colleges and universities outside of Ohio have specific policies in place that may vary from Ohio's public institutions. o AP courses are more rigorous than traditional high school courses and are designed to develop the skills needed for future success in college. Students must be prepared to take on the additional responsibility. o Courses follow the AP curriculum to prepare students for the AP exam at the end of the yearlong course. o Students taking AP classes participate in the AP exam to demonstrate competency and potentially qualify for college credit and are charged for participation in the program. o Students that do not participate in the AP exam will not be eligible for college credit, nor receive a weighted grade. 2 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS 3 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS 4 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS 5 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS 6 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS 7 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS College Credit Plus (CCP) – Frequently Asked Questions What kind of student takes these classes? CCP courses are available to any student that is qualified as “college ready” in grades 7 through 12. What qualifies a student as “college ready”? The traditional college measure of the “placement test” (where “Advanced Placement” gets its name) has been the COMPASS exam. We were expecting to offer a new version of COMPASS in Pickerington this year, but ACT decided to discontinue that test next year. This means we will not be getting access locally and colleges are deciding how to proceed into 2016­2017. Columbus State is opening a testing center in Reynoldsburg to provide COMPASS as needed. What other things might limit a student’s access to CCP courses? The student must have any college prerequisites passed prior to taking a course. These are college courses, taught by appropriately credentialed teachers in the local schools. In these “dual enrollment” courses, students are enrolled in both institutions. They must be prepared for both levels of work and are bound by the same college academic standards, sequences, and expectations as any other student in the college. Please note that “ready” and “prepared” are not quite the same thing. Mental aptitude does not necessarily translate to maturity and work ethic and students testing into the college courses might not be prepared for the increased level of rigor and faster pace. The skill set of self­responsibility required of the more independent learner is necessary for successful work as a college student. Those skills are not tested on a standardized test, but rather through honest insight and observation of the student, parent, and reflection of previous work. How long are the courses? The duration is the same as the college. In the case of our offerings, all are a semester in length. What are some differences between a CCP course and high school courses with placement exams (like AP)? The compressed time frame does not allow for as many assessment opportunities, and the assessments must be those of our college partners. This means that exams, papers, or other assessments have more significant value. Students that receive supports through Individualized Education Plans or 504 plans are able to use the plans, but must work with the Office of Disability Services for the college partner for the course. Federal laws that give civil protections to these students requires that the college approve the form of assistance that students will receive. It is an excellent opportunity for students to practice self­advocacy in the college environment. I think this is a great idea and would prefer that my student’s high school teachers provide the first introduction to college courses. Since this is locally taught by local employees, everything is still the same, right? No. There are significant changes in the teacher­parent relationship. As these are college courses taught by local teachers in an adjunct instructor role on behalf of a college, the primary exchange of information regarding student progress is shared between the student and their instructor. The co­location of the college courses on the Pickerington campus does not change the college dynamic. Parents do, of course, have access to student grades through the Infinite Campus system or using their student’s access to the college’s system. Parents may also attend face­to­face conference meetings with the instructors, but the student must be present for any conversation. Parents cannot expect any direct communication with the instructor through email or phone conversations. Students whose success is dependent on frequent phone calls home and periodic progress reporting might not be prepared for the college environment as college policies and regulations require much greater student responsibility and self­advocacy. Much as students gain independence in going to college, so they are expected to be independent learners in these locally­offered college courses. 8 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS Should my student take these classes? It is a great opportunity for students to earn college credits early and save time and money later, but it can also be a stressful transition for students. If a student is ready for the course by the college’s measures and is confident in the subject matter, then it may be a terrific choice. In other subject areas, a student may be college­ready, but less confident about skills in the content area. An option such as an Advanced Placement course that may yield college credit but allow time to more fully develop and explore skills in the content might be an excellent choice. There is no “one size fits all solution” for any student. Some students may choose classes for reasons that are not strictly focused on academic reasons, while others may choose activities offered at certain times of the day that limit their choices. Still more may have work or other activities. The best way to approach these choices is to talk with your student about what he or she really wants. College will be around in the future, but kids are young only once. We encourage a well­rounded approach for our students. Do these courses transfer? Yes – all of Ohio’s public universities and colleges accept the credits we offer in core courses. In most cases, the specific course name and number of the college to which your student matriculates can even be determined in advance. The courses have also been accepted at private college in Ohio where CCP students have gone, as well as out of state. As our college partners are accredited institutions, colleges have been more open to accepting the credit, even when AP credits have not been accepted such as Ivy League colleges, or even colleges outside the United States. Courses that are not in the core curriculum such as Theater or Introduction to Education are very likely to be accepted, but the nature of the credit accepted may vary slightly between colleges. There is still no cost for these courses, they retain all of the benefits of College Credit Plus programming, and offer an excellent in­depth view of a career field, an art, or provide excellent technical introductions to different disciplines. Is one college partner better than another? No. Most college courses offered in Ohio’s public colleges and universities are cleared by the Ohio Department of Higher Education as “TAG/OTM” courses. This means they follow “Transfer Assurance Guidelines” and are in the “Ohio Transfer Module.” As such, the courses transfer to Ohio’s public colleges as if they were taken on that campus. A political science course through Columbus State will transfer to Miami as if it was taken at Miami and a psychology course through COTC will transfer to Ohio State as if it was taken at OSU. The college process has changed substantially in the past twenty five years. All public colleges in Ohio use semesters rather than quarters. At one time, Ohio State was the school anyone could get into – now it has the most selective admissions process of public colleges in the state. The portability of credits between colleges is a natural extension of this process. Are my student’s teachers qualified to teach these classes? Yes. When a Pickerington teacher is teaching the course as the teacher of record, that teacher must meet the same credentialing standard as any other college instructor, normally as a result of graduate­level study in the content area. In some cases, courses may be “facilitated,” with a local teacher helping guide students through a robust blend of online and in­class work. In those cases, teachers have undergraduate degrees in their content in addition to their educational backgrounds. If my student graduates with a significant amount of credits, will s/he be ready for more difficult courses? That certainly depends on the student and why the CCP credits are wanted. Having credits going into college could allow students to cut down the number of years needed to complete a degree, or allow them to have smaller course loads each semester and focus on courses that may be more difficult. Students may choose not to use certain credits going into college and retake a course. Participating in CCP courses will not impact a student’s choices – the intent is to prepare our students and to offer more options in getting ready for life after high school, not to lock them into one track. Students, regardless of number of CCP credits earned in high school, are as eligible for scholarships or other programs as any other freshman matriculating into college. In fact, the process for matriculation is the same for all students, regardless of participation in the CCP program. 9 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS What is the cost of each course? There are no student/parent costs associated with CCP courses under state law. Students may take up to thirty (30) credits through CCP each year. “Credits” in this context means classes in which a student is a participant, regardless of setting. For example, a full year high school course uses three of the thirty credits. Any credits taken in the college setting beyond those thirty credits are “self­pay,” and the responsibility of the student/parent. Summer courses, much like summer school, are not included in standard tuition, and students or their parents will bear the financial responsibility for credits taken in the summer term. *​
A student will be responsible for college tuition if he or she fails a CCP course or withdraws from the CCP course after after 14 calendar days. What if a student fails the course? If a student’s final transcripted grade for the course is an “F” for academic reasons, or a “WF” due to withdrawal past the date established by the college partner, the school district may require the student’s family to reimburse the district for all costs associated with the course, which varies between college partners and manner of course delivery. It is critical for students to be mindful of their course progress, give their very best efforts, and keep themselves updated on dates and deadlines. Another consideration is that these grades are transcripted and have the potential to impact graduation requirements, eligibility for extracurricular activities, scholarships, as well as college admission and transferability. College Credit Plus courses must under law be faithful to the college partner’s grading methods. How can I tell if a course will transfer for my student? One terrific resource is at www.transferology.com – a website preferred by most Ohio institutions of higher education to report how a course from one college transfers to another. For private and out­of­state schools that do not use Transferology, contacting the college directly about transfer credit or using the college’s own online transfer module is best. If a student chooses a dual credit course, what is the process? As a dual credit course, there is a level of coordination between higher education institutions and Pickerington Schools. This means that Pickerington alone cannot determine the deadlines or the course requirements, and decisions are not solely the responsibility of staff within the district. The overview of the process for the College Credit Plus course offered within the Pickerington schools is this: 1.
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Students will register for classes like any other Pickerington course. Students must apply to the college partner through the college’s admissions process, usually online. Students must be determined to be “college ready.” This could mean through the ACT or a placement test given by the college, and this measure may vary between courses. Students and their parents will sign the state­required Dual Enrollment Forms. Students will have their information reviewed by the district to ensure that they are qualified for the specific courses they wish to take. Once the district has confirmed that all proper steps have been taken and that the student has met the college’s requirements, the counseling department at the schools will receive a list of students to add to the course schedules. School counselors will not add students to CCP courses without the approval of the district office. Students wishing to drop a CCP course will continue to do so through their respective school counselors, but remember to be mindful about the college’s deadlines. Students choosing to attend CCP courses on a college’s campus or online may do so, but must make arrangements directly with the college that is administering the class. Course­related costs (tuition and books) are not passed to students or their families, but the student is responsible for transportation to any course located off­site. CCP courses are not offered solely at the discretion of the district​
. The process is dynamic and may change throughout the student registration process in Pickerington. As course availability changes or college partnerships shift, it is important that students and their families be up to date with revisions and messages. Information will be sent out in several forms: 1) announcements made during normal school messages at the school, 2) OneCall Now 10 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS emails by the schools (please make sure email contacts are current and checked), 3) actively check for updates under the “AP and College Credit Plus” section of the PHS North or Central website. Description of College Credit Plus offerings in Pickerington These descriptions of our College Credit Plus options were created by our college partners. Please note that the courses may have prerequisites listed, and that course prerequisites and descriptions may vary between school years. This list is the current list of courses pending final approval by our college partners and some courses may not be available for the 2016­2017 due to staffing restrictions or student interest. Please check the web­based version of this list for additions or changes. ART/CORE 1110 – Drawing Methods ● 3 college credits; 1 high school fine arts credit Drawing Methods provides an introduction to drawing techniques, methods, and concepts, employing strategies that serve the studio arts and design arts. Course projects center on ideation, observation, and creative growth through investigation of subjects including still life, environmental structure and the human form. Using traditional, digital, and hybrid media, a variety of compositional strategies and creative applications will be explored while technical skills are expanded. Critical examination and research of drawing practices in historic and contemporary context facilitate conceptual development. ART/IL 2031 ­ Drawing for Entertainment Design​
● 3 college credits; 1 high school fine arts credit Basic illustrative drawing skills for storytelling are introduced. Class assignments emphasize observation of the human figure through drawing costumed models. Projects explore character development and storyboards. ART/CORE 1120 ­ Visual Literacy I ● 3 college credits; 1 high school fine arts credit Visual Literacy I provides an introduction to the principles of creative design and the common organizational systems associated with color theory. Leveraging 2­D, 3­D and 4­D strategies, the elements of design and the properties of color are identified, employed and controlled in progressively more complex projects. Effective design strategies, color management tools, functional page layout, typographic principles and conceptual solutions are investigated. Course projects require the use of traditional studio processes in conjunction with digital media employing the Adobe Creative Cloud ­ Illustrator, Photoshop, and InDesign. Software literacy is facilitated by lectures, demonstrations and specialized technological support. Critical examination and research of design practices in historic context and contemporary applications initiate conceptual development. ART/CORE 1221 ­ Visual Literacy II​
● 3 college credits; 1 high school fine arts credit Visual Literacy II lectures, demonstrations, specialized software lessons and projects support creative development through contextual applications of color and design. The conceptual, expressive, cultural, symbolic, and associative impact of color and design in society is examined. 2D, 3D, and 4D project strategies will include intermediate use of Illustrator, Photoshop, and InDesign as well as offer opportunities to utilize other software applications, such as Google Sketch­Up, After Effects and Premier. Development of pictorial space, thematic concepts, narrative and sequential imagery, and effective info­graphics are investigated. Knowledge of cross­disciplinary applications and technological literacy are facilitated by employing traditional studio processes, digital media, hybrid processes, and lens­based activities. Critical examination and research of design practices in historic context and contemporary applications expand conceptual development. Prerequisite: ART/CORE 1120 BMGT 1008 ­ 21st Century Workplace Skills ● 2 college credits; .67 high school elective credit In this fundamental course, students learn basic skills needed to gain entry to and thrive in a rapidly changing workplace environment. 11 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS BMGT 1101 ­ Principles of Business ● 3 college credits; 1 high school elective credit This course provides an overview of the various functions and activities of business enterprises. Marketing, human resources, accounting and finance, and operations are examined. Additionally, the topics of globalization and economics are covered. Students will learn important business terms and definitions. Prerequisite: placement into appropriate writing level (ENGL 0190) BIO 105 ­ Environmental Science ● 4 college credits; 1 high school credit in Science The course is an introduction to environmental science with an emphasis on the complexity and interrelatedness of environmental issues, concerns, problems and economics. The impact of humans on ecosystems, resources, energy and the environment are presented. Special reference is made to the significance of sustainability and the problems of pollution, waste management, hazardous and toxic materials. The roles of business, industry and government related to the environment will be addressed. Credit in ENGL 1100 strongly recommended BIO 160 ­ Biology I ● 5 college credits; 1 high school credit in Science This course explores general biological problems and processes as they are experienced by all living organisms: the chemistry and energetics of life, molecular genetics, cellular reproduction, and evolution. The laboratory portion enhances the theories and concepts presented in lecture. This is the first of a two­semester sequence ­ Biology I (BIO­160) and Biology II (BIO­161). Prerequisite: C (2.00) in high school Biology ​
and​
C (2.00) in high school Chemistry; credit in ENGL 1100 strongly recommended
BIO 161 ­ Biology II ● 5 college credits; 1 high school credit in Science The course explores general biological relationships and processes for all living organisms: plant and animal diversity, evolution, basic plant and animal systems, hormones, and immunology. The laboratory portion enhances the theories and concepts presented in lecture. Prerequisite: C grade (2.00) or better in BIO 160. CHEM 110 ­ General Chemistry I ● 5 college credits; 1 high school credit in Science The course includes the following topic areas: matter and measurement, significant figures, atomic and molecular structure, chemical formulas and equations, stoichiometry, solutions, thermochemistry, quantum theory, periodic properties, and chemical bonding theory. Problem solving during the course will develop analytical and interpretive skills and apply algebraic techniques. Laboratories will apply the principles learned in lecture, develop safety awareness, and enhance analytical, preparative and interpretive skills. Safety training and goggles are required for laboratory sessions. Prerequisite: C grade (2.00) or better in high school chemistry ​
and​
C grade (2.00) or better in MATH 1148 or appropriate ACT (22 math subscore) or ​
college­approved alternative​
Math placement. CHEM 111 ­ General Chemistry II ● 5 college credits; 1 high school credit in Science A continuation of General Chemistry I designed for the student pursuing an Associate of Science degree and/or interested in transfer credit. The course includes the following topic areas: intermolecular forces, properties of solutions, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, chemical thermodynamics, acid­base equilibria, buffers and electrochemistry. Problem solving during the course will develop analytical and interpretive skills and application of algebraic techniques. Laboratories will apply the principles learned in lecture, develop safety awareness, and enhance analytical, preparative and interpretive skills. Safety training and goggles are required for laboratory sessions. Prerequisite: C grade (2.00) or better in CHEM­110. CLA 1100 – Laboratory Theory in the Health­Related Industry ● 2 college credits; .67 high school elective Science credit This course is designed to provide theoretical concepts for individuals in the health related industries who may be interested in learning an additional set of medically related skills. This knowledge and skill set is intended to enhance current job proficiency or for potentially increasing employability in entry­level, health­related positions. The course is designed to encourage phlebotomists, medical assistants, nursing assistants, and other health­oriented industry personnel, to achieve competencies requiring basic laboratory testing as a part of the facility’s services. 12 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS Prerequisite: placement into college reading level (ACT Reading subscore of 21) and placement into ENGL 1100 (ACT English subscore of 18). Additional Biology coursework may be required. COLS 1100 ­ College First Year Experience Seminar ● 1 college credit; .33 high school elective credit The First Year Experience Seminar provides students with an introduction to the college. It emphasizes skills and resources necessary to be successful in their personal, academic and career­related pursuits, as well as engage in career exploration and selection of academic majors appropriate for the student’s career goals. The course includes an orientation to college resources, policies, and processes. EDUC 2210 ­ Introduction to Education ● 3 college credits; 1 high school elective credit An introduction to the teaching profession. Candidates engage in a variety of experiences that broadly explore the purposes of schools in society and the knowledge dispositions, and performances required to be an effective teacher today.​
Prerequisite: placement into ENGL 1100 or ACT English subscore of 18
ENGL 1100 ­ Composition I ● 3 college credits; 1 high school credit of English applied to ELA credits required for graduation English 1100 is an introductory college composition course offered locally, but taught by a college instructor. This course develops processes for critical reading and writing skills expected of academic work in the university setting. The course facilitates an awareness of the interplay among purpose, audience, content, structure, and style, while also introducing research and documentation methods and the many deliberate decisions writers must make in the writing process. Class readings and writing assignments may be thematically organized. This is a college course, offered for concurrent high school credit, and requires students to have a clear understanding of the fundamentals of effective writing at the time of enrollment and to be organized, self­motivated, and personally responsible for meeting deadlines. Prerequisite: placement into course by ACT English subscore 18 or college­approved alternative ENGL 2367 ­ Composition II ● 3 college credits; 1 high school credit of English applied to ELA credits required for graduation English 2367 is an intermediate college composition course that extends and refines skills in expository and argumentative writing, critical reading, critical thinking, and in­depth research. The largest component of this course focuses on researching a topic in order to gain a deeper level of understanding; assignments may include an annotated bibliography, formal outline, extended essay, and presentation. Course reading and writing assignments may be thematically organized. This is a college course, offered for concurrent high school credit, and requires students to have a clear understanding of the fundamentals of effective writing at the time of enrollment and to be organized, self­motivated, and personally responsible for meeting deadlines, demonstrated through the successful completion of introductory college coursework. Credit in ENGL 1100 is a prerequisite. Students electing to use previous AP coursework must transfer their AP credit from the College Board to the course college partner. ENGL 211 ­ Survey of American Literature I ● 3 college credits; 1 high school credit of English applied to ELA credits required for graduation Survey of American Literature I is designed to expose students to a wide range of early American literature. In this course, the student will examine the works of major writers in the U.S., from the early settlements to 1865. The student will read and critically analyze various genres, including essays, short stories, fiction, and the novel. The student will also use literary criticism and theories including, but not limited to, biographical criticism, gender criticism, historical criticism, psychological theories, and reader­response theories. Through a series of close readings, discussions, reader responses, critical essays, and argumentative papers, the student will trace the development of both literary and cultural movements such as Puritanism, Romanticism and Transcendentalism.​
Credit in ENGL 1100 with a “C” is a prerequisite; concurrent credit in ENGL 2367 recommended. 13 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS ENGL 212 ­ Survey of American Literature II ● 3 college credits; 1 high school credit of English applied to ELA credits required for graduation Survey of American Literature II is designed to expose the student to a wide range of later American literature. In this course, the student will examine the works of major writers in the U.S., beginning with the years following the Civil War and leading up to the present day. The student will read and critically analyze various genres, including essays, short stories, fiction, drama, and the novel. The student will also use literary criticism and theories including, but not limited to, biographical, gender, and historical criticisms, psychological theories, and reader­response theories. Through a series of close readings, discussions, reader responses, critical essays, and argumentative papers, the student will trace the development of both literary and cultural movements such as Realism and Modernism. ​
Credit in ENGL 1100 with a “C” is a prerequisite; concurrent credit in ENGL 2367 recommended.
ENGL 221 ­ Survey of British Literature I ● 3 college credits; 1 high school credit of English applied to ELA credits required for graduation This course provides the student with a general background in the literary, philosophical, and historical trends from the Middle Ages through the eighteenth century in Britain. The student will examine representative works from this historical period, tracing developments in style, language, and genre. The student will also make connections between the literature and the social and political events that contributed to its production. The student will use literary criticism and theories including, but not limited to, biographical criticism, gender criticism, historical criticism, psychological theories, and reader­response theories. Through a series of close readings, discussions, reader responses, critical essays, and argumentative papers, the student will trace the development of historical, cultural, and literary movements, such as the Middle Ages, Renaissance, Restoration, and Enlightenment. ​
Credit in ENGL 1100 with a “C” is a prerequisite; concurrent credit in ENGL 2367 recommended. ENGL 222 ­ Survey of British Literature II ● 3 college credits; 1 high school credit of English applied to the four ELA credits required for graduation This course provides the student with a general background in the literary, philosophical, and historical trends from 1800 to the present in Britain. The student will examine representative works from this historical period, tracing developments in style, language, and genre. The student will also make connections between the literature and the social and political events that contributed to its production. The student will use literary criticism and theories including, but not limited to, biographical criticism, gender criticism, historical criticism, psychological theories, and reader­response theories. Through a series of close readings, discussions, reader responses, critical essays, and argumentative papers, the student will trace the development of historical, cultural, and literary movements, such as the Romantic period, Victorian period, and the Twentieth Century. ​
Credit in ENGL 1100 with a “C” is a prerequisite; concurrent credit in ENGL 2367 recommended. FREN 1101 ­ Beginning French I ● 4 college credits; 1 high school credit in French FREN 1101 presents an introduction to the fundamentals of the French language with practice in listening, reading, speaking and writing. Course also includes selected studies in French culture. Prerequisite: Placement into ENGL 1100, ACT English subscore of 18. FREN 1102 ­ Beginning French II ● 4 college credits; 1 high school credit in French This course is a continuation of FREN 1101, with further development of listening, reading, speaking and writing skills and further study of French culture. Prerequisite: FREN 1101, minimum grade of “C” HIST 150 ­ American History to 1877 ● 3 college credits; 1 high school elective credit of Social Studies (must be taken with HIST 1152 to complete American History requirement for graduation) This course covers a wide range of topics in early American history from the Age of Discovery through the Civil War and Reconstruction. It is an introduction to the study of history and to the political, economic, intellectual and social themes that have shaped our present society. Prerequisite: placement into ENGL 1100, ACT English subscore of 18. 14 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS HIST 151 ­ American History since 1877 ● 3 college credits; 1 high school elective credit of Social Studies (must be taken with HIST 1151 to complete American History requirement for graduation) This course covers a wide range of topics in modern American history from Reconstruction to the present time. It is an introduction to the study of history and to the political, economic, intellectual, and social themes that have shaped our present society. Prerequisite: placement into ENGL 1100, ACT English subscore 18. HIST 2223 ­ African­American History I before 1877 ● 3 college credits; 1 high school elective credit of Social Studies The class is primarily a lecture/discussion course which includes the history of African Americans in the New World from the time of the slave trade to the end of Reconstruction. Prerequisite: placement into ENGL 1100, ACT English subscore 18. HIST 2224 ­ African­American History II since 1877 ● 3 college credits; 1 high school elective credit of Social Studies The class is primarily a lecture/discussion course which includes the history of African Americans from the end of Reconstruction to present times. Prerequisite: placement into ENGL 1100, ACT English subscore 18. HIST 1100 ­ Western Civilization to 1492 ● 3 college credits; 1 high school elective credit of History This course is a survey of Western Civilization examining ideas and cultural and political institutions from prehistory through the early part of the Reformation. Subjects covered include: ancient Middle East, Greece, Rome, Christianity, Islam, the Early Middle Ages, the High Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Reformation, and European voyages of discovery. Prerequisite: placement into ENGL 1100, ACT English subscore 18. HIST 1110 ­ Western Civilization from 1492 to Present ● 3 college credits; 1 high school elective credit of History This is a survey of Western Civilization examining ideas and cultural and political institutions from the European Age of Discovery to the present day. Topics covered include: the Wars of Religion, the Scientific Revolution, Absolutism, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, nineteenth century science and ideologies, twentieth century wars, the Cold War and Globalization. Prerequisite: placement into ENGL 1100, ACT English subscore 18. HIST 1121 – Modern East Asia ● 3 college credits; 1 high school elective credit of History Modern East Asia will provide students with a foundation in early modern to modern history of China, Korea, Japan and Vietnam. Topics for the course will include, but are not limited to; the early modern/late traditional era including European and American contact with Asia, the end of the Tokugawa period in Japan, the Meiji Reformation, the decline and partition of China, Industrialization and Imperialism through World War II, Communism in China, the Korean Conflict, Indo­China through the Vietnam War and an examination of the successor states in Modern East Asia. Prerequisite: placement into ENGL 1100, ACT English subscore 18. HUMS 1010 ­ Leadership Development Studies ● 3 college credits; 1 high school elective credit This course is designed to provide emerging and existing leaders the opportunity to explore the concept of leadership and to develop and improve leadership skills. The course integrates readings from the humanities, experiential exercises, films, and contemporary readings on leadership. Prerequisite: placement into ENGL 1100, ACT English subscore 18. HUMS 1020 ­ Critical Thinking ● 3 college credits; 1 high school elective credit Critical Thinking is the general term given to a wide range of cognitive skills. The purpose of this course is to develop these skills through readings and activities. This will be accomplished through drawing inferences from data; identifying language problems, including ambiguity and vagueness; recognizing hidden assumptions; and developing the skill of making rationally defensible choices. Students will be challenged to identify their own styles of critical thought, and to apply new techniques to real­life issues. Prerequisite: placement into ENGL 1100, ACT English subscore 18. 15 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS MATH 1110 ­ Mathematics for Business ● 4 college credits; 1 high school credit of Math applied to Math credits for graduation Provides the mathematical skills needed to solve business application problems and satisfies the math requirement of several of the Zane State technologies. Fractions, decimals, checking accounts, equations, percentages, business statistics, the metric system, trade and cash discounts, markups and markdowns, taxes, insurance, mortgages, simple interest and simple discount, compound interest, consumer credit, annuities, depreciation, and payroll are studied. Prerequisite: Placement by testing MATH 1120 – Technical Mathematics ● 3 college credits; 1 high school credit of Math applied to Math credits for graduation This course contains skills and applications related to the engineering technologies with an emphasis on formulas, graphing, trigonometry, vectors, exponential and logarithmic functions. Prerequisite: Placement by testing MATH 1230 ­ Industrial Mathematics ● 4 college credits; 1 high school credit of Math applied to Math credits for graduation Algebraic expressions and operations, ratio, proportions, direct, inverse and joint variation, measurement in the metric system and the U.S. Customary system, basic geometry, trigonometry of the right triangle, factoring, solving linear and quadratic equations in one of more variables, oblique triangles including the law of sines and the law of cosines are studied. Prerequisite: Placement by testing MATH 1148 ­ College Algebra ● 4 college credits; 1 high school credit of Math applied to Math credits for graduation This course is a continuation of the study of functions. The concept of transformations is used to graph and analyze functions including quadratic, higher degree polynomial, power, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions. The function concept is applied to solving equation inequalities, and applications regarding these types of functions. Factor and remainder theorems and roots of polynomial functions are included. The concept of functions is extended to include composition of functions and inverse functions. Systems of linear and non­linear equations are solved using algebraic and graphical methods. Trigonometric functions of right angles are defined and used in problem solving. ​
Prerequisite: ACT qualifying Math subscore of 22 or college­approved alternative placement into course MATH 1149 ­ Trigonometry ● 4 college credits; 1 high school credit of Math applied to Math credits for graduation This course is a study of the trigonometric functions, vectors, and related applications. Topics include right triangle trigonometry; trigonometry of general angles; the unit circle; the graphs of the trigonometric functions; analytical trigonometry; inverse trigonometric functions; verifying identities; solving trigonometric equations; the Law of Sines; the Law of Cosines; applications of trigonometry; polar coordinates and the graphs of polar equations; geometric and algebraic vectors; vector applications; plane curves and parametric equations; trigonometric form of complex numbers; DeMoivre’s Theorem. The conic sections are defined and analyzed algebraically and graphically. Prerequisite: MATH 1148 or ACT qualifying Math subscore of 26 or college­approved alternative placement into course MATH­130 Introduction to Statistics ● 3 college credits; 1 high school credit of Math applied to Math credits for graduation This is a non­calculus, introductory course in descriptive and inferential statistics. Concepts are explained intuitively and supported by examples. The applications are general in nature, and the exercises include problems from agriculture, biology, business, economics, education, environmental studies, psychology, engineering, medicine, sociology, and computer science. Prerequisite: ACT or ​
college­approved alternative​
placement into course 16 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS MATH 1151 – Calculus I ● 5 college credits; 1 high school credit of Math applied to Math credits for graduation This course provides an introduction to differential calculus. Topics presented include functions, limits, continuity, derivatives, differentiation rules, and derivatives of the trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions, related rates, extrema, curve sketching, and optimization. Course also introduces integral calculus: antiderivatives, definite integral, Riemann sums, area under a curve, Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, numerical integration, integration by substitution, and derivatives and integrals of inverse trigonometric, hyperbolic, and inverse hyperbolic functions. Applications to problems in science and engineering are highlighted. Prerequisite: MATH 1149 or ​
college­approved alternative​
placement into course, ACT qualifying Math subscore of 28. MATH 1152 – Calculus II ● 5 college credits; 1 high school credit of Math applied to Math credits for graduation This course continues the introduction to integral calculus. Topics covered include integration of exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, inverse trigonometric functions, volume and surface area of solids of revolution, arc length, and methods of integration. Course also presents L’Hopital’s Rule and Improper Integrals. Students will learn to analyze plane curves given parametrically or in polar coordinates, and their differential and integral calculus. Students will learn about infinite sequences and series, their sum and/or convergence, conic sections, vectors in the plane and in space. Applications to problems in science and engineering are noted. Prerequisite: MATH 1151 MKTG 1230 Customer Service & Sales ● 3 college credits; 1 high school elective credit MKTG 1230 provides an introduction to the sales process and the key role that sales activities play in any consumer or commercial business endeavor. The course deals with the basic components of selling including understanding customer psychology and building customer relationships. This course also emphasizes the important issues facing customer service providers and customer service managers in business. Special emphasis is placed on the mastery of specific skills and analyzing customer attitudes and behaviors to determine the tasks required to deliver excellent customer service. MLT 1100 ­ Basic Concepts in Health Care ● 2 college credits; .67 high school elective Science credit This course provides a general introduction to health care in the U.S. General topics such as health care past and present, legal and ethical issues, diversity in health care, safety topics, and health industry systems will be covered. Professional attributes, skills, and qualities needed for success in a health care career are also discussed. Prerequisite: placement into college reading level (ACT Reading subscore of 21) and placement into ENGL 1100, ACT English subscore of 18.
MULT 1500 ­ Concepts for the Pharmacy Technician​
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(taught concurrently with MULT 1525) ● 4 college credits; 1 high school elective credit of Science This course prepares students to work under the supervision of a registered Pharmacist in preparing medications for dispensing to patients according to physician orders. Topics covered include reading and interpreting prescriptions, dosage calculations, aseptic technique, drug compounding, dose conversions, inventory control, billing and reimbursement. This course prepares students for the Pharmacy Technician Certification Board Exam. Prerequisite: must be a graduating senior able to pass a criminal background check and drug screening MULT 1525 ­ Basic Health Care Analytical Concepts​
​
(taught concurrently with MULT 1500) ● 1 college credit; .33 high school elective credit of Science This course provides students with the mathematical skills and strategies required to successfully work in the allied health fields. Topics covered include: an introduction to the metric and apothecary systems of measure, dose conversions, strengths of solutions, unit conversions between Fahrenheit and Celsius scales, ratio and proportion calculations, common abbreviations used in interpreting prescriptions, dosage calculations. PHYS 110 ­ Algebra­Based Physics I ● 5 college credits; 1 high school credit of Science This is a laboratory course in classical mechanics (kinematics, Newton’s laws, gravitation, energy, momentum, rotational motion, and angular momentum) as well as fluids, harmonic motion, waves, and sound. Prerequisites: placement into MATH 1148 or higher; ACT Math subscore of 22, placement into ENGL 1100 recommended 17 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS PHYS 111 ­ Algebra­Based Physics II ● 5 college credits; 1 high school credit of Science This is a laboratory course in classical electromagnetism (electric charge, field and potential, DC circuits, magnetic forces and fields, induction, and electromagnetic waves), geometric and physical optics, and topics in modern physics (special relativity and quantum, atomic, and nuclear physics). Prerequisite: PHYS 110 POLS 1100 ­ Introduction to American Government ● 3 college credits; 1 high school credit of Social Studies – ​
fulfills the student’s POD requirement This course introduces students to the nature, purpose and structure of the American political system. Attention is given to the institutions and processes that create public policy. The strengths and weaknesses of the American political system are discussed, along with the role of citizens in a democracy. Prerequisite: placement into ENGL 1100, ACT English subscore 18.
POLS 1200 ­ Comparative Politics ● 3 college credits; 1 high school elective credit of Social Studies This course is designed as an introductory survey class for the student interested in the field of comparative politics. Students will analyze what comparative politics is; explore a theoretical framework that helps the student understand the basic principles found within comparative politics; and will study specific countries by analyzing their history, institutions, political culture, and economy. Prerequisite: placement into ENGL 1100, ACT English subscore 18. POLS 1250 ­ State & Local Government ● 3 college credits; 1 high school elective credit of Social Studies This course introduces the student to the nature, purpose and structure of state and local governments, especially in Ohio. Attention is given to the institutions and processes that create public policy, including fiscal policy and the court system. The strengths and weaknesses of the state and local government system are discussed along with the everyday role of citizens in a democracy, especially at these levels of government. Prerequisite: placement into ENGL 1100, ACT English subscore 18. SOC 100 ­ Introduction to Sociology ● 3 college credits; 1 high school elective credit of Social Studies Sociology is the study of social groups and societal institutions and their effect on society and individuals. Topics covered include research methods, theoretical perspectives, culture, the structure and organization of society, systems of stratification including global inequality, racial stratification, social class and gender stratification, major social institutions and current topics. SOC 2060 ­ Race and Ethnicity ● 3 college credits; 1 high school elective credit of Social Studies An exploration of American diversity in terms of the dynamics of intergroup relations, focusing on selected racial and ethnic groups. In addition, other diversities that may be included in the exploration: religion, gender, sexual preference, and the Appalachian area. Prerequisite: placement into ENGL 1100, ACT English subscore 18. SPAN 1101 ­ Spanish I ● 4 college credits; 1 high school credit of Spanish​
This class prepares the student to connect with the language and cultures of the Spanish­speaking word. Through the introduction of cultural themes and related activities, the student will engage in meaningful communication in the Spanish language and have various opportunities to practice the basic foundations of comprehending, reading, speaking, and writing the language. Spanish is the primary language of classroom instruction. The course content includes grammar and practical vocabulary applications. ​
Prerequisite: Placement into ENGL 1100, ACT English subscore 18. 18 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS SPAN 1102 ­ Spanish II ● 4 college credits; 1 high school credit of Spanish This class is a continuation of Spanish I and increases the foundational knowledge and comprehension of Spanish. The course further prepares the student to connect with the language and cultures of the Spanish­speaking world. Through the continued introduction of cultural themes and related activities, the student will engage in meaningful communication in the Spanish language and have various opportunities to continue to practice the basic foundations of comprehending, reading, speaking, and writing the language. Spanish is the primary language of classroom instruction. The course content includes additional grammar and practical vocabulary applications. Prerequisite: credit in SPAN 1100 with a minimum grade of a ‘C’ THEA 1100 ­ Introduction to Theatre ● 3 college credits; 1 high school credit of Fine Arts This course is designed to help students bring critical thinking skills into their experience as theatre goers.
THEA 2205 ­ Technical Production Practicum ● 2 college credits; .67 high school credit of Fine Arts This course offers a supervised practical experience in the technical area(s) of a theatre production 19 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS ENGLISH DEPARTMENT ALL COURSES ARE 3 MODS UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED IN CLASS LENGTH Course No. Title Availability Credit FRESHMAN ENGLISH 405 English 9 9 1.00 408H Honors English 9 9 1.00 SOPHOMORE ENGLISH 411 English 10 10 1.00 414H Honors English 10 10 1.00 JUNIOR ENGLISH 417 English 11 11 1.00 426H Honors English 11 11 1.00 421H Honors Extended Thematic Studies 11 11 1.00 418AP AP English Language & Composition 11, 12 1.00 419AP AP English Literature & Composition 11, 12 1.00 SENIOR ENGLISH* 429 English 12 12 1.00 422H Honors Extended Thematic Studies 12 12 1.00 418AP AP English Language & Composition 11, 12 1.00 419AP AP English Literature & Composition 11, 12 1.00 ELECTIVES 444 Journalism 1 9, 10, 11, 12 .50 446 Journalism 2 10, 11, 12 1.00 441 Applied Public Relations/Sports Information 11, 12 1.00 807 Yearbook 9, 10, 11, 12 1.00 410 Public Speaking and Discourse 9, 10, 11, 12 .50 ENGL1100CCP Composition 1 CCP 9, 10, 11, 12 1.00 ENGL2367CCP Composition 2 CCP 9, 10, 11, 12 1.00 ENGL211CC
P ENGL212CC
P ENGL221CC
P ENGL222CC
P Length Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y (4 mods) Y (4 mods) Y Y Y (4 mods) Y (4 mods) S Y Y Y S S S Survey of American Literature I CCP 9, 10, 11, 12 1.00 S Survery of American Literature II CCP 9, 10, 11, 12 1.00 S Survey of British Literature I CCP 9, 10, 11, 12 1.00 S Survey of British Literature II CCP 9, 10, 11, 12 1.00 S *Seniors who anticipate early graduation need to see their counselor to register for English. All courses in English Language Arts will follow the Common Core State Standards adopted by Ohio and ​
forty­one other states, the District of Columbia, four territories, and the Department of Defense Education Activity (DoDEA)​
. In these courses, students should expect the following emphases provided below. Students in grades 11­12 have the options of AP Language and Composition and AP Literature or Honors English 11, Honors Thematic Studies 11 and Honors Thematic Studies 12. Students in 9­10 have the option of Honors or College Preparatory English. The course descriptions and course numbers follow. In the common core, students follow a progression of content from kindergarten through twelfth grade that is designed to prepare all students for the rigors of college and the workplace through a focus on reading, writing, language, and speaking and listening standards. Reading: Students will utilize close reading strategies to examine increasingly complex literary and informational texts containing universal themes and information of value to students’ lives in printed, audio, and visual formats. Students will analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and compare and contrast the development of themes, use of language, and the delivery of information to discern the authority and validity of sources, using written, spoken, and listening skills. 20 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS Writing/Language: Students will respond to tasks in clear and coherent writing using deliberate vocabulary choices and following the conventions and craft of Standard English. They will successfully develop narrative, expository and argumentative writing pieces at each grade level. Emphasis will be on providing evidence for analyses and the use of short and sustained research to support written ideas. Speaking and Listening: Students should expect a strong emphasis on student inquiry and peer­group collaboration reflecting a growing need for collaborative skills in career and college environments. This emphasis will require students to present information to peers and discuss complex ideas in order to participate in civil discourse and reach higher levels of understanding. 405 ­ ENGLISH 9 Full Year • 1 credit • Fee • Required unless taking ESL English, or Honors English 9. • End­of­Course State Test required. 408H – HONORS ENGLISH 9 Full Year • 1 credit • Fee • Fulfills English requirement • Recommended for students interested in extending learning beyond regular courses. • End­of­Course State Test required. Pickerington Local School District recommends honors English classes for students interested in extending learning beyond regular courses through greater depth of content exploration and enrichment/mastery of Common Core skill sets requisite for success in AP and college­level course work. Course includes quarterly independent reading and a summer assignment. 411 ­ ENGLISH 10 Full Year • 1 credit • Fee • Required unless taking ESL English or Honors English 10. • End­of­Course State Test required. 414H – HONORS ENGLISH 10 Full Year • 1 credit • Fee • Fulfills English requirement • Recommended for students interested in extending learning beyond regular courses. • End­of­Course State Test required. Pickerington Local School District recommends honors English classes for students interested in extending learning beyond regular courses through greater depth of content exploration and enrichment/mastery of Common Core skill sets requisite for success in AP and college­level course work. Course includes quarterly independent reading and a summer assignment. 417 ­ ENGLISH 11 Full Year • 1 credit • Fee • Required unless taking Honors English 11, Honors Extended Thematic Studies 11 or AP English Language/Literature and Composition 426H – HONORS ENGLISH 11 Full Year • 1 credit • Fee • Fulfills English requirement • Recommended for students interested in extending learning beyond regular courses. Pickerington Local School District recommends honors English classes for students interested in extending learning beyond regular courses through greater depth of content exploration and enrichment/mastery of Common Core skill sets requisite for success in AP and college­level course work. Course includes quarterly independent reading and a summer assignment. 421H – HONORS EXTENDED THEMATIC STUDIES 11 Full Year • 1 credit • Fee • Fulfills English requirement • Grade 11 Working above and beyond the requirements of the common core, Honors Extended Thematic Studies in Literature 11 is the first year of a two­year, team­taught course. The course is designed to individualize instruction based upon students’ multiple intelligence profiles and individualized learning goals set by each student at the beginning of the year. Therefore, this course will evolve based upon a collaboration of teacher and students to design the types of activities and assessments that will allow the group to demonstrate their mastery of the skills set forth in the common core. In particular, students will be challenged to flex their individual creativity and problem­solving skills and work collaboratively to design and complete projects aligned with the class goals. The curriculum demands artistic expression, performance (narrative poetry, visual arts) and public speaking founded in both traditional and nontraditional research. Team teaching of the course across grade levels facilitates a focus on community with junior students benefitting from direct mentoring by seniors. The student who chooses this course should demonstrate a mature grasp of time management and the ability to handle long­range projects both during the junior year and moving into a year­long project the following year. 21 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS 429 ­ ENGLISH 12 Full Year • 1 credit • Fee • Required unless taking Honors Extended Thematic Studies 12, AP English Language & Composition or AP English Literature & Composition. 422H – HONORS EXTENDED THEMATIC STUDIES 12 Full Year • 1 credit • Fee • Fulfills English requirement • Grade 12 Working above and beyond the requirements of the common core, Honors Extended Thematic Studies in Literature 12 is the second year of a two­year, team­taught course. The course is designed to individualize instruction based upon students’ multiple intelligence profiles and individualized learning goals. Therefore, this course will evolve based upon a collaboration of teacher and students to design the types of activities and assessments that will allow the group to demonstrate their mastery of the skills set forth in the common core. Extending the skills developed in grade 11, not only will students mentor their younger peers in Honors Thematics 11, they will be challenged to examine their individual interests and engage in a year­long research­based project. As part of that project, students will locate, consult, and collaborate with an adult community mentor having expertise in their field of study. This extended research study culminates in an adjudicated public presentation, professional portfolio, and student­created product. A mature grasp of time management, the ability to handle long­range projects, problem­solving skills, creativity, and a collaborative spirit are all both essential skills and targeted areas of growth within this course. 418AP – AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION Full Year • 4 mods • 1 credit • Fee • Fulfills English requirement • Grades 11, 12 • Prerequisite: English 10 or 11. The AP Program is intended for any student who wishes to work on a collegiate level in high school. The College Board encourages high schools to remove all barriers to admittance for AP courses. Recommended: A­ or better in English 10. This course emphasizes the development of skills in critical reading of texts from a variety of historical periods and disciplines. American literary and non­fictional texts are emphasized and include literature, speeches, sermons, historical documents, personal narratives, novels, short stories, and poetry. This is for the students capable of doing college­level work in English while they are in secondary school and willing to devote the energy necessary to complete a course more rigorous and demanding than other high school English courses designed for the college­bound student. ​
Required summer reading. Advanced placement courses are demanding and require daily homework. The class concludes with a college level exam, prepared by the College Board, which, if passed, may result in college credit. 419AP ­ AP ENGLISH LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION Full Year • 4 mods • 1 credit • Fee • Fulfills English requirement • Grades 11, 12 • Prerequisite: English 11. The AP Program is intended for any student who wishes to work on a collegiate level in high school. The College Board encourages high schools to remove all barriers to admittance for AP courses. Recommended: A­ or better in English 11. This is a course emphasizing the development of skills in critical reading of "texts of recognized literary merit" and in writing about literature and related ideas. Response to classic and modern literature will be used in class discussions, informal and formal writing assignments, oral presentations, and research. This is for the students capable of doing college­level work in English while they are in secondary school and willing to devote the energy necessary to complete a course more rigorous and demanding than other high school English courses designed for the college­bound student. ​
Required summer reading. Advanced placement courses are demanding and require daily homework. The class concludes with a college level exam, prepared by the College Board, which, if passed, may result in college credit. ELECTIVES 444 ­ JOURNALISM 1 Semester • 1/2 credit • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 This course will provide an introduction to the basic skills necessary to be a journalist and will greatly benefit students interested in a career in communications. It will cover various topics: mass media, reporting, editing, advertising, and news on the journalism site. In addition, the students will write articles for the school site and an emphasis will be placed on writing. 446 ­ JOURNALISM 2 Full Year • 1 credit • Grades 10, 11, 12 • Recommend ​
C​
or better in Journalism 1/or by Instructor approval. This course is offered for students who wish to advance their skills in the field of journalism. The course will concentrate on the production of the high school journalism site. Students will construct and publish on a monthly basis a school article for the site. News reporting, photography, advertising, and article make­up will be emphasized. 22 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS 441 ­ APPLIED PUBLIC RELATIONS/SPORTS INFORMATION Full Year • 1 credit • Grades 11, 12 The Applied Public Relations/Sports Information course, open to four students in grades 11 and 12 at each high school, is a year­long, hands­on study of the real­world application of public relations, journalism and social media tactics and strategies. Students will work directly with the school district's Public Relations Office to develop content for websites and social media channels. This content could include, but not be limited to, written feature stories, photography, and videos of events and activities at the high schools. Assignment areas would vary by student interest, but the anticipation is that some of the participants would focus on covering high school athletics. This course will be limited to four students at each of the district's high schools. Interested students must be excellent writers. Students with a sincere interest in pursuing college majors in public relations, journalism, communication or similar fields are highly encouraged to consider this course. To be considered for Applied Public Relations, students must interview with the district's Public Relations Director and submit samples of written work. Interviews are held in the late spring. 807 ­ YEARBOOK Full Year • 1 credit • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • Elective • Fee • Instructor approval required Students learn the basics of magazine layout and design, copywriting, marketing, desktop publishing, photography, and deadline production. Students will produce pages in the yearbook. As students learn, they will earn the opportunity to work toward editorial positions. Yearbook may be offered as an independent study (see instructor). 410 ­ PUBLIC SPEAKING AND DISCOURSE Semester • 1/2 credit • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 This course is designed to build a student’s confidence and improve communication skills in public speaking. The student will study effective ways to communicate, i.e. learning the vocalization process; using nonverbal and verbal techniques to communicate effectively; developing key listening skills; making language choices in speech preparation; organizing and delivering speeches for various purposes; and becoming more effective in group discussions. The emphasis in this class is on active participation and on presenting a variety of speeches. Speaking in front of others will no longer intimidate the student who successfully completes this course. ENGL1100CCP ­ COMPOSITION 1 CCP Semester • 1 high school credit of English applied to English credits for graduation • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • 3 college credits • Prerequisite: placement into course by ACT English subscore of 18 or college­approved alternative. English 1100 is an introductory college composition course offered locally, but taught by a high school instructor. This course develops processes for critical reading and writing skills expected of academic work in the university setting. The course facilitates an awareness of the interplay among purpose, audience, content, structure, and style, while also introducing research and documentation methods and the many deliberate decisions writers must make in the writing process. Class readings and writing assignments may be thematically organized. ​
This is a college course, offered for concurrent high school credit, and ​
requires students to have a clear understanding of the fundamentals of effective writing at the time of enrollment and to be organized, self­motivated, and personally responsible for meeting deadlines. The Columbus State Community College English Department has designed ENGL 1100 and 2367 as a sequence with each successive course dependent on the previous course and encourages students to register for English 2367 the semester after they take English 1100. ENGL2367CCP ­ COMPOSITION 2 CCP Semester • 1 high school credit of English applied to English credits for graduation • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • 3 college credits • Prerequisite: Credit in ENGL1100CCP English 2367 is an intermediate college composition course that extends and refines skills in expository and argumentative writing, critical reading, critical thinking, and in­depth research. The largest component of this course focuses on researching a topic in order to gain a deeper level of understanding; assignments may include an annotated bibliography, formal outline, extended essay, and presentation. Course reading and writing assignments may be thematically organized. ​
This is a college course, offered for concurrent high school credit​
, and ​
requires students to have a clear understanding of the fundamentals of effective writing at the time of enrollment and to be organized, self­motivated, and personally responsible for meeting deadlines, demonstrated through the successful completion of introductory college coursework. Students electing to use previous AP coursework must transfer their AP credit from the College Board to the course college partner. 23 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS ENGL211CCP ­ ​
SURVEY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE I CCP Semester • 1 high school credit of English applied to English credits for graduation • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • 3 college credits • Prerequisite: Credit in ENG1100DC with a “C” or higher • Concurrent credit in ENGL 2367 is recommended Survey of American Literature I is designed to expose students to a wide range of early American literature. In this course, the student will examine the works of major writers in the U.S., from the early settlements to 1865. The student will read and critically analyze various genres, including essays, short stories, fiction, and the novel. The student will also use literary criticism and theories including, but not limited to, biographical criticism, gender criticism, historical criticism, psychological theories, and reader­response theories. Through a series of close readings, discussions, reader responses, critical essays, and argumentative papers, the student will trace the development of both literary and cultural movements such as Puritanism, Romanticism and Transcendentalism. ENGL212CCP ­ ​
SURVEY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE II CCP Semester • 1 high school credit of English applied to English credits for graduation • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • 3 college credits • Prerequisite: Credit in ENG1100DC with a “C” or higher • Concurrent credit in ENGL 2367 is recommended Survey of American Literature II is designed to expose the student to a wide range of later American literature. In this course, the student will examine the works of major writers in the U.S., beginning with the years following the Civil War and leading up to the present day. The student will read and critically analyze various genres, including essays, short stories, fiction, drama, and the novel. The student will also use literary criticism and theories including, but not limited to, biographical, gender, and historical criticisms, psychological theories, and reader­response theories. Through a series of close readings, discussions, reader responses, critical essays, and argumentative papers, the student will trace the development of both literary and cultural movements such as Realism and Modernism. ENGL221CCP ­ ​
SURVEY OF BRITISH LITERATURE I CCP Semester • 1 high school credit of English applied to English credits for graduation • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • 3 college credits • Prerequisite: Credit in ENG1100DC with a “C” or higher • Concurrent credit in ENGL 2367 is recommended This course provides the student with a general background in the literary, philosophical, and historical trends from the Middle Ages through the eighteenth century in Britain. The student will examine representative works from this historical period, tracing developments in style, language, and genre. The student will also make connections between the literature and the social and political events that contributed to its production. The student will use literary criticism and theories including, but not limited to, biographical criticism, gender criticism, historical criticism, psychological theories, and reader­response theories. Through a series of close readings, discussions, reader responses, critical essays, and argumentative papers, the student will trace the development of historical, cultural, and literary movements, such as the Middle Ages, Renaissance, Restoration, and Enlightenment. ENGL222CCP ­ ​
SURVEY OF BRITISH LITERATURE II​
CCP Semester • 1 high school credit of English applied to English credits for graduation • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • 3 college credits • Prerequisite: Credit in ENG1100DC with a “C” or higher • Concurrent credit in ENGL 2367 is recommended This course provides the student with a general background in the literary, philosophical, and historical trends from 1800 to the present in Britain. The student will examine representative works from this historical period, tracing developments in style, language, and genre. The student will also make connections between the literature and the social and political events that contributed to its production. The student will use literary criticism and theories including, but not limited to, biographical criticism, gender criticism, historical criticism, psychological theories, and reader­response theories. Through a series of close readings, discussions, reader responses, critical essays, and argumentative papers, the student will trace the development of historical, cultural, and literary movements, such as the Romantic period, Victorian period, and the Twentieth Century. 24 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS THEATRE DEPARTMENT Course No. 560 562 564 566 568 570 572 574 THEA2205CCP THEA1100CCP ALL COURSES ARE 3 MODS UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED IN LENGTH Title Availability Credit Theatre 1 9 .50 Theatre 2 9, 10, 11, 12 .50 Theatre 3 9, 10, 11, 12 .50 Theatre 4 10, 11, 12 .50 Theatre Production 1 9, 10, 11, 12 .50 Theatre Production 2 9, 10, 11, 12 .50 Theatre Production 3 10, 11, 12 .50 Theatre Production 4 10, 11, 12 .50 Technical Production Practicum CCP 9, 10, 11, 12 .67 Introduction to Theatre CCP 9, 10, 11, 12 .67 Length S S S S S S S S S S 560 ­ THEATRE 1 Semester • 1/2 credit • Grade 9 • Fee Students will learn about Theatre history. They will also learn about stage make­up and costuming. Students will learn about theatre as a business as well as how to market themselves as an actor. Also, students will learn how to perform small scenes and monologues. They will be assessed on their participation, quizzes, worksheets, group work, and performances. 562 ­ THEATRE 2 Semester • 1/2 credit • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • Fee • Prerequisite: Theatre 1 This course is constructed as an accelerated Theatre I. Students will develop a sophisticated use of acting skills, improvisation, pantomimes, stage makeup, stage combat, monologues, dialogues, methods of acting and short scenes. Students will learn the structures of musical theatre and read two plays. They will be assessed on their participation, quizzes, worksheets, group work, projects and performances. 564 ­ THEATRE 3 Semester • 1/2 credit • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • Fee • Prerequisites: Theatre 1 and Theatre 2 and ​
AUDITION​
for the instructor. This is for the advanced theatre student who may be interested in acting, directing or production work. This class produces the Holiday Dinner­Theatre or other special events and helps with the production of the Fall Play. This is an audition­based course and instructor permits entry in this class. 566 ­ THEATRE 4 Semester • 1/2 credit • Grades 10, 11, 12 • Fee • Prerequisite: Theatre 1 and 2, Independent Theatre 1 and ​
AUDITION for the instructor. This course is for those students who want to produce longer works. Class members will produce a Mystery Dinner­Theatre or other special events and help in the production of the Spring Musical. This is an audition­based course and instructor permits entry in this class. 568 ­ THEATRE PRODUCTION 1 Semester • 1/2 credit • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • Fee This course is designed to be a practical, hands­on approach to theatre. Students will be introduced to the fundamentals of lighting, sound, and rigging and will concentrate on learning the fundamentals of scenery construction by helping to construct the set for the Fall Play. They will also serve as crew members for various school district events which are produced in the Performing Arts Center. 25 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS 570 ­ THEATRE PRODUCTION 2 Semester • 1/2 credit • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • Fee This course is a continuation of Theatre Production 1. Greater emphasis is placed on lighting, sound, and rigging. Students will serve as construction crew members for the Spring Musical and also serve as crew members for various school district events which are produced in the Performing Arts Center. 572 ­ THEATRE PRODUCTION 3 Semester • 1/2 credit • Grades 10, 11, 12 • Fee • Repeatable • Prerequisite: Theatre Production 1 and Theatre Production 2, Extensive experience on crews of the Fall Play and Spring Musicals, and permission of Instructor ­ ​
INTERVIEW/AUDITION​
for the instructor. This class is for the serious technical theatre production student who has displayed outstanding technical and theatre construction skills on previous main stage productions. Under the direction of the instructor, the student will produce demanding projects during the semester. This class provides 1/2 Arts credit for college. 574 ­ THEATRE PRODUCTION 4 Semester • 1/2 credit • Grades 10, 11, 12 • Fee • Repeatable • Prerequisite: Independent Theatre Production 1, Extensive experience on production crews of the Fall Play and Spring Musicals, and permission of Instructor ­ ​
INTERVIEW/AUDITION​
for the instructor. This class is a continuation of Theatre Production 3. The student will produce challenging works in the technical or construction fields under the direction of the instructor. This class, taken in conjunction with THEA 2205DC, provides 0.67 college credits. Students electing college credit must select this course registration option and must meet the requirements set forth by the college partner. THEA2205CCP ­ TECHNICAL PRODUCTION PRACTICUM CCP Semester • 0.67 high school credit of Fine Arts • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • 2 college credits This course offers a supervised practical experience in the technical area(s) of a theatre production. This course is taken in conjunction with 574 Theatre Production 4. The following Dual Credit/College Credit Plus offering may not be available pending college approval and student registration: THEA1100CCP ­ ​
INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE CCP Semester • 1 high school credit of Fine Arts • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • 3 college credits This course is designed to help students bring critical thinking skills into their experience as theatre goers. 26 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS FOREIGN/WORLD LANGUAGES ALL COURSES ARE 3 MODS UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED IN CLASS LENGTH Course No. 630 Title Availability American Sign Language 1 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit 1.00 Length Y 632 American Sign Language 2 10, 11, 12 1.00 Y 634 American Sign Language 3 11, 12 1.00 Y 640 French 1 9, 10, 11, 12 1.00 Y 642 French 2 9, 10, 11, 12 1.00 Y 644 French 3 10, 11, 12 1.00 Y 646H Honors French 4 11, 12 1.00 Y 648AP AP French 11, 12 1.00 Y FREN1101CCP Beginning French I CCP 9, 10, 11, 12 1.00 S FREN1102CCP Beginning French II CCP 9, 10, 11, 12 1.00 S 650 German 1 9, 10, 11, 12 1.00 Y 652 German 2 9, 10, 11, 12 1.00 Y 654 German 3 10, 11, 12 1.00 Y 656H Honors German 4 11, 12 1.00 Y 658AP AP German 11, 12 1.00 Y 670 Spanish 1 9, 10, 11, 12 1.00 Y 672 Spanish 2 9, 10, 11, 12 1.00 Y 674 Spanish 3 9, 10, 11, 12 1.00 Y 676H Honors Spanish 4 10, 11, 12 1.00 Y 678AP AP Spanish 11, 12 1.00 Y SPAN1101CCP Spanish I CCP 9, 10, 11, 12 1.00 S SPAN1102CCP Spanish II CCP 9, 10, 11, 12 1.00 S NOTE: In all World Language courses, the student may be required to purchase ​
supplemental materials and have access to the internet. World Language courses take a holistic approach to language proficiency, which recognizes the complex interrelatedness of comprehension and comprehensibility, vocabulary usage, language control, communication strategies, and cultural awareness. Students learn language structures in context and use them to convey meaning. The instructional focus is on function and not the examination of irregularity and complex grammatical paradigms about the target language. Language structures are addressed as they serve the communicative task and not as an end goal unto themselves. Pickerington Local School District’s world language courses emphasize fluency and accuracy in language use and do not overemphasize grammatical accuracy at the expense of communication. In order to best facilitate the study of language and culture, world language courses are taught in the target language. World Language Class Level Required Proficiency Level Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 AP Novice­Mid Novice­High Intermediate­Low Intermediate­Mid 27 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS 630 ­ AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE 1 Full Year • 1 credit • Elective • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • Fee During this course the students will study the vocabulary, grammar, and structure of ASL in order to learn expressive (signing) and receptive (comprehension) skills. Deaf culture and the literature of ASL will also be studied. Guest signers and artistic events will give students an opportunity to interact with deaf community members. The course is mainly conducted in ASL. Students will be evaluated using tests, quizzes, written reports, homework assignments, daily participation, and assessment of student videotapes. ASL is memorizing and studying the vocabulary and grammar of the language. Some colleges and universities accept ASL as a foreign language credit. Check with your counselor. 632 ­ AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE 2 Full Year • 1 credit • Elective • Grades 10, 11, 12 • Fee • Required proficiency of Novice Mid in ASL 1. This class is designed to develop more fully the student's ability to comprehend and express ASL. The majority of the class is conducted in ASL, including instructions, information, and activities. Each student will have the opportunity to create original dialogues, practice communicating about various daily situations, and learn to talk about his/her own interests and experiences in ASL. Cultural awareness and sensitivity will be emphasized by interaction with the deaf community. Students will also continue to view videotapes of native ASL speakers. This fast­paced course requires daily work participating in class, memorizing vocabulary, studying the language structure, and preparing for tests, assignments, reports, and student videotapes. Some colleges and universities accept ASL as a foreign language credit. Check with your counselor. 634 ­ AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE 3 Full Year • 1 credit • Elective • Grades 11, 12 • Fee • Required proficiency of Novice High in ASL 2. By the time you reach this level of sign language you should be fluent. This class is conducted in ASL, including activities, information, questions and answers. You will practice various conversations with classmates in ASL as well as make up your own to sign to the class. Body language and facial features are extremely important to get your point across in ASL. Students will continue the video activities and interpreting from the previous levels but more challenging. We will explore various career opportunities available using ASL and have guest speakers talk about how it is important to know/use ASL at their job. You are expected to remember vocabulary from the last two years and will add onto it. Some colleges and universities accept ASL as a foreign language credit. Check with your counselor. 640 – FRENCH 1 Full Year • 1 credit • Elective • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 The study for French begins with strategies for learning a second language. Subsequent units introduce basic communication, grammar, and writing skills and vocabulary. Students will be introduced to French speaking communities and practices around the globe through real life, everyday activities that deal with vacations, school, family, and sports and leisure activities. Proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing is developed through interaction with a variety of media such as videos, music, games, and the Internet. 642 ­ FRENCH 2 Full Year • 1 credit • Elective • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • Fee • Required proficiency of Novice Mid in French 1. Cultural themes in Level 2 focus on additional French­speaking communities. More complex grammatical concepts and vocabulary build on the basic skills acquired in Level 1. The method of instruction again stresses interaction with a variety of media presenting current reality in today's French speaking communities. 644 ­ FRENCH 3 Full Year • 1 credit • Elective • Grades 10, 11, 12 • Fee • Required proficiency of Novice High in French 2. French 3 completes the basic study of the language with a multimedia approach. The francophone communities of Europe, Africa and North America are presented in greater detail. As in the previous two years, video, CD's, music, games and the Internet are used to enhance the acquisition of active language skills. Heavy emphasis is placed upon structures and phrases used by French­speaking teens in everyday situations. 28 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS 646H – HONORS FRENCH 4 / Pre­AP Full Year • 1 credit • Elective • Grades 11, 12 • Fee • Required proficiency of Intermediate Low in French 3. French 4 is designed to continue the development of all language skills to increase proficiency on college placement tests in French. As students read a novel and short stories, comprehension and fluency is increased through class discussion. Writing skills are fine­tuned through short compositions. Students will work to the attainment of mid­level intermediate proficiency of the Lingua­Folio assessment. Students will understand the main idea and many details of written and oral communication, will state a point of view and converse effectively, will describe events and experiences, give opinions, narrate a story, and present a simple oral or written communication with details. An appreciation of French customs and history is also developed with videos and individual projects. 648AP ­ AP FRENCH Full Year • 1 credit • Elective • Grade 11, 12 • Fee • Required proficiency of Intermediate Mid in French 4. The three modes of communication (Interpersonal, Interpretive, and Presentational) defined in the ​
Standards for Foreign st
Language Learning in the 21​
Century ​
are foundational to the AP French Language and Culture course. The AP course provides students with opportunities to demonstrate their proficiency in each of the three modes in the Intermediate to Pre­Advanced range as described in the ​
ACTFL Performance Guidelines for K­12 Learners​
. The AP French Language and Culture course engages students in an exploration of culture in both contemporary and historical contexts. The course develops students’ awareness and appreciation of products, both tangible (e.g., tools, books, music) and intangible (e.g., laws, conventions, The AP French Language and Culture course engages students in an exploration of culture in both contemporary and historical contexts. The course develops students’ awareness and appreciation of products, both tangible (e.g., tools, books, music) and intangible (e.g., laws, conventions, institutions); practices (patterns of social interactions within a culture); and perspectives (values, attitudes, and assumptions that underlie both practices and products). Fees: AP test fee and AP support materials. The following Dual Credit/College Credit Plus offering may not be available pending college approval and student registration: FREN1101CCP ­ BEGINNING FRENCH I CCP Semester • 1 credit • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • 4 college credits • Prerequisite: placement into ENGL 1100, ACT English subscore of 18 FREN 1101 presents an introduction to the fundamentals of the French language with practice in listening, reading, speaking and writing. Course also includes selected studies in French culture. FREN1102CCP ­ BEGINNING FRENCH II CCP Semester • 1 credit • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • 4 college credits ​
​
• Prerequisite: credit in FREN 1100 with a “C” or higher This course is a continuation of FREN 1101, with further development of listening, reading, speaking and writing skills and further study of French culture. 650 ­ GERMAN 1 Full Year • 1 credit • Elective • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • Fee This course is a study of the language and culture of German­speaking people. Emphasis is placed on the development of listening and speaking skills. Vocabulary and grammar are taught through conversational situations, language games and videos. 652 ­ GERMAN 2 Full Year • 1 credit • Elective • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • Fee • Required proficiency of Novice Mid in German 1. German 2 continues to build on the content from German 1 as vocabulary continues to increase. New grammar concepts are introduced resulting in improved speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills. 654 ­ GERMAN 3 Full Year • 1 credit • Elective • Grades 10, 11, 12 • Fee • Required proficiency of Novice High in German 2. German 3 rounds out the development of a basic proficiency in the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. It also reviews and expands all of the basic grammatical structures. German history will be taught and discussed through texts and movies. Awareness is expanded and a greater emphasis is placed on vocabulary development and reading and writing skills through various types of German media. 29 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS 656H – HONORS GERMAN 4 / Pre­AP Full Year • 1 credit • Elective • Grades 11, 12 • Fee • Required proficiency of Intermediate Low in German 3. German 4 continues to strengthen learned vocabulary and grammatical structures through a variety of reading texts. Individual attention will be given to each student’s writing skill development through composition assignments, including remedial work on individual grammar needs. Students will work to the attainment of mid­level intermediate proficiency of the Lingua­Folio assessment. Students will understand the main idea and many details of written and oral communication, will state a point of view and converse effectively, will describe events and experiences, give opinions, narrate a story, and present a simple oral or written communication with details. Reading comprehension, vocabulary expansion, development of fluency in oral and written language skills, and an understanding of Germany’s past and present through fiction and nonfiction are the primary goals. 658AP – AP GERMAN Full Year • 1 credit • Elective • Grade 11, 12 • Fee • Required proficiency of Intermediate Mid in German 4. The three modes of communication (Interpersonal, Interpretive, and Presentational) defined in the ​
Standards for Foreign Language Learning in the 21st​
Century ​
are foundational to the AP German Language and Culture course. The AP course provides students with opportunities to demonstrate their proficiency in each of the three modes in the Intermediate to Pre­Advanced range as described in the ​
ACTFL Performance Guidelines for K­12 Learners​
. The AP German Language and Culture course engages students in an exploration of culture in both contemporary and historical contexts. The course develops students’ awareness and appreciation of products, both tangible (e.g., tools, books, music) and intangible (e.g., laws, conventions, The AP German Language and Culture course engages students in an exploration of culture in both contemporary and historical contexts. The course develops students’ awareness and appreciation of products, both tangible and intangible, practices, and perspectives. Fees: AP test fee and AP support materials. 670 ­ SPANISH 1 Full Year • 1 credit • Elective • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 This course is a study of the language and culture of Spanish­speaking people. Communication skills are emphasized, along with a strong foundation in vocabulary and basic grammar structures. 672 ­ SPANISH 2 Full Year • 1 credit • Elective • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • Fee • Required proficiency of Novice Mid in Spanish 1. Spanish 2 is a continuation of Spanish 1. Basic grammar and vocabulary are expanded to cover more complex concepts and students learn new verb tenses. Culture studies add to the students’ understanding of the Hispanic people. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are stressed to improve the understanding of both the language and the people who speak it. 674 ­ SPANISH 3 Full Year • 1 credit • Elective • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • Fee • Required proficiency of Novice High in Spanish 2. Spanish 3 presents a period of review in grammatical structures through reading selections. The major emphasis of this course is on communicative competency. Listening and oral skills are stressed. Writing skills are developed through paragraph construction. Culture studies add to the students understanding of the Hispanic people. 676H – HONORS SPANISH 4 / Pre­AP Full Year • 1 credit • Elective • Grade 10, 11, 12 • Required proficiency of Intermediate Low in Spanish 3. Spanish 4 is designed to continue the development of all language skills to increase proficiency on college placement tests in Spanish. As students read a novel and short stories, comprehension and fluency is increased through class discussion. Writing skills are fine­tuned through short compositions. Students will work to the attainment of mid­level intermediate proficiency of the Lingua­Folio assessment. Students will understand the main idea and many details of written and oral communication, will state a point of view and converse effectively, will describe events and experiences, give opinions, narrate a story, and present a simple oral or written communication with details. An appreciation of Spanish customs and history is also developed with videos and individual projects. 30 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS 678AP – AP SPANISH Full Year • 1 credit • Elective • Grade 11, 12 • Fee • Required proficiency of Intermediate Mid in Spanish 4. The three modes of communication (Interpersonal, Interpretive, and Presentational) defined in the ​
Standards for Foreign Language Learning in the 21st​
Century ​
are foundational to the AP Spanish Language and Culture course. The AP course provides students with opportunities to demonstrate their proficiency in each of the three modes in the Intermediate to Pre­Advanced range as described in the ​
ACTFL Performance Guidelines for K­12 Learners​
. The AP Spanish Language and Culture course engages students in an exploration of culture in both contemporary and historical contexts. The course develops students’ awareness and appreciation of products, both tangible (e.g., tools, books, music) and intangible (e.g., laws, conventions, The AP Spanish Language and Culture course engages students in an exploration of culture in both contemporary and historical contexts. The course develops students’ awareness and appreciation of products, both tangible and intangible, practices, and perspectives. Fees: AP test fee and AP support materials. SPAN1101CCP ­ SPANISH I CCP Semester • 1 credit • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • 4 college credits • Prerequisite: Placement into ENG1100CCP, ACT English subscore of 18. This class prepares the student to connect with the language and cultures of the Spanish­speaking word. Through the introduction of cultural themes and related activities, the student will engage in meaningful communication in the Spanish language and have various opportunities to practice the basic foundations of comprehending, reading, speaking, and writing the language. Spanish is the primary language of classroom instruction. The course content includes grammar and practical vocabulary applications. SPAN1102CCP ­ SPANISH II CCP Semester • 1 credit • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • 4 college credits • Prerequisite: credit in SPAN 1100 with a “C” or higher This class is a continuation of Spanish I and increases the foundational knowledge and comprehension of Spanish. The course further prepares the student to connect with the language and cultures of the Spanish­speaking world. Through the continued introduction of cultural themes and related activities, the student will engage in meaningful communication in the Spanish language and have various opportunities to continue to practice the basic foundations of comprehending, reading, speaking, and writing the language. Spanish is the primary language of classroom instruction. The course content includes additional grammar and practical vocabulary applications. 31 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT Course No. 302 308 308H 314 314H 301 322 324 328H 335 338AP 339AP 341AP 340AP MATH130CCP MATH1110CCP MATH1120CCP MATH1148CCP MATH1149CCP MATH1151CCP MATH1152CCP MATH1230CCP ALL COURSES ARE 3 MODS UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED IN CLASS LENGTH Title Availability Credit Algebra 1 9, 10, 11, 12 1.00 Geometry 9, 10, 11, 12 1.00 Honors Geometry 9, 10, 11, 12 1.00 Algebra 2 9, 10, 11, 12 1.00 Honors Algebra 2 9, 10, 11, 12 1.00 College Transition Math 11, 12 1.00 Statistics 11, 12 1.00 Pre­Calculus 10, 11, 12 1.00 Honors Pre­Calculus 10, 11, 12 1.00 Intro to Calculus and Discrete Math 11, 12 1.00 AP Calculus AB 11, 12 1.00 AP Calculus AB (only avail. as part 11, 12 1.00 of Integrated AP Calc/Physics) AP Calculus BC 11, 12 1.00 AP Statistics 11, 12 1.00 Introduction to Statistics CCP 9, 10, 11,12 1.00 Mathematics for Business CCP 9, 10, 11,12 1.00 Technical Mathematics CCP 9, 10, 11,12 1.00 College Algebra CCP 9, 10, 11,12 1.00 Trigonometry CCP 9, 10, 11,12 1.00 Calculus I CCP 9, 10, 11,12 1.00 Calculus II CCP 9, 10, 11,12 1.00 Industrial Mathematics CCP 9, 10, 11,12 1.00 Length Y (4 mods) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y (4 mods) Y (4 mods) Y (4 mods) Y (4 mods) S S S S S S S S OHIO’S NEW LEARNING STANDARDS FOR MATHEMATICS At the high school level, we will be utilizing Ohio’s New Learning Standards. The standards call on students to practice applying mathematical ways of thinking to real world issues and challenges; they prepare students to think and reason mathematically. The high school standards set a rigorous definition of college and career readiness, not by piling topic upon topic, but by demanding that students develop a depth of understanding and an ability to apply mathematics to novel situations, as college students and employees regularly do. CALCULATOR INFORMATION A graphing calculator is required for all high school math courses. The recommended graphing calculator is one from the TI­84 plus series. 302 ­ ALGEBRA 1 Full year • 4 mods • 1 credit • Fee • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • End­of­Course State Test required. The fundamental purpose of this course is to formalize and extend the mathematics that students learned in the middle grades. Because it is built on the middle grade standards, this is a more ambitious version of algebra 1, than has generally been offered. The critical areas, called units, deepen and extend the understanding of linear and exponential relationships by contrasting them with each other and by applying linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend, and students engage in methods for analyzing, solving, and using quadratic functions. ​
CALCULATOR — see Calculator Information at beginning of section. 32 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS 308 ­ GEOMETRY Full Year • 1 Credit • Fee • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • Prerequisite: Algebra I • End­of­Course State Test required. The fundamental purpose of the course in Geometry is to formalize and extend students’ geometric experiences from the middle grades. Students explore more complex geometric situations and deepen their explanations of geometric relationships, moving toward formal mathematical arguments. Topics include triangle congruence and similarity, trigonometry, two and three­dimensional objects, extension of Pythagorean theorem, circle theorems, theoretical and experimental probabilities. ​
CALCULATOR — see Calculator Information at beginning of section. 308H – HONORS GEOMETRY Full Year • 1 Credit • Fee • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • Prerequisite: Algebra 1 • Recommended for students interested in extending learning beyond regular courses. • End­of­Course State Test required. The fundamental purpose of the course in Geometry is to formalize and extend students’ geometric experiences from the middle grades. Students explore more complex geometric situations and deepen their explanations of geometric relationships, moving toward formal mathematical arguments. Topics include triangle congruence and similarity, trigonometry, two and three­dimensional objects, extension of Pythagorean theorem, circle theorems, theoretical and experimental probabilities. Honors­level concepts include additional constructions and probability, deriving area formulas, proving Laws of Sines and Cosines, as well as completion of a monthly contextual problem. ​
CALCULATOR — see Calculator Information at beginning of section. 314 ­ ALGEBRA 2 Full Year • 1 credit • Fee Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • Prerequisite: Geometry This course extends students repertoire of functions to include polynomial, rational, and radical functions. Students work closely with the expressions that define the functions, and continue to expand and hone their abilities to model situations and to solve equations, including solving quadratic equations over the set of complex numbers and solving exponential equations using the properties of logarithms. ​
CALCULATOR — see Calculator Information at beginning of section. 314H­ HONORS ALGEBRA 2 Full Year • 1 credit • Fee • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • Prerequisite: Geometry • Recommended for students interested in extending learning beyond regular courses. This course extends students repertoire of functions to include polynomial, rational, and radical functions. Students work closely with the expressions that define the functions, and continue to expand and hone their abilities to model situations and to solve equations, including solving quadratic equations over the set of complex numbers and solving exponential equations using the properties of logarithms. Honors­level concepts include extending polynomial identities, more complex probability analysis, as well as completion of a monthly contextual problem. ​
CALCULATOR — see Calculator Information at beginning of section. 301 ­ COLLEGE TRANSITION MATH Full Year • 1 credit • Grade 11, 12 • Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra 2 College Transition Math is for students who have completed Algebra 2, but are not interested in pursuing pre­calculus​
. ​
The focus of the course is to provide a reinforcement of math skills necessary for success in college level math courses. ACT preparation materials will be used to reinforce algebra, problem­solving skills, graphs, functions, data applications and interpretation, critical thinking and geometric concepts. Graphing and calculators play a key role in this course. CALCULATOR — see Calculator Information at beginning of section. 322 ­ STATISTICS Full Year • 1 credit • Grades 11, 12 • Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra 2 This course is designed to follow either Algebra 2 or Pre­Calculus. Some work will involve Excel spreadsheet software. The course will emphasize decision­making based upon data analysis. Topics include probability, discrete and normal distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, and regression analysis. ​
CALCULATOR — see Calculator Information at beginning of section. 324 ­ PRE­CALCULUS Full Year • 1 credit • Fee • Grades 10, 11, 12 • Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra 2 Pre­Calculus is for the student who has completed Algebra 1, Geometry, and Algebra 2. The course will primarily expand the student's proficiency in analysis, trigonometric concepts, algebraic concepts, problem solving, real and complex number systems and elementary calculus. It is intended to prepare the student for college mathematics courses above Algebra. CALCULATOR — see Calculator Information at beginning of section. 33 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS 328H – HONORS PRE­CALCULUS Full Year • 1 credit • Fee • Grades 10, 11, 12 • Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra 2 • Recommended for students interested in extending learning beyond regular courses. Pre­Calculus is for the student who has completed Algebra 1, Geometry, and Algebra 2. The course will primarily expand the student's proficiency in analysis, trigonometric concepts, algebraic concepts, problem solving, real and complex number systems and elementary calculus. It is intended to prepare the student for college mathematics courses above Algebra. Honors level learning extensions include an extended study of an original research problem encompassing scholarly research. This extended study project will include the identification of a research problem or question, inclusion of scholarly research in the form of a literature review, completion of an independent research design, a research paper documenting the findings, and a dissemination of the student’s research findings. ​
CALCULATOR — see Calculator Information at beginning of section. 335 ­ INTRODUCTION TO CALCULUS AND DISCRETE MATH Full Year • 1 credit • Grades 11, 12 • Prerequisite: Completion of Pre­Calculus Introduction to Calculus and Discrete Math is designed for those students planning to enter Calculus in college. Topics to be presented will include function theory, sequences, functions and limits, derivatives, algebraic functions, integration, logarithmic functions, set theory, real number theory, logic, determinants and matrices, statistics and probability. Algebraic and trigonometric skills and procedures will also be maintained. The course will be taught from an intuitive, numeric point of view using the computer and graphing calculator to explore these topics. First semester focus will be calculus, and second semester will focus on discrete math. CALCULATOR — No calculator above TI85 will be permitted. ​
CALCULATOR — see Calculator Information at beginning of section. 338AP ­ AP CALCULUS AB Full Year • 4 mods • 1 credit • Grades 11,12 • Prerequisite: Completion of Pre­Calculus This course is designed for the fifth­year mathematics student and consists of a full academic year of work in Calculus comparable to courses in colleges and universities. AP Calculus emphasizes both algebraic and graphical solutions to problems. Topics included are functions, limits, derivatives, antiderivatives, integrals and their applications. Students must take the AP exam in May in order to receive the weighted grade. ​
Advanced placement courses are demanding and require daily homework. The class concludes with a college level exam, prepared by the CollegeBoard, which, if passed, may result in college credit. ​
CALCULATOR — see Calculator Information at beginning of section. 339AP ­ AP CALCULUS AB ­ (as part of Integrated AP Calculus/Physics) Full Year • 4 mods • 1 credit • Grades 11,12 • Prerequisite: Completion of Pre­Calculus ­ Taken as part of the Integrated AP Calculus/Physics course This course is designed for the fifth­year mathematics student and consists of a full academic year of work in Calculus st
comparable to 1​
semester courses in colleges and universities. AP Calculus emphasizes both algebraic and graphical solutions to problems. Topics included are functions, limits, derivatives, antiderivatives, integrals and their applications. The course will also focus on the ways that calculus is used and integrated into upper level physics concepts. Students must take the AP exam in May in order to receive the weighted grade. ​
Advanced placement courses are demanding and require daily homework. The class concludes with a college level exam, prepared by the CollegeBoard, which, if passed, may result in college credit. ​
CALCULATOR — see Calculator Information at beginning of section. 341AP ­ AP CALCULUS BC Full Year • 4 mods • 1 credit • Grades 11,12 • Prerequisite: Completion Calculus AB This version of the AP Calculus course is designed for the student who has completed AP Calculus AB. It reviews the major nd
fundamentals of the AB course, and then focuses on material comparable to 2​
semester calculus courses in colleges and universities. AP Calculus BC emphasizes both algebraic and graphical solutions to problems. Topics included are the same as those listed for the AP Calculus AB course, with additional material covering further integration techniques, parametric, polar and vector equations, series, sequences and other extensions of the AB curriculum. It is a significantly more rigorous and extensive set of topics compared to the AB course. Students must take the AP exam in May in order to receive the weighted grade. ​
Advanced placement courses are demanding and require daily homework. The class concludes with a college level exam, prepared by the College Board, which, if passed, may result in two full semesters of college calculus credit. Students will receive an additional AP exam score based solely upon their performance on questions related to the AB curriculum. ​
CALCULATOR — see Calculator Information at beginning of section. 34 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS 340AP ­ AP STATISTICS Full Year • 4 mods • 1 credit • Grades 11, 12 • Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra 2. The AP Statistics course is an excellent option for any secondary school student who has successfully completed a second­year course in algebra and who possesses sufficient mathematical maturity and quantitative reasoning ability. This course is equivalent to a one­semester, introductory, non­calculus­based college course in statistics. Students are introduced to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Topics include: Exploring data, sampling and experimentation, anticipating patterns, and statistical inference. Advanced placement courses are demanding and require daily homework. ​
The class concludes with a college level exam, prepared by the College Board, which, if passed, may result in college credit. ​
CALCULATOR — see Calculator Information at beginning of section. MATH1148CCP ­ COLLEGE ALGEBRA CCP Semester • 1 high school credit of Math applied to Math credits for graduation • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • 4 college credits • ​
Prerequisite: ACT qualifying Math subscore of 22 or college­approved alternative placement into course This course is a continuation of the study of functions. The concept of transformations is used to graph and analyze functions including quadratic, higher degree polynomial, power, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions. The function concept is applied to solving equation inequalities, and applications regarding these types of functions. Factor and remainder theorems and roots of polynomial functions are included. The concept of functions is extended to include composition of functions and inverse functions. Systems of linear and non­linear equations are solved using algebraic and graphical methods. Trigonometric functions of right angles are defined and used in problem solving. MATH1149CCP ­ TRIGONOMETRY CCP Semester • 1 high school credit of Math applied to Math credits for graduation • Grades 9, 10,11, 12 • 4 college credits • ​
Prerequisite: MATH1148CCP or ACT qualifying Math subscore of 26 or college­approved alternative placement into course This course is a study of the trigonometric functions, vectors, and related applications. Topics include right triangle trigonometry; trigonometry of general angles; the unit circle; the graphs of the trigonometric functions; analytical trigonometry; inverse trigonometric functions; verifying identities; solving trigonometric equations; the Law of Sines; the Law of Cosines; applications of trigonometry; polar coordinates and the graphs of polar equations; geometric and algebraic vectors; vector applications; plane curves and parametric equations; trigonometric form of complex numbers; DeMoivre’s Theorem. The conic sections are defined and analyzed algebraically and graphically. MATH1151CCP ­ CALCULUS I CCP Semester • 1 high school credit of Math applied to Math credits for graduation • Grades 9, 10,11, 12 • 5 college credits ​
• ​
Prerequisite: MATH1149CCP or college­approved alternative placement into course, ACT qualifying Math subscore of 28. This course provides an introduction to differential calculus. Topics presented include functions, limits, continuity, derivatives, differentiation rules, and derivatives of the trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions, related rates, extrema, curve sketching, and optimization. Course also introduces integral calculus: antiderivatives, definite integral, Riemann sums, area under a curve, Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, numerical integration, integration by substitution, and derivatives and integrals of inverse trigonometric, hyperbolic, and inverse hyperbolic functions. Applications to problems in science and engineering are highlighted. MATH1152CCP ­ CALCULUS II CCP Semester • 1 high school credit of Math applied to Math credits for graduation • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • 5 college credits • ​
Prerequisite: MATH1151CCP This course continues the introduction to integral calculus. Topics covered include integration of exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, inverse trigonometric functions, volume and surface area of solids of revolution, arc length, and methods of integration. Course also presents L’Hopital’s Rule and Improper Integrals. Students will learn to analyze plane curves given parametrically or in polar coordinates, and their differential and integral calculus. Students will learn about infinite sequences and series, their sum and/or convergence, conic sections, vectors in the plane and in space. Applications to problems in science and engineering are noted. 35 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS The following Dual Credit/College Credit Plus offering may not be available pending college approval and student registration: MATH1110CCP ­ MATHEMATICS FOR BUSINESS CCP Semester • 1 high school credit of Math applied to Math credits for graduation • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • 4 college credits • ​
Prerequisite: Placement by testing Provides the mathematical skills needed to solve business application problems and satisfies the math requirement of several of the Zane State technologies. Fractions, decimals, checking accounts, equations, percentages, business statistics, the metric system, trade and cash discounts, markups and markdowns, taxes, insurance, mortgages, simple interest and simple discount, compound interest, consumer credit, annuities, depreciation, and payroll are studied. MATH1120CCP – TECHNICAL MATHEMATICS CCP Semester • 1 high school credit of Math applied to Math credits for graduation • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • 3 college credits • ​
Prerequisite: Placement by testing This course contains skills and applications related to the engineering technologies with an emphasis on formulas, graphing, trigonometry, vectors, exponential and logarithmic functions. MATH1230CCP ­ INDUSTRIAL MATHEMATICS CCP Semester • 1 high school credit of Math applied to Math credits for graduation • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • 4 college credits • ​
Prerequisite: Placement by testing Algebraic expressions and operations, ratio, proportions, direct, inverse and joint variation, measurement in the metric system and the U.S. Customary system, basic geometry, trigonometry of the right triangle, factoring, solving linear and quadratic equations in one of more variables, oblique triangles including the law of sines and the law of cosines are studied. MATH130CCP ­ ​
INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS CCP Semester • 1 high school credit of Math applied to Math credits for graduation • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • 3 college credits • ​
Prerequisite: ACT or college­approved alternative placement into course This is a non­calculus, introductory course in descriptive and inferential statistics. Concepts are explained intuitively and supported by examples. The applications are general in nature, and the exercises include problems from agriculture, biology, business, economics, education, environmental studies, psychology, engineering, medicine, sociology, and computer science. 36 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS SCIENCE DEPARTMENT ALL COURSES ARE 3 MODS UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED IN CLASS LENGTH Title Availability Credit Length Integrated Science 9,10 1.00 Y (4 mods) Biology 9,10 1.00 Y (4 mods) Honors Biology 9,10 1.00 Y (4 mods) AP Biology 10, 11, 12 1.00 Y (4 mods) Forensic Science 1 10, 11, 12 .50 S Forensic Science 2 10, 11, 12 .50 S Chemistry 9, 10, 11, 12 1.00 Y (4 mods) Honors Chemistry 9, 10, 11, 12 1.00 Y (4 mods) Honors Organic Chemistry 10, 11, 12 .50 S (4 mods) AP Chemistry 10, 11, 12 1.00 Y (4 mods) Honors Anatomy and Physiology A 10, 11, 12 .50 S (4 mods) Honors Anatomy and Physiology B 10, 11, 12 .50 S (4 mods) Ecology 10, 11, 12 .50 S AP Environmental Science 10, 11, 12 1.00 Y (4 mods) Food Science 10, 11, 12 .50 S Meteorology and Oceanography 9, 10, 11, 12 .50 S Astronomy 9, 10, 11, 12 .50 S Physics 9, 10, 11, 12 1.00 Y (4 mods) Honors Physics 9, 10, 11, 12 1.00 Y (4 mods) AP Physics 10, 11, 12 1.00 Y (4 mods) Integrated AP Calc/Physics 11,12 2.00 Y (8 mods) Environmental Science CCP 9, 10, 11,12 1.00 S (4 mods) Biology I CCP 9, 10, 11,12 1.00 S (4 mods) Biology II CCP 9, 10, 11,12 1.00 S (4 mods) General Chemistry I CCP 9, 10, 11,12 1.00 S (4 mods) General Chemistry II CCP 9, 10, 11,12 1.00 S (4 mods) Algebra­based Physics I CCP 9, 10, 11,12 1.00 S (4 mods) Algebra­based Physics II CCP 9, 10, 11,12 1.00 S (4 mods) Biomedical Health STEM Pathway 285H Honors Principles of Biomedical Sciences 9, 10 1.00 Y (4 mods) 287H Honors Human Body Systems 10, 11 1.00 Y (4 mods) 254 Medical Interventions 11, 12 1.00 Y (4 mods) 255 Biomedical Innovations 12 1.00 Y (4 mods) Basic Concepts in Health Care CCP MLT1100CCP 9, 10, 11, 12 0.67 S (4 mods) PHSN ONLY CLA1100CCP Laboratory Theory CCP ​
PHSN ONLY 9, 10, 11, 12 0.67 S (4 mods) Concepts for the Pharmacy MULT1500CCP 12 1.00 S (4 mods) Technician CCP ​
PHSN ONLY Basic Health Care Analytical Concepts MULT1525CCP 12 0.33 S (4 mods) CCP ​
PHSN ONLY Beginning with the graduating class of 2015 and 2016, all students will take Integrated Science and Biology. Incoming ninth graders who have earned high school credit in the eighth grade will take Biology in the ninth grade. Each student should review the recommendations for college admission, honors diploma, career center and specific career choices to ensure that they select the courses that provide them with the best background possible to enhance their ability to attain goals they have set for themselves. Course No. 205 203 203H 212AP 219 221 226 223H 227H 228AP 208H A 208H B 206 252AP 253 232 234 247 244H 250AP INT­AP BIO105CCP BIO160CCP BIO161CCP CHEM110CCP CHEM111CCP PHYSC110CCP PHYS111CCP 37 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS 205 ­ INTEGRATED SCIENCE Full Year • 4 mods • 1 credit • Fee • Grades 9, 10 – Chemical Splash Goggles included with fee • Prerequisite for other high school science courses. Integrated Science is an inquiry­based laboratory course that introduces students to key concepts and theories that provide a foundation for advanced study in the physical sciences such as chemistry, physics, earth and space science. The course comprises the study of the physical world including developing models about classifying matter and how it changes, the particle nature of matter and atomic structure, types of chemical bonding and reactions and the conservation of matter. Energy interactions and the study of forces and motion will be emphasized. Students will also develop an understanding of the periodic table for use in explaining the chemical and physical changes developed in the course. In addition students will be introduced to scientific theories about the origin, development and structure of the universe and the types of nuclear reactions such as those that occur within stars. Integrated Science is a high school introductory level course that fulfills the Ohio Core requirements for one year of physical science necessary for graduation. BIOLOGY COURSES 203 ­ BIOLOGY Full Year • 4 mods • 1 credit • Grades 9, 10, • Requirement for graduation • Fee • Prerequisite: Integrated Science • Biology is a prerequisite for additional biology or upper level science courses. • End­of­Course State Test required. This course will emphasize biology concepts, from the Ohio Model Curriculum in Biology, including cell structure and function, cellular processes, ecosystems, evolution and interdependence of life, heredity and cellular genetics. A laboratory approach will be used to encourage students to develop inquiry skills, process skills and a working knowledge of biology. Knowledge and skills gained will be applied by students in individual and cooperative projects related to course themes. 203H – HONORS BIOLOGY Full Year • 4 mods • 1 credit ­ Grades 9, 10 • Requirement for graduation • Fee • Prerequisite: Integrated Science • Biology or Honors Biology is a prerequisite for additional biology or upper level science courses. • Recommended for students interested in extended learning beyond regular classes. • End­of­Course State Test required. Honors Biology is intended for highly motivated students who have demonstrated an interest in science. In Honors Biology, students are expected to work independently and collaboratively on a variety of assignments and accept greater responsibility for their learning. Honors Biology is designed to give students a more challenging and in­depth experience of the Ohio Model Curriculum in Biology. This will include additional time requirements outside of the regular school day for the students to complete extended Biology projects. Additionally students will be required to design and conduct scientific investigations to explore Biology phenomena. A laboratory approach will be used to encourage students to develop inquiry skills, process skills and working knowledge of Biology. 212AP – AP BIOLOGY Full year • 4 mods • 1 credit • Fee • Grades 10, 11, 12 • Prerequisite: completion of Integrated Science and Biology. This course is the equivalent of the college freshman biology course following the prescribed curriculum as published by the College Board. This course is an excellent preparation for premedical, nursing, veterinarian, industrial hygienist, and other health related careers. The student must be able to work independently. Individual and creative laboratory work is an integral part of the course of study. The following topics will be studied during the course: Molecules and Cells, Heredity and Evolution, and Organisms and Populations. Additional time for lab work may be required. ​
Advanced placement courses are demanding and require daily homework. The class concludes with a college level exam, prepared by the College Board, which, if passed, may result in college credit. 206 ­ ECOLOGY Semester • 1/2 credit • Fee • Grades 10, 11, 12 • Prerequisite: successful completion of one year of Biology. Students will study the interaction of living organisms with each other and their environments. Students will examine how ecosystems function as well as man's interaction with the environment. The focus of this class will be research projects that allow students to develop a greater understanding and appreciation for our local environment. Projects may require students to be involved in research outside of normal class hours and to take an active role in studying ecological relationships in the central Ohio area. Students should expect to go outside in all types of weather to complete projects and laboratory investigations, and they will be asked to dress appropriately on days where class will be held outside. 38 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS 208H A – HONORS ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY A Semester • 4 mods • 1/2 credit • Grades 10, 11, 12 • Fee • Prerequisite: Integrated Science and Biology • ​
Recommended for students interested in extended learning beyond regular courses. Honors Anatomy and Physiology A is intended for highly motivated students who demonstrate an interest in or are pursuing professions in medical fields. Honors Anatomy and Physiology students are expected to work independently and collaboratively on a variety of assignments and accept greater responsibility for their learning. This will include additional time requirements outside of the regular school day for students to complete the following: design and conduct independent and collaborative scientific investigations to answer questions; perform inquiry activities that extend over time; relate investigation(s) to recent research and communicate findings in a formal written laboratory report and presentation. Students will investigate human body systems, organs, tissues and cells, focusing on the integument, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems along with laboratory approach for the physiology and application of life processes. 208H B – HONORS ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY B Semester • 4 mods • 1/2 credit • Grades 10, 11, 12 • Fee • Prerequisite: Honors Anatomy and Physiology A • ​
Recommended for students interested in extended learning beyond regular courses and that have successfully completed part A. Honors Anatomy and Physiology B will be a continuation and extension of concepts and standards explored in Honors Anatomy and Physiology A. Students will investigate the endocrine, lymphatic, cardiovascular, digestive, respiratory, immune and reproductive systems. Students will examine similarities of the human body systems through a mammal dissection. 253 – FOOD SCIENCE Semester • 1/2 credit • Fee • Grades 10, 11, 12 • Prerequisite: successful completion of Integrated Science and Biology. This course will reinforce and enhance the student’s knowledge of scientific principles from physical, chemical and biological science and connect them using real world application. Students will investigate food biochemistry including the study of water, carbohydrates (crystals, calories, and candy) fats, proteins (muscle of metabolism), vitamins and supplements. Students will also cover topics in biology on food preservation and food safety, the digestive process, food borne bacteria, and organic vs. natural food. Students will design, conduct and analyze scientific investigations in an inquiry based laboratory setting using current technologies. The course will also emphasize food science and society including topics such as medical nutrition therapy, food allergies and nutrition counseling. This course is designed for students with various academic abilities, learning styles and interests​
. 219 – FORENSIC SCIENCE 1 Semester • 1/2 credit • 1 period a day • Fee • Grades 10, 11, 12 • Chemical splash goggles required but not included in fee. • Prerequisite: Completion of Integrated Science AND Biology This course will examine a variety of topics related to the field of forensic science including: observation skills, fiber and textile analysis, hair analysis, fingerprinting, blood and blood splatter analysis, forensic anthropology, crime scene investigation, and evidence collection. This course will emphasize inquiry and problem solving in the laboratory. 221 – FORENSIC SCIENCE 2 Semester • 1/2 credit • Fee • Grades 10, 11, 12 • Prerequisite: Completion of Integrated Science, Biology, AND Forensic Science 1 This course will build on and expand topics explored in Forensic Science 1. Topics may include Pollen and Spore Examination, DNA Fingerprinting, Drug Identification and Toxicology, Soil Examination, Glass Evidence, Casts and Impressions, Tool Marks, Ballistics, Forensic Entomology, Cyber Crimes, and Criminal Profiling. This course will emphasize inquiry and problem solving in the field and laboratory. 252AP – AP ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE Full Year • 4 mods • 1 credit • Fee • Grades 10, 11, 12 • Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology and Algebra I This course is the equivalent of the college freshman environmental science course following the prescribed curriculum as published by the College Board. Students will explore and investigate the interrelationships of the natural world, identify and analyze environmental problems, both natural and human­made, evaluate the relative risks associated with these environmental problems, and examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them. Advanced placement courses are demanding and require daily homework. The class concludes with a college level exam, prepared by the College Board, which, if passed, may result in college credit​
. 39 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS CHEMISTRY COURSES 226 ­ CHEMISTRY Full Year • 4 mods • 1 credit ­ Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • Fee • Prerequisite: Integrated Science, Biology (may be concurrent) and Algebra I Chemistry is designed for the college bound students who have a developing interest in science. Chemistry is intended to be an inquiry course that will emphasize the organized collection, analysis, and communication of data, while introducing evaluation, prediction, and application of skills. The topics, from the Ohio Model Curriculum, covered in Chemistry will include: analysis of materials, nomenclature, bonding, stoichiometry, chemical equations, periodicity, atomic models, reduction and oxidation reactions, acids and bases, gas laws, intermolecular attractions, kinetics and equilibrium processes. Throughout the course, qualitative and quantitative laboratory skills will be developed through the manipulation of standard laboratory equipment. ​
Completion of Chemistry or Honors Chemistry along with one credit of Physics and two other science credits will fulfill the science requirements for an Honors Diploma. 223H ­ HONORS CHEMISTRY Full Year • 4 mods • 1 credit ­ Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • Fee • Chemical Splash Goggles – required, but not included with fee • Prerequisite: Integrated Science, Biology (may be concurrent), Algebra I and Geometry (may be concurrent) • Recommended for students interested in extended learning beyond regular classes. Honors Chemistry is intended for highly motivated students who have demonstrated an interest in science. Honors Chemistry is designed to give the students a more challenging and in­depth experience of the Ohio Model Curriculum in Chemistry. In Honors Chemistry, students are expected to work independently and collaboratively on a variety of assignments and accept greater responsibility for their learning. This will include additional time requirements outside of the regular school day for students to complete extended Chemistry projects. Additionally students will be expected to conduct scientific explorations that will emphasize the organized collection, analysis, and communication of data, while introducing evaluation, prediction, and application of skills. A laboratory approach will be used to encourage students to develop inquiry skills, qualitative and quantitative laboratory skills, process skills and working knowledge of Chemistry. ​
Completion of Chemistry or Honors Chemistry along with one credit of Physics and two other science credits will fulfill the science requirements for an Honors Diploma. 227H – HONORS ORGANIC CHEMISTRY Semester • 4 mods • 1/2 credit • Fee • Grades 10, 11, 12 • Chemical Splash Goggles ­ required, but not included in fee • Prerequisite: Successful completion of a year long chemistry course. Recommended for students interested in pursuing a science major in college. This course will introduce the characteristics of organic compounds and the most important organic functional groups. The chemistry of carbon compounds will be distinguished from inorganic chemistry. The various classes of aliphatic and aromatic compounds will be examined. The diversity of functional groups will be explored with regard to reactivity and mechanism. Stereochemistry will emphasize the three dimensional aspect that the carbon backbone confers upon macromolecules. A laboratory approach will be used to encourage students to develop inquiry skills, qualitative and quantitative laboratory skills, process skills and working knowledge of Organic Chemistry. 228AP ­ AP CHEMISTRY Full Year • 4 mods • 1 credit • Fee • Grades 10, 11, 12 • Chemical Splash Goggles ­ required, but not included in fee • Prerequisite: Chemistry, and Algebra 2 This course is the equivalent of the college freshman chemistry course following curriculum as prescribed by the College Board. This course is an excellent preparation for premedical, nursing, veterinarian, industrial hygienist, and engineering related careers. Students are admitted to the course only if they meet the above prerequisites. Students must be able to work independently. Further development of individual laboratory skills introduced in previous courses will be emphasized. Additional time for lab work may be required. Please see instructor for details. ​
Advanced placement courses are demanding and require daily homework. The class concludes with a college level exam, prepared by the College Board, which, if passed, may result in college credit. EARTH SCIENCE COURSES 232 – METEOROLOGY & OCEANOGRAPHY Semester • 1/2 credit • Fee • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • Prerequisite: Integrated Science The focus of this course will be on understanding the phenomena that occur on a daily basis in our oceans and how they relate to changes in our atmosphere. Special emphasis will be placed on plate tectonics, ocean currents, ocean exploration, and the effects the ocean has on climate included with analysis of weather data and climactic changes, as well as atmospheric phenomena. Computer literacy will be developed by implementing Internet weather data banks. 40 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS 234 ­ ASTRONOMY Semester • 1/2 credit • Fee • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • Prerequisite: Integrated Science Astronomy is a semester course that will focus on the study of our cosmos. Through a combination of laboratory activities, short and long term projects, and other daily class work, the student will review and further expand on the scientific principles of our solar system, galaxy, and universe. Special emphasis will be placed on the history of astronomy, structures in space, and theories behind our world’s beginning and interrelationships with the rest of space. PHYSICS COURSES 247 ­ PHYSICS Full Year • 4 mods • 1 credit • Fee • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • Prerequisite: Completion of Integrated Science and concurrent enrollment in Algebra 2 or higher math. The focus of this course will be to develop a better understanding of the physical laws that govern nature through conceptual and mathematical processes and an inquiry­based laboratory approach. Topics, from the Ohio Model Curriculum, include kinematics (position, velocity and acceleration of objects), as well as forces, energy and its conservation, electricity, and magnetism. Laboratory skills will be designed to encourage problem solving and independent thought, and a variety of tools and technology will be used for collecting and analyzing data. This course is designed to prepare students for a college major that requires science. ​
Completion of Physics or Honors Physics along with one credit of chemistry and two other sciences will fulfill the science requirements for an Honors Diploma. 244H ­ HONORS PHYSICS Full Year • 4 mods • 1 credit ­ Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • Fee • Prerequisite: Successful completion of Integrated Science and concurrent enrollment in Algebra II or higher math​
. ​
• Recommended for students interested in extended learning beyond regular classes. Honors Physics is intended for highly motivated students who have demonstrated an interest in science. In Honors Physics, students are expected to work independently and collaboratively on a variety of assignments and accept greater responsibility for their learning. Honors Physics is designed to give students a more challenging and in­depth experience of the Ohio Model Curriculum in Physics. This will include additional time requirements outside of the regular school day for the students to complete extended Physics projects. Additionally students will be required to design and conduct scientific investigations to explore Physics phenomena. A laboratory approach will be used to encourage students to develop inquiry skills, process skills and working knowledge of Physics. Additional tools and technology will be used to collect and analyze data as compare to regular Physics. Examples include students analyzing, presenting and questioning lab results with peers in a Socratic setting. Students will be asked to design and build projects to demonstrate the application of physics as it relates to engineering. Students may be expected to research and present additional topics in Physics, and perform more technical writing to describe their research and projects. As compared to Physics, additional topics in Honors Physics may include topics from modern physics such as quantum theory or special relativity. ​
Completion of Physics or Honors Physics along with one credit of Chemistry and two other science credits will fulfill the science requirements for an Honors Diploma. 250AP – AP PHYSICS Full Year • 4 mods • 1 credit • Fee • Grades 10, 11, 12 • Prerequisite: Physics, ​
and​
Algebra 2 This course is the equivalent of the college freshman Calculus­based physics course in (1) Mechanics and (2) Electricity & Magnetism following the prescribed curriculum as published by the AP Board. Engineering and pure science majors may use this course to deepen their understanding of college physics principles and procedures. AP Physics will emphasize higher order thinking and problem solving skills in the laboratory and theoretical settings. Students will need to be highly motivated and self­directed in both individual and team based work. Advanced Placement courses are demanding and require daily work outside of class. Topics in the Mechanics part of the course include advanced study of kinematics; Newton’s laws of motion and forces; work, energy and power; systems of particles and linear momentum; circular motion and rotation along with moment of inertia; and oscillations and gravitation. The Electricity & Magnetism part of the course will highlight an advanced study of electrostatics and electric fields; conductors, capacitors and dielectrics; electric circuits (both DC and AC); magnetic fields and forces; and electromagnetism including RLC circuits and Lenz’s Law. Students will take an AP exam for each of the two topics (Mechanics and Electricity & Magnetism) and those who attain a passing score on the respective AP exams (normally a 3 or higher) should receive college credit entering most fields requiring physics, including engineering or pre­medicine. Passing both AP Physics exams could result in credit for a full year (10 semester hours) of calculus­based college physics. 41 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS INT­AP – INTEGRATED AP CALCULUS/PHYSICS Full Year • ​
8 mods • ​
2 credits • Fee • Grades 11, 12 This program combines AP Calculus AB and AP Physics. Please see Calculus and Physics instructors for more information. Please also see the course description for 339AP ­ AP CALCULUS AB ­ (as part of Integrated AP Calculus/Physics) in the Math section of the course guide ​
and 250AP ­ AP PHYSICS ­ for details about the specific content for the math and science parts of the integrated course. Project Lead the Way (PLTW) Biomedical Health STEM Science Technology Engineering Math (STEM) programs have become a national priority for schools. Preparing future technology workers, engineers, and scientists is an issue that U.S. Presidents and Ohio Governors have emphasized as critical to global competitiveness. STEM programs integrate math, science, technology, and engineering content with st
language arts and 21​
Century skills such as problem solving, communication, entrepreneurship and critical thinking. Pickerington’s Biomedical STEM program follows the nationally recognized Project Lead the Way framework. Students are eligible to receive college credit when they are enrolled in the advanced biomedical coursework as juniors and seniors. 285H – HONORS PRINCIPLES OF BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES Full Year • ​
4 mods • 1 credit • Grades 9, 10 • Project Lead The Way end­of­course test required • Career­Technical end­of­course test required In the introductory course of the Project Lead The Way (PLTW) Biomedical Science program, students explore concepts of biology and medicine to determine factors that led to the death of a fictional person. While investigating the case, students examine autopsy reports, investigate medical history, and explore medical treatments that might have prolonged the person’s life. The activities and projects introduce students to human physiology, basic biology, medicine and research processes while allowing them to design their own experiments to solve problems. 287H – HONORS HUMAN BODY SYSTEMS Full Year • ​
4 mods • 1 credit • Grades 10, 11 • Prerequisite: Principles of the Biomedical Sciences • Project Lead The Way end­of­course test required • Career­Technical end­of­course test required Students examine the interactions of human body systems as they explore identity, power, movement, protection, and homeostasis. Exploring science in action, students build organs and tissues on a skeletal Manikin®; use data acquisition software to monitor body functions such as muscle movement, reflex and voluntary action, and respiration; and take on the roles of biomedical professionals to solve real­world medical cases. 254 – MEDICAL INTERVENTIONS Full Year • ​
4 mods • 1 credit • ​
weighted grade ​
• Grades 11, 12 • Prerequisite: Human Body Systems • Project Lead The Way end­of­course test required • Career­Technical end­of­course test required Students follow the life of a fictitious family as they investigate how to prevent, diagnose, and treat disease. Students explore how to detect and fight infection; screen and evaluate the code in human DNA; evaluate cancer treatment options; and prevail when the organs of the body begin to fail. Through real­world cases, students are exposed to a range of interventions related to immunology, surgery, genetics, pharmacology, medical devices, and diagnostics. 255 – BIOMEDICAL INNOVATIONS Full Year​
• ​
4 mods • 1 credit • weighted grade • Grade 12 • Prerequisite: Medical Interventions • Project Lead The Way end­of­course test required In the final course of the PLTW Biomedical Science sequence, students build on the knowledge and skills gained from previous courses to design innovative solutions for the most pressing health challenges of the 21st century. Students address topics ranging from public health and biomedical engineering to clinical medicine and physiology. They have the opportunity to work on an independent design project with a mentor or advisor from a university, medical facility, or research institution. ​
This course is offered at Ohio Health's Pickerington Campus. The district does not provide transportation. Students are responsible for their transportation to Ohio Health. 42 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS HEALTH CARE CAREER CREDENTIAL COURSES Pickerington Schools, in partnership with Columbus State Community College, will offer dual credit courses in health care studies, enabling high school students to get a head start on industrial credentials and prerequisite courses for acceptance to nursing and other health care degree programs. Students participating in these courses must meet Columbus State Community College application deadlines as well as qualifications for each course. MLT1100CCP ­ ​
BASIC CONCEPS IN HEALTH CARE CCP ​
(Students are encouraged to take CLA1100CCP concurrently.)​
­ ​
offered at PHSN only – available to all students Semester • 4 mods • 0.67 high school elective Science credit • grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • 2 college credits • Prerequisite: ​
placement into college reading level (ACT reading subscore of 18) and placement into ENGL1100CCP This course provides a general introduction to health care in the U.S., covering topics such as the history of Western medicine, legal and ethical issues, alternative medicine, safety issues, and the evolution of hospitals, medical education, and insurance. The course is taught through a combination of in­class and online materials and will provide students in health­related fields with the background necessary to pursue further studies. This course leads to the Clinical Laboratory Technician credential offered through Columbus State Community College. CLA1100CCP – LABORATORY THEORY CCP ​
(Students are encouraged to take MLT1100CCP concurrently.)​
­​
offered at PHSN only ­ available to all students Semester • 4 mods • 0.67 high school elective Science credit • grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • 2 college credits • Prerequisite: ​
placement into college reading level (ACT reading subscore of 21) and placement into ENGL1100CCP (ACT English subscore of 18) Additional Biology coursework may be required. This course is designed to provide theoretical concepts for individuals in the health related industries who may be interested in learning an additional set of medically related skills. This knowledge and skill set is intended to enhance current job proficiency or for potentially increasing employability in entry­level, health­related positions. The course is designed to encourage phlebotomists, medical assistants, nursing assistants, and other health­oriented industry personnel, to achieve competencies requiring basic laboratory testing as a part of the facility’s services. MULT1500CCP ­ CONCEPTS FOR THE PHARMACY TECHNICIAN CCP ​
(taught concurrently with MULT1525CCP)​
­ ​
offered at PHSN only ­ available to all students (Gr. 12) Semester • 4 mods • 1 high school elective Science credit • grade 12 only • 4 college credits • Prerequisite: ​
must be a graduating senior able to pass a criminal background check and drug screening This course prepares students to work under the supervision of a registered Pharmacist in preparing medications for dispensing to patients according to physician orders. Topics covered include reading and interpreting prescriptions, dosage calculations, aseptic technique, drug compounding, dose conversions, inventory control, billing and reimbursement. This course prepares students for the Pharmacy Technician Certification Board Exam. ​
Students accepted into this course are required to submit a criminal background check and drug screening. MULT1525CCP ­ BASIC HEALTH CARE ANALYTICAL CONCEPTS CCP ​
(taught concurrently with MULT1500CCP) Semester • 4 mods • 0.33 high school elective Science credit • grade 12 only • 1 college credits This course provides students with the mathematical skills and strategies required to successfully work in the allied health fields. Topics covered include: an introduction to the metric and apothecary systems of measure, dose conversions, strengths of solutions, unit conversions between Fahrenheit and Celsius scales, ratio and proportion calculations, common abbreviations used in interpreting prescriptions, dosage calculations. BIO105CCP ­ ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE CCP Semester • 4 mods • 1 credit • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • 4 college credits • ​
Credit in ENGL1100CCP strongly recommended The course is an introduction to environmental science with an emphasis on the complexity and interrelatedness of environmental issues, concerns, problems and economics. The impact of humans on ecosystems, resources, energy and the environment are presented. Special reference is made to the significance of sustainability and the problems of pollution, waste management, hazardous and toxic materials. The roles of business, industry and government related to the environment will be addressed. 43 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS BIO160CCP ­ BIOLOGY I CCP Semester • 4 mods • 1 credit • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • 5 college credits • ​
Prerequisite: C (2.00) or better in high school Biology ​
and C (2.00) or better in high school Chemistry; credit in ENGL1100CCP strongly recommended This course explores general biological problems and processes as they are experienced by all living organisms: the chemistry and energetics of life, molecular genetics, cellular reproduction, and evolution. The laboratory portion enhances the theories and concepts presented in lecture. This is the first of a two­semester sequence ­ Biology I CCP (BIO160CCP) and Biology II CCP (BIO161CCP). BIO161CCP ­ BIOLOGY II CCP Semester • 4 mods • 1 credit • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • 5 college credits • ​
Prerequisite: C (2.00) or better in BIO160CCP The course explores general biological relationships and processes for all living organisms: plant and animal diversity, evolution, basic plant and animal systems, hormones, and immunology. The laboratory portion enhances the theories and concepts presented in lecture. The following Dual Credit/College Credit Plus offering may not be available pending college approval and student registration: CHEM110CCP ­ GENERAL CHEMISTRY I CCP Semester • 4 mods • 1 credit • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • 5 college credits • ​
Prerequisite: C grade (2.00) or better in high school chemistry and C grade (2.00) or better in MATH1148CCP or appropriate ACT (22 math subscore) or ​
college­approved alternative Math placement. The course includes the following topic areas: matter and measurement, significant figures, atomic and molecular structure, chemical formulas and equations, stoichiometry, solutions, thermochemistry, quantum theory, periodic properties, and chemical bonding theory. Problem solving during the course will develop analytical and interpretive skills and apply algebraic techniques. Laboratories will apply the principles learned in lecture, develop safety awareness, and enhance analytical, preparative and interpretive skills. Safety training and goggles are required for laboratory sessions. CHEM111CCP ­ GENERAL CHEMISTRY II CCP Semester • 4 mods • 1 credit • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • 5 college credits • ​
Prerequisite: C grade (2.00) or better in CHEM110CCP A continuation of General Chemistry I designed for the student pursuing an Associate of Science degree and/or interested in transfer credit. The course includes the following topic areas: intermolecular forces, properties of solutions, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, chemical thermodynamics, acid­base equilibria, buffers and electrochemistry. Problem solving during the course will develop analytical and interpretive skills and application of algebraic techniques. Laboratories will apply the principles learned in lecture, develop safety awareness, and enhance analytical, preparative and interpretive skills. Safety training and goggles are required for laboratory sessions. PHYS110CCP ­ ALGEBRA­BASED PHYSICS I CCP Semester • 4 mods • 1 credit • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • 5 college credits • ​
Prerequisites: placement into MATH1148CCP or higher; ACT Math subscore of 22, placement into ENGL1100CCP recommended. This is a laboratory course in classical mechanics (kinematics, Newton’s laws, gravitation, energy, momentum, rotational motion, and angular momentum) as well as fluids, harmonic motion, waves, and sound. PHYS111CCP ­ ALGEBRA­BASED PHYSICS II CCP Semester • 4 mods • 1 credit • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • 5 college credits • ​
Prerequisite: PHYS110CCP This is a laboratory course in classical electromagnetism (electric charge, field and potential, DC circuits, magnetic forces and fields, induction, and electromagnetic waves), geometric and physical optics, and topics in modern physics (special relativity and quantum, atomic, and nuclear physics). 44 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS SOCIAL STUDIES DEPARTMENT Course No. 501 508H 511 518H 520AP 523 528AP 530 535AP 536AP 538 541 542 542AP HIST1100CCP HIST1110CCP HIST1121CCP HIST2223CCP HIST2224CCP HIST150CCP HIST151CCP POLS1100CCP POLS1200CCP POLS1250CCP SOC100CCP SOC2060CCP Title World History Honors World History American History Honors American History AP United States History Principles of Democracy AP Government & Politics Economics AP Micro/Macro Economics AP European History Contemporary Issues History of American Sport Psychology AP Psychology Western Civilization to 1492 CCP Western Civilization from 1492 to Present CCP Modern East Asia CCP African­American History I before 1877 CCP African­American History II since 1877 CCP American History to 1877 CCP American History since 1877 CCP Introduction to American Government CCP Comparative Politics CCP State & Local Government CCP Introduction to Sociology CCP Race and Ethnicity CCP Availability 9 9 10 10 10 11, 12 11, 12 11, 12 11, 12 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 11, 12 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 .50 1.00 1.00 .50 .50 .50 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Length Y Y Y Y Y Y Y S Y Y S S S Y S S S S S S S S S S S S 501 ­ WORLD HISTORY Full Year • 1 credit • Grade 9 The World History courses will begin with a review of the renaissance, reformation, exploration, age of reason and enlightenment and then focus on the world from 1877 to the modern era. Students will study the variety of emerging global powers and the issues created as the world moved through the 20th century. 508H – HONORS WORLD HISTORY Full Year • 1 credit • Grade 9• Recommended for students interested in extended learning beyond regular classes. The World History courses will begin with a review of the renaissance, reformation, exploration, age of reason and enlightenment and then focus on the world from 1877 to the modern era. Students will study the variety of emerging global powers and the issues created as the world moved through the 20th century. Students in honors courses will synthesize and evaluate information and concepts from multiple sources to create their own understanding of the impact of human decision­making upon history. These “Topic Analysis” assignments will coincide with major historical events within the course. In order to support the matriculation to AP courses, students will be exposed to the same texts used in advanced 45 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS placement and college­level courses. Students will be introduced to the essential academic skills necessary for success in an AP courses. Honors­level courses will challenge students to become autonomous learners: students who possess the knowledge, skills and habits of mind necessary for making informed judgments about the past. Finally, students in honors classes may be asked to complete activities that will extend their learning beyond the classroom walls (e.g. thesis defense, capstone projects, etc.). 511 ­ AMERICAN HISTORY Full Year • 1 credit • Grade 10 • End­of­Course State Test required. This course examines the history of the United States of America from 1877 to the present. The federal republic has withstood challenges to its national security and expanded the rights and roles of its citizens. The episodes of its past have shaped the nature of the country today and prepared it to attend to the challenges of tomorrow. Understanding how these events came to pass and their meaning for today’s citizens is the purpose of this course. The concepts of historical thinking introduced in earlier grades continue to build with students locating and analyzing primary and secondary sources from multiple perspectives to draw conclusions. Students will also be required to use skills related to using a variety of resources to construct theses and support or refute contentions made by explanations of historical events; examine issues related to historical inevitability; and examine key documents that form the basis for the United States of America. 518H – HONORS AMERICAN HISTORY Full Year • 1 credit • Grade 10 • Recommended for students interested in extended learning beyond regular classes. • End­of­Course State Test required. This course examines the history of the United States of America from 1877 to the present. The federal republic has withstood challenges to its national security and expanded the rights and roles of its citizens. The episodes of its past have shaped the nature of the country today and prepared it to attend to the challenges of tomorrow. Understanding how these events came to pass and their meaning for today’s citizens is the purpose of this course. The concepts of historical thinking introduced in earlier grades continue to build with students locating and analyzing primary and secondary sources from multiple perspectives to draw conclusions. Students will also be required to use skills related to using a variety of resources to construct theses and support or refute contentions made by explanations of historical events; examine issues related to historical inevitability; and examine key documents that form the basis for the United States of America. Students in honors courses will synthesize and evaluate information and concepts from multiple sources to create their own understanding of the impact of human decision making upon history. These “Topic Analysis” assignments will coincide with major historical events within the course. In order to support the matriculation to AP courses, students will be exposed to the same texts used in advanced placement and college­level courses. Students will be introduced to the essential academic skills necessary for success in an AP courses. Honors­level courses will challenge students to become autonomous learners: students who possess the knowledge, skills and habits of mind necessary for making informed judgments about the past. Finally, students in honors classes may be asked to complete activities that will extend their learning beyond the classroom walls (e.g. thesis defense, capstone projects, etc.). 520AP ­ AP UNITED STATES HISTORY Full Year • 1 credit • Grade 10 • Fee • Any student willing and ready to do the work should be considered for an AP course This course is a full year course that offers a college­level general survey of American History since the 15th century. Extensive reading, writing, and study skills useful in college will be emphasized. Advanced placement courses are demanding and require daily homework. The class concludes with a college level exam, prepared by the College Board, which, if passed, may result in college credit. The exam is given in May. The course is designed to provide a comprehensive overview of U.S. History and to provide students with analytical skills and factual knowledge to deal critically with the problems and materials in United States history. Students should learn to assess historical materials ­ their relevance to a given interpretive problem, their reliability, and their importance ­ and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. Summer reading may be required: if so, information will be available to students. Fees: AP Exam AND Exam Review Book. 46 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS 523 ­ PRINCIPLES OF DEMOCRACY Full Year • 1 credit • Grade 11, 12 • End­of­Course State Test required. This course examines the principles and practices of government in the United States. The purpose of the course is to acquaint students with the basic American governmental structure and the skills needed for today’s citizen to participate in the governmental process. HIST150CCP ­ AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1877 Semester • 1 high school elective credit of Social Studies (must be taken with HIST 1152 to complete American History requirement for graduation) • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • 3 college credits • Prerequisite: placement into ENGL 1100, ACT English subscore of 18. This course covers a wide range of topics in early American history from the Age of Discovery through the Civil War and Reconstruction. It is an introduction to the study of history and to the political, economic, intellectual and social themes that have shaped our present society. HIST151CCP ­ AMERICAN HISTORY SINCE 1877 Semester • 1 high school elective credit of Social Studies (must be taken with HIST 1151 to complete American History requirement for graduation) • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • 3 college credits • Prerequisite: placement into ENGL 1100, ACT English subscore of 18. This course covers a wide range of topics in modern American history from Reconstruction to the present time. It is an introduction to the study of history and to the political, economic, intellectual, and social themes that have shaped our present society. HIST2223CCP ­ AFRICAN­AMERICAN HISTORY I BEFORE 1877 Semester • 1 high school elective credit of Social Studies • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • 3 college credits • Prerequisite: placement into ENGL 1100, ACT English subscore of 18. The class is primarily a lecture/discussion course which includes the history of African Americans in the New World from the time of the slave trade to the end of Reconstruction. HIST2224CCP ­ AFRICAN­AMERICAN HISTORY II SINCE 1877 Semester • 1 high school elective credit of Social Studies • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • 3 college credits • Prerequisite: placement into ENGL 1100, ACT English subscore of 18. The class is primarily a lecture/discussion course which includes the history of African Americans from the end of Reconstruction to present times. 528AP ­ AP GOVERNMENT & POLITICS Full Year • 1 credit • Grades 11, 12 • Fee • Any student willing and ready to do the work should be considered for an AP course. The AP Government course is designed to provide students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials facing the government of the United States. The course objectives are more complex than those of the other POD courses offered at the high school because of the college level nature of the course. The course will thus develop the skills necessary to arrive at conclusions on the basis of an informed judgment and to present reasons and evidence clearly and persuasively in essay format. The major content areas of the course are: constitutional underpinnings of United States government; political beliefs and behaviors; political parties, interest groups and mass media; institutions of national government: the Congress, the presidency, the bureaucracy, and the federal courts; public policy; and civil rights and civil liberties. Advanced placement courses are demanding and require daily homework. Summer reading may be required: if so, information will be available to students. Fees: AP Exam AND Exam Review Book. 47 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS 530 ­ ECONOMICS Semester • 1/2 credit • Grades 11, 12 Economics examines the economic system of the United States. This course will acquaint students with economic theory and how it applies to the public and private sectors. Topics covered will include the evolution of our economic system, price determination, money and credit, government finance and taxation, unemployment, international trade, as well as other aspects of economics. 535AP ­ AP MICRO/MACRO ECONOMICS Full Year • 1 credit • Grades 11, 12 • Fee • Any student willing and ready to do the work should be considered for an AP course. The AP Economics course will be divided into two parts. The course will address microeconomics in the first semester and macroeconomics in the second semester. The course is designed to provide students with analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with economic concepts such as, the nature and function of markets, factor markets, efficiency, the role of government in economic systems, output and income, spending and taxation, money and banking, and international trade. The course objectives are more demanding because of the college level nature of the course. AP courses are demanding and require daily homework and reading. There will be a semester exam but no final due to the AP exam. Fees: AP Microeconomics Exam AND AP Macroeconomics Exam. 536AP ­ AP EUROPEAN HISTORY Full Year • 1 credit • Grades 11, 12 • Elective The AP European History course is designed to provide students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with he principal events, movements and themes in modern European history. The course will develop the skills necessary to analyze historical evidence and express historical understanding in writing. The course will cover intellectual, cultural, political, diplomatic, social, and economic history of modern European. Advanced placement courses are demanding and require daily homework. Students must take the AP exam in May in order to receive the weighted grade. Summer reading may be required: if so, information will be available to students. Fees: AP Exam AND Exam Review Book. 538 ­ CONTEMPORARY ISSUES Semester • 1/2 credit • Elective • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • Fee • Recommend completion of World History and American History Contemporary Issues provides a study of current foreign and domestic topics. Periodicals such as Time Magazine, U.S.A., Today, Newsweek, and U.S. News and World Report are used as resources for researching current issues. Upon completion of research on a given topic, students engage in one of the following methods of discussion: group debates, round table discussions, one­on­one crossfire debates, and panel discussions. Students may be required to purchase supplemental materials. 541 ­ HISTORY OF AMERICAN SPORT Semester • 1/2 credit • Elective • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 This course presents an overview of the development of amateur and professional athletics over the course of history in the United States. Using the development of sport and games as a lens, the social, cultural, and business history of the United States will be considered with a focus on the racial, ethical, legal, and monetary components of sports. Students need not be athletes to appreciate this elective course. 542 ­ PSYCHOLOGY Semester • 1/2 credit • Elective • Grades 11, 12 • Recommended: C or better average in previous high school social studies courses. Psychology is the study of human behavior. The course examines biological and environmental influences on the individual. Students will explore what people do, how they think, and why they act as they do. Topics to be covered include: history of psychology, methods of psychology, personality theories, theories of learning, sensations and perceptions, conflicts and adjustment, stress and frustration, psychological disorders and treatment. 48 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS 542AP ­ AP PSYCHOLOGY Full Year • 1 credit • Grades 11, 12 • Fee • Elective AP Psychology is a college level introductory psychology course in which students learn the ​
theoretical and historical underpinnings of the field of psychology, distinguish among the domains of psychology (biological, cognitive, contemporary approaches) analyze contributions of major historical figures, gain exposure to the empirical ​
research process upon which the field is based and the application of research and theory to explain human behavior, and discuss and challenge contemporary approaches to biological, cognitive, learning, developmental, motivation, personality, abnormal behavior, and social psychology. Typically, students who achieve a requisite score on the College Board’s AP exam are awarded college credit. Fees: AP Exam AND Exam Review Book. SOC100CCP ­ INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY CCP Semester • 1 high school elective credit of Social Studies • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • 3 college credits Sociology is the study of social groups and societal institutions and their effect on society and individuals. Topics covered include research methods, theoretical perspectives, culture, the structure and organization of society, systems of stratification including global inequality, racial stratification, social class and gender stratification, major social institutions and current topics. POLS1100CCP ­ INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN GOVERNMENT CCP Semester • 1 high school credit of Social Studies – ​
fulfills the student’s POD requirement • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • 3 college credits • Prerequisite: placement into ENGL1100CCP, ACT English subscore 18. This course introduces students to the nature, purpose and structure of the American political system. Attention is given to the institutions and processes that create public policy. The strengths and weaknesses of the American political system are discussed, along with the role of citizens in a democracy. POLS1200CCP ­ COMPARATIVE POLITICS CCP Semester • 1 high school elective credit of Social Studies – DOES NOT ​
fulfill the student’s POD requirement • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • 3 college credits • Prerequisite: placement into ENGL1100CCP, ACT English subscore 18. This course is designed as an introductory survey class for the student interested in the field of comparative politics. Students will analyze what comparative politics is; explore a theoretical framework that helps the student understand the basic principles found within comparative politics; and will study specific countries by analyzing their history, institutions, political culture, and economy. POLS1250CCP ­ STATE & LOCAL GOVERNMENT CCP Semester • 1 high school elective credit of Social Studies • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • 3 college credits • Prerequisite: placement into ENGL1100CCP, , ACT English subscore of 18. This course introduces the student to the nature, purpose and structure of state and local governments, especially in Ohio. Attention is given to the institutions and processes that create public policy, including fiscal policy and the court system. The strengths and weaknesses of the state and local government system are discussed along with the everyday role of citizens in a democracy, especially at these levels of government. The following Dual Credit/College Credit Plus offering may not be available pending college approval and student registration: HIST1100CCP ­ WESTERN CIVILIZATION TO 1492 CCP Semester • 1 high school elective credit of Social Studies • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • 3 college credits • Prerequisite: placement into ENGL1100CCP, ACT English subscore of 18. This course is a survey of Western Civilization examining ideas and cultural and political institutions from prehistory through the early part of the Reformation. Subjects covered include: ancient Middle East, Greece, Rome, Christianity, Islam, the Early Middle Ages, the High Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Reformation, and European voyages of discovery. 49 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS HIST1110CCP ­ WESTERN CIVILIZATION FROM 1492 TO PRESENT CCP Semester • 1 high school elective credit of Social Studies • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • 3 college credits • Prerequisite: placement into ENGL1100CCP, ACT English subscore of 18. This is a survey of Western Civilization examining ideas and cultural and political institutions from the European Age of Discovery to the present day. Topics covered include: the Wars of Religion, the Scientific Revolution, Absolutism, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, nineteenth century science and ideologies, twentieth century wars, the Cold War and Globalization. HIST1121CCP – MODERN EAST ASIA CCP Semester • 1 high school elective credit of Social Studies • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • 3 college credits • Prerequisite: placement into ENGL1100CCP, ACT English subscore of 18. Modern East Asia will provide students with a foundation in early modern to modern history of China, Korea, Japan and Vietnam. Topics for the course will include, but are not limited to; the early modern/late traditional era including European and American contact with Asia, the end of the Tokugawa period in Japan, the Meiji Reformation, the decline and partition of China, Industrialization and Imperialism through World War II, Communism in China, the Korean Conflict, Indo­China through the Vietnam War and an examination of the successor states in Modern East Asia. SOC2060CCP ­ RACE AND ETHNICITY CCP Semester • 1 high school elective credit of Social Studies • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • 3 college credits • Prerequisite: placement into ENGL1100CCP, ACT English subscore of 18. An exploration of American diversity in terms of the dynamics of intergroup relations, focusing on selected racial and ethnic groups. In addition, other diversities that may be included in the exploration: religion, gender, sexual preference, and the Appalachian area. 50 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS BUSINESS & MARKETING Course No. Title Availability Credit Length 717 Finance Foundations 9, 10, 11, 12 .50 S 709 Business Foundations 9, 10, 11, 12 .50 S 949 Marketing Principles 10, 11, 12 .50 S 725 Management Principles & Research ­ Offered at PHSN Only* 10, 11, 12 1.00 Y 726 Strategic Entrepreneurship ­ Offered at PHSN Only* 11, 12 1.00 Y 946 Marketing Applications ­ Offered at PHSC Only* 11, 12 1.00 Y 947 Marketing Research ­ Offered at PHSC Only* 11, 12 .50 S 948 Professional & Technical Sales ­ Offered at PHSC Only* 11, 12 .50 S BMGT1008CCP 21st Century Workplace Skills CCP 9, 10, 11, 12 1.00 S BGMT1101CPP Principles of Business CCP 9, 10, 11, 12 1.00 S MKTG1230CCP Customer Service & Sales CCP 9, 10, 11, 12 1.00 S Business Entrepreneurship Pathway 709 Business Foundations and/or Finance Foundations 9, 10 .50 S 949 Marketing Principles 9, 10 .50 S 725 Management Principles & Research ­ Offered at PHSN Only* 10, 11, 12 1.00 Y 726 Strategic Entrepreneurship ­ Offered at PHSN Only* 2017­18 11, 12 1.00 Y Business Entrepreneurship Pathway Electives BMGT1008CCP 21st Century Workplace Skills CCP 9, 10, 11, 12 1.00 S BGMT1101CPP Principles of Business CCP 9, 10, 11, 12 1.00 S MKTG1230CCP Customer Service & Sales CCP 9, 10, 11, 12 1.00 S Marketing Pathway 709 Business Foundations and/or Finance Foundations 9, 10 .50 S 949 Marketing Principles 9, 10 .50 S 948 Professional & Technical Sales ­ Offered at PHSC Only* 11, 12 .50 S 946 Marketing Applications ­ Offered at PHSC Only* 11, 12 1.00 Y 947 Marketing Research ­ Offered at PHSC Only* 11, 12 .50 S Marketing Pathway Electives BMGT1008CCP 21st Century Workplace Skills CCP 9, 10, 11, 12 1.00 S BGMT1101CPP Principles of Business CCP 9, 10, 11, 12 1.00 S MKTG1230CCP Customer Service & Sales CCP 9, 10, 11, 12 1.00 S *The Business and Marketing courses that are taught at one school are available to students from both high schools. Business Entrepreneurship and Marketing Pathways Changes in the U.S. and world economies have created opportunities for and growth of entrepreneurs. ​
Entrepreneurship is the development of a business from the ground up — coming up with an idea and turning it into a profitable business. But while the ​
definition of ​
entrepreneurship may be simple, its execution is much more difficult. Pickerington Schools offers a variety of business entrepreneurship and marketing courses designed to prepare students with the foundational knowledge and skills to compete in the workforce, regardless of their chosen career path. Students can benefit from taking one or more 51 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS business or marketing elective courses, or they may decide to follow a career pathway by majoring in business entrepreneurship or marketing. The pathways above describe the course sequences for business entrepreneurship and marketing pathways. For students interested in a career in one of these fields, the courses follow a specific sequence designed to prepare an in­depth and concentrated preparation while in high school. As students progress through the pathways, they will have opportunities to develop business plans and participate in internships, research projects and other real­world learning. 717 – FINANCE FOUNDATIONS Semester • 1/2 credit • Elective • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • Career­Technical end­of­course test required This course introduces students to the specializations offered in the finance career field. Students will obtain fundamental knowledge and skills in accounting, banking services, corporate finance, insurance, and securities and investments. They will acquire knowledge of financial analysis and application, business law and ethics, economics, international business and business relationships. Knowledge management and information technology will be emphasized. Employability skills, leadership and communication will be incorporated in classroom activities. Personal financial management is taught and includes balancing a checkbook, living debt­free, and planning for the future (investments, insurance, taxes and credit). 709 ­ BUSINESS FOUNDATIONS Semester • 1/2 credit • Elective • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • Career­Technical end­of­course test required This hands­on course is designed as an introduction to business. The purpose is to give students a broad overview of the different disciplines within business that will impact their personal and professional lives. Students will gain a better understanding of the American business world and it’s place in our social, economic and global environment. Business career exploration, types of business, marketing in today’s world, buying goods and services and various types of money management will be discussed. Practical business applications and projects will be a part of this class. Students can expect projects, presentations and guest speakers in various subjects related to business. 949 – MARKETING PRINCIPLES Semester • 1/2 credit • Elective • Grades 10, 11, 12 • Prerequisite: Completion of either Business Foundations or Finance Foundations • Career­Technical end­of­course test required Marketing is everywhere and in this course, students obtain fundamental knowledge and skills in marketing communications (including social media), marketing management, marketing research, visual merchandising and professional selling. They will acquire knowledge of marketing strategies, market identification techniques, employability skills, business ethics and law, economic principles and international business. Technology, leadership and communications will be incorporated in classroom activities. Students can expect project­based learning in groups, presentations, guest speakers, and opportunities to participate in a student organization, DECA, and participate in networking and leadership experiences. 725 – MANAGEMENT PRINCIPLES & RESEARCH​
­ Offered at PHSN Only Full Year • 1 credit • Elective • Grades 11, 12 • Prerequisite: Completion of two of the three offered courses ­ Marketing Principles, Business Foundations and/or Finance Foundations • Career­Technical end­of­course test required This course provides students with twenty­first century skills that are essential in today’s global society. Through the use of current software tools and applications, students will identify, select, and apply appropriate technology and resources to produce creative works and construct technology enhanced products and presentations. In addition, students will use problem­solving skills and critical analysis to explore real world scenarios, study career options, develop electronic research strategies, and practice effective communication techniques. Students are encouraged to participate in the student­lead organization, DECA, to gain practical skills, networking opportunities, and eligibility for scholarships. 726 – STRATEGIC ENTREPRENEURSHIP​
­ Offered at PHSN Only Full Year • 1 credit • Elective • Grades 11, 12 • Prerequisite: Completion of two of the three offered courses ­ Marketing Principles, Business Foundations and/or Finance Foundations • Career­Technical end­of­course test required Students will use innovation skills to generate ideas for new products and services, evaluate the feasibility of ideas, and develop a strategy for commercialization. They will use technology to select target markets, profile target customers, define the venture’s mission, and create business plans. Students will take initial steps to establish a business. Students will calculate and forecast costs, break­even, and sales. Establishing brand, setting prices, promoting products, and managing customer relationships will be emphasized. Students can expect to polish and present their ideas in various formats. Students are encouraged to participate in the student­lead organization, DECA, to gain practical skills, networking opportunities, and eligibility for scholarships. 52 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS 946 – MARKETING APPLICATIONS ­ Offered at PHSC Only Year • 1 credit • Elective • Grades 11, 12 • Prerequisite: Completion of either Business Foundations or Finance Foundations • Career­Technical end­of­course test required Students will develop and implement marketing strategies and techniques across marketing functions: channel management, marketing research, market planning, pricing, product/service management and branding. They will use marketing operations procedures and activities to ensure marketing’s efficiency and effectiveness. Students will generate, screen, and develop new product ideas. They will predict economic trends and conditions and determine how cultural intelligence can impact organizations. Technology, employability skills, leadership and communications will be incorporated in classroom activities. 947 – MARKETING RESEARCH ­ Offered at PHSC Only Semester • 1/2 credit • Elective • Grades 11, 12 • Prerequisite: Completion of either Business Foundations or Finance Foundations • Career­Technical end­of­course test required Students will conduct qualitative and quantitative marketing research using primary and secondary data. They will gather, synthesize, evaluate, and disseminate marketing information for use in business decision­making or to address a specific marketing problem or issue. Students will apply project management techniques to guide and control marketing­research activities. They will use statistical techniques to evaluate marketing data. Technology, employability skills, leadership and communications will be incorporated in classroom activities. 948 – PROFESSIONAL & TECHNICAL SALES ­ Offered at PHSC Only Semester • 1/2 credit • Elective • Grades 11, 12 • Prerequisite: Completion of either Business Foundations or Finance Foundations • Career­Technical end­of­course test required In this course, students will demonstrate sales processes and techniques used in a business­to­business environment. They will develop, grow, and maintain positive business relationships. Students will monitor trends and the business environment to determine the impact on their sales, customers, and competitors, they will negotiate and adjust prices and sales terms. Students will manage sales activities and territories. Technology, employability skills, leadership and communications will be incorporated in classroom activities. College Credit Plus Offerings (available at both Central and North): BMGT1008CCP ­ 21ST CENTURY WORKPLACE SKILLS CCP Semester • 0.67 high school elective credit • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • 2 college credits In this fundamental course, students learn basic skills needed to gain entry to and thrive in a rapidly changing workplace environment. BMGT1101CCP ­ PRINCIPLES OF BUSINESS CCP Semester • 1 high school elective credit • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • 3 college credits • Prerequisite: placement into appropriate writing level (ENGL0190CCP) This course provides an overview of the various functions and activities of business enterprises. Marketing, human resources, accounting and finance, and operations are examined. Additionally, the topics of globalization and economics are covered. Students will learn important business terms and definitions. MKTG1230CCP CUSTOMER SERVICE AND SALES CCP Semester • 1 high school elective credit • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • 3 college credits MKTG1230CCP provides an introduction to the sales process and the key role that sales activities play in any consumer or commercial business endeavor. The course deals with the basic components of selling including understanding customer psychology and building customer relationships. This course also emphasizes the important issues facing customer service providers and customer service managers in business. Special emphasis is placed on the mastery of specific skills and analyzing customer attitudes and behaviors to determine the tasks required to deliver excellent customer service. 53 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS INTEGRATED TECHNOLOGY Cours
e No. Title Availability Suggested Credit Length 9, 10, 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 .50 S 9, 10, 11, 12 .50 S 9, 10, 11 .50 S 10, 11 11, 12 .50 .50 S S 9, 10, 11, 12 .50 S 10, 11, 12 10, 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 10, 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 10, 11, 12 .50 .50 .50 .50 .50 .50 1 2.00 2.00 S S S S S S Y Y Y 9 10 11 11, 12 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Y Y Y Y 802 Construction: Building and Materials 804 Construction: Design & Engineering 9, 10, 11, 12 Introduction to Video & Television 9, 10, 11 Broadcasting Advanced Television Broadcasting 10, 11, 12 Advanced Cable Broadcasting 11, 12 Introduction to Drafting, Drawing and 9, 10, 11, 12 Design Architectural Drafting and Design 10, 11, 12 Advanced Drafting, Drawing, and Design 10, 11, 12 Introduction to Engineering Technology 9, 10, 11, 12 Advanced Engineering Technology 10, 11, 12 IT Fundamentals 9, 10, 11, 12 Introduction to IT Engineering 9, 10, 11, 12 Technology Internship 10, 11, 12 Multimedia – Tech Prep 1*** 11 Multimedia – Tech Prep 2* *** 12 Pre­Engineering STEM Pathway Introduction to Engineering Design 9, 10 Principles of Engineering 10, 11, 12 Digital Electronics 11, 12 Engineering Design and Development 11,12 806 816 821 808 809 822 824 826 832 838 844 834 836 839 840 841 843 *for juniors on a space available basis ***available ​
only​
at PHSN but available to both North and Central students Technology Program Philosophy All students should become technologically literate in order to become wise decision makers in the 21st Century. By developing an understanding of the history and impact of technology, students become wise consumers, productive members of our community, and contributors to the forces of change that shape our world. Through the application of technical skills, knowledge, and processes, students should be able to solve problems in a systematic fashion. Coupled with sound work values, habits and attitudes, these skills should provide students with the opportunity to adapt to a changing environment, and enhance those abilities related to creative thinking and career development. Integrated Technology Education Technology Education is defined as a comprehensive study of the knowledge and processes necessary in designing, making, developing, producing, using, managing, and assessing technological systems and products. Dimensions of technology include assessing impacts and consequences of technology, nature and history of technology, and connections. Technological systems and products are those systems and products that change the world around us to satisfy our needs and wants. In particular, technology education focuses on three systems; information, physical, and bio­related. 54 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS Goals The technology education goals of the program are to allow students to develop: ● knowledge and ability to properly use the tools, techniques, and resources of technology systems in a proper manner. ● creative solutions to present and future societal problems using technical means. ● human potential for responsible work, leisure, and citizenship roles in a technological society. ● appreciation for the evolution of technology. ● values on the impact of technology and how it alters our environment. Courses Offered for College Credit The Integrated Technology Department offers classes that articulate with Columbus State Community College for college credit. This means if you take a specific class or combination of classes in our department you can receive credit for the appropriate class at Columbus State Community College. Students must meet requirements to receive college credit. See your instructor for details. These Integrated Technology courses articulate to Course No. Course No. ENGT 1115 ARCH 1110 ARCH 1112 ENGT 1110 Title 808 Intro to Drafting, Drawing and Design 808 and 809 808 and 809 Intro to Drafting, Drawing and Design and​
Architectural Drafting and Design Intro to Drafting, Drawing and Design and​
Architectural Drafting and Design 826 These CSCC courses Advanced Engineering Technology Title Engineering Graphics Basic Manual Drawing CAD Drafting Intro to Engineering Technologies Computer Applications for Construction/ Engineering Computer Applications for Construction/ Engineering II ITST 1101 832 and 838 IT Fundamentals ​
and​
Introduction to IT Engineering Credits ITST 1102 ITST 1123 PC Tech Essentials 3 1 1 2 2 2 3 802 ­ CONSTRUCTION: BUILDING AND MATERIALS Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • Semester • 1/2 credit • Elective • Fee • Prerequisite: None Construction: Building and Materials is an introductory course that will give students a "hands on" experience with building materials, construction techniques, tools and equipment utilized in industry to build a structure on a site. Students will simulate activities performed by contractors, sub­contractors, and laborers as they prepare a site, build a foundation, frame a structure, and finish the exterior and interior details of the structure. The course will also address issues dealing with home maintenance, plumbing, and electricity. 804 – CONSTRUCTION: DESIGN & ENGINEERING Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • Semester • 1/2 credit • Elective • Fee • Prerequisite: None Construction: Design and Engineering is an introductory level course that will study the skills required to properly design a house and plan a structure. Students will study the concepts, skills, and attitudes about designing and building a residential structure referred to as a “dream house.” Building materials, landscape and exterior design for a structure are also addressed. Students will develop an appreciation for the responsibilities and work of a contractor and services of an architect. Students will develop a set of working drawings, by using drafting techniques and Auto Cad, and will ​
construct a scaled model of their “dream house.” Students will also study contractual and engineering specifications for the structure. 55 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS 806 ­ INTRODUCTION TO VIDEO & TELEVISION BROADCASTING Grades 9, 10, 11 • Semester • 1/2 credit • Elective • Fee • Prerequisite: None This is an introductory level course for students interested in the areas of video, video post­production work, and the television broadcasting industry. Students will be expected to learn the basic operation of video cameras, and non­linear editing systems. By incorporating integrated math, science and technology activities students will be able to develop an understanding of additional areas and enrichment activities, including studio set­up and set design, the television, film, and radio industry, script writing, lighting, advertising, and other aspects of the broadcasting industry. 816 ­ ADVANCED TELEVISION BROADCASTING PRODUCTION Grades 10, 11, 12 • Semester • 1/2 credit • Elective • Fee • Prerequisite: Intro. to Video and Television Broadcasting and instructor’s approval This is an advanced level course that builds on the experience and background information from the Introduction to Video and Television Broadcasting course. These students will be involved with the actual production of the video announcements. Students will work in all areas of broadcasting production, including camera operation, audio, post­production editing, studio set­up and design, script writing, and stage lighting. By incorporating integrated math, science and technology activities students will be able to develop an understanding of how the broadcast industry uses math and science to produce every aspect of broadcast productions, from transmitting, recording, editing and distribution, to how a studio works 821 ­ ADVANCED CABLE BROADCASTING Grades 11, 12 • Semester • 1/2 credit • Elective • Fee • Prerequisite: Intro to TV & Video Broadcasting, Advanced Television Broadcasting Production and instructor’s approval This class will build on the course content, math, and science based skills from both the Introduction to Television Broadcasting course and the Advanced Television Broadcasting course to produce a cable TV show WPKN for North, and WPIC for Central. The student will develop an understanding of the television and cable industries through the production of a half hour program to be aired weekly on all three local cable companies. Students will be expected to work in many different areas of broadcast production. Students are expected to complete work outside of class and may be required to travel around the school district during class time or after school. Editors and on screen talent must submit an audition tape to be considered for the class (see instructor for details). 808 ­ INTRODUCTION TO DRAFTING, DRAWING & DESIGN Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • Semester • 1/2 credit • Elective • Fee • Prerequisite: None Drafting conventions and drawing techniques will be taught through sketching and instrument drawing. The course will cover such areas as: ● Drafting and Drawing techniques ● Proper use of drafting tools and equipment ● Lettering and dimensioning practices ● Multi­view (orthographic) drawings ● Pictorial (isometric) drawings ● Designing, drafting, and construction of three­dimensional models ● Introduction to CAD (Computer Aided Drafting) This course is designed to provide students with basic design, drafting, integrated math and science skills along with the ability to conceptualize objects in 2D and 3D. 56 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS 809 ­ ARCHITECTURAL DRAFTING AND DESIGN Grades 10, 11, 12 • Semester • 1/2 credit • Elective • Fee • Prerequisite: None, grades 11, 12; Construction: Design and Engineering, grade 10. This course involves the study of construction to include commercial and residential building design. Students will be involved with “hands on” activities to include design of structures, materials estimating and specifications, blueprints reading, building codes, inspection career studies, innovative design techniques, residential and community development, financing, and cost factors. Students will use drafting and CAD to problem­solve design and develop drawings. Basic applications in 3D modeling will also be implemented in the set of house drawings. Students will have a portfolio at the end of the class. 822 ­ ADVANCED DRAFTING, DRAWING AND DESIGN Grades 10, 11, 12 • Semester • 1/2 credit • Fee • Prerequisite: None for grades 11, 12; Introduction to Drafting, Drawing & Design, grade 10. This is an advanced level course to give students design and integrated problem solving skills using engineering drafting and computer aided drafting skills to produce drawings and designs. The student will be involved in such applications as: ●
Engineering drafting and design skills ●
Surface developments ●
Auxiliary views ●
Section views ●
Perspectives ●
Technical illustration ●
CAD and CAM techniques ●
Research and integrated math and science problem solving skills ●
Engineering print reading skills ●
3D Modeling programs This course is designed to give students the technical skills required for such fields as engineering, architecture, graphics, communications and trade skilled areas. 824 ­ INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • Semester • 1/2 credit • Elective • Fee • Prerequisite: None Introduction to Engineering Technology is a one­semester course that will expose students to many different areas of technology in. Students will be using more machines and technology than used in Junior High. Topics that may be included/incorporated are: power and energy ­ physics, simple machines, fluid power systems, robotics and mechanical devices; manufacturing materials and processes, STEM­like project construction using manufacturing processes in the areas of woodworking, metal work, plastics, and computer controlled machines. Civil, electrical, industrial, and mechanical concepts are applied in the lab through critical thinking and problem solving skills in the design and construction of their projects. 826 ­ ADVANCED ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY Grades 10, 11, 12 • Semester • 1/2 credit • Elective • Fee • Prerequisite: Introduction to Engineering Technology Advanced Engineering Technology is a one semester course in which students will continue to learn and master the different areas of power/energy, manufacturing, and engineering technologies learned in the introductory class. The students will be expected to research and design several working projects and to make a full set of plans for these problems. Students will also be exposed to CNC mills, CNC lathes, robotics, and other supplemental activities. By incorporating integrated math, science and technology activities students will be able to develop an understanding to advanced engineering concepts. 57 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS 832 ­ IT FUNDAMENTALS
Semester • 1/2 credit • Elective • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • (This class is provided in partnership with Pickerington Schools and Eastland­Fairfield Career & Technical Schools to provide state­of­the­art training in IT.) Information Technology (IT) Fundamentals is a foundation course designed for students to acquire the necessary IT skills for their chosen careers. This course will expose students to all areas of IT that are needed in the world of work. The curriculum will introduce students to a variety of computer­based information systems, particularly software applications and computer hardware. Subject areas include computer applications (word processing, data bases, spreadsheets, desktop publishing, and presentation software), e­mail, programming, graphic design, Internet, web page design, multimedia and networking. 838 ­ INTRODUCTION TO INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ENGINEERING Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • 1 period per day • .50 credits • Elective • Fee • Prerequisites: None This practical, hands­on course in integrated problem solving covers common hardware and software solutions for Macintosh and Windows based PCs. The course focuses on the operating systems and hardware of both Mac and PC platforms, including investigation into the most frequent difficulties found in specific applications. An emphasis is placed on the best solution to the most common work interruptions caused by software and hardware conflicts. Issues including printing, viruses, lost files, surge protection, extensions/drivers, and hardware and software installation are also covered. No typing experience is required. Students should have a desire to learn how to solve integrated computer problems and the ability to attend to detail. 844 ­ TECHNOLOGY INTERNSHIP Full Year ​
• Grades 10, 11, 12 • 1 elective credit The Student Technology Genius Bar course, open to students in grades 10, 11, and 12, is a year­long, hands on study of technology integration in an educational context. Students are required to assess problem sets throughout the day and define the best approach to addressing or solving the problem. In addition to solving problems for students and teachers, students will be required to complete and maintain several running projects that address problems or solutions in educational technology integration. The course also asks students to have a prior understanding of Apple OS, Chrome OS, and the iPad iOS. To be considered for Help Desk, students are required to interview with the Director of Instructional Technology, Technology Supervisor and building level technicians, as well as the building administration. Interviews are held in the late spring. *In addition to skills and knowledge related to educational technology, Genius Bar students should possess strong research, writing, and critical thinking skills. Students are expected to be self­motivated, independent learners. The Student Genius Bar will be limited to 16 students per high school, with two students managing the Genius Bar per period. Students will have the opportunity to obtain Apple and Google Industry credentials. INDEPENDENT STUDY
Grades 11 and 12 • Upperclassmen who have completed and mastered a specific area of study.
Semester or Full Year • 1/2 or 1 credit • periods vary per program • Fee: varies on type of course of study
Areas of Study: ● Materials Technology
● Photography ● Drafting Technology ● Graphics ● Construction Technology ● Engineering Technology ● Video Broadcasting 58 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS 834 & 836 MULTIMEDIA TECH PREP 1 AND 2 Program offered at PHSN but also available to PHSC students. Grades 11, 12 • 2 periods per day • 2 credits • Elective • See school counselor for Eastland­Fairfield application Multimedia is a hands­on program using the latest technology to give students the academic and technical skills needed to create Web sites, take great pictures, construct animations, produce excellent videos and design eye­catching graphics. Students will learn to express their creativity as they collaborate, think critically, and communicate with other students to create digital experiences. In our increasingly digital age, these skills are becoming essential for anyone in business. Multimedia is designed to give students a head­start. Offered through a partnership with Eastland­Fairfield Career & Technical Schools, this is a 2­year program that meets for 2 periods each day, and thus counts for 2 high school credits each year, along with several college credits. For more information about this program, including answers to frequently asked questions, a portfolio of student work, highlights of successful student projects, and updates on what graduates are doing now, please visit: ​
www.eastlandmultimedia.com​
. GRADE 11 Prerequisites: ● Junior in good standing (no academic deficiencies) ● Demonstrate college level potential as measured by course work or standardized achievement tests ● Algebra 1 (Geometry recommended) ● Attendance (95%) ● Approval of Tech Prep Instructors A student that signs up for Multimedia ­ Tech Prep must also sign up for the following courses as part of the total curriculum program. ● Multimedia ­ (Lab 11) ● English ● Algebra 2 or Geometry GRADE 12 Prerequisites: ● Senior in good standing (no academic deficiencies) ● Demonstrate college level potential as measured by course work or standardized achievement tests ● Algebra 2 or Geometry ● Attendance (95%) ● Approval of Instructors A student that signs up for Multimedia ­ Tech Prep must also sign up for the following courses as part of the total curriculum program. ● Multimedia ­ (Lab 12) ● English 12 ● Algebra 2 or Pre­Calculus Project Lead the Way (PLTW) Pre­Engineering STEM Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) is a national education, workforce development and economic development policy priority. STEM is widely viewed as critical for the economic competitiveness of American students and this is evidenced by President Obama’s Educate to Innovative initiative. Time Warner Cable’s Connect a Million Minds, Tapping America’s Potential, The National Math and Science initiatives all aim to increase the number of American STEM graduates. In Ohio, STEM industries are a top priority for economic development (Jobs Ohio). Six of the eight strategic priority focus areas for the Ohio Department of Development are STEM­related industries such as polymers, automotive, information technology and biohealth. Of the fifty high wage­high demand occupations in Ohio, 28 are in STEM­related careers and 17 of those are in the health care industry (Ohio Department of Job and Family Services, 2012). Project Lead the Way (PLTW) is a national pre­engineering curriculum, implemented at schools. Students who take a four­course sequence of PLTW classes may receive transcripted college credits at colleges and universities nationally, including the College of Engineering at The Ohio State University. College credit information for PLTW’s Pre­engineering courses can be found here: ​
http://www.pltwohio.org/pltw_paths.php​
. 59 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS 839 ­ INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING DESIGN Project Lead the Way Pre­Engineering Full Year • 1 credit • Fee • Elective • Preference for grade 9 • Project Lead The Way end­of­course test required • Career­Technical end­of­course test required The first in a four­course sequence in the national Project Lead the Way curriculum. Students must complete Introduction to Engineering design prior to enrolling in future PLTW courses. Introduction to Engineering Design teaches problem­solving skills using a design development process. Students use design and modeling software to solve engineering problems and create innovative product applications. Students dig deep into the engineering design process, applying math, science, and engineering standards to hands­on projects. They work both individually and in teams to design solutions to a variety of problems using 3D modeling software, and use an engineering notebook to document their work. 840 ­ PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING Project Lead the Way Pre­Engineering Full Year • 1 credit • Fee • Elective • Preference for grade 10 • Prerequisite: Introduction to Engineering Design • Project Lead The Way end­of­course test required • Career­Technical end­of­course test required This course will introduce students to fundamental engineering concepts and scientific principles associated with engineering design applications. Topics include mechanisms, energy, statics, materials, and kinematics. Additionally students will learn material properties and electrical, control and fluid power systems. Students will learn to apply problem solving, research and design skills to create solutions to engineering challenges. 841 ­ DIGITAL ELECTRONICS Project Lead the Way Pre­Engineering Full Year • 1 credit • Fee • Elective • Preference for grade 11 • Prerequisite: Principles of Engineering • Project Lead The Way end­of­course test required • Career­Technical end­of­course test required From smartphones to appliances, digital circuits are all around us. This course provides a foundation for students who are interested in electrical engineering, electronics, or circuit design. Students study topics such as combinational and sequential logic and are exposed to circuit design tools used in industry, including logic gates, integrated circuits, and programmable logic devices. 843 ­ ENGINEERING DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT (EDD)­ CAPSTONE COURSE Project Lead the Way Pre­Engineering Full Year • 1 credit • Fee • Elective • Preference for grade 11 • Prerequisite: Principles of Engineering, Digital Electronics • Project Lead The Way end­of­course test required • Career­Technical end­of­course test required The knowledge and skills students acquire throughout PLTW Engineering come together in EDD as they identify an issue and then research, design, and test a solution, ultimately presenting their solution to a panel of engineers. Students apply the professional skills they have developed to document a design process to standards, completing EDD ready to take on any post­secondary program or career. 60 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS ART DEPARTMENT Course No. 850 852 854 814 864 868 883 884 851 865 847 871 879AP 848A 848B CORE1110
CCP IL2031CCP Title Foundations in Two Dimensiona Design Foundations in Three Dimensional Design Foundations in Computer Graphics Foundations in Photography Intermediate Drawing Exploration Intermediate Painting Intermediate Ceramics ­ Handbuilt Intermediate Ceramics ­ Wheel Intermediate Computer Graphics Intermediate 3D Media Studies Intermediate Photography Advanced Studio Art AP Art Advanced Photography A Advanced Photography B Drawing Methods CCP Drawing for Entertainment Design CCP Visual Literacy I CCP Recommend Availability Credit Length 9 9, 10, 11, 12 .50 S 9 9, 10, 11, 12 .50 S 9 9, 10, 11, 12 .50 S 9 10 9, 10, 11, 12 10, 11, 12 .50 .50 S S 10 10 10, 11, 12 10, 11, 12 .50 .50 S S 10 10, 11, 12 .50 S 10 10, 11, 12 .50 10 10, 11, 12 .50 S 10 11 12 11, 12 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 10, 11, 12 11, 12 11, 12 11, 12 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 .50 1.00 1.00 .50 .50 1 S Y Y S S S (4 mods) 9, 10, 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 1 S (4 mods) S CORE 9, 10, 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 1 S (4 mods) 1120CCP CORE Visual Literacy II CCP 9, 10, 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 1 S (4 mods) 1221CCP Art courses are offered at three levels: foundation (beginner’s), intermediate, and advanced. Students must progress through the courses by taking beginner’s courses before moving on to the intermediate and advanced offerings. There are three types of media offered in the program: 2D (drawing, painting, photography), 3D (ceramics and other 3D media), and digital (computer graphics and photography). 850 ­ FOUNDATIONS IN TWO DIMENSIONAL DESIGN Semester • 1/2 credit • Elective • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • Fee Foundations in Two Dimensional Design is a course for beginning students interested in drawing, painting, and other 2D works of art. The class will use media, such as graphite, colored pencils, and paint. ​
The class objective is to provide the fundamental “tools" necessary to draw and paint with confidence and to develop within the student the ability to see the world the way artists see. ​
Students who plan on taking more advanced art courses should try to take this course as early as their schedule allows. Sketchbooks will be required. 61 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS 852 ­ FOUNDATIONS IN THREE DIMENSIONAL DESIGN Semester • 1/2 credit • Elective • Grades 9,10,11,12 • Fee Foundations in Three Dimensional Design is a course for beginning students who are interested in ceramics, sculpture, and metalworking. Students will learn to work with clay, plaster, metal, and various other materials. Students will also learn to plan out work, develop their personal voice, design elements, color theory, and art history. Students who plan on having a career in art should plan on taking this course their freshman year. Sketchbooks will be required. 854 ­ FOUNDATIONS IN COMPUTER GRAPHICS Semester • 1/2 credit • Elective • Grades 9,10,11,12 • Fee Foundations in Computer Graphics is a course for students who want to learn how to draw, paint, and digitally manipulate images using various computer graphics programs. Working with the principles of design, students will learn how to use new tools and techniques with each lesson. Students will learn how to create original works of art from scratch, as well as the skills necessary to manipulate/modify photos, or even images of their own, traditional pieces of art. Students who plan on taking more advanced art courses should try to take this course as early as their schedule allows. 814 ­ FOUNDATIONS IN PHOTOGRAPHY Semester ​
• ​
1/2 credit ​
• ​
Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 ​
•​
Fee ​
• ​
Prerequisite: None This course is designed to offer a solid foundation in the photographic processes. The course focuses on basic camera operations, composition techniques, photo editing with professional level applications such as Photoshop or Lightroom, and an introduction to chemical processing in the darkroom. Students are encouraged to develop personal artistic expression through photography. Students are expected to complete work outside of class. A digital camera is required (images captured on mobile devices welcome). 35mm film cameras are available for student use, however students are encouraged to use their own cameras. 864 ­ INTERMEDIATE DRAWING EXPLORATION Semester • 1/2 credit • Elective • Grades 10, 11, 12 • Fee • Prerequisite: C or higher in Foundations in Two Dimensional Design. This is a prerequisite for Advanced Studio Art. This course is designed to develop drawing skills introduced in Foundations in Two Dimensional Design. The course will explore 2D art to a more demanding degree, stressing observational techniques, principles of design, and multimedia applications. Students will be encouraged to start developing their own artistic style through research, reflection, and class critiques. Students interested in a career in art are encouraged to take this class early on in their high school course work to learn skills necessary in many other art classes. A sketchbook is required. 868 ­ INTERMEDIATE PAINTING EXPLORATION Semester • 1/2 credit • Elective • Grades 10, 11, 12 * Fee • Prerequisite: C or higher in Foundations in Two Dimensional Design. This is a prerequisite for Advanced Studio Art. This course is designed to develop painting skills introduced in Foundations in Two Dimensional Design. The course will explore 2D art to a more demanding degree, stressing use of color, principles of design, and various painting media. Students will be encouraged to start developing their own artistic style through research, reflection, and class critiques. Students interested in a career in art are encouraged to take this class early on in their high school course work to learn skills necessary in many other art classes. A sketchbook is required. 883 ­ INTERMEDIATE CERAMICS ­ HANDBUILT Semester • 1/2 credit • Elective • Grades 10, 11, 12 * Fee • Prerequisite: C or higher in Foundations in Three Dimensional Design. This is a prerequisite for Advanced Studio Art. This course is designed to further develop ceramic hand­building techniques including pinching, coil, and slab construction, introduced in Foundations in Three Dimensional Design. Students will continue to examine various glazing and firing techniques. The importance of good design, critical thinking, and problem solving will be stressed. Students will be encouraged to start developing their own artistic style through research, reflection, and class critiques. A sketchbook is required. 62 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS 884 ­ INTERMEDIATE CERAMICS ­ WHEEL Semester • 1/2 credit • Elective • Grades 10, 11, 12 * Fee • Prerequisite: C or higher in Foundations in Three Dimensional Design. This is a prerequisite for Advanced Studio Art. This course is designed to further develop ceramic wheel thrown techniques introduced in Foundations in Three Dimensional Design. Students will continue to examine various glazing and firing techniques. The importance of good design, critical thinking, and problem solving will be stressed. Students will be encouraged to start developing their own artistic style through research, reflection, and class critiques. A sketchbook is required. ​
Due to the nature of this class, size is limited; therefore upperclassmen will be scheduled first. 865 ­ INTERMEDIATE 3D MEDIA STUDIES Semester • 1/2 credit • Elective • Grades 10, 11, 12 * Fee• Prerequisite: C or higher in Foundations in Three Dimensional Design. This is a prerequisite for Advanced Studio Art. In this course, students will further develop metals, sculpture, and mixed 3D media skills introduced in Foundations in Three Dimensional Design. Additionally, students can explore alternative mediums. Throughout, students will be encouraged to develop new approaches to their work. The importance of good design, critical thinking, and problem solving will be stressed. Students will be encouraged to start developing their own artistic style through research, reflection, and class critiques. A sketchbook is required. 851 ­ INTERMEDIATE COMPUTER GRAPHICS Semester • 1/2 credit • Elective • Grades 10, 11, 12 • Fee Prerequisite: C average in Foundations in Computer Graphics. This is a prerequisite for Advanced Studio Art. This course is designed to develop artistic skills introduced in Foundations in Computer Graphics. Students will work with a number of graphics programs which utilize raster, vector, and potentially 3D graphics. Projects will strongly emphasize the principles of design, and may include a blend of photo manipulation, artistic expression, and commercial/graphic design applications. Students will be encouraged to start developing their own artistic style through research, reflection, and class critiques. 847 ­ INTERMEDIATE PHOTOGRAPHY Semester ​
•​
1/2 credit ​
•​
Grades 10, 11, 12 ​
•​
Fee ​
•​
Prerequisite: B or higher in Foundations in Photography This is an intermediate level course focused on controlling light by mastering exposure and depth of field through the use of single lens reflex (SLR) film cameras and digital photography. Students will develop film and use their negatives to print photos in the school’s darkroom. Students will also explore hybrid photography by scanning and enhancing their negatives in professional level applications such as Photoshop or Lightroom. Finally, students will continue building their digital skills in digital photography and editing with professional level applications such as Photoshop or Lightroom. Students are expected to complete work outside of class. A digital camera is required (images captured on mobile devices welcome on several assignments). Both film and digital cameras are available for student use, however students are encouraged to use their own cameras. Students that complete Intermediate Photography can earn articulated credit with Columbus State Community College. This means that students who complete this sequence of courses and attend Columbus State Community College can earn 3 credits for Columbus State Community College’s FOTO 2294 course (Current Trends in Digital Photography). Students must meet requirements to receive college credit. See your instructor for details. 871 ­ ADVANCED STUDIO ART Full Year • 1 credit • Grades 11, 12 • Elective • Fee • Prerequisite: C or higher in at least two intermediate art classes. (2D, 3D, or Computer Graphics in any combination) Students will be able to work in the 2D – 3D media of their choice, including drawing, painting, ceramics, sculpture, metals or computer graphics. Students will spend the year developing individual portfolios to submit for college consideration and scholarship competitions. Students will be guided through the individual preparation of their portfolios based on prior experience, artistic strengths, and career plans with the help of the instructor. The creation and presentation of portfolios, including the creation of a digital record of work, will be emphasized. Students requesting this course will have demonstrated high motivation, interest, and the ability to work independently during previous art courses. A sketchbook is required. ​
This class may be taken for 879AP: AP (Advanced Placement) credit with permission from the instructor. 63 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS 848A ­ ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPHY A Semester ​
•​
1/2 credit ​
•​
Grades 11, 12 ​
•​
Fee • Prerequisite: A in Intermediate Photography This is an advanced level class focused on digital photography and is aimed at preparing students for the Professional Photographer Association’s Certified Professional Photographer accreditation. Students will apply the exposure and depth of field skills learned in Intermediate Photography to the digital single lense reflex (DSLR) camera. Students will study composition, portraiture, and advanced lighting and editing techniques. Upon completion of Advanced Photography A and B, students are encouraged to submit a portfolio and complete the Certified Professional Photographer examination. Student must provide their own DSLR or mirrorless camera. Use of mobile devices for image capture is prohibited. 848B ­ ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPHY B Semester ​
•​
1/2 credit ​
•​
Grades 11, 12 ​
•​
Fee • Prerequisite: A in Advanced Photography A This is the final class in the Photography curriculum and is focused on digital photography. This class is aimed at preparing students for the Professional Photographer Association’s Certified Professional Photographer accreditation. Students will apply the exposure and depth of field skills learned in Intermediate Photography to the digital single lense reflex (DSLR) camera. Students will study composition, portraiture, and advanced lighting and editing techniques. Upon completion of Advanced Photography A and B, students are encouraged to submit a portfolio and complete the Certified Professional Photographer examination. Student must provide their own DSLR or mirrorless camera. Use of mobile devices for image capture is prohibited. The following Dual Credit/College Credit Plus offering may not be available pending college approval and student registration: CORE1110CCP – DRAWING METHODS CCP Semester ​
• ​
4 mods ​
•​
1 high school fine arts credit ​
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Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 ​
•​
3 college credits Drawing Methods provides an introduction to drawing techniques, methods, and concepts, employing strategies that serve the studio arts and design arts. Course projects center on ideation, observation, and creative growth through investigation of subjects including still life, environmental structure and the human form. Using traditional, digital, and hybrid media, a variety of compositional strategies and creative applications will be explored while technical skills are expanded. Critical examination and research of drawing practices in historic and contemporary context facilitate conceptual development. IL2031CCP ­ DRAWING FOR ENTERTAINMENT DESIGN CCP Semester ​
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4 mods ​
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1 high school fine arts credit ​
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Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 ​
•​
3 college credits Basic illustrative drawing skills for storytelling are introduced. Class assignments emphasize observation of the human figure through drawing costumed models. Projects explore character development and storyboards. CORE1120CCP ­ VISUAL LITERACY I CCP Semester ​
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4 mods ​
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1 high school fine arts credit ​
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Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 ​
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3 college credits Visual Literacy I provides an introduction to the principles of creative design and the common organizational systems associated with color theory. Leveraging 2­D, 3­D and 4­D strategies, the elements of design and the properties of color are identified, employed and controlled in progressively more complex projects. Effective design strategies, color management tools, functional page layout, typographic principles and conceptual solutions are investigated. Course projects require the use of traditional studio processes in conjunction with digital media employing the Adobe Creative Cloud ­ Illustrator, Photoshop, and InDesign. Software literacy is facilitated by lectures, demonstrations and specialized technological support. Critical examination and research of design practices in historic context and contemporary applications initiate conceptual development. CORE1221CCP ­ VISUAL LITERACY II CCP Semester ​
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4 mods ​
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1 high school fine arts credit ​
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Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 ​
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3 college credits • Prerequisite: ART/CORE 1120 Visual Literacy II lectures, demonstrations, specialized software lessons and projects support creative development through contextual applications of color and design. The conceptual, expressive, cultural, symbolic, and associative impact of color and design in society is examined. 2D, 3D, and 4D project strategies will include intermediate use of Illustrator, Photoshop, and InDesign as well as offer opportunities to utilize other software applications, such as Google Sketch­Up, After Effects and Premier. Development of pictorial space, thematic concepts, narrative and sequential imagery, and effective info­graphics are investigated. Knowledge of cross­disciplinary applications and technological literacy are facilitated by employing traditional studio processes, digital media, hybrid processes, and lens­based activities. Critical examination and research of design practices in historic context and contemporary applications expand conceptual development. Prerequisite: ART/CORE 1120 64 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS MUSIC DEPARTMENT Course No. 600 604 606 608 612 602 614 616 622 610AP Title Marching Band Symphonic Band Concert Band 1 Concert Band 2 Orchestra Jazz Band Chorale Symphonic Choir Concert Choir AP Music Theory Availability 9, 10, 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 11, 12 Credit .50 .50 .50 .50 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Length 10 weeks​
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(4 mods) 26 weeks​
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(4 mods) 26 weeks​
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(4 mods) 26 weeks​
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(4 mods) Y Y Y Y Y Y The Music Department offers a variety of academic and performance courses in both the instrumental and vocal areas. All music credits may be counted toward fulfillment of graduation requirements. INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC To receive ​
any​
credit in band, student must participate both semesters. 600 ­ MARCHING BAND 10 weeks •​
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4 mods • 1/2 credit (in conjunction with concert performing bands) • Elective • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 The Marching Band is an active performing ensemble that studies and performs literature from all genres. Participation in marching band involves music performance, aerobic activity, and outdoor rehearsals in all elements. The band performs at all varsity football games and at organized band competitions as determined by the director. The band may also be required to perform at community and school events scheduled throughout the year. ​
Participation in the band program is by audition only. Attendance at all scheduled rehearsals, sections, and performances are mandatory. Pre­band camp, band camp, and summer rehearsals are mandatory​
. Students must participate in a Concert Performing Group to be in Marching Band. Students may not take any band independent study. Two seasons of membership in marching band fulfill the physical education requirement for graduation. PARTICIPATION FEE 604 ­ SYMPHONIC BAND 26 weeks •​
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4 mods • 1/2 credit • Elective • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 (in conjunction with Marching Band) • Advanced level The Symphonic Band is a select organization comprised of those high school students who show above average proficiency on their instruments. Literature performed will represent material designed to improve technical skills. Performances may include winter and spring concerts and OMEA sponsored contest. ​
Membership in the Symphonic Band will be determined through auditions of all instrumental students held in the spring prior to each school year and will be limited to an instrumentation determined by the director. The Symphonic Band will meet five days each week during school with additional rehearsals scheduled by the director. Students may not take any band independent study 606 ­ CONCERT BAND 1 26 weeks •​
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4 mods • 1/2 credit • In conjunction with Marching Band • Elective • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • Intermediate level Concert Band 1 is a select organization comprised of those high school students who show a marked proficiency on their instruments. Literature performed will represent the finest of educational and program material. Performances may include winter and spring concerts, OMEA sponsored contests, and commencement exercises. ​
Membership in this group is determined through auditions of all instrumental students held in the spring prior to each school year and will be limited to an instrumentation determined by the director​
. Concert Band 1 will meet five days each week during school with additional rehearsals scheduled by the director. Students may not take any band independent study. 65 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS 608 ­ CONCERT BAND 2 26 weeks •​
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4 mods • 1/2 credit (in conjunction with Marching Band) • Elective • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • Entry level Concert Band 2 is a select organization comprised of those high school students who show above average proficiency on their instruments. Literature performed will represent material designed to improve technical skills. Performances may include winter and spring concerts and OMEA sponsored contest. ​
Membership in Concert Band 2 will be determined through auditions of all instrumental students held in the spring prior to each school year and will be limited to an instrumentation determined by the directo​
r. Concert Band 2 will meet five days each week during school with additional rehearsals scheduled by the director. Students may not take any band independent study. 612 ­ ORCHESTRA Full Year • 1 credit • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • Elective • Fee The Orchestra is open to anyone playing violin, viola, cello, or string bass. Past experience or permission of the instructor is required. The goal of this group is to improve technique, blend, and musicianship. Students will have a theoretical and historical understanding of orchestral music and instruments. Students will also learn the science of sound production and bow distribution. A variety of music will be performed to give the students a balance of styles from chamber to symphonic. Students will also perform solos and be required to take playing tests individually and in small groups. Students are required to participate in concerts and rehearsals as well as any special events such as festivals, concerts, etc. PARTICIPATION FEE 602 – JAZZ BAND Full Year • 1 credit • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • Elective • Fee Jazz Band is a course designed to provide students with the opportunity to study music through performance in jazz band. Students will be introduced to and study a wide variety of jazz, Latin, rock and pop music genres and styles. Students will also learn about basic techniques in jazz improvisation. Additionally, students will be given the opportunity to develop self­discipline, leadership, and communication skills. Jazz Band is a full year course. Students must be a member of the PHSN Band Program in good standing or have permission from the instructor to enroll in jazz band. Students must participate in jazz band for the entire year to receive any credit or awards. Membership/enrollment in jazz band is determined by audition in the spring of each school year. PARTICIPATION FEE VOCAL MUSIC A variety of types of music and experiences will be planned for each choir of Pickerington High School. Students are encouraged to continue in the choral program all four years to gain the benefits of years of preparation and hard work. Each choir is special to the choir program and care for the development of each individual singer is supremely important. Singing is a fun way to enjoy the beauties of the performing arts. 614 ­ CHORALE Full Year • 1 credit • Elective • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • Fee • Prerequisite: Permission of the director ­ Audition only ­ Prior choir experience. A select singing group determined through auditions each year. This group will take part in the same concerts and may be a part of the Symphonic Choir. They will also take part in many other public and school performances. Students auditioning for this group must have a high regard for all types of music and exhibit good self­discipline. Students will be required to attend extra rehearsals as needed. Students will also be required to purchase either all, or a portion of, their outfit. ​
Auditions will be conducted during second semester​
. PARTICIPATION FEE 66 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS 616 ­ SYMPHONIC CHOIR Full Year • 1 credit • Elective • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • Prerequisite: Permission of the director. The Symphonic Choir is open to all students. Students must show willingness and a desire to improve as a singer and musician. The choir is required to take part in the autumn, holiday, winter, and spring concerts; contests; festivals; etc.; and other events as announced by the director. Students will be given a schedule of events at the beginning of each year. The director will determine the final size of the choir. ​
Auditions will be conducted during second semester.​
622 ­ CONCERT CHOIR Full Year • 1 credit • Elective • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 The Concert Choir is open to any female student. The choir is required to take part in the autumn, holiday, winter, and spring concerts; contests; festivals; etc.; and other events as announced by the director. Students will be given a schedule of events at the beginning of each year. The director will determine the final size of the choir. 610AP – AP MUSIC THEORY Full Year • 1 credit • Elective • Grades 11, 12 • Recommended concurrent enrollment in an ensemble or permission from instructor. The student’s ability to read and write musical notation is fundamental to such a course. It is also strongly recommended that the student will have acquired at least basic performance skills in voice or on an instrument. The AP Music Theory course is equal to a first year college­level music theory course, covering the material from two separate courses: written skills and aural skills. Within the course, students will study elements of music such as rhythm, notation, sight singing, rhythmic dictation, keyboard harmony and part writing all within the historical “common practice th​ th​
period” (18​
­19​ centuries). There are two goals for this class: 1) that students would be prepared to take the AP Music Theory exam, and 2) that students would have a lifelong ability to understand and appreciate music. The development of aural skills is a primary objective of the AP Music Theory course. Throughout the course, students listen to musical works attentively and analytically, developing their musical memory and their ability to articulate responses to formal, stylistic, and aesthetic qualities of the works. Performance using singing, keyboard, and students’ primary performance media are also a part of the learning process. Although sight singing is the only performance skill that is directly tested by the AP Exam, training in all these areas will develop the aural skills that are tested. Fluency and quickness with basic materials are essential to success in the course. 67 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS HEALTH DEPARTMENT Course No. 900 Title Health Availability 10 Credit .50 Length S 900 ­ HEALTH Semester • 1/2 credit • Required • Grade 10 This course focuses on gaining current knowledge about selected health topics. It also gives students opportunities to demonstrate the following skills: goal setting, coping with stress, communicating, and decision­making. This course includes the following topics: mental and emotional health, nutrition, physical fitness, stress management, tobacco, alcohol and other drugs, and sexual health. This course is designed to assist students to obtain accurate information, develop lifelong positive attitudes and behaviors, and make wise decisions related to their personal health. This course is co­educational. 68 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS PHYSICAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT Course No. Title Availability Credit Length 901 Lifetime Fitness 9, 10, 11, 12 .25 S 903 Lifetime Sports 9, 10, 11, 12 .25 S 905 Team Sports 9, 10, 11, 12 .25 S 908 Physical Conditioning/Strength Training 9, 10, 11, 12 .25 S The Physical Education Department will offer students the following course selections to fulfill the graduation requirement of Physical Education. Each student is required to earn .50 credit of Physical Education in order to graduate. These courses are designed to provide students an opportunity to develop skills in a variety of activities that will promote a lifetime of fitness. Students must select a combination of the courses to fulfill the graduation requirement of .50 credit. ​
Students may not repeat a course to complete the requirement. 901 ­ LIFETIME FITNESS Semester • .25 credit • Grades 9,10,11,12 This course is designed for those students who wish to develop a personal fitness program. Lifetime Fitness will help the student develop individual strategies for a lifetime of healthy living. Students will evaluate their present fitness level and then develop a plan on how to improve their personal fitness. Body movement, cardiovascular conditioning and strength conditioning will be emphasized. The class will also discuss nutrition and the role it plays in maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Video workouts used in class may include Pilates, yoga, and Tae­Bo to reinforce the importance of flexibility and muscular strength. 903 ­ LIFETIME SPORTS Semester • .25 credit • Grades 9,10,11,12 This class will introduce students to lifetime sports. During each unit of study students will learn physical skills, rules, concepts, game strategies, and sportsmanship. This course will engage students in a number of sports that will allow them to remain active and healthy throughout their lifetime. Lifetime Sports may include but will not be limited to the following activities: tennis, Frisbee golf, golf, badminton, table tennis and various recreational activities. In addition to exploring lifetime sports this class will also include basic fitness instruction and lifetime conditioning skills. 905 ­ TEAM SPORTS Semester • .25 credit • Grades 9,10,11,12 This class is designed for those students who wish to participate in team sports. The team sports will focus on game rules and strategies associated with a variety of sports. The emphasis of this class will be on teamwork, sportsmanship, and improve the basic skill level required by the various team activities. Some of the team activities the students may participate in may include but will not be limited to the following activities: flag football, soccer, volleyball, basketball, and track and field, softball, eclipse ball and speedball. 908 ­ PHYSICAL CONDITIONING AND STRENGTH TRAINING Semester • .25 credit • Grades 9,10,11,12 This program will help students understand the importance of strength training and how it relates to sports. This course will cover a comprehensive overview of the basic techniques and fundamentals of safe, sound, and effective strength training. The course will help develop an understanding that strength training will decrease injuries, increase physical size, muscular strength, speed, improve self esteem, and skill performance. 69 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS SERVICE LEARNING Course No. 490 491 494 495 Title Peer Collaboration Gold Medal Peer Service Learning ­ Academic Tutoring Service Learning ­ Life Sports Availability 10, 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 11, 12 11, 12 Credit .50 .50 1.00 1.00 Length S S Y Y 490 ­ PEER COLLABORATION Grade 10, 11, 12 • Semester • 1/2 credit • Prerequisite: Application and approval by instructor Students will have the opportunity to learn about disabilities, diversity and acceptance. The peer collaborator will support students with disabilities in their classes and assist them to succeed by helping them to complete class assignments and participate in class. Students will be required to participate in a training session, complete a reflection paper due at conclusion of class and keep a daily attendance long. 491 – GOLD MEDAL PEER Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • Semester • ½ credit • Integrated into the student’s existing schedule Prerequisite: Application and approval by instructor ​
The Gold Medal Peer program is designed to provide an experience for students interested in service learning and volunteerism as well as students who may be interested in a career working with people with disabilities. This course is offered at Pickerington High School Central and North. The course is housed in the special education department and is designed to offer a peer social experience for disabled and non­disabled students. Goals of the program include learning about disabilities, diversity and acceptance. The course will be based on the Ohio Department of Education’s community service standards. Gold Medal Peers will model the virtues and attributes of friendship to their peers by assisting and supporting them academically and socially within their general education classes. This support may include, but is not limited to, help with assignments. Additionally, gold medal peers will maintain a social connection to their partner peers outside of the classroom setting. 494 ­ SERVICE LEARNING ­ACADEMIC TUTORING Full Year • 1 credit • Elective • Grades 11, 12 Prerequisite: Application, two teacher recommendations and excellent attendance. Service Learning is a form of experiential learning that offers purposeful learning with real­world applications. Integrating community service with the common core standards, the 21st century learner will gain valuable insight through the five stages of service learning: investigation, preparation, action, reflection, and demonstration. Students will participate in an academic tutoring program with a PLSD elementary school and work with elementary students and teachers. Students that are selected for this class will be in service placements for three days and will be required to attend a weekly meeting session(s). Students must be able to provide their own reliable transportation to and from a partner elementary school. Students will be required to have knowledge of Google classroom, complete an online portfolio, make presentations, and keep a daily attendance log. 495 ­ SERVICE LEARNING ­ Life Sports Full Year • 1 credit • Elective • Grades 11, 12 Prerequisite: Application, two teacher recommendations and excellent attendance. Service Learning ­ Life Sports is a form of experiential learning that offers purposeful learning with real­world applications. Students will travel to elementary and middle schools to serve as peer mentors for younger students through a sports and physical activity setting. Peer mentors will assist teachers in leading physical activities that reinforce positive youth development such as self­control, effort, teamwork and social responsibility. Students will be in service placements for three days a week and will be required to attend a weekly meeting session(s) at their high school. Students must be able to provide their own reliable transportation to and from a partner school. There are also after­school options for credit. 70 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS CAREER ELECTIVES Course No. EDUC2210CCP COLS1100CCP HUMS1010CCP HUMS1020CCP Title Introduction to Education CCP College First Year Experience Seminary CCP Leadership Development Studies CCP Critical Thinking CCP Availability 9, 10, 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit 1.00 .33 1 1 Length S S S S EDUC2210CCP ­ INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION CCP Semester • 1 high school elective credit • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • 3 college credits • Prerequisite: placement into ENGL1100 or ACT English subscore of 18. An introduction to the teaching profession. Candidates engage in a variety of experiences that broadly explore the purposes of schools in society and the knowledge dispositions, and performances required to be an effective teacher today. The following Dual Credit/College Credit Plus offering may not be available pending college approval and student registration: COLS1100CCP ­ COLLEGE FIRST YEAR EXPERIENCE SEMINAR CCP Semester • 0.33 high school elective credit • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • 1 college credit The First Year Experience Seminar provides students with an introduction to the college. It emphasizes skills and resources necessary to be successful in their personal, academic and career­related pursuits, as well as engage in career exploration and selection of academic majors appropriate for the student’s career goals. The course includes an orientation to college resources, policies, and processes. HUMS1010CCP ­ ​
LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT STUDIES CCP Semester • 1 high school elective credit • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • 3 college credits • Prerequisite: placement into ENGL 1100, ACT English subscore of 18. This course is designed to provide emerging and existing leaders the opportunity to explore the concept of leadership and to develop and improve leadership skills. The course integrates readings from the humanities, experiential exercises, films, and contemporary readings on leadership. HUMS1020CCP ­ ​
CRITICAL THINKING CCP Semester • 1 high school elective credit • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12 • 3 college credits • Prerequisite: placement into ENGL 1100, ACT English subscore of 18. Critical Thinking is the general term given to a wide range of cognitive skills. The purpose of this course is to develop these skills through readings and activities. This will be accomplished through drawing inferences from data; identifying language problems, including ambiguity and vagueness; recognizing hidden assumptions; and developing the skill of making rationally defensible choices. Students will be challenged to identify their own styles of critical thought, and to apply new techniques to real­life issues. 71 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS CREDIT FLEX Credit Flexibility Credit flexibility provides students the opportunity to receive high school credit by demonstrating mastery of content learned outside the school setting such as participation in dance, art, sports, foreign language,summer camps, academic enrichment, an internship, or other learning outside of school. Students interested in pursuing credit flex must receive approval from the School Credit Flexibility Committee prior to starting any credit flex experience. ​
Credit awarded through this process will be posted on the student’s transcript and count toward a student’s grade point average, class rank, and as graduation credit in required subject areas or as an elective. Credit Flex approval forms are found on the high school website. There are also examples of approved credit flexibility projects to assist students in developing their proposals. District Pre­Approved Credit Flex Courses These courses do not go through the building­level approval process and are automatically approved once appropriate signatures are obtained. Students must submit the district­approved credit flex form from their school's website to their counselors. Special Olympics Physical Education .5 BYU Health Health .5 Child Nutrition and Cooking elective science .5* The Music of the Rolling Stones elective music .5* Early Christianity ­ The Letters of Paul elective social studies* The Music of the Beatles elective music .5* The Science of Happiness elective social studies .5* The Language of Hollywood: Storytelling elective English Language Arts .5* Dinosaur Paleobiology elective science .5* *cannot be used to satisfy a subject­specific graduation requirement 72 Return to TABLE OF CONTENTS 
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