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Apple’s Educator Technology Profile

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Apple’s Educator Technology Profile
Apple’s Educator Technology Profile
About the Technology Profile Report - The report contains summary data
from the Apple Educator Technology Profile, plus analysis and
recommendations for next steps to support teachers in their technology
infusion practices. In addition, the report provides data about the technology
available to teachers either personally or at school, their preferences for
professional development delivery, and their views on technology support at
both school and district levels. Survey responses are unique to each
institution, and the response rate is solely the responsibility of the institution.
The Education Technology Profile is a 15-minute online self-assessment that
gathers information about educators’ technology skills and infusion practices
within an institution, school, or district. The resulting data is aligned to Dr.
Ruben Puentedura’s SAMR model and provides education leaders information
that spotlights faculty strengths and professional development opportunities.
It is important to realize that all four stages of SAMR practice can make
valuable contributions to the work of an institution; however, large
improvements in student outcomes are not observed until the upper stages
are reached. Hence, it is desirable for faculty to progressively develop their
practice to reach these upper stages. When the Education Technology Profile
is used as an evaluation metric tool, it engages the entire leadership team in
identifying the levels of professional development best suited to faculty and
creating actionable steps that move their goals from vision to reality. Along
with the Education Leadership Profile, it provides a data-driven view of the
institution’s technology implementation impact on learning and teaching.
Part 1 - SAMR Model Analysis per Building
The conclusions for this section are drawn from Dr. Ruben Puentedura's
SAMR model, which outlines four levels for the use of technology in learning
and teaching:
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Pickerington Schools Technology Plan • 116
Substitution: The new technology is used as a direct substitute for an older
tool, with no change in the tasks undertaken by students or how these tasks
are accomplished. At this level, no noticeable improvements in student
outcomes are recorded.
Augmentation: The new technology substitutes for an older tool, with no
change in the tasks undertaken by students. However, features of the new
technology are used to improve how these tasks are carried out, such as by
making the tasks easier or faster to accomplish or by providing additional
features not previously available. At this level, small improvements in student
outcomes are recorded.
Modification: The tasks to be undertaken by students are significantly
redesigned in order to achieve new educational goals. The redesign is made
possible by features of the new technology,
not available before. At this level, noticeable
improvements in student outcomes are
recorded.
Redefinition: Older tasks are replaced in part
or in whole by newer tasks in order to achieve
previously unattainable educational goals.
The new tasks are made possible by features
of the technology, not available before. At this level, strong improvements in
student outcomes are recorded.
SAMR Analysis for PLSD Elementary Schools
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Pickerington Schools Technology Plan • 117
SAMR Analysis for PLSD Middle, Junior High and High Schools
Part 2 - Professional Development Levels Best Suited for Faculty
It's important to realize that all four SAMR practices make valuable
contributions to learning; however, large improvements in student outcomes
are not observed until the upper levels are reached. Hence, it's desirable for
faculty to progressively develop their ability to engage learners at each level.
The overall percentages of SAMR practices by faculty in your institution are as
follows:
It is also worthwhile to identify the categories and levels of professional
development that will prove most useful to educators to assist them in
reaching these stages. The current questionnaire identifies three levels of
professional development best suited to faculty:
Level 1: Educators that fall into this category should attend professional
development sessions that focus on foundational technology skills, these
entry level professional development sessions should help faculty become
confident and comfortable integrating technology into their teaching
strategies.
Level 2: Educators that fall into this category should attend professional
development sessions that focus on curricula, content design, and instruction
with all technology.
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Pickerington Schools Technology Plan • 118
Level 3: Educators that fall into this category should attend professional
development sessions that support faculty and administrators in technology
visioning, planning, and building capacity.
PD Levels Best Suited for Faculty
Part 3 - Technology Integration Categories
The following are categories of technology integration. Identify the categories
that best support your mission and vision for learning. These can be used to
create a meaningful professional development plan at the levels most
relevant to your faculty. The percentage of faculty ready for each level is
identified in the graphs below.
Technology Integration Categories - % of staff in each Level (1 = Foundational, 2 = Integration, 3 = Support)
Social: Tools that we use
to communicate,
collaborate, and share what
we create.
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Pickerington Schools Technology Plan • 119
Mobile: Tools directly linked
to mobile devices' capacity
to explore and create
anytime, anyplace learning;
obtain data via sensors from
the world; and make
information available in sitespecific context.
Data Analysis: Numbercrunching tools as well as
tools used to create
numerical models and
simulations.
Visualization: Tools that
we use to translate
abstract concepts into
two- or threedimensional visual
representations, allowing
us to understand them
and manipulate them
more readily.
Media: Tools that we use to
generate digital media in its
basic forms: images, video,
and audio.
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Pickerington Schools Technology Plan • 120
Digital Storytelling: Tools
that we use to integrate
digital media into narratives
that make meaning for others
and for ourselves.
Educational Gaming:
Games that might be used
for instruction as well as the
tools that might be used to
create such games.
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Pickerington Schools Technology Plan • 121
Student Perception Survey based on ISTE Standards
In a partnership with Dr. Laci Fiala, Associate Professor of Sociology for
Walsh University, the District will survey all students involved in the One to
One program. Questions on the survey are based on the ISTE Student
Standards, which have been deconstructed and rewritten into student-friendly
language.
This survey, and the ISTE standards, will measure the students perception on
how technology is improving their learning through six different areas:
•
Creativity and Innovation
•
Communication and Collaboration
•
Research and Information Fluency
•
Critical Thinking, Problem Solving and Decision Making
•
Digital Citizenship
•
Technology Operations and Concepts
As the District continues to roll out the One to One program, this survey will
turn into a longitudinal study of the effect of technology on teaching and
learning. All identifiable student information will be kept in the District, only
an identification number, for each student, will be shared with Dr. Fiala and
only for data analysis purposes.
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Pickerington Schools Technology Plan • 122
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