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Course Descriptions
This is Public Health (PUBH) to Youth Development and
Research (YoSt) of the Course Description section of the
2006-2008 Undergraduate Catalog for the
University of Minnesota, Twin Cities campus.
Contents
Academic Health Center Shared (AHS)................................ 358
Accounting (ACCT).............................................................. 358
Adult Education (ADED)....................................................... 358
Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics (AEM)..................... 359
Aerospace Studies (AIR)...................................................... 360
Afro-American Studies (AFRO)............................................ 361
Agricultural Industries and Marketing (AIM)......................... 363
Agricultural, Food, and Environmental Education (AFEE)...... 363
Agronomy and Plant Genetics (AGRO)................................. 364
Akkadian (AKKA)................................................................. 365
American Indian Studies (AMIN).......................................... 365
American Sign Language (ASL)........................................... 367
American Studies (AMST)................................................... 367
Anatomy (ANAT).................................................................. 368
Animal Science (ANSC)....................................................... 368
Anthropology (ANTH)........................................................... 369
Applied Business (ABUS)..................................................... 372
Applied Economics (APEC).................................................. 373
Arabic (ARAB)..................................................................... 374
Aramaic (ARM).................................................................... 375
Architecture (ARCH)............................................................ 375
Art (ARTS)........................................................................... 378
Art History (ARTH)............................................................... 381
Asian American Studies (AAS)............................................. 383
Asian Languages and Literatures (ALL)............................... 383
Astronomy (AST)................................................................. 385
Bio-based Products (BP)..................................................... 385
Biochemistry (BioC)............................................................ 387
Bioinformatics (BINF).......................................................... 388
Biology (BIOL)..................................................................... 388
Biomedical Engineering (BMEN).......................................... 389
Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering (BAE)................... 390
Business Administration (BA).............................................. 391
Business and Industry Education (BIE)................................ 391
Business Law (BLAW)......................................................... 392
Center for Spirituality and Healing (CSPH)........................... 392
Central Asian Studies (CAS)................................................. 394
Chemical Engineering (CHEN)............................................. 394
Chemistry (CHEM)............................................................... 395
Chicano Studies (CHIC)....................................................... 397
Child Psychology (CPSY)..................................................... 398
Chinese (CHN)..................................................................... 399
Civil Engineering (CE).......................................................... 400
Classical and Near Eastern Studies (CNES)......................... 401
Classical Civilization (CLCV)................................................ 403
Classics (CLAS)................................................................... 404
Clinical Laboratory Science (CLS)........................................ 404
College of Food, Agricultural & Natural Resource Sciences
(CFAN)................................................................................ 404
College of Liberal Arts (CLA)................................................ 405
Communication Studies (COMM)......................................... 405
Comparative Literature (CL)................................................ 407
Comparative Studies in Discourse and Society (CSDS)........ 407
Computer Science (CSCI).................................................... 407
Construction Management (CMGT)...................................... 410
Coptic (COPT)..................................................................... 411
Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature (CSCL)............ 411
Curriculum and Instruction (CI)............................................ 412
Dance (DNCE)..................................................................... 412
Danish (DAN)...................................................................... 414
Dental Hygiene (DH)............................................................ 414
Design Institute (DESI)........................................................ 416
Design, Housing, and Apparel (DHA).................................... 416
Dutch (DTCH)...................................................................... 418
East Asian Studies (EAS)..................................................... 419
Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior (EEB)................................ 419
Economics (ECON).............................................................. 421
Education and Human Development (EDHD)........................ 424
Educational Policy and Administration (EDPA)...................... 424
Educational Psychology (EPSY)........................................... 427
Electrical and Computer Engineering (EE)............................ 430
Emergency Health Services (EHS)....................................... 433
English as a Second Language (ESL)................................... 434
English: Composition (ENGC)............................................... 436
English: Creative Writing (ENGW)......................................... 437
English: Literature (ENGL).................................................. 437
Entomology (ENT)............................................................... 441
Environmental Sciences, Policy, and Management (ESPM).. 442
Family Social Science (FSOS).............................................. 444
Finance (FINA).................................................................... 446
Finnish (FIN)........................................................................ 446
Fisheries and Wildlife (FW).................................................. 446
Food Science and Nutrition (FSCN)...................................... 447
Forest Resources (FR)......................................................... 449
French (FREN)..................................................................... 450
French and Italian (FRIT)..................................................... 452
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies (GLBT)..... 452
Genetics, Cell Biology and Development (GCD).................... 453
Geographic Information Science (GIS)................................. 453
Geography (GEOG).............................................................. 453
Geological Engineering (GEOE)............................................ 456
Geology and Geophysics (GEO)........................................... 457
German (GER)..................................................................... 459
German,Scandinavian, and Dutch (GSD).............................. 460
Gerontology (GERO)............................................................ 460
Global Studies (GLOS)......................................................... 460
Greek (GRK)........................................................................ 463
Health Informatics (HINF).................................................... 464
Health Systems Management (HSM)................................... 464
Hebrew (HEBR)................................................................... 464
Hindi (HNDI)........................................................................ 465
History (HIST)...................................................................... 465
History of Medicine (HMED)................................................ 473
History of Science and Technology (HSCI)............................ 474
Hmong (HMNG)................................................................... 475
Honors Seminar (HSEM)...................................................... 475
Horticultural Science (HORT)............................................... 475
Human Resource Development (HRD)................................. 477
Human Resources and Industrial Relations (HRIR)............... 477
Humanities (HUM)............................................................... 478
Icelandic (ICEL)................................................................... 479
Industrial Engineering (IE)................................................... 479
Information and Decision Sciences (IDSC)........................... 480
Information Networking (INET)............................................ 480
Innovation Studies (IS)........................................................ 481
Institute of Technology (IOFT).............................................. 481
Insurance and Risk Management (INS)................................ 481
Inter-College Program (ICP)................................................. 481
Interdepartmental Study (ID)............................................... 481
Interdisciplinary Archaeological Studies (INAR).................... 482
International Business (IBUS).............................................. 482
Italian (ITAL)........................................................................ 482
Japanese (JPN)................................................................... 483
Jewish Studies (JWST)....................................................... 484
Journalism and Mass Communication (JOUR)..................... 485
Kinesiology (KIN)................................................................. 487
Korean (KOR)...................................................................... 489
Laboratory Medicine and Pathology (LAMP)........................ 490
Landscape Architecture (LA)............................................... 490
Language, Teaching, and Technology (LGTT)....................... 491
Latin (LAT).......................................................................... 491
Latin American Studies (LAS).............................................. 492
Learning and Academic Skills (LASK).................................. 492
Liberal Studies (LS)............................................................. 493
Linguistics (LING)................................................................ 493
Management (MGMT)......................................................... 494
Manufacturing Technology (MT).......................................... 494
Marathi (MAR)..................................................................... 495
Marketing (MKTG)............................................................... 495
Materials Science (MATS)................................................... 495
Mathematics (MATH)........................................................... 497
Mathematics Education (MTHE).......................................... 500
Mechanical Engineering (ME).............................................. 500
Medical Technology (MEDT)................................................ 502
Medicinal Chemistry (MEDC)............................................... 502
Medieval Studies (MEST).................................................... 502
Microbial Engineering (MICE).............................................. 503
Microbiology (MICB)............................................................ 503
Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures (MELC)................. 503
Military Science (MIL)......................................................... 504
Modern Greek (MDGK)........................................................ 505
Mortuary Science (MORT)................................................... 505
Museum Studies (MST)....................................................... 506
Music (MUS)....................................................................... 506
Music Applied (MUSA)......................................................... 509
Music Education (MUED)..................................................... 511
Naval Science (NAV)............................................................ 512
Neuroscience (NSC)............................................................ 512
Neuroscience Department (NSCI)........................................ 513
Norwegian (NOR)................................................................ 513
Nursing (NURS)................................................................... 513
Nutrition (NUTR).................................................................. 516
Operations and Management Sciences (OMS)..................... 516
Otolaryngology (OTOL)........................................................ 517
Periodontics (PERO)............................................................ 517
Pharmacology (PHCL)......................................................... 517
Pharmacy (PHAR)................................................................ 517
Philosophy (PHIL)................................................................ 517
Physical Education (PE)....................................................... 520
Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PMED)...................... 521
Physics (PHYS).................................................................... 522
Physiology (PHSL)............................................................... 523
Plant Biology (PBIO)............................................................ 524
Polish (PLSH)...................................................................... 525
Political Science (POL)........................................................ 525
Portuguese (PORT).............................................................. 529
Postsecondary Teaching and Learning (PSTL)..................... 530
Program for Individualized Learning (PIL)............................ 532
Psychology (PSY)................................................................ 532
Public Affairs (PA)................................................................ 534
Public Health (PUBH)........................................................... 537
Radiation Therapy (RTT)...................................................... 538
Recreation Resource Management (RRM)........................... 539
Recreation, Park, and Leisure Studies (REC)........................ 539
Religions in Antiquity (RELA)............................................... 540
Religious Studies (RELS)..................................................... 542
Respiratory Care (RC).......................................................... 542
Rhetoric (RHET)................................................................... 543
Russian (RUSS)................................................................... 544
Sanskrit (SKT)..................................................................... 545
Scandinavian (SCAN).......................................................... 545
Slavic (SLAV)...................................................................... 546
Social Work (SW)................................................................ 546
Sociology (SOC).................................................................. 547
Soil, Water, and Climate (SOIL)............................................ 549
South Asian Languages and Cultures (SALC)....................... 550
Spanish (SPAN)................................................................... 551
Spanish and Portuguese (SPPT).......................................... 553
Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences (SLHS)....................... 553
Sport Studies (SPST)........................................................... 554
Statistics (STAT).................................................................. 555
Studies in Cinema and Media Culture (SCMC)..................... 555
Sumerian (SUM).................................................................. 555
Swedish (SWED)................................................................. 555
Teaching English as a Second Language (TESL).................. 556
Theatre Arts (TH)................................................................. 556
Toxicology (TXCL)................................................................ 559
Translation and Interpreting (TRIN)...................................... 559
Turkish (TURK).................................................................... 559
University College (UC)........................................................ 560
Urban Studies (URBS)......................................................... 560
Urdu (URDU)....................................................................... 560
Veterinary Medicine (CVM).................................................. 560
Vietnamese (VIET)............................................................... 561
Water Resources Science (WRS)......................................... 561
Women’s Studies (WOST).................................................... 561
Work and Human Resource Education (WHRE).................... 563
Youth Development and Research (YOST)............................ 564
Course Descriptions
Course Descriptions
355
Course Descriptions
Gendered nature of public policy. Historical analysis
of welfare, single motherhood, and protective
legislation. How laws structure public policy. How
courts are arenas for policy making. Emphasizes
employment discrimination and reproductive
rights. Differences among women. Intersection of
oppression based on class/race/sexual orientation.
PA 5611. Feminist Economics. (2 cr. Prereq–[5021, grad
student] or #)
Feminist philosophy, methodology, and economic
practice. Feminist perspectives on development
and the global economy, work/family. Heterodox
traditions in economics.
PA 5690. Topics in Women and Public Policy. (1-3 cr [max 9
cr]. Prereq–Grad student or #)
Selected topics.
PA 5701. Science and State. (3 cr. Prereq–Grad or #)
Relationship between science and contemporary
society. Nature of science: its values, processes, and
ways of knowing. How science has influenced U.S.
political institutions and political/judicial processes.
Issues in current debate over U.S. science policy.
PA 5711. Science, Technology, and International Affairs.
(3 cr. Prereq–Grad student or #)
Effect of science/technology on relations among
nations in such matters as autonomy, national
security, economic strength, environment, cultural
identity, and international cooperation. Negotiating
international agreements with S&T implications.
PA 5902. Computer Applications in Public Affairs. (.5-3 cr
[max 6 cr]; S-N only)
Introduction to computer systems/applications in
public affairs practice.
PA 5903. Introduction to Computers and Applications at
the Humphrey Institute. (2 cr; S-N only. Prereq–International
HHH fellow)
Computers/applications. Basic skills. Software such
as MS Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access. Using
Internet, e-mail, search engines (for research),
HTML (through Web page creation software).
PA 5910. Developing Your Public Service Career. (1 cr;
S-N only. Prereq–Major in [public affairs or public policy or
urban/regional planning or [science, technology/environmental
policy]] or #)
Students investigate/analyze interests, skills,
and abilities and combine them in a career plan.
Students develop tools to demonstrate their abilities,
document their experiences/knowledge, and explore
public service career options.
PA 5912. Politics of Public Affairs and Civic Engagement.
(3 cr. Prereq–Grad student or #)
Potential for public affairs professionals to be agents/
architects of democracy in a radically changing,
diverse, global landscape of governance.
PA 5920. Skills Workshop. (.5-3 cr [max 6 cr]. Prereq–Grad
student or #)
Topics on various public policy/planning skills such
as lobbying, grantwriting, and project management.
PA 5931. Role of the Media in Public AffAIRs. (3 cr.
Prereq–Grad or #)
PA 5721. Energy and Environmental Policy. (3 cr.
Prereq–Grad or #)
Impact of energy production/consumption choices
on environmental quality, sustainable development,
and other economic/social goals. Emphasizes public
policy choices for energy/environment, linkages
between them.
PA 5722. Environmental and Resource Economics Policy.
(3 cr. Prereq–[Intermediate microeconomics, intermediate policy
analysis, grad student] or #)
Public policy associated with natural resource
use and environmental protection. Develops/
applies economic concepts/methodologies/policy
mechanisms. Principles of environmental/resource
economics. Issues related to renewable/nonrenewable
resources and environmental pollution. Focuses on
scientific/political aspects of policy.
PA 5790. Topics in Science, Technology, and
Environmental Policy. (1-3 cr [max 9 cr]. Prereq–Grad or #)
Historical/contemporary role of news media in
defining/shaping public opinion/policy, primarily
in the United States. Emphasizes critical research,
professional skills in three forms of journalism:
hard news coverage, investigative reporting,
documentaries. Field experience, practice in
governmental public relations.
PA 5941. Leadership for the Common Good. (4 cr.
Prereq–Major in public affairs or #)
Personal, team, organizational, visionary, political,
and ethical aspects of leadership. Emphasizes
building/experiencing a learning community.
PA 5951. Global Commons Seminar. (3 cr [max 6 cr]; S-N
only. Prereq–International Hubert H. Humphrey Fellows)
Meets specific needs of International Humphrey
Fellows. Topics vary each year depending on the
interests and needs of the fellows.
PA 5952. Global Commons Seminar II. (2 cr. Prereq–HHH
International fellow)
Selected topics.
PA 5801. Global Public Policy. (3 cr. Prereq–Grad student
or #)
Creation of rules, norms, and institutions to regulate
global activities. Policy making, from exclusive
domain of state to including various nonstate actors.
How global policy making regulates interstate,
national, and transnational activities. Creation/
enforcement of global rules. Applications to
international security, political economy, and other
topics.
PA 5812. Open Economy Models: An Assessment. (3 cr.
Prereq–[Intermediate macroeconomics, trade theory, grad
student] or #)
Research/presentations related to professional
development projects. Each week selected students
assign readings, deliver a presentation on their
professional development project, and distribute a
summary of the talk. Presentations are developed in
collaboration with at least one faculty specialist in
the subject area.
PA 5900. Computer Applications in Public Affairs
(Summer). (.5 cr [max 1 cr]; S-N only. Prereq–#)
Introduction to basic computer systems/applications
in public affairs practice (e.g., MS Windows, MS
Word). Offered summer.
PA 5901. Computer Applications in Public Affairs. (.5-3 cr
[max 6 cr]; S-N only. Prereq–#)
Scientific, sociocultural, and attitudinal aspects
of communicable and degenerative diseases,
environmental and occupational health hazards, and
alcohol and drug problems. Role of education in
health conservation, disease control, and drug abuse.
PUBH 3005. Fundamentals of Alcohol and Drug Abuse for
Teacher Education. (1 cr. §PUBH 3003, PUBH 3004, PUBH
6003. Prereq–Undergrad in agricultural educ or business/
marketing educ or career/technical educ or foundations of educ
or [kinesiology, pre-PE] or technology educ or music educ)
Scientific/socio-cultural aspects of alcohol/drug
problems. Emphasizes role of education in health
conservation and drug abuse prevention.
PUBH 3010. Public Health Approaches to HIV/AIDS. (2 cr.
§PUBH 6010. Prereq–College level biology course)
FPrimary, secondary, and tertiary prevention.
Community responses to HIV/AIDS in Minnesota.
Medical, social service, and political responses.
PUBH 3040. Dying and Death in Contemporary Society:
Implications for Intervention. (2 cr [max 4 cr]. §PUBH 6040.
Prereq–Jr or sr or #)
Concepts, attitudes, ethics, and lifestyle management
in relation to dying, death, grief, and bereavement.
Emphasizes intervention/educational aspects
for community health/helping professionals and
educators.
PUBH 3050. Practicum in Peer Education I. (2 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–[Upper div student, [demonstrated hth sci or hlth ed
interests], [3001 or ¶3001 or 3004 or ¶3004]], #)
Multiple factors that influence health. Through
various health promotion strategies, students build
upon or gain skills such as public speaking, needs
assessments, program planning, interpersonal
communication, and program evaluation.
PUBH 3052. Practicum in Peer Education II. (2 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–[Upper div student, [demonstrated hth sci or hlth ed
interests], [3001 or ¶3001 or 3004 or ¶3004]], #)
Multiple factors that influence health. Through
various health promotion strategies, students build
upon or gain skills such as public speaking, needs
assessments, program planning, interpersonal
communication, and program evaluation.
PUBH 3093. Directed Study: Public Health. (1-4 cr [max
4 cr]. Prereq–#)
Directed study in selected public health problems or
current issues.
PUBH 3102. Issues in Environmental and Occupational
Health. (3 cr. §PUBH 6102)
Public Health (PUBH)
PUBH 3300. Topics: Clinical Research. (1-4 cr [max 8 cr].
Prereq–Jr or sr)
General topics in public policy.
Facts about how alcohol affects college life. Personal
prevention strategies. Maximizing student/campus
safety. Web-based distance learning format starts
before students arrive on campus.
Selected topics.
PUBH 3004. Basic Concepts in Personal and Community
Health. (4 cr. §PUBH 3003, PUBH 3005, PUBH 6003)
Scope of the field of environmental health. Concepts
upon which environmental interventions are
based. Consulting literature to identify appropriate
interventions for community environmental health
problems. Online course.
PUBH 1003. Alcohol and College Life. (1 cr. Prereq–Fr or
soph or PSEO)
PA 5890. Topics in Foreign Policy and International
AffAIRs. (1-5 cr [max 9 cr]. Prereq–Grad student or #)
Scientific, sociocultural, and attitudinal aspects of
alcohol and other drug abuse problems. Emphasizes
incidence, high-risk populations, prevention, and
intervention.
PA 5990. Topics: Public Affairs—General Topics. (.5-3 cr
[max 9 cr]. Prereq–Grad student or #)
School of Public Health
Open economics, implications for policy making/
implementation. Issues at level of international/
domestic economies.
PUBH 3003. Fundamentals of Alcohol and Drug Abuse.
(2 cr. §PUBH 3004, PUBH 3005, PUBH 6003)
PUBH 3000. Topics: Public Health. (.5-4 cr [max 80 cr])
New courses or topics of interest in public health.
Topics regarding health research in humans.
PUBH 3390. Topics: Epidemiology. (1-4 cr [max 20 cr].
Prereq–Jr or sr)
New course offerings or topics.
PUBH 3639. Prevention: Theory, Practice, and Application
in Public Health Services. (3 cr. Prereq–Jr or sr)
Current issues/controversies centered on prevention
and health promotion. How they relate to health
services and program implementation.
PUBH 3001. Personal and Community Health. (2 cr)
Fundamental principles of health conservation and
disease prevention.
Introduction to computer systems/applications in
public affairs practice.
For definitions of course numbers, symbols, and abbreviations, see page 300.
Course Descriptions
PA 5601. Survey of Women, Law, and Public Policy in the
United States. (3 cr. Prereq–Grad or #)
537
Course Descriptions
PUBH 3801. Health Economics and Policy. (3 cr. §APEC
3801. Prereq–[Principles of microeconomics [APEC 1101 or
ECON 1101], knowledge of plane geometry] or #)
Economics of health care markets. Problems faced
by consumers and health care services. Builds on
basic microeconomic principles of supply and
demand for health, health care, health insurance, and
role of government. Theoretical/empirical models/
applications.
PUBH 3810. Math Review for Health Economics. (1 cr; S-N
only. Prereq–[Jr or sr or grad student], basic calculus, linear
algebra)
Calculus, linear algebra. Health economic models,
equilibriums, matrix algebra, general function
models, exponentials/logarithms. Lecture, working
mathematical problems, discussion.
PUBH 3893. Directed Study: Health Services Research and
Policy. (1-4 cr [max 20 cr]. Prereq–#)
PUBH 3905. Human Nutrition and Health. (2 cr. §PUBH
6905. Prereq–Jr or sr or #)
Topics of contemporary interest. Concepts/facts
about science of human nutrition discussed in
relation to personal/community nutrition problems/
concerns. Applied introductory course with labs.
PUBH 5060. Smoking Intervention. (2 cr. Prereq–[Che or
MCH or epi MPH] or epi grad student or #)
Impact of smoking on U.S. public health. Review of
research on onset/prevention. Factors maintaining
dependence, cessation/intervention strategies. Public
health campaigns. Public policies, second-hand
smoking controversies. International issues.
Radiation Therapy (RTT)
College of Continuing Education
RTT 2001. Radiation Therapy: Radiation Exposure,
Imaging, Safety, and Basic Care. (1 cr; A-F only. Prereq–BAS
student in radiation therapy program, ∆)
Introduction to technical aspects of radiologic
sciences, standard patient care issues, and
radiation oncology issues. Structure/function
of x-ray equipment. Fundamental concepts of
x-ray production, interaction, imaging, and safety.
Physical/psychological aspects of patient care. Legal/
ethical values in health care environment.
RTT 2002. Radiation Therapy: Radiation Exposure,
Imaging, Safety, and Basic Care Lab. (1 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–2001, BAS student in radiation therapy program, ∆)
Fundamental topics of x-ray imaging and patientcare skills in a hands-on environment. Focuses on
simulation of procedures and of clinical projects.
RTT 2999. Radiography Certification Credit. (1-40 cr [max
40 cr])
Evaluation of credits earned for certification.
RTT 3001. Radiation Therapy: Introduction to Radiation
Therapy. (1 cr; A-F only)
538
Basic overview of radiation therapy and its role in
medicine.
RTT 3100. Radiation Therapy: Mathematics. (2 cr; A-F only)
Basic arithmetic, algebra, geometry, and
trigonometry.
RTT 3110. Radiation Therapy: Basic Physics. (2 cr; A-F only)
Basic physics.
RTT 3120. Radiation Physics I. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq–BASRTT student (UMMC))
Physics principles of physics related to ionizing
radiation. Production, interactions. Types of
radiation, their application to patient treatment.
Radiation protection. Technical aspects of RT
technology. Treatment modalities, patient set-up.
Application re clinical dosimetry and treatment
planning. Machine calibration. Quality assurance.
RTT 3121. Radiation Physics II. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq–BASRTT admitted (UMMC))
Electron beam therapy, radiation protection, quality
assurance, 3D CRT, beam geometry, beam quality/
characteristics, whole body irradiation, advanced
concepts, nuclear transformations.
RTT 3122. Radiation Therapy: Advanced Dosimetry. (2 cr;
A-F only. Prereq–∆)
Modern radiation oncology treatment planning.
Cross-sectional anatomy.
RTT 3130. Radiation Therapy: Principles of Oncology I.
(3 cr; A-F only)
General principles of radiation oncology. Imaging
procedures, concept of disease, disease factors,
disease management, treatment results.
RTT 3131. Radiation Therapy: Principles of Oncology II.
(3 cr; A-F only)
General principles of radiation oncology. Imaging
procedures, concept of disease, disease factors,
disease management, treatment results.
RTT 3132. Radiation Therapy: Medical Oncology. (2 cr; A-F
only. Prereq–3131, ∆)
Medical oncology principles. Basis for classification/
action of cytotoxic drugs. Chemotherapy regimens,
strategies, side effects, effect on radiotherapy patient.
RTT 3140. Radiation Therapy: Radiobiology. (2 cr; A-F only)
Principles of cell response to radiation/hyperthermia.
RTT 3150. Radiation Therapy: Brachytherapy. (1 cr; A-F
only)
Principles of radioactivity, its medical uses.
RTT 3160. Radiation Therapy: Methods of Patient Care.
(1 cr; A-F only)
Concepts of radiotherapy patient care/management.
Physical/psychological concerns.
RTT 3171. Radiation Therapy: Clinical Radiation I. (6 cr
[max 7 cr]; A-F only)
Hands-on clinical experience in a working
environment.
RTT 3172. Radiation Therapy: Clinical Radiation II. (5 cr;
A-F only)
Hands-on clinical experience in a working
environment.
RTT 3173. Radiation Therapy: Clinical Radiation III. (9 cr;
A-F only)
Hands-on clinical experience in a working
environment.
RTT 3174. Radiation Therapy: Clinical Radiation IV. (8 cr;
A-F only. Prereq–3171, 3172, 3173, ∆)
Hands-on clinical experience in working
environment. Students operate state-of-the-art
radiotherapy equipment. Treatment decision-making,
procedures, planning.
RTT 3501. Introduction to Radiation Therapy. (2 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–BAS-RTT student)
Role of radiation therapy as major modality to
treat cancer. Procedures/equipment: simulation,
dosimetry, treatment units, charting radiation
doses. Introduction to cancer data, epidemiology,
spread, staging, treatment. Psychosocial aspects of
cancer diagnosis and of patient care interactions.
Preparation for clinical rotations.
RTT 3521. Patient Care in Radiation Oncology. (2 cr; A-F
only. Prereq–BAS RTT student)
Skills to assess/manage patient side effects and
psychological conditions resulting from radiation
therapy. Concepts of patient care: vital sign
determination, emergency management and CPR,
medical-surgical asepsis, infection control, nutrition,
tube management, patient examinations. Safety
considerations for patient/staff.
RTT 3541. Pathology. (1 cr; A-F only. Prereq–BAS RTT student)
Normal/abnormal development of human cells/
tissues. Focuses on cell structure, function, and
kinetics. Cellular adaptation/injury. Inflammation/
repair. Hemodynamics and inherited disorders. Types
of growth. Causative factors. Biological behavior of
neoplastic disease.
RTT 3551. Radiation Oncology Physics. (3 cr. Prereq–BAS
RTT student)
General physics principles. Radiation properties,
production/control, measurement of emission,
attenuation, transmission. Treatment units. Structure
of matter. Principles of radioactivity/decay. Sealed
sources to place/implant in tumor volume. Low vs
high dose rate brachytherapy. Permanent implant
techniques.
RTT 3561. Cross-Sectional Anatomy. (2 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–BAS RTT student)
Human anatomy via cross-section and in relationship
to radiation oncology. Identifying anatomic
structures/interrelationships on successive transverse
planes via diagrams and CT scan images. Anatomy
lab visits explore gross human anatomy, anatomic
relationships of organs. Body structure/function.
RTT 3581. Principles and Practices of Radiation Therapy I.
(4 cr; A-F only. Prereq–BAS RTT student)
Introduction to management/treatment of oncology
patient. Histology, etiology, anatomy, presenting
symptoms, diagnosis, staging, treatment regimens.
Simulation procedures, patient positioning/
immobilization, planning requirements, treatment
techniques, radiation record keeping, managing side
effects. Labs in simulator.
RTT 3596. Clinical Practicum I. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq–BAS
RTT student)
Introduction to clinical practice of a radiation
therapist. Under direct supervision students observe/
assist in patient radiation treatments and simulation
procedures. Technical skills. Cancer care team.
RTT 3601. Clinical Quality Assurance and Computer
Applications. (1 cr; A-F only. Prereq–BAS RTT student)
Quality assurance/management principles. Methods/
frequency/limits on patient treatment records, linear
accelerators, simulator equipment. National/state
regulations. Radiation oncology computer uses/
applications such as digital imaging, tomography,
picture archiving, portal/3-D imaging, treatment
verification/planning.
RTT 3696. Clinical Practicum II. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq–3596,
RTT BAS student)
Initial application/integration of principles of
radiation therapy practice into clinical setting.
Students participate in patient care procedures
and perform simple/intermediate-level clinical
competency exams.
RTT 3701. Advanced Radiobiology and Radiation
Protection. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq–RTT BAS student)
Principles of radiobiology, radiation protection,
and safety in radiation oncology. Physiological
interactions: cellular, holistic. Tolerance dose, timedose relationships, fractionation schemes re clinical
practice. Radiation health/safety requirements
of regulatory/accreditation agencies. Therapist
responsibilities.
RTT 3996. Practicum. (1-2 cr [max 2 cr]; A-F only. Prereq–BAS
RTT student, ∆)
Supervised practicum work in radiation therapy
setting.
RTT 3999. Radiation Therapy Certification Credit. (1-40 cr
[max 40 cr])
Evaluation of credits earned for certification.
RTT 4511. Dosimetry and Treatment Planning. (4 cr; A-F
only. Prereq–3551, RTT BAS student)
Basic concepts, Isodose charts/distributions,
treatment dose calculations, irregular fields, beam
weighting, dose limiting structures, selection of
optimal treatment field design and other pertinent
dosimetry principles. Emerging technologies, their
impact on treatment planning.
RTT 4581. Principles and Practices of Radiation Therapy
II. (4 cr; A-F only. Prereq–3581, BAS RTT student)
Advanced principles of applying virtual simulations,
three dimensional planning, conformal treatments,
including intensity modulated radiation therapy.
Natural history, diagnosis/management of cancer
disease sites. Technical issues relating to simulation,
treatment techniques, electronic record keeping.
Course Descriptions
Application/integration of principles of radiation
therapy practice in clinical setting. Patient care
procedures. Intermediate-level clinical competency
exams: methodology behind treatment technique;
critical thinking skills.
RTT 4601. Project. (1 cr; A-F only. Prereq–3696, BAS RTT
student)
Guided independent study project. Students research
a topic of their choice and present their paper to
faculty/students. Students are encouraged to submit
paper for publication. Faculty provide guidance/input
into development of project.
RTT 4696. Clinical Practicum IV. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq–
3596, 3696, 4596)
Practice of clinical competencies, completion of
required advanced level clinical competency exams:
methodology behind treatment technique; critical
thinking. Students rotate through dosimetry and
participate in radiation treatment planning.
RTT 4796. Clinical Practicum V. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq–3596,
3696, 4596, 4696, BAS RTT student)
Final rotation. Students demonstrate full
comprehension of all radiation treatment/simulation
procedures. Problem solving. Integration of
dosimetric changes in a treatment. Participation in
advanced level procedures. Completion of remaining
clinical competency exams.
RTT 5281. Scientific Foundations. (3 cr; A-F only. §PT 6281.
Prereq–Registered rehab science or PT student)
RRM 42000H. Honors Seminar. (1 cr; A-F only. Prereq–RRM
upper div honors, #)
Current topics presented by faculty/students.
Lectures, discussions.
RRM 4232W. Managing Recreational Lands. (4 cr; A-F only.
§RRM 5232)
Recreation management tools from a public agency
perspective. Social carrying capacity, recreation
opportunity spectrum, limits of acceptable change,
benefits based management, visitor experience/
resource protection. Various projects. Group project
to develop a management plan.
RRM 4293. Directed Study. (1-5 cr [max 12 cr]. Prereq–#)
Students select/conduct a study of or project on a
topic of personal interest in consultation with faculty
member. Documented by initial proposal and reports
of accomplishment.
RRM 4801H. Honors Research. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq–RRM
upper div honors or #)
First semester of independent research project
supervised by faculty member.
RRM 4802H. Honors Research. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq–RRM
upper div honors, #)
Honors thesis. Oral report.
RRM 5101. Nature and Heritage Based Tourism. (3 cr; A-F
only. §RRM 3101. Prereq–Grad student or #)
Interaction of resource based tourism with
cultural/natural environments. Impacts of tourism on
environment.
RRM 5201. Introduction to Travel and Tourism. (3 cr. §RRM
3201. Prereq–Grad student or #)
Nature, structure and complexity of tourism
industry. Overview of travel/tourism: definition,
evolution, magnitude globally. Types/functions of
various sectors, tourism distribution system, role of
various stakeholders in creation/delivery of tourism.
Motivations for travel as means of understanding
demand for tourism.
Recreation Resource
Management (RRM)
Department of Forest Resources
College of Food, Agricultural and
Natural Resource Sciences
RRM 5232. Managing Recreational Lands. (4 cr; A-F only.
§RRM 4232W. Prereq–Grad student or #)
RRM 1001. Orientation and Information Systems. (1 cr;
A-F only)
Course planning for RRM majors, careers, liberal
education requirements, internships, summer jobs.
Mentoring/utilizing alumni contacts. Technical tools
in the workplace, lab equipment, software, getting
around GUIs, navigating the Internet, preparing
documents. Making spreadsheet calculations. Using
Lumina and periodical indexes.
RRM 1901. Freshman Seminar. (1 cr. Prereq–Freshman)
In-depth study of issues/topics related to natural
resources and the environment. Topics vary each
semester.
RRM 1905. Freshman Seminar. (1-3 cr [max 3 cr].
Prereq–Freshman)
In-depth study of issues/topics related to natural
resources and the environment. Topics vary each
semester.
RRM 3101. Nature and Heritage Based Tourism. (3 cr; A-F
only. §RRM 5101)
Interaction of resource based tourism with
cultural/natural environments. Impacts of tourism on
environment.
RRM 3201. Introduction to Travel and Tourism. (3 cr. §RRM
5201)
Travel/tourism is one of the world’s largest
industries. Course introduces the nature, structure
and complexity of the industry. Begins with
overview of travel/tourism definition, evolution of
travel/tourism, and magnitude globally. Examine
types and functions of various sectors, tourism
distribution system and role of various stakeholders
in creation/delivery of tourism. Explore motivations
for travel as means of understanding demand for
tourism.
Recreation management tools from a public agency
perspective. Social carrying capacity, recreation
opportunity spectrum, limits of acceptable change,
benefits based management, visitor experience/
resource protection. Various projects. Group project
to develop a management plan.
RRM 5259. Visitor Behavior Analysis. (3 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–RRM major or ENR major or grad student or #)
Application of social science theory/methods
to recreation and resource-based tourism visitor
behavior. Culture and cultural identity. Influences
on behavior. Mitigating environmental impacts.
Theory/analysis of surveys, observation, and content.
Implications for sustainable resource management.
Recreation, Park, and
Leisure Studies (REC)
School of Kinesiology
College of Education and Human
Development
REC 1501. Orientation to Leisure and Recreation. (3 cr)
Introduction to the history and development of
the parks and recreation movement; sociological,
economical, psychological, and political
considerations of leisure and recreation in
contemporary society; interrelationship between
professional and service organizations; orientation to
the professional field.
REC 2151. Outdoor and Camp Leadership. (3 cr; A-F only)
Practical and theoretical study of leading groups in
outdoor and camp settings. Outdoor leadership skills,
expedition planning, emergency procedures and
risk management, minimum impact approaches, and
working with youth in a camp environment.
REC 3281. Research and Evaluation in Recreation, Park,
and Leisure Studies. (4 cr; A-F only. Prereq–1501 or #)
Basic techniques; emphasis on social research and
evaluation methodology; survey of present status of
recreation and park research and evaluation.
REC 3541W. Recreation Programming. (3 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–1501 or #, Rec major)
Various methods, skills, materials needed for
planning, developing, implementing, evaluating
professional recreation programs for diverse
populations in various settings.
REC 3551. Administration and Finance of Leisure
Services. (4 cr; A-F only. Prereq–3541 or #, Rec major)
Principles and practices of financing and managing
leisure service agencies in the public and private
sector.
REC 3601W. Leisure and Human Development. (3 cr)
Exploration of relevant issues concerning many
roles of leisure in human development from
influence on healthy fetal development to viability
until death. Examination of diverse, multicultural
perspectives on leisure, its centrality throughout
history and influence on how civilizations define
themselves.
REC 3796. Senior Internship in Recreation, Park, and
Leisure Studies. (1-12 cr [max 15 cr]; S-N only. Prereq–Rec
sr, #)
Supervised field experience for pre-professional
students in selected agencies.
REC 3993. Directed Study in Recreation, Park, and Leisure
Studies. (1-9 cr [max 24 cr]. Prereq–Rec major, #)
Scholarly projects (e.g., library or field research) or
demonstration projects.
REC 5101. Foundations of Recreation. (3 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–MEd or grad student or #)
Investigation of the rational, sociological,
psychological, and philosophical foundations of the
recreational use of leisure in contemporary society.
Includes a survey of leisure services.
REC 5111. Sports Facilities. (3 cr; A-F only. §KIN 5111.
Prereq–Kin or Rec major or #)
Steps in planning and building facilities for
athletics, physical education, and sport for college,
professional, and public use.
REC 5115. Event Management in Sport. (3 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–§: KIN 5115; Grad student, #)
Techniques/principles of planning, funding, and
managing sport events. Collegiate championships,
non-profit events/benefits, professional events.
REC 5161. Recreation Land Policy. (3 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–1501 or 5101 or #)
Historical development of recreational land policy in
the United States and related contemporary issues in
policy, management, interpretation, and research.
REC 5191. Commercial Recreation and Tourism. (3 cr; A-F
only. Prereq–3551 or #)
Scope and development of profit-oriented recreation
agencies, including an emphasis on the tourism
industry.
REC 5211. Introduction to Therapeutic Recreation. (3 cr;
A-F only. Prereq–1501 or ¶5101, rec major or #)
Purposeful intervention; roles of specialist/
recreation therapists in meeting cognitive, physical,
emotional, social needs of people with disabling
conditions through recreation services; roles of
specialist/recreation therapists changing societal
attitudes toward illness and disability and the selfconcepts of individuals with impairments.
REC 5215. Assess and Monitor Patient/Client Functioning
in Recreation Therapy. (3 cr. Prereq–TR major or academic
health professional or #; majors A-F only)
Selecting appropriate techniques/tools, analysis
of individual p/c supports/deficits. Monitoring/
recording progress in RT and in collaborative
services: standard notes; team meetings; online reporting for quality assurance, referral,
augmentation/termination of services.
For definitions of course numbers, symbols, and abbreviations, see page 300.
Course Descriptions
RTT 4596. Clinical Practicum III. (6 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–3596, 3696)
539
Course Descriptions
REC 5221W. Comprehensive Therapeutic Recreation
Services Development and Management. (4 cr. Prereq–
5211 or #, rec major)
Guided development of written plans including
development of protocols and critical pathways,
intervention programs/activities, individual treatment
plans and standards for appropriate placement of
individuals in group intervention, and management
of patient/client service delivery, record keeping, and
administrative responsibilities.
REC 5231. Therapeutic Recreation and Diagnostic Groups.
(3 cr; A-F only. Prereq–5211 or #)
Definitions, philosophies, methodologies regarding
therapeutic recreation services for persons in
diagnostic groups of cognitive, physical, sensory,
communication, and psychiatric impairments/
disabilities. Lectures, group discussion. Presentations
by parents, professionals, and self-advocates.
Clinical or community practicum assignment.
REC 5241. Functional Intervention: Recreation Therapy in
Geriatric Care. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq–3541 or 5111 or #)
Role of leisure in maintenance of mental, physical,
social-emotional health/functioning. Issues
relative to prevention of impairment/disability.
Rehabilitation, support of vital life involvement,
effect on design/delivery of recreation services.
REC 5271. Community Leisure Services for Persons with
Disabilities. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq–1501, Rec major or #)
Exploration and application of concepts and
techniques of normalization and least restrictive
environment strategies to leisure service delivery
in inclusive community settings for a range of
individuals with disabilities.
REC 5288. Grant Writing in Human Services. (3 cr; A-F only)
Identify, develop, and procure financial assistance
for programs in human services, including education,
recreation, and social programs. Skills and strategies
for preparing and evaluating competitive proposals
for grant support through federal agencies and
private foundations or corporations.
REC 5301. Wilderness and Adventure Education. (4 cr;
A-F only)
Rationale for, methods in applying wilderness/
adventure education programs in education,
recreation, corporate, human service settings.
Emphasizes adventure/wilderness program
management.
REC 5311. Programming Outdoor and Environmental
Education. (3 cr; A-F only)
Methods, materials, and settings for developing and
conducting environmental and outdoor education
programs.
REC 5371. Sport and Society. (3 cr; A-F only. §KIN 5371.
Prereq–[3126, grad student] or #)
540
Sport, sporting processes, social influences,
systems, and structures that have effected and exist
within/among societies, nations, and cultures. Issues
concerning social differentiation. Social concerns
such as violence and honesty.
REC 5421. Sport Finance. (3 cr; A-F only. §KIN 5421.
Prereq–Grad student or #)
Introduction to financial analysis in sport. Cash flow
statements, budgeting issues, traditional/innovative
revenue producing strategies available to sport
organizations. Discussion, practical analysis of
current market.
REC 5461. Foundations of Sport Management. (3 cr; A-F
only. Prereq–[Rec or Kin] student or #)
Theories/techniques in administering/managing sport
enterprises. Organizational theory/policy. Practical
examples of sport management skills/strategies.
REC 5511. Women in Sport and Leisure. (3 cr; A-F only.
§KIN 5511)
Critically examines women’s involvement in/
contributions to sport, physical activity, and leisure.
REC 5601. Sport Management Ethics and Policy. (3 cr; A-F
only. §KIN 5601. Prereq–Grad student or # #)
Ethical concepts that underpin or inform sport
policies. Evaluating sport policies from a normative
point of view. Selected sport policy issues are used to
illustrate relevance of ethical considerations in policy
development, ethical implications of sport policy.
RELA 1035. Introduction to Christianity. (3 cr; A-F only.
§RELA 3035)
Christian traditions throughout history. Emphasizes
recurrent themes: reform/renewal, relations between
church/society, varieties of spiritual formation,
elusive pursuit of Christian unity.
RELA 1082. Jesus in History. (3 cr. §CNES 1082)
Introduction to marketing concepts as they apply to
sport industry. Consumer behavior, market research,
marketing mix, corporate sponsorship, licensing
concepts. Discussion, practical application.
Jesus of Nazareth in his original setting. Modern
approaches to the historical Jesus. Perspectives and
needs of early gospel writers and effects of portrayals
of Jesus. Shifting representations of Jesus in new
historical and cultural situations. Meets with RelA
1182.
REC 5701. Positive Youth Development Programming. (3
cr. Prereq–Upper div undergrad or grad student or #)
RELA 1083. Jesus the Jew. (3 cr. §CLAS 1083, JWST 1083,
JWST 3083, RELA 3083)
REC 5631. Programming and Promotion in Sport. (3 cr; A-F
only. §KIN 5631. Prereq–Kin or Rec grad student or #)
Youth development programming for out-of-school
time. Philosophy/purpose of youth development
programs. Principles/procedures for developing outof-school time programs.
REC 5801. Legal Aspects of Sport and Recreation. (4 cr;
A-F only. Prereq–3551 or 5461 or #)
Legal issues related to recreation, park, and sport
programs/facilities with public/private sectors.
REC 5900. Special Topics: Contemporary Issues in Leisure
Services. (1-12 cr [max 12 cr])
Contemporary issues emphasizing administrative
and supervisory functions for recreation and allied
professionals; individual offerings, to be determined
by faculty, focus on special issues and professional
groups.
REC 5981. Research Methodology in Kinesiology,
Recreation, and Sport. (3 cr; A-F only. §KIN 5981.
Prereq–MEd or grad student or #)
Defines/reviews various types of research in exercise
and sport science, physical education, and recreation
studies. Qualitative research, field studies, and
introspective research strategies as alternatives to
traditional scientific paradigm.
REC 5992. Readings: Recreation. (1-3 cr [max 9 cr].
Prereq–REC major, #)
Independent study under tutorial guidance by faculty
member on particular topic(s) not covered in regular
coursework.
REC 5995. Problems in Recreation, Park, and Leisure
Studies. (1-12 cr [max 30 cr]. Prereq–[MEd or grad student], #)
Independent study of leisure service programs,
systems, facilities, or policies. Focuses on conduct of
recreation programs. Scholarly projects (e.g., library
or field research) or demonstration projects.
Religions in Antiquity
(RELA)
Department of Classical and Near Eastern Studies
College of Liberal Arts
RELA 1001. Introduction to the Religions of the World.
(3 cr)
An introduction to the major religions of the world
and the academic study of religion. Hinduism,
Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, and some
pre-Christian religions of Antiquity.
RELA 1031. Introduction to the Religions of South Asia.
(3 cr)
Historical study of the three traditional religions of
India: Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism through
literature, art, and film. General topics include myth,
yoga, mysticism, and the religious order of society.
RELA 1034. Introduction to Jewish History and
Civilization. (3 cr. §JWST 1034, JWST 3034, RELA 3034)
Jewish history, society, and culture from Second
Temple period (5th century BCE) to modern era as
illuminated by literature, philosophy, art, film, music,
religious law/custom, and artifacts of daily life.
Emphasizes political, social, and cultural contexts
that shapeddevelopment of Jewish ideas, practices,
and institutions.
Historic figure of Jesus within context of first century
Palestinian Judaism. Main groups/institutions
of Judaism at time of Jesus. Rabbinic literature/
traditions. Works describing Jesus. life/sayings
(synoptic gospels). Jesus and the Law, Messianic
ideals/expectations, problem of religious authority.
Positions regarding Rome, its authority. James and
the Jerusalem Church.
RELA 1905. Freshman Seminar. (3 cr)
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
RELA 3013W. Biblical Law and Jewish Ethics. (3 cr. §JWST
3013W, JWST 5013, RELA 5013)
Significance of religious law in Judaism. Babylonian
background of biblical law. Biblical creation of the
person as a legal category. Rabbinic transformations
of biblical norms. Covenant in Christianity/Islam.
Contemporary Jewish literature/philosophy.
RELA 3034. Introduction to Jewish History and
Civilization. (3 cr. §JWST 1034, JWST 3034, RELA 1034)
Jewish history, society, and culture from Second
Temple period (5th century BCE) to modern era as
illuminated by literature, philosophy, art, film, music,
religious law/custom, and artifacts of daily life.
Emphasizes political, social, and cultural contexts
that shapeddevelopment of Jewish ideas, practices,
and institutions.
RELA 3035. Introduction to Christianity. (3 cr; A-F only.
§RELA 1035. Prereq–§1035)
Christian traditions throughout history. Emphasizes
recurrent themes: reform/renewal, relations between
church/society, varieties of spiritual formation,
elusive pursuit of Christian unity.
RELA 3036. Islam: Religion and CultureIslam. (3 cr. §ARAB
3036, HIST 3493, HUM 3036)
Religion of Islam, faith, practices, sectarian
splintering, expansion outside original home to
status of world religion, institutions, status in world
societies - Asia, Europe, Americas.
RELA 3072. The New Testament. (3 cr. §CNES 3072, CNES
5072, RELA 5072)
Early Jesus movement in its cultural and historical
setting: origins in Judaism; traditions about Jesus;
Paul, his controversies and interpreters; questions
of authority, religious practice, and structure;
emergence of the canon of scripture. Contemporary
methods of New Testament study.
RELA 3072H. Honors Course: The New Testament. (4 cr.
Prereq–Honors)
Early Jesus movement in its cultural/historical
setting: origins in Judaism; traditions about Jesus;
Paul, his controversies/interpreters; questions of
authority, religious practice, structure; emergence of
canon. Contemporary methods of New Testament
study. Meets with 3072. Additional weekly recitation
section.
RELA 3073. Roman Religion and Early Christianity. (3 cr)
Etruscan, Republican religion. Appeal of nonRoman cults. Ruler worship. Christians in Asia
Minor, Egypt, and the West. Popular piety, Christian
and non-Christian. Rabbinic Judaism. Varieties of
Christianity in 2nd and 3rd centuries. Influence
of Greco-Roman culture on emerging church.
Constantine and Julian.
Course Descriptions
Historic figure of Jesus within context of first century
Palestinian Judaism. Main groups/institutions
of Judaism at time of Jesus. Rabbinic literature/
traditions. Works describing Jesus’ life/sayings
(synoptic gospels). Jesus and the Law, Messianic
ideals/expectations, problem of religious authority.
Positions regarding Rome, its authority. James and
the Jerusalem Church.
RELA 3112. Jewish Mysticism, Magic, and Kabbalah. (3 cr;
A-F only. §JWST 3112, JWST 5112, RELA 5112)
Mystical traditions from early rabbinic traditions to
Zohar (Book of Splendor) in 13th century. Literature
of heavenly ascent (Hekhalot, Merkavah), Book
of Creation (Sefer Yetzirah), precursors of Zohar.
the Bahir. Schools of Provence, Gerona, and Zohar.
Tension between legal/mystical aspects, magical
theurgic techniques, evolution of doctrine of
Sefirot, mystical interpretation of Scripture, erotic
dimension.
RELA 3115. Mishnah and Midrash in Translation. (3 cr.
§JWST 3115, JWST 5115, RELA 5115)
Jewish law studied as a mirror of society and as a
way to actualize its value. Consideration of original
socioreligious contexts and current applications.
Selections include biblical interpretations addressing
moral, theological, legal, and literary problems.
RELA 3201. The Bible: Context and Interpretation. (3 cr.
§CNES 1201, CNES 3201, JWST 1201, JWST 3201)
Survey of literary and historical narrative texts from
the Pentateuch, Joshua, Judges, Samuel, Kings,
Ruth. Study of the art of Biblical narrative and
major themes of Biblical stories. Comparison with
other Ancient Near Eastern Literatures. Literary
conventions of the biblical writers.
RELA 3202. Prophecy in Ancient Israel. (3 cr. §ANE 1002,
CNES 3202. Prereq–Knowledge of Hebrew not required)
Survey of Israelite prophets, with emphasis on
Amos, Hosea, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel and Second
Isaiah. Prophetic contributions to Israelite religion.
Personality of prophets. Politics and prophetic
reaction. Textual analysis and Biblical scholarship.
Prophecy viewed cross-culturally
RELA 3203. The Bible: Wisdom, Poetry, and Apocalyptic.
(3 cr. §ANE 1003, CNES 3203. Prereq–Knowledge of Hebrew
not required)
Survey of books of Psalms, Proverbs, Job, Song
of Songs, Lamentations, Ecclesiastes (Qoheleth).
Characteristics of biblical poetry. Conceptions of
Israelite wisdom writing. Traits of early Jewish
apocalyptic writing.
RELA 3504. Development of Israelite Religion II. (3 cr. §ANE
3504, ANE 5504, RELA 5504)
RELA 5115. Mishnah and Midrash in Translation. (3 cr.
§JWST 3115, JWST 5115, RELA 3115)
RELA 3535. Death and the Afterlife in the Ancient World.
(3 cr. §CNES 3535, CNES 5535, RELA 5535)
RELA 5251. Archaeology of Herodian Israel. (3 cr; A-F only.
§CNES 5251, RELS 5251. Prereq–One course in [archaeology or
ancient history] or grad student)
Ancient Judaism from the Persian restoration
(520 BCE) to Roman times (second century CE).
Religious, cultural, and historical developments
are examined to understand Jewish life, work, and
worship under a succession of foreign empires:
Persian, Greek, and Roman.
Beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors related to death and
afterlife found in cultures of ancient Mediterranean
and Near East. Literature, funerary art/epitaphs.
Archaeological evidence for burial practices and care
of dead.
RELA 3993. Directed Studies. (2-4 cr [max 10 cr])
Student works with faculty on a subject decided
upon by both.
RELA 5013. Biblical Law and Jewish Ethics. (3 cr. §JWST
3013W, JWST 5013, RELA 3013W)
Significance of religious law in Judaism. Babylonian
background of biblical law. Biblical creation of the
person as a legal category. Rabbinic transformations
of biblical norms. Covenant in Christianity/Islam.
Contemporary Jewish literature/philosophy.
RELA 5070. Topics in Ancient Religion. (3 cr [max 18 cr].
§CNES 5070. Prereq–RELA 3071 or 3072 or 3073 or 5071 or
5073 or any RelS course or #)
Study of a specific aspect of religion in Classical
and Near Eastern antiquity such as healing cults,
magic and divination, Gnosticism, or prophecy and
authority. Topics specified in Class Schedule.
RELA 5071. Greek and Hellenistic Religions. (3 cr. §CNES
3071, CNES 5071, RELA 3071. Prereq–#)
Greek religion from the Bronze Age to Hellenistic
times. Sources include literature, art, and
archaeology. Homer and Olympian deities;
ritual performance; prayer and sacrifice; temple
architecture; death and the afterlife; mystery cults;
philosophical religion; Near Eastern salvation
religions. Meets with 3071.
RELA 5072. The New Testament. (3 cr. §CNES 3072, CNES
5072, RELA 3072, RELA 5072)
Early Jesus movement in its cultural, historical
setting. Origins in Judaism; Jesus traditions. Apostle
Paul, his controversies and interpreters. Questions
of authority, religious practice, structure; emergence
of the canon. Contemporary methods of New
Testament study; biblical writings as history and
narrative. Meets with 3072.
RELA 5073. Roman Religion and Early Christianity. (3 cr.
§CNES 5073)
RELA 3251. Modern Study of the Old Testament. (3 cr.
§ANE 3251. Prereq–No knowledge of Hebrew required)
Methods used in studying the Old Testament,
including textual criticism, the anthropological
approach, the sociological approach, the history of
religion, and the use of archaeology in interpreting
the text.
RELA 3501. Ancient Israel: The Origins of Israel in Biblical
Traditions. (3 cr. §ANE 3501. Prereq–Hebrew not required)
Foundation of the Hebrew people. Traditions of
patriarchal period, development of Israelite religious/
legal institution. Ancient Near Eastern context of
Israel’s origins.
RELA 3502. Ancient Israel: From Conquest to Exile.
(3 cr. §CNES 3502, CNES 5502, HIST 3502. Prereq–Hebrew not
required; 3501 recommended)
Israelite history in context of what is known from
Egyptian, Canaanite, Mesopotamian sources.
Focuses on issues raised by archaeological data
related to Israelite conquest of Canaan.
RELA 3503. History and Development of Israelite Religion
I. (3 cr. §ANE 3503, ANE 5503, CNES 3503, CNES 5503, RELA
5503. Prereq–No knowledge of Hebrew required)
Survey of the evolution of Israelite religion. Cultic
practices, law and religion, prophecy, religion and
historiography. Relationship to surrounding religious
systems.
Etruscan, Republican relgion. Appeal of non-Roman
cults. Ruler worship. Christians in Asia Minor,
Egypt, and the West. Popular piety, Christian and
non-Christian. Rabbinic Judaism. Varieties of
Christianity in 2nd and 3rd centuries. Influence
of Greco-Roman culture on emerging church.
Constantine and Julian.
RELA 5080. New Testament Proseminar. (3 cr [max 18 cr].
§CNES 5080. Prereq–RELA 1082 or 3072 or equiv)
Discussion seminar. Study of some specific aspect
of the New Testament and related literature. Topics
specified in Class Schedule.
RELA 5112. Jewish Mysticism, Magic, and Kabbalah. (3 cr;
A-F only. §JWST 3112, JWST 5112, RELA 3112)
Mystical traditions from early rabbinic traditions to
Zohar (Book of Splendor) in 13th century. Literature
of heavenly ascent (Hekhalot, Merkavah), Book
of Creation (Sefer Yetzirah), precursors of Zohar.
the Bahir. Schools of Provence, Gerona, and Zohar.
Tension between legal/mystical aspects, magical
theurgic techniques, evolution of doctrine of
Sefirot, mystical interpretation of Scripture, erotic
dimension.
Jewish law studies as mirror of society and as way to
actualize its value. Original socioreligious contexts,
current applications. Selections include biblical
interpretations addressing moral, theological, legal,
and literary problems.
Archaeological sites in Israel dating to era of Herod
the Great (37-4BC). Palaces, religious edifices,
and remains from Jewish/gentile settlements
throughout the kingdom. Course readings consist
of contemporary literary sources and excavation
reports.
RELA 5503. History and Development of Israelite Religion
I. (3 cr. §ANE 3503, ANE 5503, CNES 3503, CNES 5503, RELA
3503)
Survey of the evolution of Israelite religion. Cultic
practices, law and religion, prophecy, religion and
historiography. Relationship to surrounding religious
systems.
RELA 5504. Development of Israelite Religion II. (3 cr. §ANE
3504, ANE 5504, RELA 3504)
Ancient Judaism from the Persian restoration
(520 B.C.E.) to Roman times (2nd century C.E.).
Religious, cultural, and historical developments
are examined to understand Jewish life, work, and
worship under a succession of foreign empires:
Persian, Greek, Roman.
RELA 5513. Scripture and Interpretation. (3 cr; A-F only.
§JWST 5513)
Idea of divine revelation, its impact upon religion/
literature. How history of Bible’s creation,
transmission, and interpretation helps us think
critically about role of idea of revelation in history
of religious traditions. What is revelation? How
does belief that a text is revealed affect the way it is
read within the community for which it constitutes
revelation?
RELA 5521. Theory and Method in the Study of Religion. (3
cr. Prereq–Sr or grad student or #)
Fundamental theoretical/methodological issues
pertaining to academic study of religion. Influential
modern theories of origin, character, and function
of religion as a human phenomenon, including
psychological, sociological, anthropological, and
phenomenological perspectives.
RELA 5535. Death and the Afterlife in the Ancient World.
(3 cr. §CNES 3535, CNES 5535, RELA 3535)
Beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors related to death and
afterlife found in cultures of ancient Mediterranean
and Near East. Literature, funerary art/epitaphs.
Archaeological evidence for burial practices and care
of dead.
RELA 5993. Directed Studies. (2-4 cr [max 10 cr])
Guided individual reading or study.
Religious Studies (RELS)
Department of Classical and Near Eastern Studies
College of Liberal Arts
RelS 3070. Post-Holocaust Jewish and Christian Theology.
(1-4 cr [max 4 cr]; A-F only)
Topics specified in Class Schedule and Course
Guide.
RELS 3521W. History of the Holocaust. (3 cr. §HIST 3727W,
JWST 3521W)
Study of the 1933-1945 extermination of six million
Jews and others by Nazi Germany on the basis of
race. European anti-Semitism, implications of social
Darwinism and race theory, perpetrators, victims,
onlookers, resistance, and theological responses of
Jews and Christians.
For definitions of course numbers, symbols, and abbreviations, see page 300.
Course Descriptions
RELA 3083. Jesus the Jew. (3 cr. §CLAS 1083, JWST 1083,
JWST 3083, RELA 1083)
541
Course Descriptions
RELS 5111. Problems in Historiography and
Representation of the Holocaust. (3 cr. Prereq–3521 or
3541 or JWST 3521 or #)
Issues connected with Holocaust. Inclusiveness
of other groups, Holocaust versus “Shoah,”
historiographical conflicts about perpetrators.
Problems of representation in literature/art. Problems
of narrative theology after Auschwitz.
RELS 5251. Archaeology of Herodian Israel. (3 cr; A-F only.
§CNES 5251, RELA 5251. Prereq–One course in [archaeology
or ancient history] or grad student)
Archaeological sites in Israel dating to era of Herod
the Great (37-4BC). Palaces, religious edifices,
and remains from Jewish/gentile settlements
throughout the kingdom. Course readings consist
of contemporary literary sources and excavation
reports.
RelS 5993. Directed Studies. (1-4 cr [max 24 cr])
Directed studies in religion. Credits may vary from
term to term to a limit of nine.
Respiratory Care (RC)
College of Continuing Education
RC 2011. Foundations for Clinical Practice of Respiratory
Care. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq–BAS respiratory care major)
Respiratory care profession. Clinical roles,
responsibilities, career options. Subspecialties,
professional settings. Preparation for clinical practice
in respiratory care within a hospital setting. Lab
sessions, discussion, simulation, interviews, roleplaying.
RC 2021. Patient Care Techniques. (2 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–BAS respiratory care major)
Fundamental practice, attitudes, and competencies
for all health care providers, including respiratory
care. Communication skills, infection control, vital
signs, patient assessment. General care techniques of
respiratory/nursing personnel. Transfer of patients.
Specialized care, including immobilized patients
(e.g., mechanical ventilation).
RC 3101. Respiratory Care Modalities and Equipment I.
(4 cr; A-F only. Prereq–2210 or equivalent, BAS RC student)
Perform non-invasive monitoring and therapeutic
procedures. Medical gas therapy, humidity/aerosol
therapy, bronchial drainage, volume expansion
therapy. Common aerosol medications. Procedures
in context of national practice guidelines: rationale,
limitations, hazards/complications. Issues of asepsis
and of adaptation to patient needs.
RC 3102. Respiratory Care Modalities and Equipment II.
(4 cr; A-F only. Prereq–3101)
542
Implementation/operation of invasive monitoring
and life-support technology for the critically ill.
Airway management. Hemodynamic/respiratory
monitoring. Mechanical ventilation. Completion
of American Heart Association course in advanced
cardiac life support (ACLS). Simulated patient care
in emergency room or intensive care units.
RC 3201. Cardiopulmonary Patient Assessment. (4 cr; A-F
only. Prereq–[2210 or equiv], BAS RC student)
Patient assessment skills to interpret patient
data. Chart record, interview, physical exam,
medical lab data, pulmonary function reports,
electrocardiogram, hemodynamic record, ventilator
flow sheet, radiographic imaging. Introduction to
cardiopulmonary diseases. Lab emphasizes role
playing, practice exams, and assessment.
RC 3301. Clinical Practice I. (3 cr; S-N only. Prereq–BAS
respiratory care major)
Clinical rotations at Mayo Medical Center,
Rochester. Nine intensive care units, operating room,
emergency room, general floor care areas, pulmonary
function labs, sleep disorders center, smoking
cessation clinic, pulmonary rehabilitation program,
home care, outpatient clinic. Supervised performance
of procedures, diagnostic testing.
RC 3302. Clinical Practice II. (5 cr; S-N only. Prereq–3301,
BAS respiratory care major)
Continued clinical rotations at Mayo Medical Center.
Nine intensive care units, operating room, emergency
room, general floor care areas, pulmonary function
labs, sleep disorders center, smoking cessation
clinic, pulmonary rehabilitation program, home
care, outpatient clinic. Adult, perinatal, and pediatric
critical resp care.
RC 3401. Seminar in Respiratory Care I: Case reports and
Fundamentals of Research. (1 cr; A-F only. Prereq–2210)
Critical review of professional medical literature
re scientific method and clear writing style. Patient
cases for problem solving and critical thinking
issues. Collaborative class research project leading
to abstract submission. Weekly case conference
(pulmonary/critical care medicine or combined
critical care). Two-hour seminar.
RC 3402. Seminar in Respiratory Care II: Case reports and
Fundamentals of Research. (1 cr; A-F only. Prereq–3401,
BAS RC student)
Weekly conferences and seminar of significant
respiratory care cases in professional medical
literature. Case reviews from standpoint of scientific
method and clear writing style. Problem solving,
critical thinking strategies. Collaborative class
research project leading to submission of abstract.
RC 3501. Advanced Cardiopulmonary Respiratory
Physiology and Pathophysiology. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq–
3201, BAS RC student)
Physiology of cardiovascular/pulmonary systems.
Adult, pediatric, and perinatal pulmonary and cardiac
disorders. Emphasizes presenting assessment, lab
evaluation, major pathology, pathophysiologic
manifestations, and treatment. Lab observation/
measurement of normal and simulated abnormal
cardiopulmonary physiology.
RC 4111. Advanced Adult Respiratory Critical Care
Techniques. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq–3102, BAS RC student)
Providing respiratory care to critically ill adults.
Emphasizes case examples of cardiopulmonary
problems and therapeutic procedures using multiorgan system-wide patient approach. Advanced lab
competencies in ventilator management. Critical
care monitoring procedures, including hemodynamic
monitoring.
RC 4201. Subspecialization in Respiratory Care: Advanced
Perinatal and Pediatric Respiratory Care. (2 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–3102, BAS RC student)
Role of perinatal/pediatrics specialist as defined
by National Board for Respiratory Care (NBRC).
Literature on mechanical ventilation, monitoring
applied. Emphasizes evidence-based care. Case
studies of strategies for extended mechanical
ventilation or other forms of long-term support.
RC 4202. Subspecialization in Respiratory Care: Advanced
Cardiopulmonary Diagnostics. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq–3102,
BAS RC student)
Preparation for role of advanced pulmonary function
technologist and NBRC’s CPFT/RPFT board
exams. Rationale and methods. Inert gas and body
plethysmographic measurement of lung capacity.
Diffusion studies. Bronchial provocation. Heart/lung
function during maximal exercise. Cases/labs on
interpreting results and quality control.
RC 4203. Subspecialization in Respiratory Care:
Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation, Disease Prevention,
Case Mgmt. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq–3102, BAS RC student)
Care for chronically ill patients with lung/heart
disorders. Emphasizes respiratory care in the
hospital, extended care, and the home. Clinical
testing, exercise prescriptions, and practice
guidelines for management. Case management
and responsibilities unique to respiratory therapist.
Preparation for role of certified asthma educator.
RC 4301. Seminar: Research Project and Publication. (2 cr;
A-F only. Prereq–3102, BAS respiratory care major)
Students prepare a research project for submission,
including assembling a poster, abstract, or
manuscript of original research. Research mentors
are assigned to allow guided independent study.
RC 4496. Subspecialty Clinical Practicum in Advanced
Respiratory Care I. (3 cr; S-N only. Prereq–3302, BAS
respiratory care major)
Competencies in areas of advanced-level respiratory
care, including clinical subspecialties and related
areas important to respiratory care practitioner. A
rotation is eight weeks/120 hours of directed clinical
experience at facilities within Mayo Health System
and UM-affiliated institutions. Maximum two
rotations per semester.
RC 4596. Subspecialty Clinical Practicum in Advanced
Respiratory Care II. (3 cr; S-N only. Prereq–3302, BAS RC
student)
Continued competencies in areas of advanced-level
respiratory care, including clinical subspecialties
and related areas important to respiratory care
practitioner. A rotations is eight weeks/120 hours
of directed clinical experience at facilities within
Mayo Health System and UM-affiliated institutions.
Maximum two rotations per semester.
RC 4993. Directed Study. (1-4 cr [max 4 cr]; A-F only.
Prereq–Respiratory care major)
Independent project. Topic arranged with and
supervised by respiratory care faculty.
Rhetoric (RHET)
Department of Rhetoric
College of Food, Agricultural and
Natural Resource Sciences
RHET 1001. Introduction to Scientific and Technical
Communication. (2 cr; A-F only)
Research origins/history. Defining technical
communication in professional world. Focuses on
audience, purpose, ethics, global communication, and
collaboration. Journal articles, student/professional
organizations, guest presentations, interviews.
Career assessment inventories, in-class/electronic
discussions, oral presentations, feasibility report.
RHET 1101. Writing to Inform, Convince, and Persuade.
(4 cr; A-F only. §ENGC 1011, ENGC 1011H, ENGC 1012, ENGC
1012H, ENGC 1013, ENGC 1013H, ENGC 1014, ENGC 1014H,
ENGC 1015, ENGC 1016, PSTL 1422, PSTL 1423, PSTL 1424)
Writing effectively in an academic setting.
Emphasizes analyzing/creating logical arguments.
Standards of clarity, cohesion, and correctness.
RHET 1152W. Writing on Issues of Science and
Technology. (4 cr; A-F only. Prereq–Exemption from 1101 or
equiv)
Ethical, social, and political challenges created by
science/technology. Analyzes persuasion strategies
through which experts, political decision-makers,
and citizens meet these challenges. Bioscience
controversies such as cloning, organ transplantation.
Controversies over pollution, ozone depletion.
RHET 1223. Oral Presentations in Professional Settings.
(3 cr; A-F only. §COMM 1101, COMM 1101H, PSTL 1461)
Techniques for analyzing an audience, determining
a purpose, developing an argument, and delivering a
presentation. Emphasizes using presentations, basic
communication theories.
RHET 1311. The Family in American Experience. (3 cr)
The American family as portrayed in fiction, poetry,
drama, and autobiography. Introduction to literature
both as artistic and as ideological construct. Analysis
of the social critique of American family life.
RHET 1315. The Land in American Experience. (3 cr)
Land in America as idea and as actual space. History
of cultural values and the meanings land holds for us.
Contrasting views of land, especially those of certain
Native American peoples. Rise of the conservation
movement and the urbanization of U.S. space.
RHET 1381W. Rhetorical Fictions and 20th Century
Conflicts: West Africa, Vietnam, and the Middle East. (4 cr)
Analysis of selected 20th-century documentary
novels. Nature of artistic truth in relation to historical
truth. Cross-cultural comparisons of responses to
impact of Anglo-American policies.
Course Descriptions
Topics vary.
RHET 3101. Functional Photography. (3 cr; A-F only)
Basic photographic communication. Emphasizes
techniques of producing 35mm color transparencies
for use in presentations/publications. Students
provide their own camera/film.
RHET 3102. Digital Photography. (2-3 cr [max 3 cr]; A-F only.
Prereq–Digital or conventional camera)
Introduction to digital photography. Selecting/using
a digital camera. Going digital with a film camera.
Editing digital images. Printing/publishing digital
images.
RHET 3108. Gender and Ethnicity and the Rhetoric of
Science and Technology. (3 cr. Prereq–1101)
How cultural gender roles are affected by science/
technology. Influence of gender roles on scientific/
technological thinking (e.g., communication
strategies, language, image). Values/goals of past/
present scientific/technological communities.
Culture represented in historical/political events
and arts of the period. Emphasis on European
and American painting with units on architecture,
literature, film, and theater, as well as a consideration
of philosophy and ethics in other disciplines.
RHET 3382W. War. (3 cr)
Claim: If ethics (right/wrong) exist in war, then
right/wrong exist everywhere. Students experience
this claim through its expression in various arts/
humanities media of history, memoir, philosophical
meditation, and film.
RHET 3383. In Search of Nature. (3 cr)
The human need for a relationship with nature and
the ways we organize our environment to reflect
this need. Various images such as the pastoral and
wilderness are traced historically. Tensions between
rural and urban views of nature.
RHET 3384. From Soil to Civilization: Agriculture and the
Emergence of the Modern World. (3 cr; A-F only)
Central importance of emergence of agriculture (i.e.,
domestication of plants/animals) in development of
settled communities, cities, nations, and empires.
How it happened, how we know. Differences among
agricultural developments on different continents.
RHET 3221W. Theories of Human Communication. (4 cr.
Prereq–1101 or 1152 or ENGC 1011 or equiv)
Through lecture, discussion, simulations, and
small group work students become familiar with
theories and practices of interpersonal, small
group, organizational, and scientific, and technical
communication.
RHET 3257. Scientific and Technical Presentations. (3 cr.
Prereq–1223 or #)
Oral presentation skills for scientific or technical
topics. Visual communication, audience analysis,
organizing a presentation, presenting complex
material. Emphasizes use of computers.
RHET 3401. Internet Communication: Tools and Issues. (3
cr. Prereq–Internet access including e-mail, [Netscape 3.0 or
higher or equiv])
Current/developing tools/issues of internet-based
communication. E-mail, e-commerce, social/cultural
context of communication. Discussion topics vary,
depending on current issues in existing or emerging
technologies. Active online participation required.
RHET 3441. Essentials of Grammar, Punctuation, and
Style. (2 cr)
RHET 3266. Group Process, Team Building, and
Leadership. (3 cr. Prereq–1223 or equiv or #)
Progressive online instruction, examples of concepts
taught, immediate feedback, continual tracking of
progress.
Group processes, team building from perspective
of managers/leaders. Communication techniques
in small group decision making process. Theories
of team/small-group communication. Case studies.
Group project for each student.
RHET 3470. Special Topics in Communication Skills. (2 cr
[max 6 cr])
Topics vary, see current Class Schedule.
RHET 3270. Special Topics. (1-3 cr [max 3 cr])
See Class Schedule.
RHET 3291. Independent Study. (1-3 cr [max 3 cr]. Prereq–#, ∆)
Supervised reading and research on topics not
covered in regularly scheduled offerings. Intended
primarily for upper division undergraduate students.
RHET 3302. Science, Religion, and the Search for Human
Nature. (3 cr)
Relationship of religion and science as ways of
explaining human nature and behavior. Focus
on 19th century: impact of Darwin’s theory and
historical study of Biblical texts. Existentialism and
political ecology as modern efforts that problematize
“human nature.”
RHET 3361. Literature of Social Movements in the United
States: 1950 to 2000. (3 cr; A-F only)
Analysis of literature (fictional, nonfictional) of
social movements in the United States in last half of
20th century. Artistic truth in relation to historical
truth. Roles/obligations of citizens to protest/change
social structures.
RHET 3371. Technology, Self, and Society. (3 cr. Prereq–[Jr
or sr])
Cultural history of American technology. Social
values that technology represents in shifts from
handicraft to mass production/consumption to
modern transportation, communication, and
bioengineering. Ethical issues involved in themes
of power, work, identity, and our relation to nature.
How technology conditions our way of thinking.
RHET 3376W. Terrorism. (3 cr)
RHET 3381. 20th-Century Culture. (3 cr)
Terrorism is not only an ethical but an international
problem. Different cultures have meant different
historical trajectories for terrorism. To illustrate
this, the course contrasts Algerian, Irish, and Arab
terrorism.
RHET 3562W. Technical and Professional Writing. (4 cr; A-F
only. Prereq–[1101 or 1152W or ENGC 1011 or equiv], [jr or sr])
Written/oral communication in professional settings.
Gathering information, analyzing audience, assessing
conventional formats. Drafting, testing, revising
documents. Oral presentation of final reports.
RHET 3577W. Rhetoric, Technology, and the Internet. (3 cr;
A-F only. Prereq–[1101 or equiv], [3401 or equiv])
The Internet from a rhetorical perspective. How the
Internet is changing language, power to persuade,
scientific/technical knowledge, and legal issues such
as copyright, privacy, and free speech. Emphasizes
how scientific/technical information is conveyed
on the Internet. Ethical issues specific to use of
computers.
RHET 3671. Visual Rhetoric. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq–[3562,
STC major] or #)
Rhetorical principles applied to visual presentation
of information/data in print documents. Students
create examples of visual communication and
design selected technical publications. Principles of
technical writing.
RHET 3672. Project Design and Development . (3 cr; A-F
only. Prereq–[3562W, STC major] or #)
Students study, plan, research, design, and develop
technical communication print documents, including
documentation, brochures, and newsletters.
Introduction to workplace project processes.
Emphasizes developing production-quality
documents.
RHET 3701W. Rhetorical Theory and Scientific and
Technical Communication. (4 cr. Prereq–[1101 or 1152W or
ENGC 1011 or equiv])
RHET 4105W. Corporate Video for Technical
Communicators. (4 cr; A-F only. Prereq–3562 or equiv or #)
Introduction to products, professionals, and
processes of corporate video. Students analyze
corporate video; submit a proposal, treatment, and
script; maintain a journal; complete an interactive
unit on production; and conduct research on a videorelated topic of their choice.
RHET 4165. Managerial and Organizational
Communication, Planning, and Change. (3 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–3266 or #)
A study of organizational theory, communication
processes, planning, and change with emphasis on
action research in scientific and/or technical settings.
Study of organization and management theory to
develop organizational consultative skills.
RHET 4196. Internship in Scientific and Technical
Communication. (1-3 cr [max 3 cr]; S-N only. Prereq–STC
major, #)
Internships sites may include the University,
industry, or government agencies. An internship
proposal, progress report, internship journal
(optional), and final report with a letter from the
internship supervisor is required.
RHET 4258. Information-Gathering Techniques in
Scientific and Technical Communication. (3 cr; A-F only)
Informational, employment-cycle, and problemsolving interviews. Emphasizes guides, schedules,
questioning techniques, and communication theories.
Descriptive statistics used to analyze data for various
projects.
RHET 4431. Intersections of Scientific and Technical
Communication and Law. (3 cr. Prereq–[3562W, [jr or sr or
grad student]] or #)
Areas of law relevant to work/interests of
scientific/technical communicators. How emerging
issues in science/technology are affecting 21st
century practice of law. Ownership, access, ethics,
information and technology used to frame major
topics. Intellectual Property, privacy, health law, and
research practice.
RHET 4501. Usability and Human Factors in Technical
Communication. (3 cr. Prereq–Sr or grad student or #)
Principles/concepts of human factors/usability
testing. Developingobjectives, criteria, and
measures. Conducting tests in lab, field, andvirtual
environments. Using software programs to
analyzequalitative/quantitative data. Lab fee of $36
required for use of theUsability Services Laboratory
to conduct usability projects.
RHET 4561. Editing and Style for Technical
Communicators. (3 cr. Prereq–[3562, [STC major or grad
student]] or #)
Editorial process, style, and ethics for technical
subjects. Practice editing skills, cohesion, clarity,
coherence, organization, and target audiences for
print and online documents. Learn about the writereditor relationship, mark-up language, electronic
editing methods, techniques for editing illustrations
and Web content, and copyright issues.
RHET 4562. Theory and Practice in International Business
Communication. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq–3562W or equiv)
Theories/practice in international/intercultural
scientific, technical, and business communication.
Cultural metaphors, research studies. Interviewing
people from other cultures, including international
business managers. Case studies.
RHET 4573W. Writing Proposals and Grant Management.
(3 cr; A-F only. Prereq–3562W)
Research funding sources. Interpreting an RFP or
program announcement. Letters of intent. Grant
preparation following guidelines of an RFP or
program announcement. Proposals for nonprofits
or research/business proposals. Using Microsoft
Project.
Principles/history of rhetorical theory/criticism.
Emphasizes classical theories, especially “Aristotle’s
Rhetoric.” Apply Aristotelian concepts to examples
of contemporary communication. Relationship of
classical theory to scientific discourse, technical
communication.
For definitions of course numbers, symbols, and abbreviations, see page 300.
Course Descriptions
RHET 1910W. Topics: Freshman Seminar. (3 cr. Prereq–Fr)
543
Course Descriptions
RHET 4662W. Emerging Technologies in Scientific and
Technical Communication. (4 cr; A-F only. Prereq–3562 or
equiv)
Creating multimedia, hypertext, online help, and
internet documents. Linear/nonlinear design, linking,
reading/editing online. Principles of technical
communication taught through projects: scripts,
online support, mark-up language.
RHET 5001. Introduction to Graduate Studies in Scientific
and Technical Communication . (3 cr. Prereq–Jr or sr or grad
student)
History of technical communication. Different
audiences, purposes, genres, and emerging trends.
International/intercultural issues. Students participate
within a community of technical communication
professionals.
RHET 5111. Information Design: Theory and Practice I. (3
cr; A-F only. Prereq–Grad student or #)
Audience analysis, media selection, message design
through various theoretical perspectives, including
cognitive/schema, social construction, feminist,
intercultural theories. Usability testing, contextual
inquiry as means to study effectiveness of messages.
RHET 5112. Information Design: Theory and Practice II. (3
cr; A-F only. Prereq–Grad student or #)
Political, economic, social, and technical aspects of
media selection and message design. Media analyses,
scripts, budgets, treatments, project-design plans,
interactive screens. Online design project.
RHET 5196. Internship in Scientific and Technical
Communication. (3-6 cr [max 6 cr]; S-N only. Prereq–STC
grad or #)
Internship sites may include the University, industry,
or government agencies. An internship proposal,
progress report, internship journal (optional),
and final report with a letter from the internship
supervisor are required.
RHET 5270. Special Topics. (1-3 cr [max 3 cr]; A-F only.
Prereq–[[STC or RSTC] [major or grad student]], #)
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
RHET 5291. Independent Study. (1-3 cr [max 3 cr]. Prereq–#,
∆)
Supervised reading/research on advanced projects
not covered in regularly scheduled offerings.
RHET 5511. Research in Scientific and Technical
Communication. (3 cr; A-F only)
Experimental/survey research techniques for
quantitative/qualitative methodologies in scientific/
technical communication. Face-to-face, phone, focus
group interviewing. Questionnaire development,
contextual inquiry. Using rating, ranking, q-sort
methods. Ethics, experimental bias, inferential
statistical analysis.
RHET 5531. Scientific and Technical Communication
Course Development and Pedagogy I. (2 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–Grad)
544
Pedagogical philosophy/methodology in beginning
writing, speaking, and technical communication
class. Introduction to theories underlying teaching/
tutoring with technology.
RHET 5532. Scientific and Technical Communication
Course Development and Pedagogy II. (1 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–5531 or #)
Mentor with faculty, usually concurrently with
student’s first teaching assignment. Student shares
observations, solves teaching problems in seminar
setting. Issues facing new teachers. Developing a
philosophy of teaching. Focuses on evaluating work
in classroom.
RHET 5534. Designing Technical Training for Intercultural
Audiences. (3 cr; A-F only)
Select and research a training topic, write learning
objectives and outcomes, set the conditions for
learning, complete a comprehensive course outline,
and one training module.
RHET 5664. Science Writing for Popular Audiences. (3 cr;
A-F only. Prereq–RHET 3562 or #)
How science is “translated” for popular audiences.
Rhetorical theory used to critique popularized
articles. Developing a heuristic for writing articles.
Controversial issues surrounding movement from
science as “science” to science as “popular.”
RHET 5671. Visual Rhetoric. (3 cr. Prereq–Jr or sr or grad
student)
Range/development of visuals, especially those in
science/technology. Vocabulary for commenting on,
criticizing, and creating visuals.
RHET 5775. Major Figures in Rhetorical Tradition:
Classical Period. (3 cr)
Classical theories of rhetoric. Epistemological status
of rhetoric. Ethical implications of persuasion.
Emphasizes “Aristotle’s Rhetoric” as founding
document. Other figures (e.g., Plato, Isocrates,
Cicero, Quintilian).
RHET 5776. Major Figures in Rhetorical Tradition: Modern
Era. (3 cr; A-F only)
Aristotelian rhetoric in modern era. Fancis Bacon,
scientific revolution. George Campbell, rise of
human sciences. Kenneth Burke, semiotics in
twentieth century. Perelman/Olbrechts-Tyteca,
reconciliation with philosophy.
Russian (RUSS)
Institute of Linguistics, ESL, and Slavic Languages
and Literatures
College of Liberal Arts
RUSS 3311. Russian Major Project. (3 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–Advanced Russian major)
Directed research and writing in student’s chosen
field.
RUSS 3311H. Honors Major Project in Russian. (3-4 cr [max
4 cr]; A-F only. Prereq–Credit will not be granted if credit has
been received for RUSS 3311, RUSS 3312; Russ maj, #)
Directed research/writing in student’s chosen field.
RUSS 3404. Tolstoy in Translation. (3 cr. §RUSS 5404)
Novels, stories, and philosophical writings of Leo
Tolstoy.
RUSS 3407. Stories and Plays of Anton Chekhov in
Translation. (3 cr. §RUSS 5407)
Study of literary devices and themes in selected
stories and major plays using the intrinsic approach.
RUSS 3409. 19th-Century Russian Novel. (3 cr. §RUSS
5409)
The Russian realistic novel from origin to decline.
Social, political, and intellectual circumstances that
led to its emergence as the dominant genre of the
“age of realism” in Russia.
RUSS 3411. Dostoevsky in Translation. (3 cr. §RUSS 5411)
Novels, stories, and miscellaneous writings of
Fyodor Dostoevsky.
RUSS 3421. Literature: Middle Ages to Dostoevsky in
Translation. (3 cr. §RUSS 5421)
Russian literature from about 1000 A.D. to mid-19th
century; emphasizing writers of the first half of the
19th century.
RUSS 3422. Literature: Tolstoy to the Present in
Translation. (3 cr. §RUSS 5422)
RUSS 1101. Beginning Russian I. (5 cr)
Listening, speaking, reading, writing.
Survey of Russian literature from mid-19th century
to the present: realism, modernism, feminism and
other trends.
RUSS 1102. Beginning Russian II. (5 cr. Prereq–1101 or
equiv)
RUSS 3512. Russian Art and Culture from Peter I to the
Present. (3 cr)
Listening, speaking, reading, writing.
RUSS 1304W. Introduction to Russian Literature: 19thCentury Fiction. (3 cr)
Introduction to the study of literature illustrated by
materials drawn from Russian literature of the 19th
century.
RUSS 1905. Freshman Seminar. (3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F only)
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
RUSS 3001. Intermediate Russian I. (5 cr. Prereq–1102 or
equiv)
Conversation, composition, grammar review,
translation, readings in literature.
RUSS 3002. Intermediate Russian II. (5 cr. Prereq–3001 or
equiv)
Expansion of experience in speaking, reading, and
understanding Russian. Reading contemporary texts.
RUSS 3101. Advanced Russian I. (4 cr. Prereq–3002 or
equiv)
Advanced grammar, conversation, composition, and
reading.
RUSS 3102. Advanced Russian II. (4 cr. Prereq–3101 or
equiv)
Advanced grammar, conversation, composition, and
reading.
RUSS 3104. Introduction to Literary Analysis. (3 cr.
Prereq–3002 or equiv)
Reading and analysis of poetry and prose selections
to understand rudiments of studying Russian
literature. Readings are in Russian.
RUSS 3105. Russian Poetry and Prose. (3 cr. Prereq–3002)
Appreciation of literary values through stylistic
analysis and literary interpretation; analysis of
humanistic elements. Readings in Russian.
RUSS 3211. Modern Russian Literature in Translation.
(3 cr. §RUSS 5211)
Literary, cultural, and political significance of
modern Russian literary works.
Major trends in Russian visual arts discussed in the
context of pertinent social, political, and ideological
questions.
RUSS 3601. Methods of Translating Fiction from Russian
to English. (3 cr. Prereq–§: 5601; 3102 or equiv)
Learning to appreciate a variety of literary styles
through the experience of translation.
RUSS 3900. Topics in Russian Language, Literature, and
Culture. (1-4 cr [max 16 cr]. Prereq–1102 for language topics)
Variable topics in Russian language, literature and
culture. Consult department for details.
RUSS 3993. Directed Studies. (1-4 cr [max 4 cr]. Prereq–#,
∆, o)
Guided individual study.
RUSS 5021. Russia Study Tour. (6-18 cr [max 18 cr].
Prereq–3002 or equiv)
Study of Russian language & culture in an accredited
institution in Russia.
RUSS 5104. Introduction to Literary Analysis. (3 cr.
Prereq–3002 or equiv)
Reading and analysis of poetry and prose selections
to understand rudiments of studying Russian
literature. Readings are in Russian.
RUSS 5105. Russian Poetry and Prose. (3 cr. Prereq–3002
or equiv)
Appreciation of literary values through stylistic
analysis and literary interpretation; analysis of
humanistic elements. Readings in Russian.
RUSS 5211. Modern Russian Literature in Translation.
(3 cr. §RUSS 3211)
Literary, cultural, and political significance of
modern Russian literary works.
RUSS 5404. Tolstoy in Translation. (3 cr. §RUSS 3404)
Novels, stories, and philosophical writings of Leo
Tolstoy.
RUSS 5407. Stories and Plays of Anton Chekhov in
Translation. (3 cr. §RUSS 3407)
Study of literary devices and themes in selected
stories and major plays using the intrinsic approach.
Course Descriptions
RUSS 5409. 19th-Century Russian Novel. (3 cr. §RUSS
3409)
SCAN 3011. Readings in Scandinavian Languages. (4 cr.
Prereq–[DAN or Nor or SWED][1004 or 4004] or #)
RUSS 5411. Dostoevsky in Translation. (3 cr. §RUSS 3411)
SCAN 3501W. Scandinavian Culture Past and Present.
(3 cr)
Investigation of issues important to women as
articulated by Scandinavian women writers.
Historical overview of women.s writing in
Scandinavia and in-depth investigation of texts
by contemporary women writers. All readings in
translation.
SCAN 3502. Scandinavian Myths. (3 cr)
Topic may focus on a specific author, group of
authors, genre, period, or subject matter. Topics
specified in Class Schedule. Readings in English for
nonmajors. May meet with 5670.
Novels, stories, and other writings of Fyodor
Dostoevsky.
RUSS 5421. Literature: Middle Ages to Dostoevsky in
Translation. (3 cr. §RUSS 3421)
Russian literature from about 1000 A.D. to mid-19th
century; emphasizing writers of the first half of the
19th century.
RUSS 5422. Literature: Tolstoy to the Present in
Translation. (3 cr. §RUSS 3422)
Survey of Russian literature from mid-19th century
to the present: realism, modernism, feminism and
other trends.
RUSS 5601. Methods of Translating Fiction from Russian
to English. (3 cr. Prereq–§: 3601; 3102 or equiv)
Learning to appreciate a variety of literary styles
through the experience of translation.
RUSS 5900. Topics in Russian Language, Literature, and
Culture. (1-4 cr [max 3 cr]. Prereq–1102 for language topics)
Variable topics in Russian language, literature, and
culture.
RUSS 5993. Directed Studies. (1-4 cr [max 16 cr]. Prereq–#,
∆, o)
Guided individual study.
Sanskrit (SKT)
Department of Classical and Near Eastern Studies
College of Liberal Arts
SKT 5001. Beginning Sanskrit. (3 cr)
Introduction to the classical language of ancient
India.
Literary and cultural investigation of the popular
beliefs, myths, and religion of the medieval
Scandinavians; the interaction of paganism
and Christianity; the reflection of myths in Old
Scandinavian literature and art. All readings in
English.
Introduction to the classical language of ancient
India.
Readings in Sanskrit literature.
Readings in Sanskrit literature.
SKT 5710. Topics: Language and Literature. (3 cr)
Selected reading and/or study of linguistic problems
in Sanskrit.
SKT 5992. Directed Readings. (3 cr. Prereq–5202 or equiv)
Guided individual reading or study.
Scandinavian (SCAN)
Department of German, Scandinavian, and Dutch
College of Liberal Arts
SCAN 1201. Introduction to Scandinavia. (3 cr)
Five Scandinavian countries introduced through
literature, art, and film. Historical origins,
nationalism, European Union, welfare state,
environment, contemporary Scandinavian identity.
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
SCAN 1905. Topics: Freshman Seminar. (3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F
only. Prereq–Fr)
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
SCAN 1909W. Topics: Freshman Seminar. (3 cr [max 6 cr];
A-F only. Prereq–Freshman)
SCAN 4602. Fiction and Film. (3 cr)
SCAN 3504. The Immigrant Experience. (3 cr)
SCAN 4614. Introduction to Kierkegaard. (3 cr)
SCAN 3505. Scandinavian Fiction From 1890 to Present.
(3 cr)
SCAN 5501. Scandinavian Mythology. (3 cr)
Issues of origin and language, immigration and
settlement, traditions and values, culture and politics,
and transgressions of boundaries from the old to the
new studied through photos, diaries, letters, stories,
and novels by Moberg, Rølvaag, Ager, and other
pioneers. All readings in translation.
Modernity’s search for new forms to represent
changing historical situations. Ibsen, Strindberg,
Hamsun, Selma Lagerlöf, Hjalmar Bergman, Pär
Lagerkvist, Karen Blixen, Moa Martinson, Tarjei
Vesaas, Edith Södergran, Ingmar Bergman, Lars
Gustafsson. All readings in translation.
Major literary works from the Middle Ages to the
present. Readings in translation.
SCAN 3602. The Literary Fairy Tale in Scandinavia. (3 cr)
Short stories by important 19th- and 20th-century
authors from all the five Scandinavian countries.
Genre theory and practical criticism. Readings in
English for non-majors.
SCAN 3612. Images of Scandinavia in Art, Film, and
Literature. (3 cr)
Images of Scandinavia(ns) in art, film, and literature
by both Scandinavians and foreigners. Images of
self-knowledge, self-revelation, and otherness.
Representative photos and videos of people,
locations, and styles. Readings in English.
SCAN 3613. Children’s Literature in Scandinavia. (3 cr)
Analysis and discussion of representative works
in Scandinavian children.s literature from picture
books to young adult books using a variety of critical
methods of interpretation. Taught in English.
SCAN 3618. Scandinavian Drama. (3 cr)
SCAN 1904. Topics: Freshman Seminar. (3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F
only. Prereq–Freshman)
Guided individual reading and study.
Literary and folkloristic investigation of
Scandinavian folktales and legends. Readings in
translation for nonmajors.
SCAN 3605. The Scandinavian Short Story. (3 cr)
SKT 5202. Intermediate Sanskrit. (3 cr)
SCAN 3993. Directed Studies. (1-4 cr [max 12 cr]. Prereq–#,
∆, o)
SCAN 3503. Scandinavian Folklore. (3 cr)
Examples of literary fairytales from Scandinavia,
especially Hans Christian Andersen. Readings in
translation for non-majors.
SKT 5201. Intermediate Sanskrit. (3 cr. Prereq–5002 or
equiv)
SCAN 3670. Topics in Scandinavian Studies. (3 cr [max
9 cr])
Examines film adaptations of classical Scandinavian
literary texts and explores similarities and differences
between the viewer.s and reader.s experiences in the
media of film, drama and epic narration. Includes
works by Blixen, Hamsun, Ibsen, Strindberg, Axel,
Bergman, Dreyer and Losey.
SCAN 3601. Great Literary Works of Scandinavia. (3 cr)
SKT 5002. Beginning Sanskrit. (3 cr. Prereq–5001 or equiv)
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
Cultural, social, and political developments;
principal views and core values; major cultural
figures; Scandinavian mentality. Readings in
translation for nonmajors. Invited lectures on central
topics within selected areas of study.
The literary, philosophical, theological, and
psychological dimensions of Kierkegaard’s work.
Kierkegaard’s influence on 20th-century culture in
general and existentialism in particular. Analysis and
discussion of selections from Kierkegaard’s entire
oeuvre. Readings in English.
Study of Scandinavian mythology based on primary
sources represented by Saxo Grammaticus, Snorri
Sturluson.s Edda and Ynglinga Saga, and the Poetic
Edda. Myths are analyzed using contemporary
critical approaches. All readings in translation.
SCAN 5502. The Icelandic Saga. (3 cr)
Study of the sagas written in 13th-century Iceland.
Discussion includes cultural and historical
information about medieval Iceland and analysis of
a selection of saga texts using contemporary critical
approaches. All readings in translation.
SCAN 5613. Contemporary Scandinavian Literature. (3 cr)
An investigation of issues which emerged as
extremely important after 1945 in Scandinavia, as
articulated by writers and analyzed by researchers in
social sciences. All readings in translation.
SCAN 5615. Ibsen and the Beginnings of Modern Drama.
(3 cr)
Close reading of Ibsen.s .modern tragedies. from
A Doll.s House (1879) to When We Dead Awaken
(1899). Focus is on the dialectics between Ibsen
and his society, and dramatic structure and staging
conventions in the context of modern theater.
Readings in English for nonmajors.
SCAN 5616. STRINdberg and the Drama in Revolt and
Change. (3 cr)
Strindberg as the master of naturalistic drama and the
precursor of modernity in European and American
theater. Close reading of plays with emphasis on
dramatic structure and staging conventions in the
context of modern theater. All readings in English for
nonmajors.
Study of representative plays by Henrik Ibsen,
August Strindberg, Hjalmar Bergman, Pär
Lagerkvist, Nordahl Grieg, Kjeld Abell, and Ingmar
Bergman in the context of modern theater with
emphasis on politics and society. All readings in
translation.
SCAN 5670. Topics in Scandinavian Studies. (3 cr [max
9 cr])
SCAN 3619. Travel in Literature. (3 cr)
Acquisition of a reading knowledge of Old Norse;
linguistic, philological and literary study of Old
Norse language and literature.
Experiences in literature of Scandinavians going
abroad, foreigners coming to Scandinavia. Culture/
travel as self-knowledge, self-revelation, otherness.
Slides/videos of travel destinations from literature.
Readings in English.
Topic may focus on a specific author, group of
authors, genre, period, or subject matter. Topics
specified in Class Schedule. Readings in English for
nonmajors. May meet with 3670.
SCAN 5701. Old Norse Language and Literature. (3 cr)
SCAN 5704. History of the Scandinavian Languages. (3 cr)
Investigation of the development of the Scandinavian
languages from the earliest periods to the present.
For definitions of course numbers, symbols, and abbreviations, see page 300.
Course Descriptions
Reading/composition in Danish, Norwegian, and
Swedish for advanced proficiency. Introduction to
differences between the three languages.
The Russian realistic novel from origin to decline;
social, political, and intellectual circumstances that
led to its emergence as the dominant genre of the
“age of realism” in Russia.
SCAN 3634. Scandinavian Women Writers. (3 cr)
545
Course Descriptions
SCAN 5710. Topics in Old Norse Literature. (3 cr [max 9 cr].
Prereq–5701 or equiv)
Topic may focus on Old Norse prose or poetry.
Primary texts read in Old Norse. Critical literature
about texts, medieval Icelandic culture in English.
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
SCAN 5993. Directed Studies. (1-4 cr [max 12 cr]. Prereq–#,
∆, o)
Guided individual reading and study.
Slavic (SLAV)
Institute of Linguistics, ESL, and Slavic Languages
and Literatures
College of Liberal Arts
SLAV 5900. Topics in Slavic Languages and Literatures.
(3 cr)
SW 5107. Child Welfare Policy. (3 cr. §PA 5411. Prereq–Grad
or #)
SW 3705. Gender Violence in Global Perspective. (3 cr)
SW 5309. Case Management with Special Populations.
(3 cr. Prereq–Grad or non-degree-seeking student or #)
Family violence across lifespan. History, current
theories, research, and policies in child maltreatment
and family violence. Theories, research, and policies
on violence against women (battering, sexual assault,
stalking), child maltreatment (physical/sexual abuse,
emotional abuse, neglect), and abuse of vulnerable
adults (elderly, non-elderly vulnerable populations).
Theories/research on violence in intimate domestic
relationships examined through multiple lenses.
Overview of interventions in Minnesota, United
States, and other societies.
SW 3810. Special Topics. (1-4 cr [max 10 cr]; A-F only)
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
SW 4001. Basic Counseling and Interviewing Skills in the
Social Work Helping Process. (1 cr; A-F only)
School of Social Work
Development/maintenance of a social worker-client
helping relationship. Professional values and ethics.
Interviewing skills of active listening, empathy,
and authenticity. Identifying purpose, roles, and
responsibilities through asking questions, reflecting,
and clarifying.
College of Education and Human
Development
SW 4002. Advanced Counseling and Interviewing Skills
in the Social Work Helping Process. (1 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–4001 or #)
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
Social Work (SW)
SW 1001. Introduction to the World of Social Work: A
Global Perspective. (3 cr)
Varied dimensions of social work, locally, nationally,
and internationally. Origins/emergence of social
work as a profession. Effects of worldwide
economic/social oppression. Human behavior and
the social environment. Child/adult social welfare
theories. Policies, programs. Health and mental
health. Care at end of life cycle.
SW 1905. Freshman Seminar. (1-3 cr [max 6 cr]. Prereq–Fr)
Interdisciplinary seminar. Topics specified in Class
Schedule.
SW 2501W. Introduction to Social Justice. (4 cr)
Meanings of social justice. Ways in which social
justice advocates work for social change. Focuses
on three areas: criminal justice, globalization, and
social welfare. Students do service learning in a
social justice organization.
SW 3051. Cultural Diversity and the Helping Process. (3 cr)
Ethno-cultural concepts relevant to service delivery.
Cross-ethnic issues, practice considerations in human
services, issues that produce barriers to services for
diverse racial/cultural client groups.
SW 3101. Interventions in Community and Social Policy.
(3 cr)
Applying social work skills and values to community
organization, social action, and social problems using
an ecological framework.
SW 3203. Interventions with Individuals and Groups. (3 cr)
546
SW 3701. Introduction to Child Maltreatment and Family
Violence. (3 cr)
Using an ecological framework, apply social work
skills and values to work with individuals and small
groups
SW 3301. GLBT Social Movements. (3 cr. §GLBT 3301)
Development of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and
transgender (GLBT) social movement historically.
Current state of GLBT movement. Readings draw
on social movement theory, and GLBT Studies.
Interdisciplinary course with classroom and
community service learning.
SW 3402. Child Abuse and Neglect: Intervention and
Prevention. (3 cr)
Interdisciplinary/comprehensive study of child
maltreatment, family violence today. Prevalence,
scope, dynamics. Response/preventative strategies
for individual, familial, community analysis.
SW 3501. Theories and Practices of Social Change
Organizing. (4 cr)
Concepts, theories, and practices of social change
organizing. U.S. power relations. Focuses on how
people organize to make a difference. Cross-class,
multi-racial, and multi-issue organizing. Students do
service learning in a social justice organization.
Builds on 4001. Focuses on assessment and on
developing reasonable, measurable, and attainable
goals. Working with involuntary clients, goal
attainment strategies, evaluating progress, and
ending.
SW 4501. Senior Seminar in Social Justice. (4 cr.
Prereq–2501, 3501)
Capstone course. Students complete a social justice
portfolio, do service learning in a social justice
organization.
SW 4693. Directed Studies. (1-10 cr [max 10 cr]. Prereq–#)
Guided individual reading or study related to social
issues, social work methods, or social work history.
SW 4694. Directed Research. (1-10 cr [max 10 cr]. Prereq–#)
Guided research related to social issues, social work
methods, or social work history.
SW 5051. Human Behavior and the Social Environment.
(2-3 cr [max 3 cr]; A-F only. Prereq–Grad student or 8 cr social
sciences or #)
Social, psychological, biological, and cultural factors
of individual and group development as applied
to social work practice. Behavior and life-cycle
development focusing on diversity and each stage of
life. Discuss development in terms of the individual,
and in terms of overlapping social systems such as
the multigenerational family, culture, community,
and society.
SW 5052. Ecologies of Child Development Within
Communities of Color. (3 cr. Prereq–Grad or #)
Examine social, affective, and cognitive
development of children of color via a life course,
ecological systems framework. Family, school, peers,
and community are studied as ecological contexts
which influence developmental trajectories for these
children and youth. Attention is given to poverty,
racism, and oppression.
SW 5101. Historical Origins and Contemporary Policies
and Programs in Social Welfare. (3-4 cr [max 4 cr]; A-F only.
Prereq–Grad or 8 sem cr of social sciences)
Contemporary policies and programs in social
welfare are examined in light of their historical
origins and evolution. A framework is then
developed for analysis of concepts and principles
in contemporary social policy for social welfare
programs and services. The emergence of the
profession of social work also examined.
SW 5105. Women and Public Policy. (3 cr)
Study of feminist organizations; issues and conflicts
within organizations and movements; methods and
sources for studying feminism.
Examine the intersection of conceptual orientations
of developmental psychology with policies that
affect children and families. Demographic, historic,
and social trends underlying the assumptions that
drive policies directed at women and children;
projections of future policies.
Examine concepts and principles of case
management practice with special populations
such as older adults, persons with developmental
disabilities, and persons with serious and
persistent mental illness. The core functions of
case management practice in a range of settings
are addressed in relationship to issues of diversity,
vulnerability, and empowerment.
SW 5313. Social Work with Older Adults. (2 cr. Prereq–Grad
or non-degree-seeking student or #)
The practice components of social work with older
adults including assessment, intervention, and case
management. Taught from the perspective of biopsycho-social strengths and challenges and within
the context of current social policy and delivery
systems.
SW 5314. Social Work in the Schools. (2 cr. Prereq–Grad or
non-degree-seeking student or #)
Application of social work methods in a school
setting. Emphasizes assessment, diagnosis,
consultation, advocacy, interdisciplinary team
building, and crisis intervention.
SW 5315. Social Work Practice in Hospitals and Health
Care Settings. (2 cr. Prereq–Grad or non-degree-seeking
student or #)
Prepares students for social work practice in a
hospital or health care setting. Focus on integration
of conceptual and practice subject matter that
covers differential assessment, clinical intervention
models, impact of acute and chronic illness, special
populations, managed care, legal and ethical issues,
interdisciplinary team work, and transition planning
in health care.
SW 5316. Brief Treatment and the Task-Centered
Approach. (2 cr. §SW 8303. Prereq–§: 8303; grad or nondegree-seeking student or #)
The advent and current prominence of brief
treatment models in work with individuals, families,
and groups including their theoretical and empirical
bases. Practice with diverse populations in a context
of managed care. Emphasis on the task-centered
approach including skill training and supervised
practice.
SW 5317. Social Work With Involuntary Clients. (2 cr.
Prereq–Grad or non-degree-seeking student or #)
Includes theory, ethics, effectiveness, and
intervention methods for work with client systems
that experience involuntary contact with a social
worker. Interventions at micro, mezzo, and macro
levels are included. Practice in varied settings
such as child welfare, mental health, corrections,
and public schools as well as practice related to
organizational responses to change.
SW 5318. Family Centered Home Based Services. (2 cr.
§SW 8314. Prereq–§: 8314; grad or non-degree-seeking
student or #)
Ecological, multisystems approach focusing on
the family system. Triadic theory, meta-neutrality,
strengths-focus, case management and team
treatment. Family-based services evaluated for highrisk, multi-problem families and as an alternative to
foster placement.
SW 5319. Adolescents: Norms, Culture, and Health. (2 cr)
Relationships among familial, social, societal,
political, economic, environmental, psychosocial,
and cultural determinants of adolescent behavior
that affect health; major public health issues and
problems of adolescents.
Course Descriptions
Foundation of research/theory for level I child abuse
prevention studies certificate.
SW 5482. Child Abuse Prevention II: Program
Development, Evaluation, and Advocacy. (3 cr.
Prereq–5481)
Design and evaluation of policies and programs
of interventions to prevent child abuse. This is the
second course in the Level I Child Abuse Certificate
program.
SW 5483. Child Abuse Prevention III: Skill Building
I— Cultural and Legal Issues. (3 cr. Prereq–Bachelor’s
degree or #)
SOC 3201. Inequality: Introduction to Stratification. (3 cr.
Prereq–[1001 or equiv], [soc majors must register A-F])
Mentally ill, chemically abusive, or dependent
clients. Intervention, advocacy, education, and
support for client and those who are part of his
or her environment. Social, environmental, and
multicultural factors. Meets partial state requirements
for becoming licensed as an alcohol/drug counselor.
Causes, dimensions, and consequences of inequality
in American society. Class, gender, race. Power/
status differentials. Cross-national patterns of
inequality. Social mobility. Educational/occupational
influences. Status attainment. Social stratification
and change. Social welfare. Public policies affecting
inequality.
SW 5810. Seminar: Special Topics. (1-4 cr [max 10 cr])
SOC 3211W. American Race Relations. (3 cr; A-F only)
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
SW 5811. Social Work Ethics. (2 cr. Prereq–§: 8801, grad
student or non-degree seeking student or #)
Risk factors, protective factors, resilience in cultural
settings. Identifying/designing strategies appropriate
to cultural characteristics. First course for level II
child abuse prevention certification.
SW 5484. Child Abuse Prevention IV: Skill Building II—
Risk Assessment and Interviewing. (3 cr. Prereq–Bachelor’s
degree or #)
Designing instruments for child abuse risk
assessment. Culturally/ethnically competent
interviewing. Ethnographic interviewing. Strengthsbased ecosystemic assessment. Strategies for
evaluating interventions. Second course for level II
child abuse prevention certification.
SW 5519. Mediation and Conflict Resolution. (3 cr.
Prereq–§8519)
Develop mediator skills for making informed
decisions regarding the appropriateness of mediation
for conflicts that frequently confront social worker
practitioners such as divorce, neighborhood disputes,
conflicts between parents and adolescents, conflicts
between spouses, and conflicts between crime
victims and offenders.
SW 5525. Global Perspectives on Social Welfare, Peace,
and Justice. (3 cr. Prereq–2001 or #)
Role of international social welfare in meeting basic
human needs and promoting human rights, social
justice, and peace. Theories, models, and social
policies in different economic and political systems
with emphasis on Third World nations.
SW 5705. Violence in Families. (3 cr. Prereq–§: 5707; grad
student or adult special or#)
Prevention/intervention with perpetrators, survivors,
and social institutions. Perpetration, effects on
victims, social responses to family violence. Child
abuse/neglect. Abuse of women/vulnerable adults.
Roles of gender, race, culture, age, physical ability,
and sexual orientation.
SW 5706. Issues and Interventions in Child Sexual Abuse.
(2 cr. Prereq–Grad student or adult special or #)
Major issues/interventions in child sexual abuse.
Working with sexually abused children and their
families. Perceptions of victims, non-offending
parents, perpetrators, and other family members.
Interviewing. Justice system. Child protection.
Acquire knowledge base and develop skills required
to identify ethical issues, resolve ethical dilemmas,
and make ethical decisions within the context of the
professional practice of social work. Values base
and ethical standards of the profession and ethical
decision-making models examined in-depth.
SW 5813. Child Welfare and the Law. (2 cr. Prereq–2nd yr
MSW or advanced standing or #)
Social work practice in juvenile court. Child abuse/
neglect reporting laws, risk assessment, reasonable
efforts, case plan, custody proceedings, permanency
planning, termination of parental rights, child
testimony, social worker testimony, adoption laws.
SW 5991. Independent Study in Social Work. (1-4 cr [max
4 cr])
Independent study in areas of special interest to
students and faculty.
Sociology (SOC)
Department of Sociology
College of Liberal Arts
SOC 1001. Introduction to Sociology. (4 cr. §SOC 1011V,
SOC 1012W)
Scientific study of human societies/behavior. Major
theories, methods, concepts, research findings.
Characteristics of basic social units, their patterns of
interrelation, processes of change.
SOC 1011H. Honors: Introduction to Sociology. (4 cr. §SOC
1001, SOC 1012W. Prereq–Honors)
Scientific study of human societies/behavior. Major
theories, methods, concepts, research findings.
Characteristics of basic social units, their patterns of
interrelation, processes of change.
SW 5708. Substance Abuse and Social Work. (3 cr.
Prereq–Grad or non-degree seeking student or #)
Assessment and intervention in situations involving
substance abuse with special emphasis on cross
cultural practice. Relationships of substance abuse
to areas such as child welfare, mental illness, and
violence within families are examined.
Categories of psychoactive drugs. Medications to
treat mental disorders. Legal drugs such as alcohol,
nicotine, cocaine, and marijuana. What is occurring
physiologically when someone takes a psychoactive
drug.
SOC 3221. Sociology of Gender. (3 cr; A-F only. §WOST 3201.
Prereq–1001 or #)
Organization, culture, and dynamics of gender
relations as major features of social life. Gender and
racial inequalities in the workplace, relationships
between gender and race, gender and culture,
sexuality, gendered politics, and the women’s
movement.
SOC 3251W. Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and
Gender. (3 cr; A-F only. §AFRO 3251W)
Race, class, and gender as aspects of social identity
and as features of social organization. Experiences
of women of color in the United States; exploration
of family life, work, violence, sexuality and
reproduction, and the possibilities for social change.
SOC 3301W. Politics and Society. (3 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–1001 or #)
Ideas of citizenship. Relationship between politics
and society. Public sphere and civil society. Research
practicum volunteering at a policy-relevant site using
participant observation methods.
SOC 3322W. Social Movements, Protests, and Change.
(3 cr. Prereq–1001 or #)
Origins, dynamics, and consequences of social
movements. Challenges facing movement
organizations. Relationship between movements and
political institutions. Role of movements in bringing
about social change. Theoretical issues, case studies.
SOC 3411W. Organizations and Society. (3 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–1001 or #)
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
SOC 3003. Social Problems. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq–1001
or #)
SOC 3415. Sociology of Consumer Behavior. (3 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–1001 or #)
SOC 1905. Freshman Seminar. (3 cr. Prereq–Freshman or
less than 30 credits)
SOC 3090. Topics in Sociology. (3 cr. Prereq–[1001, soph or
above] or #; Soc majors must register A-F)
Current theories, research, and evaluation of
interventions with battered women and their families.
Focus on practice, e.g., direct work with social
institutions, victim-survivors, and assailants and their
families.
Surveys conceptual and theoretical tools sociologists
use to study race relations in the United States.
Empirical focus on the historical experiences among
different racial/ethnic groups in the United States
including, American Indians, African-Americans,
Latinos, Asian-Americans, and white ethnics.
Formal organizations as major social influences in
work lives, personality development, social change,
and conflict. Life-course analysis of enterprises,
bureaucracies, and voluntary organizations.
Organizational control, conflict, coordination, and
interorganizational sets/relationships.
Analysis of major social problems including,
inequality, crime, drug abuse, pollution, racism,
among others. Examination of proposed solutions
and evaluation of policy consequences.
SW 5707. Interventions with Battered Women and Their
Families. (2 cr. Prereq–§: 5705; grad or non-degree-seeking
student or #)
SW 5709. Applied Psychopharmacology for Human
Service Professionals. (2 cr; A-F only)
SW 5711. Co-Occurring Addictive and Mental Health
Disorders. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq–Cannot be taken for cr by
MSW students)
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
SOC 3093. Directed Study. (1-4 cr [max 4 cr]. Prereq–1001,
#, ∆, o)
Guided individual reading or study at the sophomore
level.
SOC 3094. Directed Research. (1-4 cr [max 4 cr].
Prereq–1001, #)
Guided research experience at the sophomore level.
SOC 3101. Introduction to the American Criminal Justice
System. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq–§SOC 3111)
Components, dynamics, and philosophical
underpinnings of criminal justice and agencies (law
enforcement, courts, corrections).
Behaviors related to symbolic value of material
goods: how symbols are created, acquired,
diffused, and used for organizing personal identity
and for maintaining group boundaries. Fashion.
Socialization. Structure of retail trade. Role of
mass media, advertising, marketing/production
strategies. Implications of world-wide markets for
manufacturing goods and selling them in retail
stores. Readings, classroom discussions, lectures.
SOC 3421W. Sociology of Work. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq–1001
or #)
Overview of sociological theories and empirical
research in study of work. Focuses on work in
contemporary American society. History, nature, and
organization of work and the U.S. economy. Social
aspects/consequences of work for individuals of
various races, ethnicities, genders, and ages. Current
topics.
SOC 3102. Introduction to Criminal Behavior and Social
Control. (3 cr. Prereq–Soc majors must register A-F)
Issues in science of crime as a social phenomenon.
Creation/use of laws, patterns/causes of crime.
For definitions of course numbers, symbols, and abbreviations, see page 300.
Course Descriptions
SW 5481. Child Abuse Prevention I: Research and Theory.
(3 cr. Prereq–Bachelor’s degree or #)
547
Course Descriptions
SOC 3451W. Cities and Social Change. (3 cr. Prereq–1001
or #)
Survey of social, economic, and cultural foundations
of modern city and its people, using theories/models
of urbanism from Wirth to Sassen. Migration/
ethnic enclaves. Racial segregation and social
control. Urban social movements. Urban-suburban
divide. Decline of urban liberalism. Contemporary
“Brazilianization” of the American city.
SOC 3452. Education and Society. (3 cr. Prereq–Soc majors
must register A-F)
Introduction to sociological theories/research about
education in modern societies. Effects of education
on beliefs/values. Effects of school characteristics
on student achievement and educational attainment.
Education and inequality. Cross-national differences
in educational systems. Link between education
and national economic performance. Organizational
characteristics of schooling. Prospects for school
reform.
SOC 3501. Sociology of Families. (3 cr. Prereq–1001 or #)
Families in contemporary American society.
Historical/cross-cultural comparisons.
Interrelationships of families with other social
institutions. Race, class, and gender in shaping
family experiences. Topics may include marriage,
divorce, childbearing, parenthood, family violence,
gay and lesbian families.
SOC 3511. World Population Problems. (3 cr. Prereq–1001
or #)
Population growth, natural resources, fertility/
mortality in less developed nations, population
dynamics/forecasts, policies to reduce fertility.
SOC 3613W. Food, Culture, and Society . (3 cr)
Food issues from a sociological perspective. Crosscultural differences in how groups/societies think
about and relate to food.
SOC 3661. Japan and the U.S.: Tides of Change in Race,
Class, and Gender. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq–1001 or courses on
or exper in East Asia or #)
Forms of social relations and values, religion,
childhood, family, community, education, work,
business organization, politics, social classes, crime
and deviance, police, popular culture, status of
women and minorities, social protest movements,
and international relations.
SOC 3701. Social Theory. (4 cr; A-F only. Prereq–1001 or #)
Traditions of social theory that have been basic to
sociological knowledge, how they have expanded
in contemporary theory, and their applications in
selected areas of empirical research.
SOC 3711. Principles of Social Organization. (3 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–1001 or equiv)
548
How and why social organization is possible.
Concepts and theories of social structure, primary
forms of social organization (groups, communities,
networks, formal organizations), basic social
processes (integration, differentiation, regulation,
change), and how social organization evolves from
individual decision making.
SOC 3721. Principles of Social Psychology. (3 cr.
Prereq–1001 or #)
Impact of social location on individual attitudes and
behaviors, dynamics of interpersonal relationships
and small groups, and processes of social interaction.
SOC 3801W. Sociological Research Methods. (4 cr.
Prereq–[1001 or 1011V] or #, soc majors must register A-F)
Principles/practice of research design, sampling, data
collection including field observation/surveys. Data
management, analysis, and reporting of quantitative/
nonquantitative data. Ethics/administration in
sociological research. Lab.
SOC 3811. Basic Social Statistics. (4 cr. Prereq–GC 0731 or
intermediate algebr or #)
Descriptive statistics. Measures of central tendency,
deviation, association. Inferential statistics focusing
on probability and hypothesis testing. T-tests, Chisquare tests, variance analysis, bivariate regression.
Statistical software used to analyze sociological data.
SOC 4090. Topics in Sociology. (3 cr. Prereq–[1001, soph or
above] or #; Soc majors must register A-F)
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
SOC 4093. Directed Study. (1-4 cr [max 12 cr]. Prereq–#,
∆, o)
Guided individual reading or study at junior or senior
level.
SOC 4094W. Directed Research: Senior Project. (4 cr; A-F
only)
Guided research experience at junior/senior level.
SOC 4101W. Sociology of Law. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq–1001
or 3101 or 3102 or 3111 or #; 3701 recommended)
Sociological analysis of law/society. Why people
obey the law, social forces involved in creating law
(both civil and criminal), procedures of enforcement,
impact of law on social change.
SOC 4102. Criminology. (3 cr; A-F only. §SOC 4103.
Prereq–3101 or 3102 or 3111 or #)
Nature/types of crime. Problems in measuring
incidence/trends. Review of sociological theories of
crime causation. Implications for crime prevention/
control.
SOC 4103. Service-Learning in Criminology. (4 cr. §SOC
4102. Prereq–3102 or #; soc majors must register A-F)
Community-based work in areas of child/adolescent
development. Interventions for “at-risk” children
and for juvenile offenders with contemporary theory.
Research on criminal careers and on offending over
the life-course. Direct engagement with criminology
and with public responses to crime.
SOC 4105. Sociology of Punishment and Corrections. (3 cr;
A-F only. Prereq–3101 or 3102 or 3111 or #)
Advanced study of correctional strategies such as
prison, probation, and parole. Theories/structures of
diversion, probation, parole, and other community
corrections programs. U.S. penal policies/practices
compared with those in other countries.
SOC 4141. Juvenile Delinquency. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq–
3101 or 3102 or 3111 or #)
Childhood and delinquency. Measuring extent/
distribution of delinquent behavior. Applying
theories to relationships within family, school, and
peer group. Institutional responses to delinquency.
Evaluating programs for treatment, prevention, and
control.
SOC 4142. Juvenile Justice and Law. (3 cr. Prereq–[3101
or 3102 or 3111 or #], [jr or sr or grad student]; grad students
may register S/N)
Evolution of juvenile court. Organizational
relationships among court, police, and other
agencies. Policies regarding serious/status offenders.
Intake, diversion, pretrial detention, waiver to adult
court, sentencing. Conflicts over due process and
treatment objectives. Current movements to abolish
juvenile justice system.
SOC 4147. Sociology of Mental Illness. (3 cr. Prereq–1001
or 3101 or 3102 or 3111 or #)
Sociological theory/research related to definitions/
origins. Epidemiology, reaction patterns, use of
mental health services.
SOC 4148. Criminal Psychopathology. (3 cr. Prereq–Sr or
grad; grad students only may enroll S-N)
Psychiatric/psychological aspects of antisocial/
criminal behavior as related to issues faced in courts
and in criminal justice system.
SOC 4149. Killing. (3 cr. Prereq–Sr or grad; grad students only
may enroll S-N)
Sociological, legal, and psychological aspects
of diverse types of killing. The topic of .normal.
killings is contrasted with various pathological types.
Subtopics include: mentally disturbed killings, sexual
killings, killings within families, gang killings, and
terrorist killings.
SOC 4161. Criminal Law in American Society. (3 cr.
Prereq–3101 or 3102 or 3111 or #)
SOC 4108. Current Issues in Crime Control. (3 cr)
Selected current criminal justice policies examined
from perspective of courts, legislature, community,
and interest groups. Impact of criminal justice policy
changes on society and on social control agencies.
Purposes of criminal law and of principles of
criminal liability, justification, and excuse.
Applications to law of criminal homicide, sexual
assault, drugs, and crimes against property, public
order, and morals.
SOC 4109. Domestic Criminal Violence. (3 cr. Prereq–3101
or 3102 or 3111 or #)
SOC 4162. Criminal Procedure in American Society. (3 cr.
Prereq–3101 or 3102 or 3111 or #)
Survey of research on family violence within
criminological framework. Definition of domestic
violence. Empirical/theoretical approaches. Response
of social control agencies.
SOC 4111. Deviant Behavior. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq–3101 or
3102 or 3111 or #)
Definition/nature of deviant behavior. Social
processes associated with deviant careers and social
reintegration. Relationship of deviant behavior to
social control.
SOC 4114. Social Control of Women Offenders. (3 cr.
Prereq–3101 or 3102 or 3111 or #)
Historical/current explanations for female
criminality. Current trends in women.s participation
in crime and their treatment in the legal system.
SOC 4125. Policing American Society. (3 cr; A-F
only. Prereq–3101 or 3102 or 3111 or #; [4161, 4162]
recommended)
Police organizations/operations from social
science perspective. Formal/informal policing:
role/functions, legal bases, accountability/restraints,
community relations, use of force, illegal practices.
SOC 4135. Sociology of White-Collar Crime. (3 cr.
Prereq–3101 or 3102 or 3111 or #; Soc majors A-F only)
Causes/consequences of white-collar crime. Control
issues, including public perception, legislation,
criminal law responses (enforcement, sentencing,
punishment), and alternative control mechanisms.
How constitutional democracy balances need to
enforce criminal law and rights of individuals to be
free of unnecessary government intrusion.
SOC 4170. International Law and Cultural Change. (3 cr;
A-F only. Prereq–1001 or 3101 or 3102 or 3111 or #)
In a globalized world, which cultural values/practices
take precedence? Which are criticized, altered,
eliminated? What role does international law
play in these processes? Immigration, terrorism,
Americanization, structure of international legal
system.
SOC 4175. Law, Politics, and Inequality. (3 cr. Prereq–1001
or 3101 or 3102 or 3111 or #; soc major must register A-F)
Critically evaluates law as a resource that defines,
reinforces, and alters social relationships. Connection
between law and justice. Law seen from perspective
of class, race, or gender.
SOC 4190. Topics in Sociology With Law/Criminology/
Deviance Emphasis. (3 cr. Prereq–1001 or #)
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
SOC 4246. Sociology of Health and Illness. (3 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–One sociology course or #)
Health/illness in context of social, political,
economic, and cultural forces and of medical
knowledge. Social meanings of illness. How
people seek help for and manage their illnesses.
How doctors, nurses, and patients interact. Social
movements surrounding health.
SOC 4305. Society and the Environment: A Growing
Conflict. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq–1001 or environmental course
or #)
Societal causes and cures of ecological problems
such as global warming, species extinction, and
resource exhaustion.
Course Descriptions
How diversity/vitality of American religion shape
public life. How religious groups engage in political
action, foster understandings of democracy and styles
of civic participation, influence volunteering/service
activities, and form individuals views on issues such
as race, poverty, the family, and sexuality.
SOC 4311. Race, Class, and the Politics of Nature. (3 cr)
Global debates over how nature is produced,
consumed, degraded, sustained, and defended.
Analytics of race/class. Politics of North-South
relations.
SOC 4321. Sociology of Globalization: Culture, Norms, and
Organization. (3 cr; A-F only. §GLOS 4221. Prereq–1001 or #)
Globalization of organizations, political relations,
and culture. Dependency and world systems
theories. Growth of international nongovernmental
organizations and their impact on state policies
and civil society. Expansion of international norms
governing nation-state behavior. Globalization of
popular culture (e.g., movies, computer games).
Effects on societies/individuals.
Effects of spouses’ work experiences on the
family, organization of household work, adolescent
employment, occupational attainment; and changes
in work organizations related to the increasing
prevalence of female employment and dual-earner
families.
SOC 4461. Sociology of Ethnic and Racial Conflict. (3 cr.
Prereq–1001 or #)
Effects of ethnic migration and of social movements.
Construction of ethnic/national identities. Questions
of citizenship. Rise of transnational movements, how
they help shape racial/ethnic conflicts.
SOC 4521. Love, Sex, and Marriage. (3 cr)
Sociological approaches to intimate human
relationships. Love, romance, dating, and mate
selection. Sexuality, cohabitation, marriage, and
related public policy debates. Current U.S. practices
in historical/cross-cultural context.
SOC 4551. Sociology of Sexualities. (3 cr. Prereq–1001 or #;
soc majors must register A-F)
Social scientific approaches to sexual attitudes,
behaviors and identities. Taken-for-granted beliefs
about naturalness of various sexual phenomena. How
social forces shape people’s sexual lives. Focuses on
diversity of thought, behavior, and lived experience
of individuals with regard to sexuality.
SOC 4601. Comparative Social Structure. (3 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–1001 or #)
SOC 4681. Sociology of German Society. (3 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–1001 or #)
The making of German society; institutions in crossnational comparison (including family, education,
welfare state, social movements, law); and current
issues of German society.
SOC 4703. Contemporary American Culture. (3 cr.
Prereq–1001 or #)
Key changes in cultural life in the United States and
internationally. Theories that have been developed to
understand them. Topics may include work, family,
social movements, media and popular culture, and
politics.
Defining research problem. Collecting/selecting data.
Analyzing data. Writing report.
Research, readings, and instruction.
SOIL 4094. Directed Research. (1-7 cr [max 7 cr]. Prereq–#)
SOC 4977W. Senior Honors Proseminar I. (3 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–3701, 3801, 3811, 9 additional upper div sociology cr,
sr soc honors major, ∆)
Soil, landscape, and crop spatial variability. GIS,
DEM, GPS technologies. Variable rate machinery,
PA software, remote sensing. Geostatistics, sampling,
experimental designs. Precision integrated crop
management. Data acquisition, processing, and
management. Socio-economical and e-marketing
aspects.
Exploring contemporary research for senior thesis.
Guidance in defining a problem and reviewing prior
theory/research. Presentation/discussion with faculty
researchers.
SOC 4978W. Senior Honors Proseminar II. (3 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–[4977V or #], 3701, 3801, 3811, at least 9 additional
upper div soc cr, sr soc honors major, ∆)
SOC 5090. Topics in Sociology. (1-3 cr [max 9 cr].
Prereq–1001 or #)
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
SOC 5455. Sociology of Education. (3 cr. §EDPA 5041.
Prereq–1001 or equiv or #)
Structures and processes within educational
institutions. Links between educational organizations
and their social contexts, particularly as these relate
to educational change.
SOC 5811. Intermediate Social Statistics. (4 cr.
Prereq–3811 or equiv)
Measurement, theory of probability, and bivariate
statistics. Focus on multiple regression analyses of
sociological data. Primarily for first-year sociology
graduate students who need preparation for advanced
social statistics. Undergraduates preparing for
graduate programs may register upon availability.
Soil, Water, and Climate
(SOIL)
Department of Soil, Water, and Climate
College of Food, Agricultural and
Natural Resource Sciences
SOIL 1125. The Soil Resource. (4 cr. §SOIL 2125, SOIL 5125)
Comparative analysis of selected societies.
Application of comparative methods to explain
differences, similarities in social structure,
development, trends. Topics include, social class,
status, political economy, policies, social movements,
ethic identities, multicultures, demography. Methods
include network models, Boolean analysis.
SOIL 4093. Directed Study. (1-7 cr [max 20 cr]. Prereq–#)
Guided individual research for the sociology major’s
senior project requirement, conducted in conjunction
with enrollment in an upper division sociology
course.
Developing the methodology of senior project,
researching it, and writing the thesis. Students work
individually or in small groups in consultation with
seminar director and other faculty. Group discussion
of individual projects.
SOC 4441. Work-Family Links. (3 cr. Prereq–1001 or #)
SOC 4966W. Major-Project Seminar. (4 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–3701, 3801, 3811, 12 cr upper div sociology, ∆)
SOC 4967W. Advanced Senior Project Independent Study.
(1 cr; A-F only. Prereq–3701, 3801, 3811, 12 additional upper
div sociology cr, ∆)
Basic physical, chemical, and biological properties
of soil. Soil genesis classification and principles of
soil fertility. Soil survey information used to make a
land-use plan. WWW used for lab.
SOIL 2125. Basic Soil Science. (4 cr; A-F only. §SOIL 1125,
SOIL 5125. Prereq–CHEM 1011 or CHEM 1021 or equiv)
Basic physical, chemical, and biological properties
of soil. Soil genesis classification, principles of soil
fertility. Use of soil survey information to make
a land-use plan. WWW used for lab preparation
information.
SOIL 3416. Plant Nutrients in the Environment. (3 cr.
Prereq–2125)
Fundamental concepts in soil fertility and plant
nutrition. Discuss dynamics of mineral elements
in soil, plants, and the environment. Evaluation,
interpretation, and correction of plant nutrient
problems.
Research under the direction of department faculty.
SOIL 4111. Introduction to Precision Agriculture. (3 cr;
A-F only. Prereq–§: MAST 2420; Basic sciences, statistics, soil,
Agronomy)
SOIL 4505. Soil Geography: Soil Variability on Planet
Earth. (2 cr. Prereq–1125 or 2125 or equiv)
Distribution/formation of soils on earth’s surface.
Soil variability/taxonomy. How various soils interact
with water, plants, microorganisms, and pollutants.
Use/management of land via appreciation of earth’s
varied soil resources.
SOIL 4511. Field Study of Soils. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq–2125)
Learn to write soil profile descriptions in the field.
Class requires hands-on experience to determine soil
texture, color, and horizon designations in the field.
SOIL 5005. Lab and Field Techniques in Soil Science. (2 cr
§SOIL 4005. Prereq–2125)
Field/lab experiences for analysis of soils/landscapes.
Students describe soils along a hillslope sequence,
take soil samples, and perform a suite of chemical,
biological, and physical soil analyses. Lab analytical
techniques, safety, quality control issues.
SOIL 5111. Practicum Internship in Precision Agriculture.
(2-5 cr [max 5 cr]; S-N only)
Practical experience in precision agriculture in agriindustry/business. Content and extent of work at the
internship site is jointly decided by the instructor,
host business representative, and student’s principal
adviser.
SOIL 5125. Soil Science for Teachers. (3 cr. §SOIL 1125,
SOIL 2125)
Basic physical, chemical, and biological properties of
soil. Soil genesis classification and principles of soil
fertility. WWW used for lab. Soil survey information
used to make a land-use plan. Similar to 2125 with
less emphasis on chemistry.
SOIL 5232. Vadose Zone Hydrology. (3 cr. Prereq–[MATH
1271 or equiv], [PHYS 1042 or equiv])
Basic soil physical properties/processes governing
transport of mass/energy in soils. Emphasizes water/
solute transport through unsaturated root/vadose
zones, their impact on subsurface hydrology and
on water quality. Lectures, hands-on laboratory
exercises, discussion of real world problems,
problem solving.
SOIL 5311. Soil Chemistry and Mineralogy. (3 cr.
Prereq–[[CHEM 1022 or equiv], PHYS 1102, grad] or #)
Structural chemistry, origin/identification of
crystalline soil clay minerals. Structure of soil
organic matter. Chemical processes in soil: solubility,
adsorption/desorption, ion exchange, oxidation/
reduction, acidity, alkalinity. Solution of problems
related to environmental degradation, plant nutrition,
and soil genesis.
SOIL 5515. Soil Genesis and Landscape Relations. (3 cr;
A-F only. Prereq–2125 or #)
Learn about collegiate soil judging by participating
in a regional or national soil judging contest.
Basic soil morphology and soil profile descriptions;
pedogenic processes and models of soil
development; soil geomorphology, hydrology,
and hillslope processes; digital spatial analysis;
soil classification; soil surveys and land use; soil
geography.
SOIL 4005. Lab and Field Techniques in Soil Science. (2 cr
§SOIL 5005. Prereq–2125)
SOIL 5555. Wetland Soils. (3 cr; A-F only. §ESPM 5555.
Prereq–1125 or 2125 or equiv or #; ¶4511 recommended)
SOIL 3521. Soil Judging. (1 cr [max 3 cr]; A-F only. Prereq–4511)
Field/lab experiences for analysis of soils/landscapes.
Students describe soils along a hillslope sequence,
take soil samples, and perform suite of chemical,
biological, and physical soil analyses. Analytical
techniques, safety, quality control issues.
Morphology, chemistry, hydrology, formation
of mineral/organic soils in wet environments.
Soil morphological indicators of wet conditions,
field techniques of identifying hydric soils for
wetland delineations. Peatlands. Wetland benefits,
preservation, regulation, mitigation. Field trips, lab,
field hydric soil delineation project.
For definitions of course numbers, symbols, and abbreviations, see page 300.
Course Descriptions
SOC 4309. Religion and Public Life in the United States.
(3 cr. Prereq–1001 or #)
549
Course Descriptions
SOIL 5611. Soil Biology and Fertility. (3 cr. Prereq–2125,
BIOL 1009 or equiv, CHEM 1021 or equiv, sr or grad; BIOC 3xxx,
MICB 3xxx recommended)
Soil microbial populations and biodiversity. Soil
microorganisms. Biogeochemical cycles. Macro and
micronutrient fertilization, and element function in
plants and microbes. Composts, sludge and manures
in fertilization. Plant microbe associations: nitrogen
fixation, mycorrhizal fungi, and biological control of
root pathogens. Pollution and bioremediation.
SOIL 5711. Forest Soils. (2 cr. Prereq–1125 or 2125)
Factors affecting tree growth; estimation,
modification, and management effects on site
productivity; regeneration.
South Asian Languages
and Cultures (SALC)
Department of Asian Languages and Literatures
College of Liberal Arts
SALC 1506. Introduction to Contemporary South Asia.
(3 cr)
Land, people, modern historical development,
contemporary problems, global setting, and future
outlook of South Asia.
SALC 1607. Introduction to Indian Civilization. (3 cr)
Indian civilization in light of its development.
Social, cultural, economic, and political life. Hindu,
Muslim, and Buddhist contributions.
Representation of Indian women studied through
literature of contemporary Indian women and against
background of traditional Indian values and roles.
SALC 3607. Introduction to Indian Civilization. (3 cr)
Indian civilization in light of its development.
Social, cultural, economic, and political life. Hindu,
Muslim, and Buddhist contributions.
SALC 3900. Topics in South Asian Literature. (1-4 cr [max
12 cr]. Prereq–Topics in South Asian literature)
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
SALC 5011. Indo-Aryan Linguistics. (3 cr)
Phonological, morphological, and syntactic
developments; Indo-European, Old Indo-Aryan,
Middle Indo-Aryan, Hindi, and other major modern
Indo-Aryan languages.
SALC 5720. Seminar in South Asian Literature. (3-4 cr
[max 4 cr])
Selected topics on South Asian literature.
SALC 5730. Seminar in South Asian Culture. (4-5 cr [max
5 cr])
Selected topics on South Asian cultures.
SALC 5833. India’s Gods and Goddesses. (3 cr)
Indian history examined by following development
of the deities Krishna, Shiva, and Kali.
SALC 5993. Directed Studies. (1-5 cr [max 5 cr]. Prereq–#,
∆, o)
Guided individual reading and study of topics
not covered in regular courses. Open to qualified
students for one or more semesters.
SALC 5994. Directed Research. (1-5 cr [max 5 cr]. Prereq–#,
∆, o)
SALC 5090. Instruction in South Asian Languages. (3-5 cr
[max 5 cr])
Directed research on topics of language, literature,
or civilization selected by qualified students with
consent of instructor and studied on tutorial basis.
SALC 5201. Ancient Indian Literature in Translation. (3 cr)
Spanish (SPAN)
Individualized instruction in one of the South Asian
languages.
Literary achievements of Indian civilization from the
ancient period.
SALC 5202. Modern Indian Literature in Translation. (3 cr)
Literary achievements of Indian civilization from the
modern period.
SALC 5204. Folklore of India. (3 cr)
Department of Spanish and Portuguese Studies
College of Liberal Arts
SPAN 144. Intermediate Medical Spanish. (0 cr; S-N only.
Prereq–[1st yr college-level Spanish or equiv], ∆)
Vocabulary of Spanish medical terms, skills in report
writing, proper format for medical communications.
Developing conversational fluency for medicalrelated topics.
Literary achievements of Indian civilization from the
ancient period.
A study of the main genres of Indian folklore—folk
tales, folk songs, folk epics, folk dramas, proverbs,
and riddles—their relationship to Indian society and
inter-relationship with literary traditions, both great
and small.
SALC 3202. Modern Indian Literature in Translation. (3 cr)
SALC 5411. Introduction to Indian Philosophy. (3 cr)
Intensive reading of a variety of texts to provide a
basic reading knowledge of Spanish. At the end of
the semester students may take the equivalent of the
Spanish Graduate Reading Examination.
SALC 3204. Folklore of India. (3 cr)
SALC 5412. Hinduism. (3 cr)
SPAN 344. Advanced Medical Spanish. (0 cr; S-N only.
Prereq–Span 0144, 2 yrs. Spanish College Level or equiv, ∆)
SALC 3201. Ancient Indian Literature in Translation. (3 cr)
Literary achievements of Indian civilization from the
modern period.
A study of the main genres of Indian folklore: folk
tales, folk songs, folk epics, folk dramas, proverbs,
and riddles; their relationship to Indian society and
inter-relationship with literary traditions, both great
and small.
SALC 3411. Introduction to Indian Philosophy. (3 cr)
Major concepts; principal schools of Indian
philosophy; traditional and contemporary views.
SALC 3412. Hinduism. (3 cr)
Development of Hinduism focusing on sectarian
trends, modern religious practices, myths and rituals,
pilgrimage patterns and religious festivals, and the
interrelationship between Indian social structure and
Hinduism.
SALC 3413. Buddhism. (3 cr. §SALC 5413)
550
SALC 3556. Women in India: Role and Repression. (3 cr.
§SALC 5556)
Historical account of Buddhist religion in terms of
its rise, development, various schools, and common
philosophical concept. Indian Buddhism, compared
with Hinduism; Buddhism’s demise and revival on
the Indian subcontinent.
SALC 3414. Comparative Religions of South Asia. (3 cr.
§SALC 5414)
Compares and contrasts basic philosophical
concepts, literatures, ideologies, and ritualistic
practices of Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism with
those of Islam and Sikhism.
SALC 3456. The Cinema of India. (3 cr. §SALC 5456)
Survey of cinema of South Asia; aesthetic, social,
economic, and political perspectives.
SALC 3506. Introduction to Contemporary South Asia.
(3 cr)
Land, people, modern historical development,
contemporary problems, global setting, and future
outlook of South Asia.
SALC 3521. Gandhi and Non-Violent Revolution. (3 cr.
§SALC 5521)
Character of Gandhi, his influence over
contemporaries, and his hold on the world today.
Major concepts; principal schools of Indian
philosophy; traditional and contemporary views.
Development of Hinduism focusing on sectarian
trends, modern religious practices, myths and rituals,
pilgrimage patterns and religious festivals, and the
interrelationship between Indian social structure and
Hinduism.
SALC 5413. Buddhism. (3 cr. §SALC 3413)
Historical account of Buddhist religion in terms of
its rise, development, various schools, and common
philosophical concept. Indian Buddhism compared
with Hinduism; Buddhism’s demise and revival on
the Indian subcontinent.
SALC 5414. Comparative Religions of South Asia. (3 cr.
§SALC 3414)
Compares and contrasts basic philosophical
concepts, literatures, ideologies, and ritualistic
practices of Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism with
those of Islam and Sikhism.
SALC 5456. The Cinema of India. (3 cr. §SALC 3456)
Survey of cinema of South Asia; aesthetic, social,
economic, and political perspectives.
SALC 5500. Problems in Indian Philosophy. (3 cr.
Prereq–3411 or 3412 or 3413 or 5411 or 5412 or 5413)
An introduction to Indian philosophy emphasizing
analyses of mind and knowledge.
SPAN 221. Reading Spanish. (0 cr; S-N only)
0 cr. course designed to further develop and
strengthen the language skills and cultural awareness
students have been exposed to and acquired in
Interm Med Span 0144, a course designed to help
care professionals communicate with patients who
speak Spanish.
SPAN 1001. Beginning Spanish. (5 cr. Prereq–Less than 2 yrs
of high school Spanish, ∆, no college-level Spanish)
Listening, speaking, reading, writing. Emphasizes
development of communicative competence.
Cultural readings.
SPAN 1002. Beginning Spanish. (5 cr. Prereq–1001
completed at UMNTC, ∆)
Listening, speaking, reading, writing. Emphasizes
development of communicative competence.
Cultural readings.
SPAN 1003. Intermediate Spanish. (5 cr. Prereq–[1002 or
1022] or EPT placement)
Speaking/comprehension. Developing reading/
writing skills based on materials from Spain/Spanish
America. Grammar review. Compositions, oral
presentations.
SPAN 1004. Intermediate Spanish. (5 cr. §SPAN 1014, SPAN
1044. Prereq–1003 or EPT placement)
Character of Gandhi, his influence over
contemporaries, and his hold on the world today.
Speaking/comprehension. Developing reading/
writing skills based on materials from Spain/Spanish
America. Grammar review. Compositions, oral
presentations.
SALC 5556. Women in India: Role and Repression. (3 cr.
§SALC 3556)
SPAN 1014. Business Spanish. (4 cr. §SPAN 1004, SPAN
1044. Prereq–1003 or [∆, #])
SALC 5710. Seminar in South Asian Languages. (4-5 cr
[max 5 cr])
SPAN 1022. Alternate Second-Semester Spanish. (5 cr.
Prereq–Placement above 1001)
SALC 5521. Gandhi and Non-Violent Revolution. (3 cr.
§SALC 3521)
Representation of Indian women studied through
literature of contemporary Indian women and against
background of traditional Indian values and roles.
Selected topics on South Asian languages; no
knowledge of South Asian languages required.
Vocabulary, report writing skills, proper format for
business communications, conversational fluency on
trade-related topics.
For students who have studied Spanish in high
school or at a community college, or who are transfer
students. Begins with an accelerated review of 1001
followed by material covered in 1002.
Course Descriptions
Practical Spanish terminology, functional grammar,
conversational fluency on medical-related topics.
SPAN 1044. Intermediate Medical Spanish. (5 cr. §SPAN
1004, SPAN 1014. Prereq–1003 or equiv)
Language needed by health-care workers who
interact with Spanish-speaking patients. Basic
medical vocabulary, questions/answers in common
medical situations. Vocabulary/phrases to conduct
patient interviews and physical exams. Readings on
Latin American view of health and health care.
SPAN 1054. Spanish for Heritage Students. (5 cr. Prereq–#,
LPE for diagnostic purposes)
Development of academic Spanish through reading/
writing. Advanced grammar/orthography.
SPAN 1905. Freshman Seminar. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq–Fr
with no more than 29 cr)
Topic specified in Class Schedule.
SPAN 3212. Discourses of Modern and Contemporary
Spain, 1800-Present. (3 cr. Prereq–3104)
Representative works of fiction, drama, poetry,
essay, and film of the past two centuries.
Intellectual/literary movements, from romanticism to
postmodernism.
SPAN 3221. Latin American Colonial Discourses Since
1492. (3 cr. Prereq–3104 or 3105)
SPAN 3401. Service Learning in the Chicano/Latino
Community. (3 cr. Prereq–[3015 with grade of at least B-], LPE
high pass)
Relationships with Latin; intermediate stages of
evolution not considered. Phonetic, morphological,
syntactic, and sociolinguistic aspects of diachronic
variation.
Development of Spanish American modernity, its
literary expression since independence from colonial
rule. Case studies (e.g., Cuba).
SPAN 3015. Spanish Composition and Communication.
(4 cr. Prereq–[1004 or 1014 or 1044], LPE high pass)
SPAN 3404. Medical Spanish and Community Health
Service. (3 cr. Prereq–3015 with grade of at least B- or [1044,
high pass on at least three sections of LPE])
Topics specified in Course Guide.
How to create materials for effective communication
with Spanish-speaking patients. Students apply
academic knowledge in work with community health
care partners who serve Chicano/Latino population.
Comprehending written/spoken texts. Speaking,
reading, writing beyond intermediate level.
SPAN 3021. Advanced Communication Skills. (4 cr.
Prereq–3015)
Improving language skills for fluency/accuracy in
Spanish.
SPAN 3501. Roots of Modern Spain and Latin America.
(3 cr. §SPAN 3501H. Prereq–3105W)
SPAN 3022. Advanced Business Spanish. (4 cr. Prereq–
[[1014 or 1004 or 1044 or equiv], LPE in Spanish] or #)
Vocabulary of Spanish business terms, Skills in
report writing, proper format for business/formal
communications. Developing conversational fluency
on trade-related topics.
SPAN 3044. Advanced Medical Spanish. (4 cr. Prereq–
[[1004 or 1014 or 1044 or equiv], LPE in Span] or #)
How to communicate more effectively in linguistic/
cultural terms with Spanish speaking patients.
Students explore more advanced/specific medical
vocabulary, communication strategies, and related
cultural aspects. Conducting patient interviews and
medical history. Using vocabulary/conversation to
conduct physical exams. Latin American views on
health and health care.
SPAN 3104W. Introduction to the Study of Hispanic
Literatures. (3 cr; A-F only. §TLDO 3104. Prereq–[3015 with
grade of at least B-], LPE high pass)
Various ways of understanding structure of diverse
texts, interpreting their meaning.
Cultural issues generated by integration of Americas
into emerging world system via Spanish/Portuguese
empires.
SPAN 3107W. Introduction to the Study of Hispanic
Linguistics. (3 cr. Prereq–[3015 with grade of at least B-], LPE
high pass)
Phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics,
lexicology, pragmatics, discourse analysis,
sociolinguistics, history of Spanish language.
Hispanic linguistics as theoretical discipline. Its
relationships with social, cultural, literary studies.
SPAN 3211. Discourses of Imperial Spain, 1492-1800.
(3 cr. §TLDO 3211. Prereq–3104)
Cultural, political, and economic development of
Spain and Latin America, from origins to beginning
of 19th century. Hispania under Roman Empire.
Coexistence of Jews, Christians, and Muslims in
Medieval Spain. Mexican and indigenous preHispanic cultures. Arrival of Europeans to New
World. Culture in Golden Age. Crisis of Spanish
Empire. Architecture, historic documents, music, and
visual arts
SPAN 3502. Modern Spain. (3 cr. Prereq–3105)
Spanish culture, from beginning of 19th century
to present. Cultural change and its conflicts as
represented in Spanish art, literature, film, and
Nationalisms.
SPAN 3510. Issues in Hispanic Cultures. (3 cr [max 9 cr];
A-F only. Prereq–3105W)
Practices that have shaped cultural identity of
Spanish-/Portuguese-speaking areas. Folklore,
religion, armed conflict, drug traffic, language/
citizenship, political movements, commodification of
national myths/icons. Topics vary.
SPAN 3512. Modern Latin America. (3 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–3105W)
SPAN 3105W. Introduction to the Study of Hispanic
Cultures. (3 cr. Prereq–[3015 with grade of at least B-], LPE
high pass)
Impact of various forms of modernization on
symbolic production in Latin American racial,
ethnic, class relations, institutional, and ideological
structures.
SPAN 3612. The Man of La Mancha and Quixotic
Discourse. (3 cr)
Narrative techniques and points of view in Don
Quixote; historical, cultural, and intellectual
conditions under which the novel was read and
debated. Taught in English.
SPAN 3653. Contemporary Latino and Latin American
Drama Written in English. (3 cr. Prereq–1001 or equiv)
Major literary genres of Spain (epic, lyric, narrative,
dramas, novels, essays) from Middle Ages/Golden
Age to Enlightenment. Representative works
(ballads, picaresque “vidas,” tragedies, mystical
verse, novellas) within historical/cultural contexts.
SPAN 3702. Structure of Spanish: Morphology and Syntax.
(3 cr. §SPAN 3702H. Prereq–3107)
SPAN 3222. Discourses of Modern and Contemporary
Latin America. (3 cr. §TLDO 3222. Prereq–3104 or 3105)
SPAN 1910W. Freshman Seminar. (3 cr. Prereq–Fr)
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
Phonetics/phonology of modern Spanish. Regional/
social variants of the language in Spain and Spanish
America.
Derivational/inflectional morphology. Using
linguistic concepts such as morpheme, flexional
affix, noun phrase, subject, subordination, and
coordination to identify different morphological/
syntactic components of Spanish.
Critical account of conquest, colonization, and
resistance in Spanish America.
Students participate in Spanish-speaking community
organizations; analyze academic materials dealing
with race, class, gender, and current patterns of
power in the United States; and relate their findings
to their community experience.
SPAN 1907W. Topics: Freshman Seminar. (3 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–Fr with no more than 29 cr)
SPAN 3701. Structure of Spanish: Phonology and
Phonetics. (3 cr. §SPAN 3701H. Prereq–3107)
Established works and works-in-progress of the
most active Latino playwrights in the United States
and historical, political, and cultural developments
that make them possible. Lectures, discussion,
performances, and visual material. Taught in English.
SPAN 3699. Study of Advanced Spanish Language Abroad.
(1-5 cr [max 5 cr]. Prereq–Two yrs college-level Spanish, ∆)
Study of advanced Spanish language in a Spanishspeaking country.
SPAN 3703. Origins and History of Spanish and
Portuguese. (3 cr. §TLDO 3703. Prereq–3107 or #)
SPAN 3704. Sociolinguistics of the Spanish-Speaking
World. (3 cr. §SPAN 3704H. Prereq–3107)
Social variants of Spanish dialects, Spanish in
contact with other languages, bilingualism, language
attitudes, pragmatic analysis of Spanish. Impact
of recent cultural, political, and socioeconomic
transformations on language.
SPAN 3705. Semantics and Pragmatics of Spanish. (3 cr.
§SPAN 3705H. Prereq–3107)
Sense relations. Semantics and grammar. Theme,
rhyme, and focus. Spanish lexicon. Context, style,
culture. Communicative competence. Speech acts.
SPAN 3706. Spanish Applied Linguistics. (3 cr.
Prereq–3107)
Introduction to main areas of Spanish applied
linguistics. Second language acquisition processes,
Spanish language from English-speaking learner s
point of view. Sociolinguistic aspects of language
learning.
SPAN 3707. Linguistic Accuracy Through Translation. (3 cr.
Prereq–3104 or 3105 or 3107)
Various texts in Spanish examined in terms of
style/audience/lexicon (popular press, business,
academic) as framework for training to communicate
with accuracy in various contexts. Students apply
lexical/grammatical choices in translating a text.
SPAN 3730. Topics in Hispanic Linguistics. (3 cr [max 9 cr].
Prereq–3107)
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
SPAN 3800. Film Studies in Spanish. (3 cr [max 9 cr].
Prereq–3104W or 3105W)
Films from Spanish-speaking worlds in their
historical, (geo)political, and socio-economic
contexts. Production/consumption, popular/high
cultures, and national/trans-national identities within
various theoretical backgrounds. Films from various
countries analyzed under interdisciplinary framework
noting cinematographical rhetorics.
SPAN 3910. Topics in Spanish Peninsular Literature. (3 cr
[max 9 cr]; A-F only. Prereq–3104)
Focus on a central theme related to important groups
of writers, literary movements, trends, critical
approaches, and methods. Topics specified in Class
Schedule.
SPAN 3920. Topics in Spanish-American Literature. (3 cr
[max 9 cr] §SPAN 3920H. Prereq–3104)
Central theme related to important groups of writers,
literary movements, trends, critical approaches, and
methods. Topics specified in Class Schedule.
SPAN 3950. Figures in Spanish American Literature. (3 cr
[max 9 cr]; A-F only. §SPAN 3950H. Prereq–3104)
One major writer or group of writers whose work
has had an impact on thought, literature, or social
problems. Figures are specified in Class Schedule.
SPAN 3970. Directed Studies. (1-4 cr [max 9 cr]. Prereq–#,
∆, o)
Guided individual reading or study in Hispanic
linguistics, language acquisition, cultural studies, and
peninsular, Latin American, and U.S. Latino theatre
and literatures.
For definitions of course numbers, symbols, and abbreviations, see page 300.
Course Descriptions
SPAN 1041. Beginning Medical Spanish. (4 cr; A-F only)
551
Course Descriptions
SPAN 3972V. Honors: Graduation Seminar. (3 cr; A-F only.
§SPAN 3972W. Prereq–§: 3972W, 3974; 31 cr of 3xxx, honors,
∆)
Work on major project about Hispanic linguistics,
language acquisition, or cultural studies, or about
peninsular or Latin American or U.S. Latino theatre/
literatures.
SPAN 3972W. Graduation Seminar. (3 cr; A-F only. §SPAN
3972V. Prereq–§: 3972V, 3974; 31 cr of 3xxx, #)
Work on major project about Hispanic linguistics.
Language acquisition. Cultural studies. Peninsular,
Latin American, U.S. Latino theatre/literatures.
SPAN 5106. The Literature of the Reconquest and Feudal
Spain. (3 cr. Prereq–Three 3xxx or 5xxx literature courses in
Spanish)
The major literary genres developed in Spain from
the Reconquest to 1502, with reference to the crucial
transformations of the Middle Ages, including
primitive lyric, epic, clerical narrative, storytelling,
debates, collections, chronicles, “exempla,” and the
Celestina (1499-1502).
SPAN 5107. The Literature of the Spanish Empire and Its
Decline. (3 cr. Prereq–Three 3xxx or 5xxx literature courses in
Spanish or Portuguese)
Major Renaissance and Baroque works of the
Spanish Golden Age (16th- and 17th-century poetry,
nonfiction prose, novel, drama) examined against the
historical background of internal economic decline,
national crisis, and ideological apparatus developed
by the modern state.
SPAN 5108. Don Quixote. (3 cr. Prereq–three 3xxx or 5xxx
literature courses in Spanish or Portuguese)
Analysis of Cervantes’ Don Quixote in its
sociohistorical context; focus on the novel’s
reception from the romantic period to postmodern
times.
SPAN 5109. The Crisis of the Old Regime: Spanish
Literature of the Enlightenment and Romanticism. (3 cr.
Prereq–Three 3xxx or 5xxx literature courses in Spanish or #)
Major literary works and intellectual movements and
conflicts represented in written culture, of the 18th
and early 19th centuries (1680-1845), examined as
expressions of the long crisis of Spain’s Old Regime
and the rise of bourgeois liberalism.
SPAN 5110. Discursive Formations at the Threshold of
20th-Century Spain. (3 cr. Prereq–Three 3xxx or 5xxx literature
courses in Spanish or #)
Theory and representative examples of the realist/
naturalist novel (Galdós, Pardo Bazán) in the context
of its antecedents (“costumbrismo”), opposites (the
idealist/sentimental novel), and turn-of-the-century
innovations of modernism and the “generation of
1898.”
SPAN 5111. Contemporary Spanish Literature Since 1915.
(3 cr. Prereq–Three 3xxx or 5xxx literature courses in Spanish
or #)
552
Major literary works and movements in Spain
from 1915 to 2000. Neomodernism; surrealism;
social realism; literatures of dictatorship and exile;
postmodernism. Poetry, novel, drama, essays, film,
video/TV; problems of literary history.
SPAN 5221. Spanish Drama in Performance: 17th-Century
Comedia. (3 cr. Prereq–Three 3xxx or 5xxx literature courses in
Spanish or Portuguese)
Major dramatists of the Spanish comedia (e.g.,
Cervantes, Lope, Tirso, Calderón). Traditional
genres such as tragedy, farce, interludes or auto
sacramentales and problems of honor, blood
purity, free will, city vs. country, and poetic justice
examined against the background of cultural and
social history.
SPAN 5234. Feminism and Literature in Spain. (3 cr.
Prereq–Three 3xxx or 5xxx literature courses in Spanish or
Portuguese or #)
Spanish feminist thought and practice; literature,
cultural discourse, literary and critical theory.
SPAN 5316. Spanish Picaresque Narratives. (3 cr. Prereq–
three 3xxx or 5xxx literature courses in Spanish or Portuguese)
Major picaresque narratives—Lazarillo, Guzmán,
Buscón,] Cervantes’ Picaros, Estebanillo
González—in relation to Spanish ambience,
Western tradition, European novel, realism. Literary
autobiography, episodic structure, themes of roguery,
delinquency, sin, marginality, social criticism,
moral preoccupations. Comparison to European
counterparts.
SPAN 5525. Caribbean Literature: An Integral Approach.
(3 cr. Prereq–Three [3xxx or 5xxx] literature courses in Spanish
or #)
Literature of Spanish-speaking Caribbean.
Emphasizes historical legacy of slavery, African
culture, and independence struggles.
SPAN 5526. Colonial Discourse in Spanish American
Writing. (3 cr. Prereq–Three 3xxx or 5xxx literature courses in
Spanish)
Discourse production in Spanish America between
1492 and 1700. Conquest and colonial writing/
counterwriting. Historical origin, evolution, and
impact of cultural, political, and socioeconomic
factors.
SPAN 5528. Popular Literary Consciousness: 1900-1950.
(3 cr. Prereq–Three 3xxx or 5xxx lit courses in Spanish or
Portuguese or ∆)
Spanish-American literature between the eve
and aftermath of the two world wars. Impact of
modernization, industrialization, and nationalistic
and populist thought on emergence of distinctive
writing, thematic trends, and literary genre
conventions.
SPAN 5529. National Affirmation and Transnationalization.
(3 cr. Prereq–Three 3xxx or 5xxx literature courses in Spanish
or #)
Literary trends of the contemporary period (1950 to
present) as a reaction to internal social demands for
development of independent national cultures and in
response to international cultural pressures.
SPAN 5531. Hispanic Literature of the United States.
(3 cr. Prereq–Three 3xxx or 5xxx Spanish or Portuguese
literature courses or #)
Interdisciplinary approach providing a framework
for deconstructing issues of national identity,
marginalization, and gender. U.S. Hispanic theatre/
literature and its ethnic diversity, regional variations,
cultural links, and scope of its genres.
SPAN 5532. Literature and National Disintegration. (3 cr)
Literary reaction to contemporary structural changes
in world economic system (1970 to present).
Effects on literature as institution. Texts related
to revolutionary trends and social movements
(feminism, theology of liberation, defense of human
rights).
SPAN 5701. History of Ibero-Romance. (3 cr. Prereq–3703,
two other 3xxx or 5xxx Spanish linguistics courses or #)
Origins and developments of Ibero-Romance
languages; evolution of Spanish, Portuguese, and
Catalan.
SPAN 5711. The Structure of Modern Spanish: Phonology.
(3 cr. Prereq–3701, two 3xxx or 5xxx linguistics courses in
Spanish or #)
Formulating and evaluating a phonological
description of Spanish. Approaches to problems in
Spanish phonology within metrical, autosegmental,
and lexical phonological theories.
SPAN 5713. The Structure of Modern Spanish: Syntax.
(3 cr. Prereq–3702, two 3xxx or 5xxx Spanish linguistics courses
or #)
Study and analysis of the principal constructions
found in the syntax of Spanish.
SPAN 5714. Theoretical Foundations of Spanish Syntax.
(3 cr. Prereq–5713 or #)
Linguistic types/processes that appear across
languages. Grammatical relations, word order,
transitivity, subordination, information structure,
grammaticalization. How these are present in syntax
of Spanish.
SPAN 5715. The Structure of Modern Spanish: Semantics.
(3 cr)
Applying semantic theory to Spanish: conceptual
organization and the structuring of experience;
meaning and cultural values; semantic fields;
categorization and prototypes; cognitive model
theory; metaphor, metonymy, and mental imagery as
source and change of meaning.
SPAN 5716. The Structure of Modern Spanish:
Pragmatics. (3 cr. Prereq–#)
Concepts used in current literature in Spanish
pragmatics, such as deixis, presupposition,
conversational implicature, speech act theory, and
conversational structure.
SPAN 5717. Spanish Sociolinguistics. (3 cr. Prereq–Two 3xxx
or 5xxx linguistics courses in Spanish or #)
Sociolinguistic variation, cross-dialectal diversity
in different varieties of Spanish in Latin America
and Spain. Impact of recent cultural, political, and
socioeconomic transformations on language.
SPAN 5718. Spanish Language Contact. (3 cr. Prereq–Two
3xxx or 5xxx linguistics courses in Spanish or #)
Analysis of different types/results of Spanish
language contact globally, taking into account
varying social conditions under which contact
occurs.
SPAN 5721. Spanish Laboratory Phonology. (3 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–[5711, honors] or grad student or #)
Core literature on Spanish laboratory phonology.
Phonology from a laboratory perspective. Students
evaluate laboratory research methodologies, perform
basic acoustic analyses, and design laboratory
phonology studies.
SPAN 5910. Topics in Spanish Peninsular Discourses.
(3 cr [max 9 cr]. Prereq–Three 3xxx or 5xxx literature courses in
Spanish or Portuguese)
Problems in Spanish cultural history and their
applicability to studies of artistic movements,
ideological trends, formal methods, or literary
genres. Topics specified in Class Schedule.
SPAN 5920. Topics in Spanish-American Discourses. (3 cr
[max 9 cr]. Prereq–3104 or ∆)
Spanish-American literature analyzed according to
important groups, movements, trends, methods, and
genres. Specific approaches depend on topic and
instructor. Topics specified in Class Schedule.
SPAN 5930. Topics in Ibero-Romance Linguistics. (3 cr
[max 9 cr])
Problems in Hispanic linguistics; a variety of
approaches and methods.
SPAN 5970. Directed Readings. (1-4 cr [max 9 cr].
Prereq–MA or PhD candidate, #, ∆, o)
Students must submit reading plans for particular
topics, figures, periods, or issues. Readings in
Spanish and/or Spanish-American subjects.
SPAN 5985. Sociolinguistic Perspectives on Spanish in
the United States. (3 cr. Prereq–Three 3xxx or 5xxx linguistics
courses in Spanish or #)
Sociolinguistic analysis of issues such as language
maintenance/shift in U.S. Latino communities, code
switching, attitudes of Spanish speakers toward
varieties of Spanish and English, language change in
bilingual communities, and language policy issues.
SPAN 5990. Directed Research. (1-4 cr [max 9 cr]. Prereq–#,
∆, o)
SPAN 5991. The Acquisition of Spanish as a First and
Second Language. (3 cr. Prereq–Three 3xxx or 5xxx linguistics
courses in Spanish or #)
Analysis of issues such as the acquisition of Spanish
and English by bilingual children; Spanish in
immersion settings; developmental sequences in
Spanish; classroom language learners’ attitudes,
beliefs, and motivation; development of pragmatic
competence.
Course Descriptions
Department of Spanish and Portuguese Studies
College of Liberal Arts
SLHS 3302. Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech and
Hearing Mechanisms. (3 cr)
Gross anatomy and basic physiology of the nervous,
auditory, respiratory, laryngeal, velopharyngeal,
and orofacial systems with emphasis on normal
communication processes.
SLHS 3303. Language Acquisition and Science. (3 cr)
SPPT 5930. Selected Topics in Hispanic and Lusophone
Cultural Discourse. (3 cr [max 9 cr]; A-F only. Prereq–Reading
knowledge of Span and Port)
Cultural discourses in Spanish- and Portuguesespeaking areas. Historical intersections/divergences.
Taught in Spanish or Portuguese, and in English
when cross-listed. Topics specified in Class
Schedule.
SPPT 5999. The Teaching of College-Level Spanish:
Theory and Practice. (3 cr. Prereq–Grad or #)
Theoretical grounding in the general principles of
second language acquisition and guidance with their
practical applications to the teaching of first- and
second-year Spanish at the college-level.
Speech-LanguageHearing Sciences (SLHS)
Department of Speech-Language-Hearing
Sciences (SLHS)
College of Liberal Arts
Survey of typical language development, major
theoretical perspectives about development.
Applications of current theory to analysis of
children’s language.
SLHS 3304. Phonetics. (3 cr. §SLHS 5304)
Phonetic analysis, transcription of speech.
Articulatory correlates of speech sounds. Extensive
practice transcribing. Emphasizes narrow
transcription of normal adult English, special
populations in Speech-Language Pathology. NonEnglish IPA sounds needed for special populations.
SLHS 3305W. Speech Science. (4 cr. Prereq–[3301, 3302,
5303] or [Cdis 3301, Cdis 3302, Cdis 3304] or #)
A survey of theories, methods, and research in
the discipline of speech science, including speech
acoustics, speech perception, and speech production.
SLHS 3306. Hearing Science. (3 cr. Prereq–[3301, 3302] or
[CDis 3301, CDis 3302] or #)
Theories, methods, and research in psychological/
physiological acoustics. Emphasizes relation
between physiological measures and perception.
Cochlear mechanics, auditory nerve firing patterns,
scaling, object perception.
SLHS 3401. Communication Differences and Disorders.
(3 cr. §SLHS 1401)
SLHS 1301V. Physics & Bio Honors. (4 cr; A-F only)
Physics/biology of spoken language, from talker’s
production of sounds/words, to transmission of
sound, to listener’s perception of what was said.
Computer analysis/synthesis of speech.
Disorders of spoken communication, their functional
effect on quality of life for individuals with
communication disorders. Intervention techniques
for specific disorders of speech/language/hearing in
context of social, cultural, linguistic diversity.
SLHS 1301W. The Physics and Biology of Spoken
Language. (4 cr)
Physics and biology of spoken language, from the
talker’s production of sounds and words, to the
transmission of sound, to the listener’s perception
of what was said. Computer analysis and synthesis
of speech.
SLHS 3402W. Major Project in Speech and Hearing
Science. (3 cr; S-N only. Prereq–Jr or sr CDis or SLHS major)
SLHS 1302. Rate Your World: Quantifying Judgments of
Human Behavior. (3 cr)
Research/writing under direction of faculty member.
Details of work are determined in consultation with
faculty thesis adviser selected based on availability/
topic.
Seminar for completion of undergraduate major
project.
SLHS 3555H. Honors Thesis. (1-2 cr [max 2 cr]; A-F only.
Prereq–See dir of undergrad studies for [thesis adviser, forms])
Basic quantitative methods as they apply to
measuring human behavior. Mathematical principles
applied to measuring behaviors such as rating
personality/attention, evaluating infant speech
perception, studying opinion polls, measuring
voice/sound, quantifying speech recognition through
cochlear implants. Lecture, hands-on activities.
SLHS 1401. Communication Differences and Disorders.
(3 cr. §SLHS 3401)
Disorders of spoken communication, their functional
effect on quality of life for individuals with
communication disorders. Intervention techniques
for specific disorders of speech, language/hearing in
context of social, cultural, linguistic diversity.
SLHS 1402. The Talking Brain. (3 cr)
How brain produces/understands speech/language.
Basic anatomy/physiology of parts of nervous
system involved in producing/understanding speech/
language. Differences in brain structure/function
among normal individuals and people with brain
injury. How brain and brain injuries are presented in
mass media.
SLHS 3900. Topics: Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences.
(1-3 cr [max 3 cr])
SLHS 3994. Directed Research. (1-12 cr [max 24 cr].
Prereq–Undergrad doing Research)
SLHS 4301. Introduction to the Neuroscience of Human
Communication. (3 cr)
Basic neuroanatomy and neurophysiology, especially
as they relate to normal speech, language, and
hearing processes.
SLHS 4502. Atypical Speech and Language. (3 cr)
Language conveyed through speech. Normal
variation in speech/language that guides
understanding of individual differences among
speakers will be studied. Breakdowns in speech/
language across lifespan in context of cultural/
linguistic diversity.
SLHS 4602. Communication and Problem Behavior. (3 cr)
SLHS 1902. Freshman Seminar. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq–
Freshman)
Social/environmental variables on young children’s
propensity for problem behavior. Communication
strategies that have been validated as a component in
reducing problem behavior.
SLHS 1905. Freshman Seminar. (3 cr; A-F only)
SLHS 4801. Hearing Measurement and Disorders. (3 cr.
Prereq–[3301, 3302] or [CDis 3301, CDis 3302] or #)
Topics vary. See Class Schedule.
SLHS 3301. Introduction to Acoustics. (3 cr)
Elements of acoustics necessary to understand
quantitative aspects of speech and hearing science,
speech-language pathology, and audiology. Nature of
sound, sound transmission, simple harmonic motion,
sound intensity and pressure, complex waves,
resonance and filtering, and distortion.
Introduction to theory, administration, and
interpretation of behavioral/physiological hearing
tests for all age groups. Immittance, pure tone,
speech, otoacoustic emissions, evoked potential
measures. Emphasizes hearing-screening protocols.
SLHS 4802. Rehabilitative Audiology. (3 cr. Prereq–[3305,
4801] or [CDis 3305, CDis 4801] or #)
Survey of sensory aids/methods used in rehabilitation
across life span after diagnosis of hearing loss.
Degree of hearing loss, developmental level,
communication modalities, client/family choice,
disability, cultural considerations.
SLHS 5304. Phonetics. (3 cr. §SLHS 3304)
Phonetic analysis, transcription of speech.
Articulatory correlates of speech sounds. Extensive
practice transcribing. Emphasizes narrow
transcription of normal adult English, special
populations in Speech-Language Pathology. NonEnglish IPA sounds needed for special populations.
SLHS 5401. Counseling and Professional Issues. (3 cr.
Prereq–[[¶ 8720 or ¶8820], grad student] recommended)
Basic counseling principles and current professional
issues in communication disorders. Application
of counseling theory to clinical practice. Analysis
of regulation, practice, and future direction of
communication disorders.
SLHS 5402. Assessment and Treatment in SpeechLanguage Pathology. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq–Grad student
or #)
Introduction to clinical methods/issues in
communication disorders. Professional/legal
mandates, collection/analysis of clinical data,
principles/models of intervention with adults/
children, clinical reporting.
SLHS 5501. Fluency and Phonological Disorders. (3 cr.
Prereq–Grad student or #)
Description, nature, and treatment of fluency
disorders in children/adults. Involvement in
therapeutic/research activities.
SLHS 5502. Voice and Cleft Palate. (3 cr. Prereq–[3305,
4301] or [CDis 3305, CDis 4301] or #)
Normal/disordered aspects of voice and resonance.
Organic/functional voice disorders, laryngectomy,
cleft palate. Nature and clinical management of these
disorders.
SLHS 5503. Dysphagia and Motor Speech Disorders. (3 cr.
Prereq–[3305, 4301] or [CDis 3305, CDis 4301] or #)
Nature/management of motor speech disorders in
adults/children. Dysarthria, apraxia.
SLHS 5603. Language and Cognitive Disorders in
Children. (3 cr. Prereq–3303 or CDis 3303 or equiv or grad
student or #)
Language assessment, teaching procedures used with
children/adolescents. Procedures apply to children
who face language disabilities such as developmental
delays, autism, learning disabilities.
SLHS 5605. Language and Cognitive Disorders in Adults.
(3 cr. Prereq–[3302, 4301] or [CDis 3302, CDis 4301] or #)
Neurogenic communicative and cognitive disorders
in adults, including aphasia, right-hemisphere
syndrome, traumatic brain injury, and dementia.
Consideration of neurologic substrates, assessment
and diagnosis, and clinical intervention.
SLHS 5606. Introduction to Augmentative and Alternative
Communication. (3 cr)
Description of the range of augmentative and
alternative communication applications for persons
with developmental and acquired disabilities.
SLHS 5607. Electronic Communication Aids. (3 cr.
Prereq–5606 or #)
SLHS 5608. Clinical Issues in Bilingualism and Cultural
Diversity . (3 cr. Prereq–3303 or equiv or #)
Topics in cultural diversity, bilingualism, and second
language learning needed for clinical competency
in speech-language pathology. Basic/applied issues
across a broad range of culturally/linguistically
diverse populations.
SLHS 5801. Audiologic Assessment I. (3 cr. Prereq–4801 or
CDis 4801 or#)
Basic audiometric battery, including pure tones,
speech, masking, and immittance in adults. Industrial
audiology, otoacoustic emissions.
For definitions of course numbers, symbols, and abbreviations, see page 300.
Course Descriptions
Spanish and Portuguese
(SPPT)
553
Course Descriptions
SLHS 5802. Hearing Aids I. (3 cr. Prereq–[3305, 4801] or
[CDis 3305, CDis 4801] or #)
Survey of modern hearing aids including history of
development, electroacoustic functions, clinic and
laboratory measurement techniques, sound field
acoustics, techniques for selection.
SLHS 5803. Hearing Loss in Children: Diagnosis. (3 cr.
Prereq–4801 or CDis 4801 or #)
Behavioral, physiological approaches to assessment
and identification, development of the auditory
mechanism, etiologies of hearing losses in infants,
children, selection of sensory aids, principles of case
management with children and families.
SLHS 5804. Cochlear Implants. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq–[4802,
5801, 5802] or [CDis 4802, CDis 5801, CDis 5802] or #)
Implantable auditory prostheses. History of device
development, including cochlear implants and
auditory brainstem implants. Signal processing.
Techniques for selection, fitting, and rehabilitation.
Behavioral/physiological changes across lifespan.
SLHS 5805. Advanced Rehabilitative Audiology. (3 cr.
Prereq–4802 or [equiv, #])
Analysis of speech perception/production.
Communication skills/strategies. Sensory modalities.
Rehabilitative techniques in adults, children, and
infants with hearing losses.
SLHS 5806. Auditory Processing Disorders. (2 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–4802 or CDis 4802)
Normal/disordered auditory processing abilities.
Anatomy/physiology of central auditory pathway,
assessments to evaluate auditory processing
skills, techniques to address auditory processing
weaknesses. Current/historical theories/controversies
surrounding auditory processing assessment.
SLHS 5807. Noise and Hearing Conservation. (3 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–[8801, 8802] or [CDis 8801, CDis 8802])
Formative Assessment in Hearing Conservation.
Auditory/nonauditory effects of noise on humans.
Designing a hearing conservation program.
Measuring noise levels. Monitoring hearing.
Measuring hearing protection devices. Developing
educational materials Describe federal/state
regulations on hearing conservation. Students work
in groups to measure noise in campus settings,
perform real-ear assessment of hearing protectors,
and develop/pilot-test educational materials on
effects of noise on hearing.
SLHS 5808. Hearing Disorders. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq–[8801,
8802] or [CDis 8801, CDis 8802])
Disorders of auditory system, including anatomical,
physiological, perceptual, and audiological
manifestations of pathologies affecting hearing.
SLHS 5810. Laboratory Module in Audiology. (1-2 cr [max 5
cr]. Prereq–4801 or CDis 4801 or#)
Intensive study of clinical methods in audiology.
Supplements didactic courses in audiology
curriculum. Laboratory study, individually or in
small groups.
554
SLHS 5820. Clinical Research and Practice: Grand
Rounds. (1-6 cr [max 6 cr]; S-N only. Prereq–4801 or CDis
4801 or equiv or #)
Students participate in group discussions of current
professional issues in audiology. Case presentations,
guest presentations on current technology, clinical/
research ethics. Group meet for an hour weekly with
faculty coordinator who leads discussion. Integrates
academic/clinical education.
SLHS 5900. Topics: Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences.
(1-3 cr [max 6 cr])
Topics in Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences.
SLHS 5993. Directed Study. (1-12 cr [max 18 cr]. Prereq–#)
Directed readings and preparation of reports on
selected topics.
Sport Studies (SPST)
School of Kinesiology
College of Human Education and
Development
SPST 1701. Introduction to Sport Studies. (2 cr; A-F only)
Scope/motive of the study of sport from a
sociological, psychological, historical, economic,
and scientific perspective. Issues in sport.
SPST 3111. Sports Facilities. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq–SPST
major only)
SPST 3861. Legal Aspects of Sport. (2 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–SPST major only)
Survey of legal issues in sport, including governance,
contracts, civil rights, civil liberties, torts, due
process, and employment and work-related legalities.
SPST 3881W. Senior Seminar in Sport Studies. (3 cr; A-F
only. Prereq–SPST major, completion of major coursework, #)
Presentations/discussions on sport-related topics of
interest.
SPST 3996. Practicum: The Sport Experience. (1-10 cr [max
10 cr]; S-N only. Prereq–3881, SPST major, #)
Practical experience in one or more sport settings.
A general identification of sports facilities including
the special features that make them unique. Emphasis
on understanding the role and purpose of planning
for such facilities.
Statistics (STAT)
SPST 3112. Applied Sport Science. (2 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–SPST or Kin or Rec major or #)
College of Liberal Arts
Introduction to historical discovery, transitional
development, and current application of scientific
principles/technology to improvement of sport
performance.
SPST 3143. Organization and Management of Sport. (3 cr;
A-F only. §KIN 3143. Prereq–SPST major)
Principles, policies, and procedures involved in the
administration and management of sports programs
at the interscholastic and intercollegiate levels.
SPST 3301. Gender and Diversity in Sport. (2 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–1701)
Development of women and girls in sport; minority
involvement and influence in sport and legal
mandates; sexuality issues; feminism and political
issues in sport.
SPST 3421. Business of Sport. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq–SPST
or Kin or Rec major or #)
Economic/business aspects of professional,
collegiate, school-based and amateur sport.
Financing issues/methods. Economic impact of sport
on communities, regions, and states. Sport/leisure
market.
SPST 3501. Sport in a Diverse Society. (3 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–SPST major only)
Relationship between sport and contemporary social
institutions (politics, religion, economics, education,
mass media). Emphasizes groups/individuals who
have historically been marginalized or excluded from
sport participation. Variables such as race, sex, social
class, sexual orientation, physical (dis)abilities also
emphasized.
SPST 3601. Ethics and Values in Sport. (2 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–SPST major only; 3611 recommended)
The study of violence, demonstrative behavior,
sportsmanship, and other ethical issues involved
in the playing of sport, and in the management and
governance of the sport industry.
SPST 3611. Sport Psychology. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq–SPST
major only)
Introduction to sport psychology. Examines people
and their behavior in sport contexts.
SPST 3621. Applied Sport Psychology. (2 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–SPST or Kin or Rec major or #)
Psychological theories/techniques as they apply
to sport performance and personal growth of sport
participants.
SPST 3631. Sport Promotion and Programming. (3 cr; A-F
only. Prereq–SPST major or #)
Fundamental theories/issues in sport marketing,
grounded within traditional marketing principles.
Emphasizes unique application to sport business
industry.
SPST 3641. Training and Conditioning for Sport. (2 cr; A-F
only. Prereq–[Kin or SpSt] major)
Overview of history, development, current
philosophies of physical training methods used in
sport. Theory, scientific basis for training methods,
methods for evaluation/prescription.
School of Statistics
STAT 1001. Introduction to the Ideas of Statistics. (4 cr.
Prereq–High school algebra)
Controlled vs. observational studies; presentation
and descriptionof data; chance variation; correlation
and causality; confidenceintervals; statistical tests.
STAT 1905. Freshman Seminar. (3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F only)
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
STAT 3011. Introduction to Statistical Analysis. (4 cr.
§ANSC 2211, STAT 5021. Prereq–Two yrs high school math)
Describing data/relationships. Discrete/continuous
random variables. Sampling distributions.
Confidence intervals. 1-/2-samplesignificance tests.
Simple linear regression.
STAT 3021. Introduction to Probability and Statistics. (3 cr.
Prereq–MATH 1272)
Elementary probability, probability distributions.
Sampling, elements of statistical inference.
Regression.
STAT 3022. Data Analysis. (4 cr. Prereq–3011 or 3021)
Practical survey of applied statistical inference and
computing covering widely used statistical tools:
multiple regression, variance analysis, experiment
design, nonparametric methods, model checking and
selection, variable transformation, categorical data
analysis, logistic regression.
STAT 4101. Theory of Statistics I. (4 cr. §STAT 5101.
Prereq–MATH 1272)
Random variables/distributions. Generating
functions. Standard distribution families. Data
summaries. Sampling distributions. Likelihood/
sufficiency.
STAT 4102. Theory of Statistics II. (4 cr. §STAT 5102.
Prereq–4101)
Estimation. Significance tests. Distribution free
methods. Power. Application to regression and to
analysis of variance/count data.
STAT 4893W. Senior Paper. (1 cr. Prereq–Stat major)
Either (1) paper on specialized area or (2) consulting
project or (3) original computer program. Directed
study.
STAT 4931. Topics in Statistics. (3 cr)
Topics vary according to student needs and available
staff.
STAT 4932. Topics in Statistics. (3 cr. Prereq–#)
Topics vary according to student needs and available
staff.
STAT 5021. Statistical Analysis. (4 cr. §ANSC 2211, STAT
3011. Prereq–§: 3011; College algebra or #; Stat course
recommended)
Intensive introduction to statistical methods for
graduate students needing statistics as a research
technique.
STAT 5031. Statistical Methods for Quality Improvement.
(4 cr. Prereq–[3021 or 3022 or 4102 or 5021 or 5102 or 8102],
MATH 1272)
Random variability/sampling. Controlling statistical
process. Shewhart/accumulative charting. Analyzing
plant data, trend surface, and variance/design of
experiments.
Course Descriptions
Axioms for subjective probability/utility. Optimal
statistical decision making. Sequential decisions/
decision trees. Backward induction. Bayesian data
analysis.
Studies in Cinema and
Media Culture (SCMC)
Department of Cultural Studies and Comparative
Literature
STAT 5101. Theory of Statistics I. (4 cr. §STAT 4101.
Prereq–Math 2263)
Logical development of probability, basic issues
in statistics. Probability spaces. Random variables,
their distributions and expected values. Law of large
numbers, central limit theorem, generating functions,
multivariate normal distribution.
STAT 5102. Theory of Statistics II. (4 cr. §STAT 4102.
Prereq–5101 or MATH 5651)
Sampling, sufficiency, estimation, test of hypotheses,
size/power. Categorical data. Contingency tables.
Linear models. Decision theory.
STAT 5201. Sampling Methodology in Finite Populations.
(3 cr. Prereq–3011 or 3021 or 5021 or #)
Simple random, systematic, stratified, unequal
probability sampling. Ratio, model based estimation.
Single stage, multistage, adaptive cluster sampling.
Spatial sampling.
STAT 5302. Applied Regression Analysis. (4 cr. Prereq–3022
or 4102 or 5021 or 5102 or #)
Simple, multiple, and polynomial regression.
Estimation, testing,prediction. Use of graphics in
regression. Stepwise and othernumerical methods.
Weighted least squares, nonlinear models,response
surfaces. Experimental research/applications.
College of Liberal Arts
SCMC 1201. Introduction to Cinema and Media Culture.
(4 cr. §CSCL 1201. Prereq–§: CSCL 1201)
Critical analysis of films, particularly as they
emerge within context of mass culture. Determining
discursive specificity of cinema, network of
institutions that expose this discourse to other
media discourses. Rudiments of film theory. Brief
engagement with production.
SCMC 3001W. History of Cinema and Media Culture. (4 cr)
Genealogy of cinema in relation to other media,
notably photography, radio, television/video and
the Internet. Representative films from decisive
moments in global development of cinema. Rise/fall
of Hollywood studio system, establishment of
different national cinemas, cinematic challenges to
cultural imperialism, emergence of post-cinematic
technologies.
SCMC 3201. Fundamentals of Digtal Filmmaking. (4 cr.
Prereq–ARTH 1921W or CSCL 1921 or equiv or #)
Practice of digital filmmaking. Emphasizes digital
techniques and practical tools required to produce
films. Students master optical/digital devices as
artistic tools. Historical/theoretical issues of cinema,
its relation to other art forms.
STAT 5303. Designing Experiments. (4 cr. Prereq–3022 or
4102 or 5021 or 5102 or #)
Analysis of variance. Multiple comparisons.
Variance-stabilizing transformations. Contrasts.
Construction/analysis of complete/incomplete block
designs. Fractional factorial designs. Confounding
split plots. Response surface design.
STAT 5401. Applied Multivariate Methods. (3 cr.
Prereq–5302 or 8102 or #)
SCMC 3202. Intermediate Digital Filmmaking. (4 cr.
Prereq–3201 or #)
Students complete a film of any length, 24 frames
or feature-length. Emphasizes formal analysis of
frames, shots, sequences, and relations of unit (frame
or shot) to whole.
SCMC 3993. Directed Study. (1-3 cr [max 6 cr])
Bivariate and multivariate distributions. Multivariate
normal distributions. Analysis of multivariate linear
models. Repeated measures, growth curve and profile
analysis. Canonical correlation analysis. Principle
components and factor analysis. Discrimination,
classification, and clustering.
STAT 5421. Analysis of Categorical Data. (3 cr. Prereq–5302
or #)
Varieties of categorical data, cross-classifications,
contingency tables. Tests for independence.
Combining 2x2 tables. Multidimensional tables/
loglinear models. Maximum-likelihood estimation.
Tests for goodness of fit. Logistic regression.
Generalized linear/multinomial-response models.
Guided individual reading or study.
SWED 1002. Beginning Swedish. (5 cr. §SWED 4002.
Prereq–1001)
Continues the presentation of all four language
modalities (listening, reading, speaking, writing),
with a proficiency emphasis. Topics include freetime activities, careers, and the Swedish culture.
SWED 1003. Intermediate Swedish. (5 cr. §SWED 4003.
Prereq–1002)
Emphasis on intermediate proficiency in listening,
reading, speaking, and writing. Contextualized
work on grammar and vocabulary is combined with
authentic readings and essay assignments.
SWED 1004. Intermediate Swedish. (5 cr. §SWED 4004.
Prereq–1003)
Emphasis on developing intermediate mid-high
proficiency in listening, reading, speaking, and
writing. Contextualized work on grammar and
vocabulary is supported by work with authentic
readings and essay assignments.
SWED 3011. Advanced Swedish. (3 cr. Prereq–1004 or 4004)
Achieving advanced proficiency in Swedish. Fiction,
film, journalistic, and professional prose. Grammar,
vocabulary building exercises, review of oral/written
modes of communication.
SWED 3012. Advanced Swedish. (3 cr. Prereq–1004 or 4004)
Novels, short stories, plays, articles. Structural,
stylistic, vocabulary-building exercises.
SWED 4001. Beginning Swedish. (2 cr. §SWED 1001.
Prereq–1004 in another language or passing score on LPE or
grad student)
Meets concurrently with 1001. See 1001 for
description.
SWED 4002. Beginning Swedish. (2 cr. §SWED 1002.
Prereq–1004 in another language or passing score on LPE or
grad student)
Meets concurrently with 1002. See 1002 for
description.
SWED 4003. Intermediate Swedish. (2 cr. §SWED 1003.
Prereq–1004 in another language or passing score on LPE or
grad student)
SCMC 4993. Directed Study. (1-3 cr [max 6 cr])
Meets concurrently with 1003. See 1003 for
description.
SCMC 5001. Critical Debates in the Study of Cinema and
Media Culture. (4 cr)
SWED 4004. Intermediate Swedish. (2 cr. §SWED 1004.
Prereq–1004 in another language or passing score on LPE or
grad student)
Guided individual reading or study.
Basic concepts in historical/international debates
over production/reception of media culture.
Emphasizes cinema. Advanced orientation toward
intellectual traditions that inform contemporary
scholarship.
Meets concurrently with 1004. See 1004 for
description.
SCMC 5993. Directed Study. (1-3 cr [max 6 cr])
Teaching English as a
Second Language (TESL)
Sumerian (SUM)
Institute of Linguistics, ESL, and Slavic Languages
and Literatures
Order statistics. Classical rank-based procedures
(e.g., Wilcoxon, Kruskal-Wallis). Goodness of
fit. Topics may include smoothing, bootstrap, and
generalized linear models.
Department of Classical and Near Eastern Studies
College of Liberal Arts
STAT 5931. Topics in Statistics. (3 cr)
Sumerian writing and grammar. Readings from
classical Sumerian literary and historical texts.
Guided individual reading or study.
STAT 5601. Nonparametric Methods. (3 cr. Prereq–3022 or
4102 or 5021 or 5102 or #)
College of Liberal Arts
SUM 5011. Elementary Sumerian I. (3 cr. Prereq–Adv
undergrads with 2 yrs of another foreign lang, grads)
Topics vary according to student needs and available
staff.
STAT 5932. Topics in Statistics. (3 cr)
Topics vary according to students’ needs and
available staff.
STAT 5993. Tutorial. (1-6 cr [max 12 cr]. Prereq–#)
Directed study in areas not covered by regular
offerings.
SUM 5012. Elementary Sumerian II. (3 cr. Prereq–5011)
Reading from classical literary and historical texts.
Swedish (SWED)
German, Scandinavian, and Dutch
College of Liberal Arts
SWED 1001. Beginning Swedish. (5 cr. §SWED 4001)
Emphasis on working toward novice-intermediate
low proficiency in all four language modalities
(listening, reading, speaking, writing). Topics
include everyday subjects (shopping, directions,
family, food, housing, etc.).
TESL 1904. Freshman Seminar. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq–
Freshman)
Topics vary. See Class Schedule.
TESL 1905. Freshman Seminar. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq–
Freshman)
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
TESL 3001. Basics in Teaching English as a Second
Language. (4 cr. Prereq–Have studied another language, [native
speaker or [C-TOEFL score of at least 213 or equiv])
Basic orientation to current theories/methods of
English as a second language (ESL) instruction.
Emphasizes methodologies for teaching/assessing
listening, speaking, pronunciation, reading, writing
skills. Contexts of teaching English to adults in the
U.S. and abroad. Internship at school or agency
teaching ESL.
For definitions of course numbers, symbols, and abbreviations, see page 300.
Course Descriptions
STAT 5041. Bayesian Decision Making. (3 cr. Prereq–4101
or 5021 or 5101 or #)
555
Course Descriptions
TESL 3501. Practical Language Learning for International
Communication. (3 cr)
Getting a handle on language learning. Having
a sense of one’s learning/language strategy
preferences. Motivation to learn languages in general
and a given language in particular. Motivation to do
specific language tasks.
TESL 5101. Academic Writing in TESOL. (1 cr; S-N only.
Prereq–[5721, grad ESL student] or #)
Research writing conventions in the profession.
University rules on ethical use of human subjects,
research paper rhetorical structure, literature sources/
searches, literature review coherence, hedging
markers, basic research methods, research result
reporting, APA-formatted bibliographies, writing
strategies.
TESL 5401. Language Analysis for Teachers of English as
a Second Language. (4 cr. Prereq–LING 3001 or LING 5001
or #)
Overview of the structure of the English language
geared to the needs of teachers of English to speakers
of other languages. Study the structures of English
from the point of view of second-language speakers
as well as native speakers. Phonetics, phonology,
morphology, and some aspects of the syntax of the
English language. Part of a two-course sequence.
TESL 5402. Language Analysis for Teachers of English as
a Second Language. (4 cr. Prereq–5401, LING 5001)
Overview of the structure of the English language
geared to the needs of teachers of English to speakers
of other languages. Study the structures of English
from the point of view of second-language speakers
as well as native speakers. More complex structures
of English syntax, as well as English semantics,
pragmatics, and discourse structures. Second in a
two-course sequence.
TESL 5610. Research Methods in Applied Language Study.
(3 cr [max 12 cr]. Prereq–LING 5505 or #)
Key issues in second language acquisition/learning
research. Focuses on learning a second or foreign
language in the classroom.
TESL 5721. Methods in Teaching English as a Second
Language. (3 cr. Prereq–LING 3001 or 5001 or #)
Introduction to methods for teaching English as a
second language to adults.
TESL 5722. Practicum in Teaching English as a Second
Language. (6 cr [max 12 cr]; S-N only. Prereq–[[5401 or
¶5401], [5402 or ¶5402], 5721, ESL major or ESL minor] or #)
Observation of, and practice in, teaching English as
a second language to adults at college or university
level.
TESL 5723. Materials for Teaching English as a Second
Language. (3 cr. Prereq–[5721, 5722] or #)
Principles for evaluating/preparing materials for
teaching second languages as applied especially to
English as a second language.
TESL 5724. Intro to Language Assessment. (3 cr; A-F only)
556
How to engage in meaningful, appropriate, and fair
second-language assessment practices; interpret test
results; and construct new forms of assessment.
TESL 5900. Topics in Second Language Learning and
Teaching. (1-4 cr [max 16 cr])
Topics vary. See Class Schedule.
TESL 5910. Seminar in Teaching English as a Second
Language. (3 cr [max 9 cr])
Topics related to second language learning/teaching.
Focuses on learning/teaching English as a second
language. Topics specified in Class Schedule.
TESL 5993. Directed Studies. (1-4 cr [max 9 cr]. Prereq–#,
∆, o)
Directed study for teaching English as a second
language.
Theatre Arts (TH)
Department of Theatre Arts and Dance
College of Liberal Arts
TH 1101V. Honors Section: Introduction to the Theater.
(4 cr. Prereq–Honors)
Introduction to art/craft of theater. Appreciation/
critical analysis of plays/performances. Examples of
theater’s diverse interactions with society considered
from various cultural perspectives.
TH 1101W. Introduction to the Theatre. (4 cr)
Introduction to art/craft of theatre. Appreciation/
critical analysis of plays/performances. Examples of
theatre’s diverse interactions with society considered
from various cultural perspectives.
TH 1102. Drama and the Media. (3 cr)
Drama and cultural values implicit in media. Study
of primary texts (biography, history, the novel,
plays), video clips, and complete films. How the
film medium shapes cultural identity.
TH 1111. Introduction to the Theatre—Condensed
Version. (3 cr. Prereq–Theatre majors/premajors should not
enroll)
Art/craft of theatre. Appreciation, critical analysis
of plays/performances. Ways theatre interacts with
society. Examples from diverse theatre over the
ages and from various cultural perspectives. Seven
weeks.
TH 1112. Drama and the Media—Condensed Version. (3 cr)
Drama/cultural values implicit in media. Study of
primary texts (biography, history, the novel, plays);
video clips; complete films. How film/television
shape collective cultural identity. Seven weeks.
TH 1301. Acting/Non-Majors. (3 cr)
Background/techniques of acting as viewed/practiced
in theatre, society, and student’s own relationships.
TH 1321. Beginning Acting: Fundamentals of
Performance. (3 cr. Prereq–1101 or ¶1101)
Vocabulary/techniques for practical performance
studies. Use/training of body/voice. Creation of
choices and dramatic phrases. Storytelling. Training
the will, the instrument, and the imagination.
TH 1322. Creating the Performance. (3 cr. Prereq–1321)
Responsibilities/techniques of modern stage director
as creative/interpretive artist. Creation of directed
performance of invented/pre-existing forms, from
happenings to traditional psychological/poetic
realism.
TH 1361. Singing for Musical Theatre. (3 cr; A-F only)
Beginning singing, interpretation, part singing,
phonetics, audition techniques. Solo/ensemble
presentations at final class performance.
TH 1362. Dance for Musical Theatre. (2 cr; A-F only. §DNCE
1362)
Movement based lab. Dance skills in musical theatre
performance. Focuses on various styles/disciplines
of dance throughout its culturally diverse heritage.
Character development necessary to execution of
various dance styles.
TH 1391. BFA Acting I. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq–Accepted into
BFA acting program)
Acting.
TH 1392. BFA Voice and Speech I. (2 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–Accepted into BFA acting prog)
Study/practice in breath centering/expansion; vocal
resonance, musicality, placement; ear training;
strengthening and making more flexible the muscles
of speech.
TH 1393. BFA Movement I. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq–BFA-acting
major)
Focuses on building a foundation for further work in
program.
TH 1395. BFA Acting II. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq–1391)
Continuing the process of interpreting dramatic
material.
TH 1396. BFA Voice and Speech II. (2 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–1392)
Building a foundation for further work in the
program. Emphasizes practicing the sounds of
good American speech and of the written phonetic
alphabet.
TH 1397. BFA Movement II. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq–1393)
May include sections such as African dance, yoga,
movement for actors, and circus techniques. Focuses
on building a foundation for further work in the
program.
TH 1904. Freshman Seminar. (3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F only.
Prereq–Freshman)
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
TH 1905. Freshman Seminar. (3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F only.
Prereq–Freshman)
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
TH 1909W. Topics: Freshman Seminar. (3 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–Freshman)
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
TH 1910W. Topics: Freshman Seminar. (3 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–Freshman)
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
TH 1911W. Freshman Seminar: Theatre, Entertainment
With Attitude. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq–Fr with no more than
30 cr)
Richness/diversity of live theatre as performance/
text. Developing critical language/eye with which
to think about live performance. Students attend
performances at Twin Cities theatres. In-class
discussions, talks with theatre/dance professionals.
TH 1950. Topics in Theater. (1-3 cr [max 6 cr])
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
TH 2391. BFA Acting III. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq–BFA student
in theatre arts)
Applying concepts of first year of training to
an ensemble performance project. Beginning of
Shakespeare foundation unit.
TH 2392. BFA Voice and Speech III. (2 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–BFA student in theatre arts)
Continuing to build a strong, healthy voice.
Mastering written phonetics, sounds of good
American speech for stage. Students begin to
explore speaking of heightened verse, particularly
Shakespearean text.
TH 2393. BFA Movement III. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq–BFA
student in theatre arts)
Deepens/refines foundation laid in BFA Movement
I/II.
TH 2395. BFA Acting IV. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq–BFA-Acting
sophomore)
Application of process towards performance.
Emphasizes Shakespeare.
TH 2396. BFA Voice and Speech IV. (2 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–BFA-acting, sophmore)
Continuing to build a strong, healthy voice.
Mastering written phonetics and the sounds of good
American speech for the stage. Students begin basic
dialect acquisition work for the stage. Emphasizes
English/Irish dialects.
TH 2397. BFA Movement IV. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq–BFAacting sophmore)
May include sections such as jazz dance, partner
dances, and movement for actors.
TH 3100. Theatre Practicum. (1 cr [max 4 cr]; S-N only.
Prereq–1101; only two enrollments as actor may count toward
a major)
Participation in University Theatre main stage play
as actor, construction/running crew personnel, or
theatre management operations personnel.
TH 3115. Introduction to Playwriting. (3 cr)
Study of traditional play structure, characterization,
dialogue, dramatic action, and theme. Final project is
a one-act play.
Course Descriptions
Introdution to diverse ways of thinking about theatre
and its representational practices. Students explore
traditional/non-traditional modes of performance
through readings, discussions, and hands-on
performance projects. Seminar-style course.
TH 3171. History of the Theatre: Ancient Greece Through
Neo-Classicism. (3 cr. Prereq–Th major or #)
Experiencing a foreign theater culture/history.
Applying voice training to dramatic material of that
culture.
TH 3393. BFA Movement V. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq–BFA
student in theatre arts)
Experiencing a foreign theatre culture/history,
applying training to dramatic material of that culture.
History of Western theatre and drama; theatrical
practices, staging conventions, and dramatic
structure of plays. Ancient to mid-18th century.
TH 3395. BFA Intensive I. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq–BFA-acting jr)
TH 3172. History of the Theatre: Age of Enlightenment to
Present. (3 cr. Prereq–Th major or #)
Continuing the application of process towards
performance.
Incorporating disciplines of acting/voice/movement.
Theatrical practices, staging conventions, dramatic
structure of plays.
TH 3398. BFA Rehearsal & Performance I. (2 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–BFA-acting jr)
TH 3399. BFA Rehearsal and Performance II. (2 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–BFA-acting jr)
TH 3261. Dramas of Culture: 20th-Century French
and Francophone Theater. (3 cr [max 9 cr]. §FREN 3260.
Prereq–FREN 3101)
Key movements, dramatists, and contexts of 20thcentury French and Francophone theatre. Naturalist
and symbolist legacies as well as existentialist,
avant-garde, and contemporary performance and
drama.
TH 3314. Text and the Actor. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq–1101,
1321, 1322)
Continuing the application of process towards
performance.
TH 3503. Design and Technical Production I: BFA. (3 cr.
Prereq–§: 3513; BFA theatre arts student)
Theory, process, and execution of design/technology
from script to production on stage. Scenery/
properties.
TH 3505. Design and Technical Production II: BFA. (3 cr.
Prereq–3513, BFA theatre arts student)
Standard stage speech, international phonetic
alphabet transcription, and textual analysis
to perform heightened language texts such as
Shakespearean/Shavian monologues, Chaucer’s
Canterbury Tales, and Beowulf. Videos viewed/
discussed.
Theory, process, and execution of design/technology
from script to production on stage. Costumes/
lighting.
TH 3513. Design and Technical Production I. (4 cr.
Prereq–1101; BFA registration permitted)
Theory, process, and execution of design/technology
from script to production on stage. Scenery/
properties.
TH 3321. Stanislavski and Techniques for
Characterization. (3 cr. Prereq–1322, [3314 or ¶3314],
audition)
TH 3515. Design and Technical Production II. (4 cr.
Prereq–1101)
Analysis of text, character, and relationship in
scenes/monologues from contemporary/modern
psychologically-based drama, early 20th-century
texts, and classical repertoire. Lecture, discussion,
exercises, performance.
Theory, process, and execution of design/technology
from script to production on stage. Costumes/
lighting.
TH 3322. Advanced Techniques for Characterization. (3 cr.
Prereq–3321)
Analysis of text, character, and relationship in
scenes/monologues from contemporary/modern
psychologically-based drama and from early
20th-century texts. Lecture, discussion, exercises,
performance.
TH 3950. Topics in Theatre. (1-4 cr [max 8 cr]. Prereq–Varies
by topic)
Topics specified in the Class Schedule.
TH 3993. Directed Study. (1-4 cr [max 12 cr]. Prereq–6 Th
cr, #, ∆, o)
Guided individual reading or study.
TH 4115. Intermediate Playwriting. (3 cr. Prereq–3115 or
[writing sample, #])
TH 3331. Physical Approaches to Acting. (3 cr. Prereq–
1322, [3314 or ¶3314], audition)
Dynamic physical approach to acting. Expanding
expressiveness/creativity. Strengthening connections
between physical/vocal expression. Uniting instinct
and intellectual analysis. Techniques as advanced
by Delsarte, Meyerhold, Grotowski, Kantor,
Suzuki, Barba, etc., and structured improvisation,
are incorporated in solo/collaborative performance
projects.
TH 3361. Introductory Musical Theatre. (3 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–[1361 or 1362 or DNCE 1362] or #)
History of American musical theatre featuring
videos/discussions, basic music theory, voice,
dance, acting, audition techniques. Solo/ensemble
presentations for public class performance.
New methods of play construction. How
characteristic plays from particular contemporary
styles create original theatrical effects by using/
breaking dramatic conventions. Writing exercises,
workshoping of student plays.
TH 4131. Shakespeare: Comedies, Romances, and
Problem Plays. (3 cr. Prereq–1101 or #)
Shakespeare’s plays as live theatre, both for the stage
and in various media. Work of actors, directors, and
designers in Shakespearean plays.
TH 4132. Shakespeare: Histories and Tragedies. (3 cr.
Prereq–1101 or #)
Shakespeare’s plays as live theatre, both for the stage
and in various media. Work of actors, directors, and
designers in Shakespearean plays.
TH 3365. Intermediate Musical Theatre. (3 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–3361 or #)
American musical theatre history. Singing,
interpretation, dance techniques. Culminates in solo/
ensemble presentations in public class performance.
TH 3381. Theatre Storytelling and Solo Performance. (3 cr.
Prereq–3314 or ¶3314)
Live storytelling and solo performance as theatrical
art form. How to turn personal experiences into
engaging stage stories. Guests perform, discuss
their work, and critique student work. Students
develop several short monologues/performances and
conclude with original solo theatre performance/
story.
TH 4177W. Survey of Dramatic Literature I: Strategic
Interpretation. (3 cr. Prereq–[[3171, 3172], [jr or sr]] or #)
Basic principles of script analysis as applied to stage
practice from traditional/postmodern approaches.
Students read plays, critical perspectives. Discussion,
critical writing, performance.
TH 4178W. Survey of Dramatic Literature II:
Representation and its Effects. (3 cr. Prereq–[[3171, 3172],
[jr or sr]] orr #)
In-depth look at how plays actively participate in
production of social values and of society itself.
Emphasizes consequences of choices theatre artists
make.
TH 4321. Career Preparation for the Actor. (3 cr.
Prereq–3322)
Information/techniques necessary for professional
acting career.
TH 4322. Acting for the Camera. (3 cr. Prereq–3321)
Differences between stage acting and acting for
camera. Hands-on experience with film equipment.
Scenes/monologues rehearsed/performed for camera.
Videotape playback for class critique.
TH 4380. Creative Collaboration. (1-3 cr [max 12 cr].
Prereq–Audition, interview, #)
Ensemble creation of a single theatre performance
work. Creative/dramaturgical work. Public showing
of work, completed or in-progress. Students work
collaboratively with faculty or affiliate guest artists.
TH 4391. BFA Intensive II. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq–BFA student
in theatre arts)
Applying first three years of training toward
performance. Seventh in sequence of eight. Acting,
voice, and movement. Integrating the disciplines.
TH 4392. BFA Acting VIII. (7 cr; A-F only. Prereq–4391)
Application of first three years of training toward
performance. Career preparation. Eighth in sequence
of eight.
TH 4393. BFA Rehearsal and Performance III. (2 cr; A-F
only. Prereq–BFA student in theatre arts)
Acting, voice, movement. Application of process
toward performance.
TH 4394. BFA Rehearsal and Performance IV. (2 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–BFA student in theatre arts)
Acting, voice and movement. Application of process
toward performance.
TH 4395. BFA Intensive III. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq–BFA-acting
sr)
Incorporating the disciplines of acting/voice/
movement.
TH 4398. BFA Rehearsal and Performance V. (2 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–BFA-acting sr)
Acting, voice and movement. Continuing the
application of process towards performance.
TH 4399. BFA Rehearsal and Performance VI. (2 cr; A-F
only. Prereq–BFA-acting sr)
Acting, voice, and movement. Continuing the
application of process towards performance.
TH 4532. Makeup for the Actor. (2 cr)
Topics vary. May include functions/aesthetics of
stage makeup, application techniques, prosthetics,
and facial hair.
TH 4550. Video Technology. (3 cr)
Lighting, camera operation, audio, and recording
for video/film production, using the state-of-the-art
equipment in Studio B. Hands-on training in tools
of video technology. Students create a final group
project.
TH 4554. Graphics and Animation for Video. (3 cr)
Students explore and experiment with graphic/
animation software. Video production, live
performance.
TH 4555. Audio Technology. (3 cr)
Sound as science. Technology to create/manipulate
sound. Recording techniques. Effects/signal
processing. Microphone/mixing techniques.
TH 4556. Digital Audio and MIDI for Performance. (3 cr)
Hands-on computer/CPU-generated audio
technology. Use of MIDI language protocol for
performance in all aspects of the arts.
TH 4557. Audio for Film and Video. (3 cr. Prereq–[4550,
4555] or #)
Processes/techniques used in capturing,
manipulating, and producing audio for use in
film/television production. Students experiment and
create audio. Challenges in creating audio for various
mediums.
TH 3391. BFA Acting V. (3 cr; A-F only)
Experiencing a foreign theater culture/history.
Applying process of interpreting dramatic material to
plays of that culture.
For definitions of course numbers, symbols, and abbreviations, see page 300.
Course Descriptions
TH 3392. BFA Voice and Speech V. (2 cr; A-F only)
TH 3120. Theatre: Theory and Practice. (3 cr [max 6 cr].
Prereq–1101)
557
Course Descriptions
TH 4560. Pre-Production and Planning for Video and Film.
(3 cr. Prereq–4550, #)
Forum for pre-planning video projects. Students
undertake pre-production planning for a specific
video project, including script development,
scheduling, location scouting, casting, fund-raising,
equipment lists/rentals, and permits.
TH 4711. Intermediate Stage Direction. (3 cr. Prereq–1322
or #)
Coordinating/guiding collaborative artistic
team. Script selection, textural analysis, concept
development, space use, composition, movement,
dialogue. Final presentation of scene. Intensive
research, textural examination, journal.
TH 4901. Senior Seminar. (2 cr; S-N only. §DNCE 4901.
Prereq–Sr, [Th or DNCE major]; offered fall semester only)
Development of senior project, alone or in groups,
under guidance of faculty members.
TH 4905H. Honors: Tutorial Seminar in Theatre Arts. (2-4 cr
[max 4 cr] Prereq–§4905; honors, theatre arts, ∆; limit [2 cr for
[cum laude or magna cum laude], 4 cr for summa cum laude])
Independent reading/research in preparing honors
thesis or selected creative project.
TH 5100. Theatre Practicum. (1-4 cr [max 20 cr]. Prereq–#,
∆; 4 cr of 3100 for undergrads)
Individual creative projects in production of
approved plays as an actor, director, dramaturg, or
playwright. (See 5500 for design practicums.)
TH 5103. The Theatre Dramaturg. (3 cr. Prereq–[4177 or
4178], [jr or sr], #)
Theoretical/practical aspects of dramaturgy in
American theater. Historical perspectives. Research/
production history of classics. Development of new
scripts. Dramaturgical structure and interpretive
choices. Dramaturgy as it relates to playwrights/
directors. Preparing/editing the rehearsal script.
Production dramaturgy.
TH 5117. Performance and Social Change. (3 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–Jr or sr or grad student)
Reading, writing, research, presentations and
workshops explore activist performance projects.
Theories of social formation and ideology provide
framework to discuss/animate theater’s potential for
social change.
TH 5178. History and Theory of Performance Conventions.
(3 cr; A-F only. Prereq–[1322, [3171 or 3172]] or grad student)
Draws on visual materials, practical exercises,
and theories of spatial representation in context of
political/social function. Historical/cross-cultural
overview of performance conventions and theatrical
space from City of Dionysia to site-specific
happenings of 20th century.
TH 5179. Text and Performance. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq–
[1322, [3171 or 3172]] or grad student)
558
How to read texts toward performance in various
dramatic/nondramatic material. Method of
unlocking metaphoric energy of texts. Vocabulary/
techniques of analysis that transform text from page
to stage.
TH 5181. Blacks in American Theatre. (3 cr. §AFRO 5181)
Historical survey of significant events in the
development of American Black theatrical tradition;
essays, plays, playwrights, and theatres from early
colonial references to Black Arts Movement.
TH 5182. Contemporary Black Theatre: 1960-Present.
(3 cr. §AFRO 5182)
Essays, plays, playwrights, and theatres that have
contributed to contemporary Black theatre. From
the beginning of the Black Arts Movement to the
present.
TH 5355. Puppetry: Techniques and Practice in
Contemporary Theater. (3 cr. Prereq–[[3513 or ¶3513], #] or
grad student)
Fundamentals of puppet and object theater/
performance are introduced through traditional/
contemporary puppetry forms. Focuses on object
theater, toy theater, hand puppets, and shadow/
Bunraku-style puppets. Readings, in-class screenings
of videos/slides. Students build/create series of short
works for in-class performance.
TH 5500. Theatre Design Practicum. (1-3 cr [max 20 cr].
Prereq–3515, #, ∆)
Individual projects in production of approved plays
as a designer of scenery/properties, costumes,
lighting, or sound. (See 5100 for other creative
practicums.)
TH 5510. Drawing, Rendering, and Painting for the
Theatre Designer I. (3 cr. Prereq–3515 or grad or #)
Development of skills necessary for presentation of
theatre scene/costume designs. Materials, layout, and
techniques in scene painting. Basic drawing/graphic
skills.
TH 5515. Design Composition and Collaboration. (3 cr.
Prereq–Grad or 3515, 3711, #)
TH 5559. Sound Design for Performance. (3 cr. Prereq–4555
or #)
Audio technology/psychology, their impact on
audience in a performance. Communication, design
process, psychoacoustics, script analysis.
TH 5560. Drawing, Rendering, and Painting for the
Theatre Designer II. (3 cr. Prereq–5510)
Development of skills necessary for presentation of
theatre scene/costume designs. Materials, layout, and
techniques in scene painting. Rendering and scene
painting skills.
TH 5570. Properties/Scenery Technology. (1-3 cr [max 15
cr]. Prereq–3515 or grad or #)
Classical composition of art and its application to
stage design and directing through the collaborative
process.
Management, structures, upholstery, mask-making,
furniture construction, stage mechanics, soft
properties, faux finishes. Topics specified in Class
Schedule.
TH 5520. Scene Design. (3 cr [max 9 cr]. Prereq–3515 or
grad or #)
TH 5580. Costume Technology. (3 cr [max 15 cr].
Prereq–3515 or grad or #)
TH 5530. Costume Design. (3 cr [max 9 cr]. Prereq–3515 or
grad or #)
TH 5590. Theatre Technology Practicum. (1-3 cr [max 15
cr]. Prereq–3515, #, ∆; 4 cr max for undergrads)
TH 5540. Lighting Design for the Theatre. (3 cr [max 9 cr].
Prereq–3515 or grad or #)
TH 5711. Advanced Stage Direction. (3 cr. Prereq–[4711, #]
or grad student)
TH 5545. Stage Lighting Technology. (3 cr. Prereq–3515 or
grad or #)
TH 5713. Theory and Practice of Performance. (3 cr; A-F
only. Prereq–[3171, 3172, [4177 or 4178], 5711] or grad
student)
Conceiving/communicating design ideas in both twodimensional sketches and three-dimensional models
for theatre and allied venues. Drafting.
Theory and process of costume design for theatrical
productions (e.g., dance, opera, film) through
hypothetical productions.
Design aesthetics and exploration of design for
various stage forms and venues. Development of the
lighting plot and paperwork; use of the computer in
lighting design.
The lighting technician’s skills and crafts:
equipment, techniques, control operation, wiring, and
maintenance.
TH 5550. Video Project. (3 cr [max 6 cr]. Prereq–[4550 or
4560 [preferred]], #)
Students participate in a video-shoot project serving
in various positions, including camera operator,
gaffer, grip, audio engineer, cast, and possibly
director and director of photography.
TH 5551. Editing and Post Production for Video and Film.
(3 cr. Prereq–#)
Students manipulate software and other technologies
used in post production. Editing, audio, image
manipulation.
TH 5553. Video Production Design and Aesthetics. (3 cr.
Prereq–4553 or #)
Use of technologies in video/film in making a
statement or communicating an idea/emotion.
Creativity, sensitivity to an audience. Students
explore different creative uses of technologies/
medium.
TH 5554. Multimedia Production for Live Performance.
(3 cr. Prereq–5553 or #)
Use of multimedia production technologies in actual
production. Students apply knowledge/skill in
conjunction with an artistic team on a production and
are an integral part of the development/realization of
that production.
TH 5556. Audio Engineering. (3 cr. Prereq–4555 or #)
Miking/recording techniques specific to music
and dramatic dialogue. Students explore recording
different styles of music. Hands-on experience in
recording bands and doing final mixes to a demo CD.
Field trips to professional studios and club/concert
recordings.
TH 5558. Audio Systems Analysis and Installation. (3 cr.
Prereq–4555 or #)
Analyzing, designing, developing specifications, and
installing sound systems. Students work from client
program lists, with given resources and given spaces,
to arrive at best possible audio system. Hands-on
experience.
Fabric enhancement techniques, masks, wig-making,
millinery, makeup prosthetics, pattern drafting, and
draping. Topics specified in Class Schedule.
Individual creative project in technology/craft area of
theatre. Practical work in costume, lighting, makeup,
props, scenery, sound, or theatre management.
Realistic/nonrealistic dramatic forms. Theory/
technique of rehearsal. Production problems.
Includes directing of three one-act plays.
Traditions of thinking about theatre, from ancient
Greece to present, in practical applications. Focuses
on epistemological significance of performance
in current critical practices of postmodernism,
psychoanalysis, and phenomenology.
TH 5714. The Drama of Myth. (3 cr. Prereq–[1322, 3171,
3172] or #)
Role of myth in performance. Students choose a
myth and study its iconography, tracing its journey
in painting, sculpture, music, and other texts
that accumulated around it throughout history.
Course culminates in creation of a non-traditional
performance score that embodies/reveals energies of
contemporary culture within ancient metaphor of a
chosen myth.
TH 5715. Actor-Director Collaboration. (3 cr. Prereq–Grad
or 3322, 3711)
Applying advanced acting and directing technique
to an artistic, collaborative process that promotes
flexibility and creativity. Actors and directors are
exposed to a challenging range of roles, styles, and
scenes.
TH 5716. Stage Management for the Theatre. (4 cr.
Prereq–[1101, 1321, soph] or grad)
Theories, practicalities, and techniques for rehearsal/
performance. Organizing/managing various types of
performance venues.
Th 5718. Principles of Theatre Management. (3 cr.
Prereq–#)
Nonprofit theatre structure: concept; mission;
organization; financial, marketing, fund-raising,
and grant-writing strategies. Discussion/guest
professionals from Twin Cities’ arts/funding
communities.
TH 5725. The Alchemy of an Object. (3 cr. Prereq–[[1322,
3171, 3172] or #], grad student)
Stage object as vehicle for investigating role of
drama in culture from Middle Ages to present.
Object as first connection that dramatic text makes
with material world. Object as culturally inscribed
link between language of drama and world of action
in a historically given moment. Object as metaphor
of cultural praxis.
Course Descriptions
TRIN 3002. Intermediate Translation. (3 cr. Prereq–3001)
Tools for intensive textual analysis for advanced
directors/designers. Traditional, Aristotelian analysis
and contemporary approaches covered through
theories/writings of Bertolt Brecht and Howard
Barker.
TH 5760. Advanced Stage Management. (2-3 cr [max 3 cr].
Prereq–5716 or ¶5716, #; [4 cr max for undergrads])
Practical experience in stage management for
specific productions of the University Theatre with
emphasis on rehearsal and performance.
TH 5780. Advanced Topics in Theatre Management. (2-4 cr
[max 8 cr]. Prereq–5718)
Study and apply theatre management theories and
techniques learned in 5718. Marketing/audience
development, fundraising and grant writing
strategies, and financial management of a nonprofit
theatre organization.
TH 5950. Topics in Theatre. (1-4 cr [max 20 cr])
Additional instruction and supervised practice in
translation.
TRIN 3005. Principles of Translation. (3 cr. Prereq–Fluent in
English, proficient in a second language, not in CCE certificate
prog in interpreting; basic knowledge of English grammar
recommended)
Key linguistic principles that help us understand how
language makes meaning. Applying principles to
translation.
TRIN 3101. Introduction to Interpreting. (3 cr. Prereq–high
level of proficiency in spoken English and another language;
3001 recommended)
Practical and theoretical introduction to interpreting
in health, human service, and legal settings.
Emphasis on understanding the unique role of the
interpreter, current models and modes of interpreting,
ethical issues and professional standards of practice,
and developing pre-interpreting skills.
TRIN 3102. Consecutive Interpreting. (3 cr. Prereq–3101,
high level of proficiency in [spoken English, another language] as
demonstrated by application, ∆)
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
TH 5993. Directed Study. (1-5 cr [max 20 cr]. Prereq–6 Th
cr, #, ∆, o)
Practice/theory at professional level in interpreting
in health, human service, legal settings. Emphasizes
professional/client dialogues. Consecutive
interpreting skills, vocabulary research/storage,
intercultural issues. Analyzing interpretive process.
Performance assessment through audio/videotaping.
Subject languages (e.g., Spanish, Russian, Somali)
specified for each section.
Guided individual reading or study.
Toxicology (TXCL)
Veterinary Diagnostic Medicine
College of Veterinary Medicine
TXCL 5000. Directed Research in Toxicology. (1-4 cr [max
16 cr]; A-F only. Prereq–#)
Special project that addresses specific issue in
toxicology. Under guidance of faculty member.
TRIN 3900. Topics in Translation and Interpreting. (1-4 cr
[max 16 cr])
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
TRIN 4201. Interpreting in Health Care Settings. (3 cr; A-F
only. Prereq–1201, 3102)
Practice in interpreting simulated clinical encounters
and monologues. Emphasizes fluency/accuracy in
consecutive/simultaneous modes. Sight translation,
medical vocabulary in two languages, ethical/
situational considerations in health care interpreting.
Coursework is done mainly in bilingual sections
(English, another language).
TXCL 5011. Principles of Toxicology. (2 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–Grad txcl major or #)
Introduction to fundamentals of poisoning in
individuals and the environment, assessment
of potential health hazards, and application of
toxicology in various professional careers.
TXCL 5195. Veterinary Toxicology. (3 cr; A-F only. §CVM
6195. Prereq–Grad student or #)
TRIN 4301. Interpreting in Legal Settings. (3 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–1301, 3102)
Toxicology of minerals, pesticides, venoms, and
various toxins. Identification of poisonous plants.
Recognition, diagnosis, and treatment of animal
poisons.
TXCL 5545. Introduction to Regulatory Medicine. (2 cr; A-F
only. §CVM 6545. Prereq–Grad student or #)
Explanation of products requiring pre-market
approval and those that may be marketed without
approval. Post-market surveillance. Adverse
reactions, removal of product from market.
Principles/practice of interpreting in legal settings.
Skill-building for fluency/accuracy in simultaneous/
consecutive modes. Sight translation. Legal register
in two languages. Ethical considerations, courtroom
conduct. Observation of actual court proceedings.
Coursework is done mainly in bilingual sections
(English and another language).
TRIN 5900. Topics in Translation and Interpreting. (1-4 cr
[max 16 cr])
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
Translation and
Interpreting (TRIN)
TRIN 5993. Directed Study. (1-3 cr [max 3 cr]. Prereq–#, ∆, o)
Directed study in translation and interpretation.
College of Continuing Education
Turkish (TURK)
TRIN 1201. Fundamentals of Health Care for Interpreters.
(3 cr; A-F only)
Institute of Linguistics, ESL, and Slavic Languages
and Literatures
Technical vocabulary, oral discourse patterns used
by healthcare providers in talking to patients,
family members. Language of American health care
interview.
TRIN 1301. American Law for Interpreters. (3 cr)
American legal system. Technical vocabulary used in
courts and other legal settings. Oral legal discourse.
Presentations by specialists, discussion, exercises for
review/practice.
TRIN 3001. Introduction to Translation. (3 cr. Prereq–Bilingual
proficiency in [English, second language of instruction], ∆)
Theory of and supervised practice in translation.
Re-expressing meaning in a second language.
Translation primarily of English language texts
concerning public health/safety, legal/voting rights,
regulations, and procedures.
TURK 3001. Intermediate Turkish I. (5 cr. §TURK 4003.
Prereq–1002 or #)
Listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in
modern standard Turkish.
TURK 3002. Intermediate Turkish II. (5 cr. §TURK 4004.
Prereq–3001 or #)
Listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in
modern standard Turkish.
TURK 3900. Topics in Turkish Language, Literature, and
Culture. (1-4 cr [max 12 cr])
Variable topics in Turkish language, literature and
culture. Consult Institute for details.
TURK 4001. Beginning Turkish I. (3 cr. §TURK 1001.
Prereq–4th sem course in another language or grad student)
Listening, speaking, reading, writing.
TURK 4002. Beginning Turkish II. (3 cr. §TURK 1002.
Prereq–[4001, 4th sem course in another language] or grad
student)
Listening, speaking, reading, writing.
TURK 4003. Intermediate Turkish I. (3 cr. §TURK 3001.
Prereq–[4002, 4th semester course in another language] or
grad student)
Listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in
modern standard Turkish.
TURK 4004. Intermediate Turkish II. (3 cr. §TURK 3002.
Prereq–[4003, 4th semester course in another language] or
grad student)
Listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in
Modern Standard Turkish.
TURK 5900. Topics in Turkish Language, Literature, and
Culture . (1-4 cr [max 12 cr])
Variable topics in Turkish language, literature, and
culture. Consult Institute for details.
University College (UC)
College of Continuing Education
UC 1000. Exploring Educational Options. (1 cr [max 20 cr];
S-N only. Prereq–∆, #)
Clarifying expectations, resources, and challenges
for transition into (back to) college. Students assess
their interests and learning style as they relate
to a college major. Internet as means of gaining
options for education. Individualized degrees at the
University, how to prepare an application for them.
Campbell Skills and Interest Survey, Learning Styles
Inventory, written assignments. Materials fee: $25.
UC 3201. Web Designer Introduction. (4 cr; A-F only)
Web design process: plan, design, launch, and
publish. Design principles, business practices, site
analysis. Students use industry standard Web design
software, including Adobe Photoshop, Macromedia
Dreamweaver, and Flash, to build Web site. HTML,
CSS. Lectures, exercises, lab.
UC 3202. Web Designer Introduction II. (4 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–3201 or #)
College of Liberal Arts
Designing with Adobe Photoshop vector tools,
using batch processing. Macromedia Flash as an
animation tool. Developing an environment through
ActionScripts. DHTML Layers, HTML frames,
form processing. Internet service providers, hosting,
search engines, Web site marketing.
TURK 1001. Beginning Turkish I. (5 cr. §TURK 4001)
UC 3950. Special Topics. (1-4 cr [max 12 cr])
TURK 1002. Beginning Turkish II. (5 cr. §TURK 4002.
Prereq–1001)
UC 4001. Professional Practice of Addictions Counseling.
(4 cr. Prereq–Adds student, #)
Listening, speaking, reading, writing.
Listening, speaking, reading, and writing.
TURK 1511. Introduction to Turkish and Ottoman Culture,
History, and Society: Intersection of Europe and Asia.
(4 cr)
Turkish/Ottoman culture, history, and society, and its
pivotal placement between East and West, through
popular media, film, literature, and the visual arts.
Issues raised by primary source materials from
multi-disciplinary perspectives. Modern urban/rural
life, recent history, religion, terrorism/violence,
migration, ethnicity, Turkic/non-Turkic peoples.
Special topics course.
Core addictions counseling functions including
clinical assessment, case management,
documentation treatment planning, and ethical
issues. Students begin process of securing internship.
UC 4002. Internship in Substance Abuse Counseling I.
(2-8 cr [max 8 cr]; S-N only. Prereq–Adds 4001, Adds student, #)
Supervised field work experience. Practical
application of substance abuse counseling skills
such as assessment, treatment planning, and case
management.
For definitions of course numbers, symbols, and abbreviations, see page 300.
Course Descriptions
TH 5753. Text Analysis for Drama. (3 cr. Prereq–5711 or
grad)
559
Course Descriptions
UC 4003. Internship in Substance Abuse Counseling II.
(4 cr; S-N only. Prereq–Adds 4001, Adds 4002, Adds student, #)
Students’ knowledge, internship site functioning,
and counseling skills are advanced through clinical
experience/supervision.
UC 4301. Perspectives: Interrelationships of People and
Animals in Society Today. (2 cr [max 3 cr]. §CVM 6050, VCS
3050)
Interrelationships of people and animals from
several viewpoints. Social, economic, and health
consequences of these relationships, including
issues such as pets and people sharing an urban
environment, animal rights, and the influence
of differences in cultures on animal-human
relationships.
UC 4525. Garbage and the Human Environment. (3 cr; A-F
only)
Human development, use of natural resources,
waste production, pollution of environment, waste
management. Comparative look at issues/problems
associated with rapid technological development.
Laws to control waste production and manage
accumulated waste.
Vietnamese (VIET)
URBS 3900. Urban Studies Internship Seminar. (2 cr [max 4
cr]; A-F only. Prereq–Sr, internship placement, ∆, #)
Asian Languages and Literatures
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
Weekly seminar integrates internship experience
with academic program.
URBS 3955W. Senior Paper Seminar. (2 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–∆)
Methods/resources for research. Substantial writing.
URBS 3993. Urban Studies Directed Study. (2-3 cr [max 6
cr]; A-F only. Prereq–URBS majors, #, ∆)
For students with a specific educational objective
that cannot be satisfied through regular curriculum
(e.g., foreign study) and for honors students to
complete an honors opportunity.
URBS 5101. The City and the Metropolis: An Exploration.
(3 cr. Prereq–Grad student or [adv URBS undergrad, #])
The City and the Metropolis as places that
result from important acts of human creativity.
Interdisciplinary/exploratory perspectives. Building/
developing (North American) cities, Construction of
“urban culture.”
College of Liberal Arts
VIET 1015. Accelerated Beginning Vietnamese. (5 cr.
Prereq–Ability in basic spoken Vietnamese)
Oral, reading, and writing skills. Grammar/usage,
practice in reading/writing. Vietnamese literature,
other formal writing. Vietnamese culture.
VIET 1016. Accelerated Intermediate Vietnamese. (5 cr.
Prereq–1015 or #)
Oral, reading, and writing skills. Grammar/usage,
practice in reading/writing. Vietnamese literature,
other formal writing. Vietnamese culture.
Water Resources Science
(WRS)
Water Resources Center
Urdu (URDU)
College of Food, Agricultural and
Natural Resource Sciences
Special topics.
Asian Languages and Literatures
WRS 5001. Introduction to Field Research in Water
Resources. (2 cr. Prereq–Grad WRS major or #)
Urban Studies (URBS)
College of Liberal Arts
UC 5075. Directed Study. (1-8 cr; A-F only)
Directed study.
UC 5950. Special Topics. (1-8 cr [max 16 cr])
Department of Geography
College of Liberal Arts
URBS 1001W. Introduction to Urban Studies: The
Complexity of Metropolitan Life. (3 cr; A-F only)
Interdisciplinary course, ranging across spatial,
historical, economic, political, and design
perspectives, among many others.
URBS 3201. Urban Studies Colloquium. (1 cr [max 4 cr]; A-F
only. Prereq–∆)
Urban/metropolitan issues. Topics vary to reflect
current concerns. In-depth reading, intensive group
discussion.
URBS 3202. Urban Studies Colloquium. (1 cr [max 4 cr];
A-F only)
URDU 1001. Introducstion to conversational Urdu. (3 cr)
Development of spoken Urdu. Fundamentals of
composition.
URDU 1101. Beginning Urdu. (5 cr)
Basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing
skills. Emphasizes development of communicative
competence.
URDU 1102. Beginning Urdu. (5 cr. Prereq–1101 or #)
Basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing
skills. Emphasizes development of communicative
competence.
URDU 3131. Intermediate Urdu. (5 cr. Prereq–1102 or #)
Development of reading, writing, speaking, and
listening skills. Grammar review, basic compositions,
oral presentations.
Urban/metropolitan issues. Topics vary to reflect
current concerns. In-depth reading, intensive group
discussion.
URDU 3132. Intermediate Urdu. (5 cr. Prereq–3131 or #)
URBS 3301W. American Cities As Settings for Cultural
Diversity. (3 cr)
URDU 4001. Beginning Urdu. (3 cr. Prereq–Passing score on
GPT in another language or grad student)
Explores cultural diversity in American cities,
considering patterns of and reasons for racial and
class segregation and interaction. Its foci are the
problems, conflicts, and successes of cultural
diversity from a multidisciplinary perspective.
URBS 3500. Urban Studies Workshop. (3 cr [max 9 cr]; A-F
only. Prereq–#)
560
URBS 3800. Topics in Urban Studies. (3 cr [max 6 cr])
Links academic learning to actual urban problems/
issues. Focuses on specific topic using local
community as laboratory. Field work, contact with
local institutions/agencies.
URBS 3751. Understanding the Urban Environment. (3 cr;
A-F only)
Examine links between cities and the environment
with emphasis on air, soil, water, pollution, parks and
green space, undesirable land uses, environmental
justice, and the basic question of how to sustain
urban development in an increasingly fragile global
surrounding.
URBS 3771. Fundamentals of Transit. (3 cr)
Importance of transit to an urban area. Issues
surrounding development/operation of transit.
Defining various modes of transit, evaluating
why/where each may be used. Making capital
improvements to transit system. Finance, travel
demand forecasting, environmental assessment,
scheduling, evaluation of effectiveness/accessibility.
Development of reading, writing, speaking, and
listening skills. Grammar review, basic compositions,
oral presentations.
Listening, speaking, reading, writing. Emphasizes
development of communicative competence.
URDU 4002. Beginning Urdu. (3 cr. Prereq–Passing score on
GPT in another language or grad student)
Listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills.
Emphasizes development of communicative
competence.
Veterinary Medicine
(CVM)
CVM 1000. Introduction to Veterinary Medicine. (1 cr; S-N
only)
History of veterinary profession, careers within
the profession, employment trends. Information
about admission to DVM. Veterinary technology
programs.
Introduction to field research techniques and
opportunities during two-week summer excursion to
regional sites. Data acquisition in large/small lakes,
streams, and wetlands for biota and chemical/
physical water quality; surface and groundwater
hydrologic measurements and sampling.
WRS 5101. Water Resources: Individuals and Institutions.
(3 cr. Prereq–Grad student or #)
Socio-cultural, legal, and economic forces that affect
use of water resources by individuals/institutions.
Historical trends in water policy, resulting water laws
in the United States. Institutional structures whereby
water resources are managed at federal, state, and
local levels.
WRS 5241. Ecological Risk Assessment. (3 cr. Prereq–#)
Evaluating current/potential impact of physical,
chemical, and biological agents on ecosystems.
Identifying ecological stressors, assessing level
of exposure, measuring ecological responses,
communicating/managing risks. Class participation,
two reaction papers, final exam, small-group project.
Women’s Studies (WOST)
Department of Women’s Studies
College of Liberal Arts
WOST1001. Introduction to Women’s Studies. (3-4 cr [max
4 cr]. §WOST 1051)
U.S. multi-/cross-cultural studies of contemporary
social, cultural, and personal conditions of women’s
lives. Includes honors recitation.
WOST 1002. Politics of Sex. (3-4 cr [max 4 cr]. §WOST 1052)
Introductory survey of historical, cultural,
psychological, and sociopolitical dimensions of
analyzing gender/sexuality. Norms/deviances
pertaining to gender/sexuality as differently enacted/
understood by social groups in different time-/placespecific locations.
WOST 1003W. Women Write the World. (3-4 cr [max 4 cr])
Concepts in literary studies. Poems, plays,
short stories, novels, essays, letters by women
from different parts of world. Focuses on lives,
experiences, and literary expression of women,
including basic concepts of women’s studies.
WOST 1902. Freshman Seminar. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq–Fr
with no more than 29 cr)
Topics/description vary. See Class Schedule, Course
Guide.
Course Descriptions
WOST 3203W. Skin, Sex, and Genes. (3 cr. Prereq–3202 or #)
Ways in which modern biology has been site
of conflict about race/gender. Race/gender
demographics of scientific professions.
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
WOST 1905. Freshman Seminar. (3 cr [max 6 cr]; A-F only.
Prereq–Freshman)
Topics/description vary. See Class Schedule, Course
Guide.
WOST 3002. Gender, Race, and Class: Women’s Lives in
the United States. (3-4 cr [max 4 cr]. §WOST 3002H)
Comparative study of women/gender, race, class,
and sexuality in two or more U.S. ethnic cultures.
Includes honors recitation.
Examines culture, gender, ethnicity, class, sexual
identity, and age as factors that influence women’s
diverse psychologies.
WOST 3206. Women and Madness in History and
Literature. (3 cr. §WOST 5203. Prereq–Jr)
WOST 3002H. Honors: Gender, Race, and Class: Women’s
Lives in the United States. (3-4 cr [max 4 cr]. §WOST 3002.
Prereq–Honors)
Comparative study of women/gender, race, class,
sexuality in two or more U.S. ethnic cultures. Honors
recitation.
WOST 3003. Gender and Global Politics. (3-4 cr [max 4 cr].
§WOST 3003H)
Similarities/differences in women’s experiences
throughout world, from cross-cultural/historical
perspective. Uses range of reading materials/media
(feminist scholarship, fiction, film, news media, oral
history, autobiography).
WOST 3003H. Honors: Gender and Global Politics. (3-4 cr
[max 4 cr]. §WOST 3003. Prereq–honors)
Similarities/differences in women’s experiences
throughout world from cross-cultural/historical
perspective. Uses range of reading materials/media
(feminist scholarship, fiction, film, news media, oral
history, autobiography). Includes honors recitation.
WOST 3004V. Honors: Point/Counterpoint: Contemporary
Feminist Debates. (3-4 cr [max 4 cr]. §WOST 3004W.
Prereq–Honors)
Contemporary debates of concern to many women.
Abortion, affirmative action, marriage rights, welfare
rights, sex education, children’s rights, date rape.
In-depth study of several issues. Debate pros/cons of
relevant perspectives. Includes honors recitation.
WOST 3004W. Point/Counterpoint: Contemporary Feminist
Debates. (3-4 cr [max 4 cr]. §WOST 3004V)
Contemporary debates of concern to many women.
Abortion, affirmative action, marriage rights, welfare
rights, sex education, children’s rights, date rape.
In-depth study of several issues. Debate pros/cons of
relevant perspectives. Includes honors recitation.
WOST 3102V. Honors: Feminist Thought and Theory.
(3-4 cr [max 4 cr]. §WOST 3102W)
Feminist theoretical perspectives. How theory
develops in response to traditions/forms of practice.
WOST 3102W. Feminist Thought and Theory. (3-4 cr [max
4 cr]. §WOST 3102V)
Feminist theoretical perspectives. How theory
develops in response to traditions/forms of practice.
WOST 3190. Topics: Theory, Knowledge, and Power. (3 cr
[max 12 cr])
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
WOST 3201. Sociology of Gender. (3 cr; A-F only. §SOC
3221. Prereq–1001 or 1002 or #)
Organization, culture, and dynamics of gender
relations. Gender/racial inequalities in workplace.
Relationships between gender/race, gender/culture.
Sexuality, gendered politics, women’s movement.
WOST 3202. Biology of Women. (4 cr)
Biological aspects of female life from early
development to old age. Biology of sex differences/
sexuality, menarche/menstrual cycles, gestation/
parturition, female-specific diseases/conditions,
menopause/aging. Ways of knowing biology of
female body. Includes lab.
WOST 3202H. Honors: Biology of Women. (4 cr)
WOST 3204. Women’s Psychologies: Feminist and
Multicultural Perspectives. (3 cr)
Biological aspects of female life from early
development to old age. Biology of sex differences/
sexuality, menarche, gestation/parturition, femalespecific diseases/conditions, menopause. Ways of
knowing biology of female body. Includes lab.
The representation of madness and how it intersects
with gender as well as class, race, sexual orientation,
and nationality.
WOST 3207. Gender and the Global Politics of Health. (3 cr;
A-F only. §GLOS 3607)
Politics, global processes, and social relations that
shape health/disease patterns world wide. Case
studies, including HIV/AIDS in Africa, diabetes
and health care in the U.S., new reproductive
technologies, and access to food. How gender,
poverty, geographic/social location, citizenship,
sexuality, and other factors help determine degree of
vulnerability to disease or right to health.
WOST 3290. Topics: Biology, Health, and Environmental
Studies. (3 cr)
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
WOST 3290H. Topics: Biology, Health, and Environmental
Studies: Enviro/ Feminism. (3 cr. Prereq–Honors)
Concepts of environmental biology, changing
conditions of life on earth, creating a sustainable
future. Connection between feminism and
environmental justice. Disproportionate impact
of environmental crises on women, children, and
economically disadvantaged communities.
WOST 3301W. Women Writers. (3 cr. Prereq–Intro literature
course)
Literature in various genres (e.g., novels, short
stories, poems, essays, plays, autobiography) written
by women of various racial/ethnic backgrounds.
WOST 3302. Women and the Arts. (3 cr)
Study of women in the arts, as represented and as
participants (creators, audiences). Discussion of at
least two different art forms and works from at least
two different U.S. ethnic or cultural communities.
WOST 3303W. Writing Differences: Literature by U.S.
Women of Color. (3 cr)
Interpret/analyze poetry, fiction, and drama of U.S.
women minority writers. Relationship of writer’s
history, ethnicity, race, class, and gender to her
writings.
WOST 3305. Language and Gender. (3 cr. §COMM 3405)
Gender and communication with an emphasis on
interdisciplinary theory. Role of communication in
creating, maintaining, reinforcing, and sometimes
changing gender relations in society.
WOST 3306. Pop Culture Women. (3 cr)
Contemporary U.S. feminism as political/intellectual
movement. Ways in which movement has been
represented in popular culture.
WOST 3307. Feminist Film Studies. (3 cr)
Construction of different notions of gender in film,
social uses of these portrayals. Lectures on film
criticism, film viewings, class discussions.
WOST 3308W. Women’s Contemporary Fiction. (3 cr)
Themes and features of style and content related to
changes in women’s roles in novels and short stories
by English-language women writers of the late 20th
century. Significance of race, sexual orientation,
class, and age in the conditions of women’s lives and
their portrayal in literature.
WOST 3390. Topics: Visual, Cultural, and Literary Studies.
(3 cr)
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
WOST 3403W. Jewish Women in the United States. (3 cr.
§AMST 3632W, JWST 3632W)
Twentieth century American Jewish women—
historically, sociologically, religiously, and
culturally; key developments over the century.
WOST 3404. International Lesbian and Queer Studies.
(3 cr. Prereq–1001 or 1002 or 3001 or #)
Lesbian/gay lives throughout world. Culturallyspecific/transcultural aspects of lesbian/gay
identity formation, political struggles, community
involvement, and global networking. Lesbian/gay
life in areas other than Europe and the United States.
WOST 3405. Latin American Women’s Lives. (3 cr. §LAS
3405. Prereq–1001, 1002 or 1003 or LAS 3131 or #)
An interdisciplinary approach to understanding
women’s lives in Latin America. Use of
ethnography, history, poetry, fiction, and
“testimonio” to understand the conditions of
women’s lives in Latin America.
WOST 3406. Gender, Labor, and Politics. (3 cr)
Historical changes in women’s labor force
participation in the United States from 1890 to
present. Systematic/institutional processes that
maintain/reproduce sex segregation. Women’s efforts
to change their work situations.
WOST 3407. Women in Early and Victorian America: 16001890. (3 cr. §HIST 3347)
Varied experiences of women in American history
from European settlement in North America to the
end of the 19th century.
WOST 3408. Women in Modern America. (3-4 cr. §HIST
3348. Prereq–3407)
History of women in the United States from 1890
to the present. Women’s changing roles in politics,
in the labor force, in the family, and in the popular
culture. Themes include work, family, sexuality,
gender ideologies, women’s right struggles, and the
different experiences of women based on race, class,
religion, and region.
WOST 3409W. Asian American Women’s Cultural
Production. (3 cr)
Diversity of cultures designated “Asian American.”
Understanding women’s lives in historical, cultural,
economic, and racial contexts.
WOST 3410. La Chicana. (3 cr. §CHIC 3212)
Focus on Chicanas or politically defined women
of the Mexican-American community. Method
is interdisciplinary emphasizing the importance
of historical context and cultural process to any
discussion of the Chicana experience.
WOST 3411. Las Mujeres. (3 cr. §CHIC 3402)
Focus on Chicanas; women of the MexicanAmerican community. Exploration of racial,
economic, political, and gender issues of concern to
all Mexican Americans and diverse Latino cultures.
WOST 3412. American Indian Women: Ethnographic and
Ethnohistorical Perspectives. (3 cr; A-F only. §AMIN 3409,
AMIN 5409)
Comparative survey of ethnographic/ethnohistorical
writings by/about American Indian women.
WOST 3413. Women and Gender in Latin American
History. (3 cr. §HIST 3424)
Changing gender norms in Latin America over time
as compared with lives of women/men of diverse
classes, ethnic groups. How women responded
to their position in society, on continuum from
accomodation to resistance.
WOST 3414. Women in Medieval Europe. (3 cr; A-F only)
Women’s role in family, politics, religion, work,
and social movements. Representations of women
in religious texts, art, literature, scientific studies,
and law. Methods/approaches to study of women’s
history.
WOST 3490. Topics: Political Economy and Global Studies.
(3 cr)
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
For definitions of course numbers, symbols, and abbreviations, see page 300.
Course Descriptions
WOST 1904. Freshman Seminar. (3 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–Freshman)
561
Course Descriptions
WOST 3503. Women and the Law. (3 cr)
Legal system as it relates to women: historical legal
approach to issues related to constitutional rights of
women.
WOST 3590. Topics: Social Change, Activism, Law, and
Policy Studies. (3 cr)
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
WOST 3690. Topics: Women, Society, and Race in the
United States. (3 cr)
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
WOST 3880H. Honors Directed instruction. (1-8 cr [max 12
cr]. Prereq–Honors)
Directed instruction.
WOST 3890H. Topics: Honors Seminar. (1-8 cr [max 12 cr].
Prereq–Honors)
Topics vary. Topics that students would like faculty
to develop into a course or topics closely related to
faculty research/scholarship or contemporary issues.
WOST 3893H. Honors Directed Study. (1-8 cr [max 12 cr].
Prereq–Honors)
Honors directed study.
WOST 3894H. Honors Directed Research. (1-8 cr [max
12 cr]. Prereq–Honors)
Honors directed research.
WOST 3980. Directed Instruction. (1-12 cr [max 12 cr].
Prereq–#, ∆, o)
WOST 3993. Directed Study. (1-12 cr [max 12 cr]. Prereq–#,
∆, o)
WOST 3994. Directed Research. (1-12 cr [max 12 cr].
Prereq–#, ∆, o)
WOST 4102. Women, Gender, and Science. (3 cr. §HSCI
4455. Prereq–1001 or 1002 or 3102 or #)
Three intersecting themes analyzed from 1700s to
the present: women in science, sexual and gendered
concepts in modern sciences, and impact of science
on conceptions of sexuality and gender in society.
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
WOST 4401. Chicana/Latina Cultural Studies. (3 cr. §CHIC
4401. Prereq–3002 or 3410 or 3411 or 3 cr Chicano studies
or #)
Diversity of cultures called “Hispanic”; women in
these cultures. Chicanas/Latinas living in United
States or migrating from their home nations to
United States.
WOST 4402. Rebels, Radicals, and Revolutionaries:
History of Western Feminisms. (3 cr [max 4 cr])
Survey of main currents in history of western
feminist thought, politics, and social movements
from 1770s to present.
WOST 4403. Queering Theory. (3 cr. Prereq–1002 or 3102
or #)
Lesbianism and lesbian identities as products of
cultural practices, relations, and meanings that are
historically specific/changing.
WOST 4404. Gender, Nation, and Literature in Latin
America. (3 cr. Prereq–[1001 or course on feminist theory],
[jr or sr])
Latin American literature/film concerning gendered
nature of Latin American politics, society,
and history. Texts by (mostly) women writers/
filmmakers. Texts are in English but available in
Spanish or Portuguese.
WOST 4490. Topics: Political Economy and Global
Studies. (3 cr. Prereq–Sr or grad student or #)
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
WOST 4502. Women and Public Policy. (3 cr. Prereq–[Jr or
sr] WoSt major or 9 cr [WoSt or pol sci or sociology] or #)
Public policy issues, processes, and histories as these
affect women-, children-, and gender-related issues.
WOST 4504. Women and the Legislative Process. (3 cr.
Prereq–Jr or sr or grad student or #)
Western/nonwestern feminist theories in
conversation. Historical, cultural, and political
context. Relation of theory to activism.
Current/historical roles, impacts, and interactions of
women as legislators, constituents, and professional
or citizen lobbyists in state/national legislatures.
Unique contributions, issues, challenges of women.
Ways in which gender is operative in legislative
process.
WOST 4108W. Senior Seminar: Writing. (3 cr. Prereq–WoSt
[jr or sr])
WOST 4505. Honors: Legislative Internship. (3 cr.
Prereq–4504 or equiv or grad, ∆)
WOST 4103H. Honors: International Feminist Theories.
(3 cr. §WOST 5104. Prereq–[3102, 8 cr WoSt] or grad or #)
Writing seminar for senior project. Writing process.
Project is completed under supervision of instructor
and faculty adviser.
WOST 4109. Field Learning. (2 cr. Prereq–WoSt major)
Projects that involve an internship or learning
practicum.
WOST 4122. Philosophy and Feminist Theory. (3 cr. §PHIL
4622, PHIL 5622, WOST 5122. Prereq–8 crs in [philosophy or
women’s studies] or #)
562
WOST 4390. Topics: Visual, Cultural, and Literary Studies.
(3 cr. Prereq–Sr or grad student or #)
Encounters between philosophy/feminism. Gender’s
influence in traditional philosophical problems/
methods. Social role of theorist/theorizing as they
relate to politics of feminism.
WOST 4190. Topics: Theory, Knowledge, and Power. (3 cr.
Prereq–Sr or grad student or #)
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
WOST 4201. The Older Woman: A Feminist Perspective.
(3 cr. Prereq–12 cr in WoSt or substantial work in psych or soc
sci)
Myths and realities surrounding conceptualizations
of older women in public, private, personal, social,
sexual, professional, and community interactions.
WOST 4290. Topics: Biology, Health, and Environmental
Studies. (3 cr. Prereq–Sr or grad student or #)
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
WOST 4302H. Honors: Women’s Personal Narratives. (3 cr.
Prereq–3301 or 3302 or 3 cr literary studies or 3 cr AFROAm
or #)
Literary autobiography, journals, travel narratives,
essays, slave narratives, and ethnographies used to
consider content of and methodological, theoretical,
and aesthetic issues in constructing/producing
women’s experience.
Discussion group and learning community for
students working as interns for a Minnesota
legislator during the year’s legislative session.
WOST 4590. Topics: Social Change, Activism, Law, and
Policy Studies. (3 cr. Prereq–Jr or sr or grad student)
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
WOST 4690. Topics: Women, Society, and Race in the
United States. (3 cr)
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
WOST 4790. Topics: Sexuality Studies. (3 cr)
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
WOST 4900W. Women’s Studies Seminar. (3 cr [max 12 cr];
A-F only. Prereq–WoSt major, junior or senior standing, or #)
Includes a component on research methods/writing.
Capstone experience. Culminates in a 20-25 page
paper.
WOST 4980. Directed Instruction. (1-8 cr [max 12 cr])
WOST 4993. Directed Study. (1-8 cr [max 12 cr])
WOST 4994. Directed Research. (1-8 cr [max 12 cr])
WOST 5101. Feminist Approaches to Ethnography. (3 cr)
Preparation for feminist ethnographic research in
the social sciences. Using recent works by feminist
ethnographers, focus is on the methods, politics, and
ethics, as well as gender, race, class, and crosscultural issues pertaining to fieldwork.
WOST 5102. Feminist Approaches to History. (3 cr.
Prereq–8 cr WoSt or grad or #)
Analysis and practice of feminist history.
Theories, methods, and sources that address the
interrelationship of gender, race, class, and sexuality.
WOST 5103. Feminist Pedagogies. (3 cr. Prereq–Grad or #)
Theory and practice of feminist pedagogies by
comparing and evaluating various multicultural
feminist theories of education/teaching and the
application of specific theories, techniques, and
teaching strategies.
WOST 5104. International Feminist Theory. (3 cr. §WOST
4103H)
Third World and transnational feminisms.
Interrogating the categories of “women,”
“feminism,” and “Third World.” Varieties of
power/oppression that women have endured/resisted,
including colonization, nationalism, globalization,
and capitalism. Concentrates on postcolonial context.
WOST 5105W. Gendered Rhetoric of Science and
Technology. (3 cr. Prereq–[§RHET 5108, §Rhet 8530]; 8 cr
WoSt or grad or #)
How cultural gender roles are affected by science
and technology as well as influence scientific and
technological thinking and communication strategies.
WOST 5107. Gender, Culture, and Science. (3 cr)
Critical study of some of the major papers
concerning the relations of gender and scientific
inquiry produced in the past 20 years.
WOST 5122. Philosophy and Feminist Theory. (3 cr. §PHIL
4622, PHIL 5622, WOST 4122. Prereq–8 crs in [philosophy or
women’s studies] or #)
Encounters between philosophy/feminism. Gender’s
influence in traditional philosophical problems/
methods. Social role of theorist/theorizing as they
relate to politics of feminism.
WOST 5190. Topics: Theory, Knowledge, and Power. (3 cr)
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
WOST 5201. Global Processes and the Politics of
Sexuality. (3 cr. Prereq–12 cr WoSt or feminist studies grad
student or #)
Comparative examination of the social construction
of sexuality. Formal/informal norms/regulations,
categories of deviance, representation of sex in the
media/arts, role of sexuality in relation to agency/
subjectivity.
WOST 5203. Women and Madness in History and
Literature. (3 cr. §WOST 3206. Prereq–Jr, 4 cr WoSt or #)
The representation of madness and how it intersects
with gender as well as class, race, sexual orientation,
and nationality.
WOST 5290. Topics: Biology, Health, and Environmental
Studies. (3 cr)
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
WOST 5300. Communication and Gender. (3 cr; A-F only.
§COMM 5406. Prereq–one women’s studies course or #)
How gender affects verbal communication.
Development of analytical skills through readings,
exercises, research that raise awareness of the
power of language and the influence of gender
prescriptions.
WOST 5390. Topics: Visual, Cultural, and Literary Studies.
(3 cr)
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
WOST 5403. Chicana/Latina Feminisms. (3 cr. Prereq–8 cr
WoSt and/or Chic or grad or #)
The historical and social development of Chicana
and Latina feminisms in general and their various
specific types.
WOST 5404. Working Class Women’s Cultures. (3 cr.
Prereq–12 cr WoSt or #)
Myths and realities surrounding working class
women and their cultures. Use sociological and
literary material in an effort to learn about working
class women and to hear their own voices.
WOST 5405. Chicanas: Women and Work. (3 cr. Prereq–#)
Chicanas, their various relationships to family/
community. Local, national, and global work forces.
Questions/issues related to growing integration of
world.s systems of production.
WOST 5490. Topics: Political Economy and Global Studies.
(3 cr [max 12 cr])
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
Course Descriptions
Legal system as it relates to women: historical legal
approach to issues related to constitutional rights of
women.
WOST 5590. Topics: Social Change, Activism, Law, and
Policy Studies. (3 cr [max 12 cr])
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
WOST 5690. Topics: Women, Society, and Race in the
United States. (3 cr)
Designing instructional programs/courses focused
on helping learners develop desired competence.
Designing instruction for performance-based training
and vocational/technical education. Developing
course syllabus components that clarify broad course
expectations. Developing academic/communitybased elements that complement course goals.
WHRE 3661. Foundations of Instructional Methods for
Business and Industry. (2 cr; A-F only. §HRD 3661)
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
WOST 5790. Topics: Sexuality Studies. (3 cr)
Topics specified in Class Schedule.
WOST 5993. Directed Study. (1-12 cr [max 12 cr])
WOST 5994. Directed Instruction. (1-12 cr [max 36 cr])
WOST 5995. Directed Research. (1-8 cr [max 36 cr])
WHRE 5341. Global Program Delivery Techniques and
Technology of Extension. (2 cr; A-F only. §AFEE 5341)
WHRE 5001. Survey: Human Resource Development and
Adult Education. (3 cr)
Overview of fields of human resource development
and adult education. Includes societal context,
theories, processes, definitions, philosophies, goals,
sponsoring agencies, professional roles, participants,
and resources. Focus on the unique characteristics
and ways the fields overlap and enhance one another.
WHRE 1301. Introduction to Career and Technical
Education Teaching. (2 cr; A-F only. Prereq–Occupationally
certifiable individual)
Entry-level skills to function as a teacher. Philosophy
of career/technical education, planning of instruction,
instructional methods, student evaluation, working
with students who have special needs, ancillary
duties of career/technical education faculty.
Emphasizes microteaching and feedback.
WHRE 3011W. Introduction to Technology and Public
Ethics. (3 cr)
Nature of technology. Values, ethical issues related
to technology. Technology and transformation of
workplace, family, community life.
WHRE 5002. Thinking, Learning, and Teaching in Work
and Human Resource Education. (3 cr; A-F only)
Nature of thinking/learning in everyday life contexts
of work and human resource education. Theory/
practice relevant to stimulating/supporting thinking/
learning in/for these contexts.
WHRE 5011W. Technology and Public Ethics. (3 cr; A-F only)
Nature of technology. Values, ethical issues related
to technology. Technology and transformation of
workplace, family, community life. Critique of
technology.
WHRE 5021. Learning Through Service. (3 cr)
WHRE 3105. Introduction to Strategic Planning Through
Human Resources. (3 cr; A-F only. Prereq–3001)
Processes organizations use when engaged in
strategic planning. How to participate in planning,
implementing, and evaluating strategic innitiatives to
improve performance.
WHRE 3121. Communication, Energy and Power,
Transportation and Machinery Technologies. (3 cr; A-F
only)
Instruction and laboratory experiences in
communication, information, power, energy, and
transportation technologies. Topics include power
systems; transportation systems; information and
communication systems; graphic communication and
computer applications.
WHRE 3301. Foundations of Philosophy and Practice of
Career and Technical Education. (2 cr; A-F only)
Service as philosophy and as method of learning.
Theory/practice of service in school-based, workbased, and community-based organizations.
WHRE 5031. Information Resources in Education. (3 cr;
S-N only)
Sources of knowledge and search strategies for
accessing library, electronic, institutional, and
informal resources of interest to educators.
WHRE 5101. Introduction to Leadership and
Administration of WHRE. (3 cr)
Finance, public relations, communications, legal
aspects, leadership, personnel policies/management,
program planning/development, evaluation. Interinstitutional collaboration of work and human
resource education programs in school-based
settings.
WHRE 5102. Leadership in WHRE. (2 cr)
Introduction to contemporary career/technical
education. Purposes/goals, governance structure,
historical perspectives, industry-education
relationship, current education practices. Possible
future trends and their implications. Development of
a personal philosophy of career/technical education.
Leadership, leadership roles/responsibilities.
Application to work and human resource education.
WHRE 5121. Principles of Supervisory Management. (3 cr)
Introduction to the principles of supervision in
education, business, industry, government, and
service organizations.
WHRE 5131. Planning WHRE. (3 cr)
Developing tests of knowledge, affect, and processes
for programs focused on instruction of skills
associated with business/industry. Developing
learning-progress reporting systems. Evaluating
instructional effectiveness. Applying tests and other
evaluation instruments to assess/report learning in
business/industry and in career/technical education
fields.
WHRE 5331. Coordination Techniques for Work and
Human Resource Education. (3 cr)
WHRE 3990. Special Topics for Undergraduates in WHRE.
(1-4 cr [max 12 cr])
Course content varies by offering.
College of Education and Human
Development
Purposes/goals of contemporary career/technical
education. Governance structure, historical
perspectives, industry-education relationship, current
education practices. Possible future trends and their
implications. Development of a personal philosophy
of career/technical education.
Purposes of cooperative work and community
education. Responsibilities of instructor coordinator.
guidance, selection, placement, supervision, and
evaluation of students. Articulation of related
instruction. Training sponsor identification,
orientation, development, and evaluation. Program
management.
WHRE 4990. Special Topics: Professional Issues in WHRE.
(1-4 cr [max 12 cr])
Work and Human Resource Education
WHRE 5301. Philosophy and Practice of Career and
Technical Education. (2 cr; A-F only)
Theory/practice in instructional methods/techniques
for career/technical education (CTE) instructors
and for human resources and development (HRD)
professionals. How to deliver instruction using
various teaching methodologies, select appropriate
methodologies, and plan for their delivery.
Course content varies by offering.
Work and Human
Resource Education
(WHRE)
WHRE 3601. Foundations of Student and Trainee
Assessment. (2 cr; A-F only)
WHRE 3629. Foundations of Course Development for
Business and Industry. (2 cr; A-F only)
Educational planning. Evaluation of work and human
resource education in formal/informal settings.
WHRE 5141. Evaluation of WHRE. (3 cr)
Designing/conducting project, program, and systems
evaluations in work and human resource education
contexts/settings.
WHRE 5201. Family and Work Relationships. (3 cr; A-F only)
Examination of the interactions of work and family
to prepare professionals to improve work and family
relationships.
Special educational activities and teaching and
communications methods and techniques for youth
and adults, ranging from outreach to extension
services, with an emphasis on youth and adult
education programs in different global settings.
WHRE 5351. Methods for Change in Developing Countries.
(3 cr; A-F only. §AFEE 5351)
Sociological and cultural parameters as they pertain
to promoting the adoption of improved practices
in rural, community, and agricultural development,
including formal and informal education institutions.
Project planning, implementation, and evaluation
related to actual change and development situations
in developing countries.
WHRE 5401. Distance Learning in Adult Education and
Training. (3 cr; A-F only)
Distance learning concepts, theory, history, present
practice, delivery systems, course design, major
issues, future directions.
WHRE 5501. Organizational Learning. (3 cr; A-F only)
Theoretical, empirical, and practical aspects of
learning in organizations. Historical context.
Definitions, theories, and applications of
organizational learning. Learning organization,
knowledge management, intellectual capital.
WHRE 5511. Education for Work. (3 cr)
Examination of contextual bases underlying
education for work; implications for practice.
WHRE 5521. Work-Based Learning Policies. (2 cr)
Aims/purposes of federal, state, and local policies,
related to work-based learning.
WHRE 5522. Work-Based Learning Practices. (3 cr)
Learning in context. Curricular integration.
Educational systems articulation. Educational
partnerships. Best practices in school-/work-/servicebased learning/connecting activities. Building
community support. Leadership relating to active,
community-based learning.
WHRE 5601. Student and Trainee Assessment. (2 cr; A-F
only. §HRD 5601. Prereq–§: BIE 5601)
Developing learning progress reporting systems
and tests of knowledge, affect, and processes for
programs focused on instruction of skills associated
with business/industry. Evaluating instructional
effectiveness. Applying tests and other evaluation
instruments to assess/report learning in business/
industry and career/technical education fields.
Students develop each type of test and an overall
evaluation plan for a course.
WHRE 5612. Managing and Consulting in Human
Resource Development and Adult Education. (3 cr.
Prereq–5001)
The theory of managing and consulting in human
resource development and adult education. Includes
a personal assessment of role requirements and
experimentation with management and consultation
processes and techniques.
For definitions of course numbers, symbols, and abbreviations, see page 300.
Course Descriptions
WOST 5501. Women and the Law. (3 cr. Prereq–9 cr [WoSt or
pre-law grad] or #)
563
Course Descriptions
WHRE 5628. Multimedia Presentations in Business. (3 cr.
Prereq–5011 or equiv)
Designing, creating, and presenting information
using multimedia resources in business settings.
WHRE 5629. Course Development for Business and
Industry. (2 cr; A-F only. §HRD 5629)
Designing instructional programs/courses that help
learners develop desired competence. Designing
instruction for performance based training and
vocational/technical education. Developing course
syllabus components that clarify course expectations.
Developing academic/community-based elements
that complement course goals. Reflect on and
compare performance-based instruction with other
curriculum models for the field.
WHRE 5661. Instructional Methods for Business and
Industry. (2 cr. Prereq–§: HRD 5661 or BIE 5661)
Theory/practice in instructional methods for career/
technical education (CTE) instructors and human
resources/development (HRD) professionals. How
to select various teaching methods and plan for their
delivery. Preparing an instructional methods plan to
clarify course content, teaching methods selected,
rationale for their selection, and how a student
organization might facilitate student learning.
WHRE 5696. Teaching Internship: Introduction. (1 cr.
§CI 5924. Prereq–Admission to initial licensure program)
Initial experiences in teaching profession.
Observation of school organization/administration,
seminars, relationship building with cooperating
teachers, reflection on personal involvement as a
beginning student teacher.
WHRE 5697. Teaching Internship: School and Classroom
Settings. (2 cr. Prereq–5696 for initial licensure program)
Nature of diverse populations, their unique learning/
training needs. Exemplary programs. Collaborative
efforts among persons representing work and human
resource education settings.
WHRE 5822. Diversity and Organizational Transformation
in Work and Human Resource Education. (3 cr)
Developing models for understanding impact
of diversity on individual, organizational, and
community outcomes. Discussing organizational
change in relation to diversity.
WHRE 5823. Program Planning and Improvement for
Special Populations in Work and Human Resource
Education. (2 cr)
Concepts, issues, and practices related to the design,
implementation, and evaluation of efforts focused
on developing new programs or modifying existing
programs, in work and human resource education
settings, for individuals with special learning needs.
WHRE 5901. Using Research in Work and Human
Resource Education. (3 cr)
Role of work and human resource education research
in professional practice. Problems of practice for
research. Alternative modes of research. Synthesis/
application of results of research.
WHRE 5990. Special Topics in Work and Human Resource
Education. (1-4 cr [max 4 cr])
Topics vary.
WHRE 5993. Directed Study in WHRE. (1-4 cr [max 4 cr])
Self-directed study, with faculty advice, in areas not
covered by regular courses.
Part-time supervised teaching experience in a school.
Seminars on managing student’s learning in context
of work and human resource education programs in
contemporary schools and on becoming a reflective
educator.
Youth Development and
Research (YOST)
WHRE 5698. Teaching Internship. (3-8 cr [max 8 cr].
Prereq–Admission to initial licensure program)
College of Education and Human
Development
Teaching experience in a school system that provides
programs for grades 5-12.
WHRE 5699. Teaching Internship: Extended. (1 cr. §CI 5927.
Prereq–5698)
Extended student teaching experience in a school
system that provides programs for grades 5-12.
WHRE 5771. Teaching Entrepreneurship: Small Business
Management. (3 cr)
Methods, organization, curriculum development and
modification, and implementation of educational
programs for entrepreneurs.
WHRE 5801. Educating Special Populations in Work and
Human Resource Education Settings. (3 cr)
Identifying/accommodating in work and human
resource education settings educational traits
of students with disabilities and disadvantaging
conditions.
564
WHRE 5821. Diversity Issues and Practices in Work and
Human Resource Education Settings. (3 cr)
WHRE 5802. Enhancing Work-based Learning Through
Collaboration. (2 cr)
Interagency planning issues/practices relating to
special populations for educational, business, and
human service organization personnel, family
members, and advocates.
WHRE 5803. Developmental Writing and the College
Student: Theory and Practice. (3 cr. Prereq–Bachelor’s
degree)
Basic grounding in theory/practice of college-level
developmental writing instruction. History of “basic
writing,” development of notions of “academic
discourse,” error/grammar in student writing, best
classroom practices, current issues.
WHRE 5804. Research in Postsecondary Developmental
Education. (3 cr. Prereq–Bachelor’s degree, courses in [intro
psychology, basic statistics])
Strategies for conducting three types of research that
are central to developmental education: placement
test validation, program evaluation, and classroom
research. Students read examples and learn what
constitutes best practices in each type.
School of Social Work
YOST 1001. Seeing Youth, Thinking Youth: Media, Popular
Media, and Scholarship. (3 cr)
Use of life-experience, news and popular media to
explore everyday realities of being a young person,
as it varies by age social class, race/ethnicity,
geography, time period, sexual orientation, and
capacity.
YOST 2001. The Everyday Lives of Youth. (4 cr)
Introduction to everyday lived experience of youth.
Ways of knowing youth. Social/cultural foundations
of youthwork. How to “read” life-worlds of young
people. At least 15 hours of service learning required.
YOST 2002W. Introduction to Youth Studies:
Understanding Youth, Young People, Youthood, and Youth
Work. (4 cr)
Introduces youth studies minor. Prepares students
for more in-depth departmental offerings and for
continued scholarship or later work with youth,
directly or on their behalf.
YOST 2101. Urban Youth and Youth Issues. (4 cr.
Prereq–1001 or #)
What it is like to be a young person in a city, in the
United States and worldwide.
YOST 2241. Experiential Learning. (4 cr. §YOST 5241.
Prereq–[1001, 2001] or #)
History/theory of experiential learning, its
application in youthwork. Observation, reflection,
program design, and evaluation skills grounded
in experiential learning theory. 15 hours of field
observation required.
YOST 3001. Introduction to History and Philosophy of
Youthwork. (4 cr. Prereq–2xxx or #)
Foundations of youthwork. Where contemporary
American youthwork stands, particularly in
comparison with international perspectives on
youth/youthwork.
YOST 3002. Observation Lab: Youth, Youth Development,
and Youth Work. (1 cr; A-F only. Prereq–SOC 1001, PSY 1001,
2001, ¶3001 and 3003)
Field observation of young people. Field visits to
youth programs.
YOST 3003. Bridging Theories, Research, Practices, and
Observations about Youth Development and Youth Work.
(1 cr; A-F only. Prereq–PSY 1001, SOC 1001, 2001, ¶3001
and 3002)
Reflective seminar to carry out, at beginning level,
guided reflection of one’s/others’ ideas, experiences,
feelings about courses, self, youth work.
YOST 3004. Youth in Community Context: Home, School,
Neighborhood, Geography, Programs, Policies. (2 cr; A-F
only. Prereq–3001, ¶3005 and 3006)
Introduces community, sociocultural context of
“growing up,” “coming of age” as primary site for
healthy youth development. Community introduced
also as home to youth agencies/programs along
intervention continuum. How community-based
cultural identity, social expectations of young
people frame young people’s roles in school, work,
neighborhoods.
YOST 3006. Fieldwork Seminar: Youth, Youthworker,
Context, Programs, Organizations, Place. (1 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–3001, current enrollment in 3004 and 3005)
Beginning youth work, youth agency, program,
organization, service as found in students’ youth
work field experience.
YOST 3007. Integrative Seminar: Analysis, Experience,
Reflection on Youth Studies and Youth Work. (2 cr; A-F only.
Prereq–3001, 3006)
Students integrate their two years of observation,
analysis, experiences, and reflections about youth,
youth work, youth programs. Work/career paths for
beginning/advanced youth workers.
YOST 3031. International Youthwork. (3 cr; S-N only. §YOST
5031. Prereq–2xxx or #)
Lives of young people living outside the United
States and of immigrants/refugees now resident in
this country. Working with and on behalf of such
groups. Socio-political analysis of globalization,
its impact on young people, youthwork, and youth
policy worldwide.
YOST 3032. Adolescent and Youth Development for
Youthworkers. (4 cr. §YOST 5032. Prereq–1001 or 2001 or
2002W or 2101, [any Psych or CPSY course])
Application of theory/research about children/
adolescents. How findings can be used. How theories
facilitate understanding of behavior.
YOST 3101. Introduction to Youthwork. (4 cr. Prereq–One
gen psy course, one gen soc course)
Historical/contemporary approaches to youthwork,
diverse settings in which it is done, importance of
worker’s life experience in crafting ethical, effective
practice. At least 15 hours of field experience.
YOST 3234. Youth Agencies, Organizations, and Youth
Service Systems. (3 cr. §YOST 5234. Prereq–[Two soc/ANTH
courses, work experience in youth [agency or org]] or #)
Communities/governmental responses to young
people as potential problems through agencies,
programs, and other organizational forms. Purpose,
structure, and activities of such forms. How the
forms are/are not integrated into youth service
systems.
YOST 3235. Community Building, Civic Engagement, and
Civic Youthwork. (4 cr. §YOST 5235. Prereq–[2001, One basic
course in Pol, one basic course in Soc] or #)
Reciprocities between youth development and
community development brought about by young
people’s civic engagement. Individual, social, and
political change by/for young people and their
community.
YOST 3240. Special Topics in Youth Studies. (2-8 cr [max
10 cr]. §YOST 5240. Prereq–[Two social sci courses, exp
working with youth] or #)
In-depth investigation of one area of youth studies.
Teaching procedure/approach determined by
specific topic and student needs. Topic announced in
advance.
Course Descriptions
YOST 5031. International Youthwork. (3 cr. §YOST 3031.
Prereq–2xxx or #)
Independent reading or research under faculty
supervision.
YOST 4002W. Constructing Personal Models of Youth
Scholarship and Youth Work. (4 cr. Prereq–2002)
Integrates/ends University-wide undergraduate
youth studies minor. Students analyze/reflect on
youth studies minor course content, especially those
models, theories, and concepts presented in 2002.
Youth, young people, youthhood, youth work.
Models, personal responds to youth. Occupational/
vocational callings. Class discussion, written
assignments.
YOST 4160H. Honors Capstone Project. (2 cr [max 4 cr].
Prereq–YOST honors or #)
Individualizes the honors experience by connecting
aspects of major program with special academic
interests.
YOST 4301. Communicating With Adolescents About
Sexuality. (3 cr. Prereq–1001 or 2002W or #)
How to communicate sensitively/effectively with
adolescents and their concerned persons about
sexuality in everyday life. Focuses on healthy sexual
development (physical, emotional, ethical) and
sexual diversities. Adolescent sexual issues: gender,
body image, disease, sexual violence, intimacy, sex
in cyberspace.
Lives of young people living outside the United
States and of immigrants/refugees now resident in
this country. Working with and on behalf of such
groups. Socio-political analysis of globalization.
Its impact on young people, youthwork, and youth
policy worldwide.
YOST 5032. Adolescent and Youth Development for
Youthworkers. (4 cr. §YOST 3032. Prereq–[1001 or 2001 or
2002W or 2101], [any Psych or CPSY course])
Application of theory/research about children/
adolescents. How findings/theories facilitate
understanding of behavior.
YOST 5101. Youth Work Practice I: Internship. (3 cr.
Prereq–3101, 5032 or equiv, ¶5111, #)
First course of a sequential internship that includes
15 hours per week working with youth in a
community youth-serving organization. Develop and
enhance competence and identity as a youth worker,
and reflect on and integrate knowledge about youth
with on-going experience in youth work.
YOST 5102. Youth Work Practice II: Internship. (3 cr.
Prereq–5101, ¶5112, #)
YOST 4315. Youthwork in Schools. (4 cr. §YOST 5315.
Prereq–Introductory course in education or #)
Second course of a sequential internship that
includes 15 hours per week of work with youth in a
community youth-serving organization. Develop and
enhance competence and identity as a youth worker,
and reflect on and integrate knowledge about youth
with ongoing experience in youth work.
YOST 4319. Understanding Youth Subcultures. (3 cr. §YOST
5319. Prereq–2001 or one course each in [anth, soc] or #)
Weekly discussion seminar taken concurrently with
5101 to integrate theory and praxis with youth work
experience. Written and experiential assignments to
increase knowledge, competency, and skills related
to working with youth.
Craft of youthwork as a framework to understand
life-worlds of young people and a practice to
enhance healthy development. How young people
often divide their lives into artificial/harmful divide:
school and not school.
Young people’s participation in and understanding
of subcultures, life-styles, and event cultures. Place
of these in young people’s identity, friendship, and
life chances.
YOST 4321. Work with Youth: Individual. (2 cr. Prereq–1001
or 2101 or #)
Assumptions underlying individual work with youth.
Issues/concerns of adolescents and of persons who
work with them in one-to-one interactions.
YOST 4322. Work with Youth: Families. (2 cr. Prereq–1001
or 2002W or #)
Theories /techniques of working with youth and
their families. Emphasizes practical methods
of structural change, developing effective
communication, decision-making and problemsolving systems, winning the family’s cooperation.
Role of professional in influencing healthy family
development.
YOST 4323. Work with Youth: Groups. (2 cr. Prereq–[[1001
or 2002W], 4321] or #)
Social group work, adolescent group needs/
associations. Group process. Working with diverse
groups of youth in community, in group living
situations, and in group therapy.
YOST 4401W. Young People’s Spirituality and Youthwork:
An Introduction. (4 cr. §YOST 5401. Prereq–1001 or 2002W
or #)
Adolescent spirituality, its relation to working with
young people. Faith/spirituality as necessary for
healthy youth development. Knowledge, attitudes,
and skills to recognize spirituality in cultural, social,
economic, and political worlds.
YOST 4402. Youth Policy: Enhancing Healthy Development
in Everyday Life. (4 cr. §YOST 5402. Prereq–[2001, one
course each in [FSoS, PolSci, Soc]] or #)
Youth policy as formulated in response to youth
issues, problems, and community/public concerns.
Policy as a political response to youth panics, as
indirect youthwork, and as a community’s moral
compact with its young people. Perspectives
explored are specific to student interests.
YOST 5301. Communicating With Adolescents About
Sexuality. (3 cr. Prereq–[Upper div AdPy course, exper working
with youth] or #)
How to communicate sensitively/effectively
with adolescents and their concerned persons
about sexuality in everyday life. Healthy sexual
development (physical, emotional, ethical), sexual
diversities. Gender/body image, disease, sexual
violence, intimacy, sex in cyberspace.
YOST 5313. Direct Work with Adolescents. (2 cr. Prereq–
Two social sci courses, exper working with youth or #)
Designed to give an understanding of direct work
with troubled and at-risk adolescents in a wide range
of settings where youth workers or social workers
are typically involved. Emphasis on young people in
groups in the “lifespace” in everyday life, rather than
in one-to-one office-based interactions.
YOST 5315. Youthwork in Schools. (4 cr. §YOST 4315.
Prereq–Introductory course in education or #)
Craft of youthwork as a framework to understand
life-worlds of young people and a practice to
enhance healthy development. How young people
often make artificially/harmfully divide their lives
into school and not school.
YOST 5319. Understanding Youth Subcultures. (3 cr. §YOST
4319. Prereq–2001 or one course each in [Anth, Soc] or #)
Young people’s participation in and understanding
of subcultures, life-styles, and event cultures. Place
of these in young people’s identity, friendship, and
life chances.
YOST 5111. Youth Work Methods I: Seminar. (1 cr.
Prereq–3101, 5032 or equiv, ¶5101, #)
YOST 5321. Work with Youth—Individual. (2 cr. Prereq–
5032 or equiv or #)
YOST 5112. Youth Work Methods II: Seminar. (1 cr.
Prereq–5111, ¶5102, #)
YOST 5322. Work with Youth—Families. (2 cr. Prereq–5321
or upper div AdPy course, family theory course or #)
Weekly discussion seminar taken concurrently with
5102 to integrate theory and praxis with youth work
experience. Written and experiential assignments to
increase knowledge, competency, and skills related
to working with youth.
YOST 5234. Youth Agencies, Organizations, and Youth
Service System. (3 cr. §YOST 3234. Prereq–[Two soc/ANTH
courses, work experience in [youth agency or org]] or #)
Communities/governmental responses to young
people as potential problems through agencies/
programs and other organizational forms. Purpose,
structure, activities of such forms. How forms are/are
not integrated into youth service systems.
Examination of basic assumptions underlying
individual work with youth. Attention to special
issues and concerns of adolescents and of persons
who work with them, especially those who work
with youth in one-to-one interactions.
Theories and techniques of working with youth
and their families. Emphasis on practical methods
of structural change, developing effective
communication, decision-making and problemsolving systems, winning the family’s cooperation;
the role of the professional to influence healthy
family development.
YOST 5323. Work with Youth—Groups. (2 cr. Prereq–5321
or CPSY or EPSY course or #)
Adolescent group needs/associations. Group
process. Working with groups of adolescents in the
community, in group living situations, and in group
therapy.
YOST 5235. Community Building, Civic Engagement, and
Civic Youthwork. (4 cr. §YOST 3235. Prereq–[2001, one basic
course in Pol, one basic course in Soc] or #)
YOST 5401. Young People’s Spirituality and Youthwork:
an Introduction. (4 cr; A-F only. §YOST 4401W. Prereq–[2001,
one course each in [Anth, Soc, CPsy]] or #)
YOST 5240. Special Topics in Youth Studies. (2 cr [max 10
cr]. §YOST 3240. Prereq–Two social sci courses, exper working
with youth or #)
YOST 5402. Youth Policy: Enhancing Healthy Development
in Everyday Life. (4 cr. §YOST 4402. Prereq–[2001, one
course each in [FSoS, PolSci, Soc]] or #)
Reciprocities between youth development and
community development brought about by young
people’s civic engagement. Individual, social, and
political change by/for young people and their
community.
In-depth investigation of one area of youth studies.
Teaching procedure and approach determined by
specific topic and student needs. Topic announced in
advance.
YOST 5241. Experiential Learning. (4 cr. §YOST 2241.
Prereq–[1001, 2001] or #)
History/theory of experiential learning, its
application in youthwork. Observation, reflection,
program design, and evaluation skills grounded
in experiential learning theory. 15 hours of field
observation required.
Adolescent spirituality, its relation to working with
young people. Faith/spirituality as actual/necessary
aspects of healthy youth development. Research,
active community-based programs. Knowledge,
attitudes, and skills to meet adolescent needs/wants.
Youth policy as formulated in response to youth
issues, problems, and community/public concerns.
Policy as political response to youth panics, as
indirect youthwork, and as a community’s moral
compact with its young people. Perspectives are
explored specific to student interests.
YOST 5291. Independent Study in Youth Studies. (1-8 cr
[max 8 cr])
Independent reading and/or research under faculty
supervision.
For definitions of course numbers, symbols, and abbreviations, see page 300.
Course Descriptions
YOST 3291. Independent Study in Youth Studies. (1-8 cr
[max 8 cr]. Prereq–#)
565
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