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Advanced Standing Programs

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Advanced Standing Programs
Advanced Standing Programs
Ohio law now requires that all state public high schools provide students with the “Advanced
Standing” programs. These programs are designed to present students with the opportunity to earn
college credit toward a degree or career certification during their high school years. The
Pickerington Local School District offers Advanced Placement courses, as well as Ohio’s new collegecredit courses known as College Credit Plus.
What is the difference between the College Credit Plus and Advanced Placement Programs?
Duration of class
Credit awarded
Weighted credit
Exam needed for college
credit
Cost
Application process
College Credit Plus
One semester (half year)
1 high school credit
5.0 A
No – course grade earned is directly
transcripted to college
None
Must qualify for college course
Advanced Placement
Two semesters (one full year)
1 high school credit
5.0 A
Yes – with a qualifying score on the
test offered at the end of the year
$93
No application process required
College Credit Plus (CCP)
College Credit Plus courses are taught by teachers who hold credentials as adjunct professors at an Ohio
college or university, or work directly with college or university faculty members. Successful completion of
coursework in the CCP program will earn students college credit that is accepted by all of Ohio’s universities
and colleges and many out-of-state and private institutions. Location, manner of delivery, and scheduling of
courses may vary.
o Students must meet qualifying grade averages and ACT (or equivalent) scores to take CCP courses. As
these are college courses, qualifications are set by the university or college awarding credit and vary
between courses and programs.
o Courses follow the same schedule as their college counterparts and are a semester long.
o Students taking CCP classes do not take a national exam at the end of the course and, by state law, are
not charged for participation in the program.
CCP courses will appear as “Advanced Placement” on students’ Pickerington transcripts if similar AP courses
exist.
Advanced Placement (AP)
Advanced Placement courses are taught by teachers using a curriculum approved by the College Board.
Successful completion of coursework in the AP program allows students the opportunity to take an exam in
May. Students who earn at least a score of a 3 on the AP test receive credit that is accepted by all of Ohio’s
public universities and colleges. The number of credits and how they apply towards a degree vary depending
on the test and the college. Students can only receive such credit if they take the AP test. Private colleges
and universities outside of Ohio have specific policies in place that may vary from Ohio's public institutions.
o AP courses are more rigorous than traditional high school courses and are designed to develop the skills
needed for success in college. Students must be prepared to take on the additional responsibility.
o Courses follow the AP curriculum to prepare students for the AP exam at the end of the yearlong course.
o Students taking AP classes participate in the AP exam to demonstrate competency and potentially
qualify for college credit and are charged for participation in the program.
o Students that do not participate in the AP exam will not be eligible for college credit, nor receive a
weighted grade. Additionally, their Pickerington transcripts will not be credited as completion of an
"Advanced Placement" course.
Description of College Credit Plus offerings in Pickerington
MATH 1148 College Algebra
This course is a continuation of the study of functions. The concept of transformations is used
to graph and analyze functions including quadratic, higher degree polynomial, power,
piecewise, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions. The function concept is applied
to solving equation inequalities, and applications regarding these types of functions. Factor
and remainder theorems and roots of polynomial functions are included. The concept of
functions is extended to include composition of functions and inverse functions. Systems of
linear and non-linear equations are solved using algebraic and graphical methods.
Trigonometric functions of right angles are defined and used in problem solving.
MATH 1149 Trigonometry
This course is a study of the trigonometric functions, vectors, and related applications. Topics
include right triangle trigonometry; trigonometry of general angles; the unit circle; the graphs
of the trigonometric functions; analytical trigonometry; inverse trigonometric functions;
verifying identities; solving trigonometric equations; the Law of Sines; the Law of Cosines;
applications of trigonometry; polar coordinates and the graphs of polar equations;
geometric and algebraic vectors; vector applications; plane curves and parametric
equations; trigonometric form of complex numbers; DeMoivre’s Theorem. The conic sections
are defined and analyzed algebraically and graphically.
POLS 1100 Introduction to American Government
Appears as AP United States Government and Politics on the student’s Pickerington transcript
This course introduces students to the nature, purpose and structure of the American political
system. Attention is given to the institutions and processes that create public policy. The
strengths and weaknesses of the American political system are discussed, along with the role
of citizens in a democracy. This course also fulfills the student’s POD requirement.
POLS 1200 Comparative Politics
Appears as AP Comparative Government and Politics on the student’s Pickerington transcript
This course is designed as an introductory survey class for the student interested in the field of
comparative politics. Students will analyze what comparative politics is; explore a theoretical
framework that helps the student understand the basic principles found within comparative
politics; and will study specific countries by analyzing their history, institutions, political culture,
and economy.
POLS 1250 State & Local Government
This course introduces the student to the nature, purpose and structure of state and local
governments, especially in Ohio. Attention is given to the institutions and processes that
create public policy, including fiscal policy and the court system. The strengths and
weaknesses of the state and local government system are discussed along with the
everyday role of citizens in a democracy, especially at these levels of government.
POLS 1300 International Relations
This course examines the origin, nature and development of the post-Cold War international
system. It explores how individuals, nation-states, and international organizations interact with
one another. Basic concepts include knowledge of actors such as nation-states,
international organizations like the United Nations, transnational corporations,
nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and social movements. The course further examines
theoretical frameworks for interaction such as idealism, realism, and nationalism. The course
considers aspects of foreign policy including political economy, isolationism, and
interventionism. It also explores strategies for enhancing international security, conflict
resolution, diplomacy, military intervention, and the role of international law.
PSY 1100 Introduction to Psychology
Appears as AP Psychology on the student’s Pickerington transcript
This introductory course provides an overview of the origins, growth, content and
applications of psychology, including the application of the scientific method to the
following topics: research methodology; beginning statistics; theories of physical, cognitive,
moral and emotional development; sensation; perception; learning; motivation; intelligence;
memory; personality; coping processes; abnormality; adjustment; and the individual in small
groups and a pluralistic society.
SOC 1101 Introduction to Sociology
This course introduces the basic concepts, methods and findings of sociology as a scientific
discipline. The sociological perspective, emphasizing social interaction and structure, is used
to explore the following topics: culture; socialization; social groups, including organizations;
deviance; various types of social inequality; major social institutions; collective behavior,
social movement and social change.
HIST 1151 American History to 1877
This course covers a wide range of topics in early American history from the Age of Discovery
through the Civil War and Reconstruction. It is an introduction to the study of history and to
the political, economic, intellectual and social themes that have shaped our present society.
HIST 1152 American History since 1877
Appears as AP US History on the student’s Pickerington transcript if both HIST 1151 and HIST
1152 are successfully completed
This course covers a wide range of topics in modern American history from Reconstruction to
the present time. It is an introduction to the study of history and to the political, economic,
intellectual, and social themes that have shaped our present society.
HIST 2223 African-American History I before 1877
The class is primarily a lecture/discussion course which includes the history of African
Americans in the New World from the time of the slave trade to the end of Reconstruction.
HIST 2224 African-American History II since 1877
The class is primarily a lecture/discussion course which includes the history of African
Americans from the end of Reconstruction to present times.
THEA 2205 Technical Production Practicum
This course offers a supervised practical experience in the technical area(s) of a theatre
production
ENGL 1100 Composition I
Appears as AP Language and Composition on the student’s Pickerington transcript
English 1100 is a beginning composition course which develops processes for critically
reading, writing, and responding to a variety of texts in order to compose clear, concise,
expository essays. The course facilitates an awareness of purpose, audience, content,
structure and style, while also introducing research and documentation methods. Course
reading and writing assignments may be thematically organized.
This course also fulfills a full credit of student’s four required English courses.
ENGL 2367 Composition II
Appears as AP Literature and Composition on the student’s Pickerington transcript
ENGL 2367 is an intermediate composition course that extends and refines skills in expository
and argumentative writing, critical reading, and critical thinking. This course also refines skills
in researching a topic, documenting sources, and working collaboratively. Course reading
and writing assignments are organized around the diversity of those who comprise the
identities. Credit in ENGL 1100 is a prerequisite.
This course also fulfills a full credit of student’s four required English courses.
EDTE 1500 - Introduction to Teacher Education
An introduction to the teaching profession. Candidates engage in a variety of experiences
that broadly explore the purposes of schools in society and the knowledge dispositions, and
performances required to be an effective teacher today.
MUS 1204 - Symphonic Band (college-level Concert Band)
Students audition and participate in a large, conducted instrumental ensemble; admission is
by audition. Participants prepare a variety of music for concert performance. (Music for
Symphonic Band is rated as college-level by the Ohio Music Education Association)
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