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Report on College-level findings from the 2013 King’s Experience Survey May 2013

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Report on College-level findings from the 2013 King’s Experience Survey May 2013
Report on College-level
findings from the 2013
King’s Experience Survey
May 2013
King’s Learning Institute
The King’s Experience Survey aims to provide information and assistance to the College,
Schools, Departments, students and others, to improve student learning and the student
experience. The survey documents dimensions of quality in undergraduate education, inviting
students to assess the extent to which they engage in educational practices associated with high
levels of learning and development.
1
Table of Contents
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
3
ABOUT THE SURVEY
3
BENCHMARKS
3
QUICK FACTS
4
RESPONDENTS
5
SOME KEY FINDINGS
5
SELECTED RESULTS
6
ENGAGEMENT AND SATISFACTION
7
ACTIVITIES AND SUPPORT
8
BENCHMARK DATA
9
National comparative benchmarks
9
King’s curriculum characteristics
10
Indicators of engagement
11
King’s priority areas
12
QUALITATIVE COMMENTS
14
APPENDIX: BENCHMARK SURVEY DATA
15
2
Executive summary
The King’s Experience Survey (KES) was sent to all non-final year undergraduate students
during March 2013. It asked 71 questions about students’ experiences inside and outside of the
classroom, how they spend their time and their perspective on the learning environment.
Questions are grouped into ‘Benchmarks’ of related activities. Students at King’s reported the
highest levels of engagement in areas of Academic Challenge, Critical Thinking and Course
Challenge. Lower levels of engagement were reported for Global Connectedness and Cocurricular Engagement. Students who report higher levels of engagement, measured across 17
Engagement Benchmarks, also report significantly higher levels of Overall Satisfaction. The
strongest correlation with Overall Satisfaction was Feedback, particularly whether students felt
they had opportunities to provide feedback on their course, that it was listened to and valued and
that it was clear how it was acted upon. Other strong correlations with satisfaction included
Academic Support and Student-Academic Relationships.
About the survey
The Benchmarks were drawn from a number of sources. They were created through scales of 55
out of the 71 questions on the survey. Another 10 questions asked students how they spent their
time during term. Four questions asked students about feedback and satisfaction, and the final
two were open-comment questions on what King’s does well and what King’s could do to
improve. The last two questions, along with two other open-ended comment questions in the
survey, provided nearly 2000 qualitative comments from students. These are explored in more
depth in the customised School and Department reports.
Benchmarks
Each benchmark summarises students’ responses on a set of related questions. They concisely
distil important aspects of the student experience inside and outside of the classroom. Each
benchmark is expressed on a 100-point scale. Benchmarks were computed by rescaling
responses to each component question from 0 to 100, then taking the average of the survey items.
National comparative benchmarks




Critical Thinking
Course Challenge
Academic Integration
Collaborative Learning
Engagement indicators



Academic Challenge
Learning with Peers
Student-Academic Relationships
King’s curriculum characteristics





Research-rich Environment
Interdisciplinarity
Academic Literacy
Community Engagement
Global Connectedness
King’s priority areas




Feedback
Assessment
Academic Support
Co-curricular Engagement
3
Quick facts
Partners
Over half of the 71 KES questions are
derived from the North American-based
National Survey of Student Engagement
(NSSE), which has been running for over a
decade and has been used by over 1,400
institutions in the US with over 4 million
students participating in the survey. The
King’s Experience survey itself is available
at www.kcl.ac.uk/kes and takes about 10-15
minutes to complete.
King’s has joined the Student Engagement
Surveys Working Group, facilitated through
the Higher Education Academy (HEA), to
pilot
engagement
survey
questions
nationally. The group includes the
Universities of Oxford, Bath and Warwick,
amongst others. The data will be analysed
anonymously and nationally benchmarked
data will be available on 14 questions,
organised through four scales, covering 20
per cent of the survey.
Population
Response Rate
The survey was sent to all non-final year
undergraduate students at King’s, 9051 in
total. Final year undergraduate students have
the opportunity to complete the National
Student Survey (NSS).
There were 1480 respondents (1373 fully
completed). The institutional response rate
was 16.4%. This is in line with similar
survey response rates at KCL.
Objectives
To provide data to the College and Schools
to use to enhance the undergraduate student
experience, inform accountability efforts,
and facilitate national benchmarking efforts.
Audiences
College management, academic staff,
personal tutors, professional staff, students,
governing boards, institutional researchers,
government agencies, prospective students
and their families, school counsellors.
Administration and Analysis
The survey was administered through the
Bristol On-line Survey system (BOS) in
coordination with the Quality & Academic
Support Office. It was open from 27
February - 2 April 2013. Analysis was
conducted by researchers in King’s Learning
Institute.
Validity & Reliability
The NSSE survey was designed by experts
and extensively tested to ensure validity and
reliability and to minimize non-response
bias and mode effects. Further validity and
cognitive testing was done on the KES
survey questions with students and staff.
Management
The King’s Experience Survey is part of the
King’s Experience Project, coordinated
through King’s Learning Institute. The
survey was approved by Academic Board in
December 2012.
Further information
More information, and a copy of the survey,
is available at www.kcl.ac.uk/kes. Please
contact Dr Camille B. Kandiko with any
queries at [email protected]
4
Respondents
There were 1480 respondents (1373 fully completed). The institutional response rate was 16.4%,
in line with the first year of running similar surveys at KCL. Of the respondents, 42% were firstyear students, 40% second-year students and the rest third- and fourth-year students. In common
with national survey responses, two-thirds of respondents were female. Three-quarters of the
respondents were Home students, the remainder split between international and EU students.
Some key findings
There was minimal variation in responses by gender and domicile. Greater differences were seen
across areas of study and year of study. Engagement levels were higher for second-year students
compared with first-year students in: Collaborative Learning, Co-Curricular Engagement, Global
Connectedness, Research-Rich Environment and Learning with Peers. Engagement levels were
lower for second-year students compared to first-years in: Course Challenge, Community
Engagement, Academic Support, and Course Feedback. The survey asked students how they
spend their time inside and outside of the classroom, preparing for formal study and how they
spent their time beyond the College.
How students spend their time
18.0
16.0
14.0
12.0
10.0
8.0
6.0
4.0
2.0
0.0
Table 1. Average student hours per week during term time
5
Selected Results
Encouraging findings
Students at King’s are prepared for life after
College: 99% of students feel their
programme has emphasised them becoming
independent learners and 95% of students
report teaching that draws on real world and
local examples
Most students (95%) report at least
‘sometimes’ asking a question in class
Students learn in a research environment,
with 94% of students looking beyond their
reading lists and 89% reading research
publications as part of their coursework and
85% have been exposed to academic staff’s
own research
About half of all students often have indepth conversations with students who are
different from them in terms of religious
beliefs, political opinions or personal values
Furthermore, 29% of students have worked
with academic staff on a research project,
and another 29% plan to do this during their
time at King’s
62% of all students at King’s have done or
plan to do an internship
KCL students average 16 timetabled contact
hours a week, and spend another 20 hours a
week preparing for lectures and working on
coursework
Four out of five students at King’s spend
fewer than 5 hours a week participating in
co-curricular activities, with over a third
reporting no participation
One-third of King’s students is in paid
employment, and work on average 10 hours
per week. Interestingly, students who work
also report higher levels of engagement
across all Benchmarks and slightly higher
levels of satisfaction
International and EU students report less
peer interaction and collaborative learning
compared with home students
83% of second-year students have given a
presentation in class, up to 88% for thirdyear students
Regarding feedback, 83% of students report
adequate opportunities to give feedback on
their course
Opportunities for improvement
Half of all students have not participated in
co-curricular activities
88% of students have not worked with
academic staff on activities other than
coursework
86% of students have not talked about their
career plans with teaching staff, advisors or
tutors
Only 44% of students have often explained
course material to other students, and only
38% have regularly worked with other
students on projects or assignments
Only 27% of students report volunteering,
but those who do volunteer do so about 6.5
hours per week.
92% of students spend fewer than 5 hours a
week participating in co-curricular activities
associated with their studies, with 55% not
doing so at all
6
Engagement and satisfaction
The relationship between engagement and satisfaction is shown in Table 2. As an example, the
Benchmark ‘Feedback on the Course’ is a composite score of questions about whether students
felt they had opportunities to provide feedback on their course, that it was listened to and valued
and that it was clear how students’ comments was acted upon, put on a 100-point scale. For
students who were unsatisfied with their experience at King’s, they reported an average of 29.03
on ‘Feedback on the Course’, meaning most disagreed they had opportunities to feedback on
their course. The average moved to 45.19 for students who said they were neither satisfied nor
dissatisfied with their course. However, students who were satisfied with their experience at
King’s had an average of 63.08, indicating they were much more satisfied with the feedback
opportunities they had.
Overall Satisfaction
Unsatisfied
Academic Challenge
Critical Thinking
Feedback on the Course
Course Challenge
Interdisciplinarity
Peer Interaction
Academic Literacy
Collaborative Learning
Academic Support
Community Engagement
Feedback Overall
Research Rich Environments
Academic Integration
Assessment
Student-Academic Relationships
Global Connectedness
Co-curricular Engagement
Mean
52.51
50.36
29.03
40.98
43.90
46.54
43.54
44.73
29.45
32.14
24.40
35.88
31.22
22.30
23.16
29.82
24.20
Neutral
Mean
57.04
54.79
45.19
46.69
48.00
51.40
46.64
47.48
39.32
39.99
33.44
37.28
34.06
27.44
27.86
31.39
22.72
Benchmark
Satisfied
Mean
68.91
65.61
63.08
58.14
57.96
56.63
53.36
50.39
51.26
49.47
46.85
40.74
41.30
39.03
38.50
35.24
24.95
Average
Mean
64.87
61.90
55.79
54.09
54.54
54.47
51.02
49.18
46.50
45.71
41.80
39.53
38.82
35.00
34.80
33.93
24.48
Table 2. Relationship between Satisfaction and Engagement Benchmarks
7
Activities and support
Students reported high levels of independent learning, spending large portions of their time on
higher-order thinking, coursework and revision. Students reported reading research materials and
developing skills to think and learn in a research-like way. Students reported lower levels of
engagement with academic staff, particularly outside of coursework, and reported lower levels of
holistic support and development opportunities. However, even minimal exposure to activities
such as fieldstrips and talking about career plans can have beneficial outcomes for students.
Most Frequent Activities
Applying facts, theories or
methods to practical problems
or new situations
Least Frequent Activities
70.5%
Analysing an idea, experience, 67.9%
or line of reasoning in depth
Looked beyond your reading
list when researching for
coursework
66.8%
Read research publications as
part of your course
60.4%
Worked with academic
staff on activities other than
coursework (for example
staff/student committees,
student representation, etc)
Discussed ideas from your
course with teaching staff
outside taught sessions
Participated in fieldtrips,
visits and offsite activities
related to one or more of
your programme
Talked about your career
plans with teaching staff,
advisors or tutors
12.2%
13.7%
15.8%
17.4%
Table 3. Most and least frequent activities; Percentage responding ‘Very often’ or ‘often’
Most Emphasis and Support
Least Emphasis and Support
Becoming an independent
learner
83.5%
Spending significant amounts
of time studying and on
academic work
81.4%
Using e-resources for
learning, including study
skills, data collection and
information retrieval
Challenging you to do your
best work
78.2%
58.8%
Encouraging you to
become a better informed
and active citizen
Providing support for
students' overall well-being
(recreation, health care,
counselling, etc.)
Incorporating international
perspectives
30.4%
Providing support
preparing students for
employment
37.5%
32.6%
34.3%
Table 4. Most and least frequent emphasis and support; Percentage responding ‘Very much’ or ‘Quite a bit’
8
Benchmark data
Results were grouped into Benchmarks. National comparative data will be available for four
Benchmarks (Critical Thinking; Course Challenge; Academic Integration and Collaborative
Learning) from a pilot run through the Higher Education Academy (HEA) in late summer. Other
Benchmarks include five derived from the King’s Curriculum Characteristics, another three
drawing on Indicators of Engagement from the US-based National Survey of Student
Engagement (NSSE), and four other related to areas of priority at King’s: Assessment, Feedback,
Academic Support and Co-curricular Engagement. Table 2 above shows the average level of
engagement for each Benchmark.
National comparative benchmarks
These benchmarks were chosen because the US-based National Survey of Student Engagement
and subsequent research has shown that these most strongly predict student success, broadly
defined as retention, progression and positive learning outcomes. On Critical Thinking, King’s
students fare well in all the items, with over two-thirds regularly applying facts and theories to
practical situations and analysing an idea in depth. However, almost 10% of respondents stated
their programme does not emphasise the importance of forming a new idea or understanding
from various pieces of information.
Predictors of student success
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
Critical Thinking
Course Challenge
Academic Integration
Collaborative Learning
Table 5. Average engagement on national comparative benchmarks (on 100-point scale)
For Course Challenge, student responses indicate that 40% state that they felt their course was
often or very often challenging, 42% felt their course was sometimes challenging and the rest
claim it has not challenged them. For the Academic Integration Benchmark, the responses for the
9
different items vary. Items which relate to contact with teaching staff and academics score
considerably lower, such as discussing ideas from the course with academic staff outside of
class. Results suggest that students feel that contact with academic staff outside class, be it
relating to performance in the course or to career development, rarely happens outside taught
sessions. However, over half of all students regularly asked questions in class and discussed
ideas outside of class with others. Similarly, regarding Collaborative Learning, it is not a
common practice for the majority of respondents, but most students have at least some
experience of it.
King’s curriculum characteristics
The King’s curriculum characteristics are part of the King’s Experience Project, an initiative to
enhance the student learning experience at King’s. Presently, students have mixed engagement
with the various characteristics. Results for the Research-rich Environment Benchmark indicate
that perhaps students do not make the most of the resources available to them at King’s in terms
of attending talks and presentations which are not part of their curriculum. More engagement
was seen in the items relating to looking beyond the reading lists for their courses and assessing
research publications to prepare for their courses.
King's Curriculum Characteristics
60.00
50.00
40.00
30.00
20.00
10.00
0.00
Benchmark Mean
Table 6. Average benchmark score for Curriculum Characteristics
Interdisciplinarity was the highest-scoring benchmark, with 85% of students reporting at least
some interdisciplinary engagement. This includes combining ideas from different courses and
having exposure to real-world and local examples in teaching sessions. For Academic Literacy,
items varied greatly, from a rather high 70% of students stating they have regularly applied facts,
theories and methods to practical problems or new situations to only 28% of students who often
10
or very often made significant changes to their work based on feedback, with nearly a quarter
stating they had never made significant changes based on feedback.
Students at King’s report lower levels of Community Engagement and Global Connectedness. A
quarter of students reported that their teaching never incorporated international perspectives and
only a third of students included diverse and global perspectives in course discussions or
assignments. However, even minimal exposure to some activities may have a substantial impact
on students: 75% of students report at least some teaching done by community-based experts,
and 85% of students report having had at least some conversations with students who were very
different from them in terms of their religious beliefs, political opinions or personal values.
Indicators of engagement
Students reported the highest levels of engagement on Academic Challenge, indicating that
King’s provides a rigorous learning environment, with 95% of students reporting their course has
emphasised them becoming independent learners. Students also reported high levels of Peer
Interaction, with 95% explaining course material to other students and 75% reporting positive
relationships with other students on their course, however, fewer than half reported positive
experiences with other students at King’s. This signals another area for improvement at King’s:
Student-Academic Relationships. Fewer than one-fifth of students reported regularly interacting
with academic staff, including working on committees, discussing ideas outside of class or
talking about career plans. Disappointingly, fewer than half of students reported positive
interactions with academic staff and their personal tutor.
Relationship with
personal tutor
Relationship with
academic staff
Poor
Poor
Neutral
Neutral
Positive
Positive
Figure 1. Quality of relationship with tutor Figure 2. Quality of relationship with staff
11
King’s priority areas
These benchmarks cover areas of the student experience that King’s is investing in improving,
including Assessment, Feedback, Academic Support and Co-curricular Engagement. As noted
above in Table 1, Feedback on the Course was the strongest predictor of student satisfaction.
Less than a third of students agreed that it was clear how students’ comments on their course had
been acted upon.
Feedback on the course: percentage that agree
70.0%
60.0%
50.0%
40.0%
30.0%
20.0%
10.0%
0.0%
Adequate opportunity to
feedback
Feedback listened to and valued
Feedback acted upon
Table 7. Satisfaction with feedback
On Assessment, the feedback loop is not as effective as it could be. Only 36% of students report
receiving written feedback on their work often, and one-fifth of students report regularly being
provided with oral feedback on their work. This is likely related to only 20% of students
regularly discussing their academic performance and feedback with an academic member of
staff. Inconsequence, a quarter of students report never making significant changes to their work
based on feedback.
Students appear to have mixed views on the support King’s provides. Areas of particular concern
are students’ overall well-being, learning support services, and careers advice. Although 95% of
students report using e-resources for learning, only 40% regularly use learning support services.
Regarding career development, a quarter of students feels King’s provides very little emphasis
on preparing students for employment or opportunities for professional development.
12
Participation in co-curricular activities
Not decided
Do not plan to do
Plan to do
Done
Figure 3. Participation in co-curricular activities
Finally, in contrast to high levels of academic engagement, students report lower levels of Cocurricular Engagement. Only half of all students have participated in co-curricular activities.
Only 10% of students have volunteered through KCLSU, and a quarter report volunteering
through other organisations. However, another quarter of students plan on volunteering.
Internships provide a huge opportunity to enhance the student experience, with only 13% of
students reporting having done an internship, but over 50% of students plan to do one.
Participation in an Internship
Not decided
Do not plan to do
Plan to do
Done
Figure 4. Participation in an internship
13
Qualitative comments
After initial analysis, several key themes emerged from the qualitative comments. The most
common theme was feedback, which is noted above as an integral part of the student experience.
Recurring themes included relationships with staff—particularly with students’ personal tutor—
programme organisation and the availability and suitability of study areas. Further themes
emerged around quality of lectures, frequency of events and the availability of resources across
the different campuses.
The positive comments featured students who were engaged with life at King’s and had
productive relationships with academic staff. Many of the suggestions for improvement were
about the lack of community students felt at King’s, in relation to the London setting, a lack of
connection with other students and relationships with staff and their personal tutor, and problems
with communication with administrative staff. Some typical examples follow:
What King’s does well:
Attracts academics whose work is highly valued and interesting, thus providing students
with inspiring and insightful lectures which are conducive to more fruitful seminar
discussions.
Gives a well-rounded curriculum that is not strictly problem-based but encourages
participation outside of the course. This builds independence that will be needed in our
future careers.
It is very laissez-faire about how you run your day-to-day life but always has facilities
that can provide you with guidance on how to get back on the right track should you need
to. It acknowledges that as students we are adults but in return we have to accept
responsibility and the consequences for whatever decisions we make. King's is nurturing,
welcoming, and engaging - it all makes me want to get up in the morning and go to
lectures.
Suggestions for improvement:
Basic administration e.g. Clearer, more efficient timetabling, informed scheduled changes
in advanced. Probably too much work but marked exam practice to inform students if
their essays are correctly structured and have the right content that will be necessary in
the exams. Employment focus, highlighted internships available to kings students, how
to secure placements, planning for future careers etc.
Main criticism: THERE NEEDS TO BE A LOT MORE STUDENT CONTACT WITH
STAFF My year group is massive and I understand that university is all about
independent learning, however I still feel that there are too many lectures and too little
tutorials/ time allowed to talk to academic staff.
14
Appendix: Benchmark survey data
Data is presented for all students on each of the items, organised into the Benchmarks
National comparative benchmarks
Critical Thinking
Analysing an idea, experience, or line of reasoning in
depth
Forming a new idea or understanding from various
pieces of information
Evaluating a point of view, decision, or information
source
Applying facts, theories or methods to practical
problems or new situations
Critical Thinking Benchmark
Very often/often
67.1%
Sometimes
26.0%
Never
5.7%
57.3%
32.0%
9.5%
60.3%
30.2%
7.1%
70.0%
24.3%
5.0%
63.7%
28.1%
6.8%
Very often/often
36.8%
Sometimes
43.0%
Never
17.2%
23.2%
56.4%
18.1%
58.6%
40.0%
27.7%
42.4%
13.4%
16.2%
Very often/often
53.8%
Sometimes
40.3%
Never
5.3%
52.3%
39.3%
7.4%
17.2%
37.4%
44.3%
13.6%
39.3%
46.3%
20.9%
53.6%
24.8%
25.9%
42.0%
25.6%
Very
often/often
43.7%
37.3%
Sometimes
Never
50.0%
45.2%
5.8%
15.4%
52.3%
39.3%
7.4%
44.4%
44.8%
9.5%
Course Challenge
Worked harder than you thought you could to meet
standards or expectations
Come to class/seminar/lecture without completing reading
or assignments
Challenging you to do your best work
Course Challenge Benchmark
Academic Integration
Asked questions or contributed to class discussions
in other ways
Discussed ideas from your readings or classes with
others outside of class
Talked about your career plans with teaching staff,
advisors or tutors
Discussed ideas from your course with teaching staff
outside taught sessions
Discussed your academic performance and/or
feedback with an academic member of staff
Academic Integration Benchmark
Collaborative Learning
Explained course material to one or more students
Worked with other students on projects or
assignments
Discussed ideas from your readings or classes with
others outside of class
Collaborative Learning Benchmark
15
King’s curriculum characteristics benchmarks
Research-Rich Environment
Looked beyond your reading list when researching
for coursework
Attended talks, presentations, seminars that are not
part of your formal curriculum
Read research publications as part of your course
Participated in fieldtrips, visits and offsite activities
related to one or more of your programme
Made explicit where an academic member of staff's
research has been used in teaching
Work with academic staff on a research project
Research-rich Environment Benchmark
Very
often/often
63.7%
Sometimes
Never
25.8%
5.8%
23.5%
46.1%
29.4%
59.0%
13.1%
26.7%
24.0%
11.9%
45.5%
39.7%
42.5%
15.3%
Done
Plan to do
8.3%
39.8%
33.5%
33.0%
Not decided/
Do not plan to
do
58.2%
21.6%
Very
often/often
43.7%
37.3%
Sometimes
Never
50.0%
45.2%
5.8%
15.4%
27.1%
36.6%
52.7%
43.0%
17.6%
17.2%
28.0%
43.1%
23.7%
70.0%
24.3%
5.0%
67.1%
26.0%
5.7%
60.3%
30.2%
7.1%
46.3%
34.0%
12.2%
Very
often/often
44.8%
Sometimes
Never
40.1%
14.0%
36.6%
35.7%
17.7%
32.0%
Done
37.7%
Plan to do
6.5%
29.7%
37.8%
29.2%
27.2%
37.8%
23.7%
Not decided/
Do not plan to
do
64.3%
43.1%
18.5%
Very often/often
Sometimes
Never
Academic Literacy
Explained course material to one or more students
Worked with other students on projects or
assignments
Given a class presentation
Worked harder than you thought you could to meet a
teacher/lecturer/tutor's standards or expectations
Made significant changes to your work based on
feedback
Applying facts, theories or methods to practical
problems or new situations
Analysing an idea, experience, or line of reasoning in
depth
Evaluating a point of view, decision, or information
source
Academic Literacy Benchmark
Global Connectedness
Had in-depth conversations with students who are
very different from you in terms of their religious
beliefs, political opinions, or personal values
Included diverse and global perspectives in course
discussions or assignments
Incorporating international perspectives
Participate in a study abroad programme
Study a foreign language
Global Connectedness Benchmark
Interdisciplinarity
16
Combined ideas from different courses when
completing assignments, or during class discussions
Connected your learning to social problems or issues
Forming a new idea or understanding from various
pieces of information
Encouraged you to approach a topic from an
alternative disciplinary perspective
Interdisciplinarity Benchmark
49.1%
34.5%
10.8%
41.3%
57.3%
37.9%
32.0%
16.1%
9.5%
28.3%
45.1%
23.4%
44.0%
37.4%
14.9%
Very often/often
31.3%
Sometimes
Never
37.3%
27.4%
62.8%
29.9%
5.3%
45.8%
33.6%
18.9%
29.8%
34.7%
33.6%
42.4%
33.9%
21.3%
Community Engagement
Drawn on community-based experts for teaching
(e.g. service users, professionals and others from
outside academia)
Drawn upon real world and local examples in
teaching content
To what extent has King's emphasised attending
College events (in addition to your regular
timetabled lectures and seminars)
To what extent has King's emphasised
encouraging you to become a better informed and
active citizen
Community Engagement Benchmark
King’s priority areas
Feedback Overall
Talked about your career plans with teaching staff,
advisors or tutors
Discussed your academic performance and/or
feedback with an academic member of staff
Made significant changes to your work based on
feedback
Provided detailed oral feedback on your work
Provided detailed written feedback on your work
I have adequate opportunities to give feedback on all
elements of my course
My feedback on the course is listened to and valued
It is clear to me how students' comments on the
degree programme have been acted upon
Feedback Overall Benchmark
Agree
17.2%
Neutral
37.4%
Disagree
44.3%
20.9%
53.6%
24.8%
28.0%
43.1%
23.7%
19.6%
34.8%
63.9%
38.1%
43.0%
19.0%
39.5%
19.7%
17.2%
36.6%
32.0%
38.8%
34.5%
24.5%
33.4%
31.6%
38.4%
28.4%
Agree
63.9%
Neutral
19.0%
Disagree
17.2%
36.6%
32.0%
38.8%
34.5%
24.5%
33.4%
31.6%
38.4%
28.4%
Very
often/often
Sometimes
Never
Feedback
I have adequate opportunities to give feedback on all
elements of my course
My feedback on the course is listened to and valued
It is clear to me how students' comments on the
degree programme have been acted upon
Feedback Benchmark
Assessment
17
Discussed your academic performance and/or
feedback with an academic member of staff
Made significant changes to your work based on
feedback
Provided detailed oral feedback on your work
Provided detailed written feedback on your work
Assessment Benchmark
20.9%
53.6%
24.8%
28.0%
43.1%
23.7%
19.6%
34.8%
31.6%
38.1%
43.0%
38.4%
39.5%
19.7%
28.4%
Co-curricular Engagement
Participation in an internship, field experience, or
placement in addition to your programme
requirements
Participation in co-curricular activities
Volunteering through KCLSU
Volunteering through other organisations
Co-curricular Engagement Benchmark
Done
Plan to do
12.7%
49.2%
Not decided/
Do not plan to
do
31.7%
49.2%
9.5%
23.8%
23.8%
23.2%
20.1%
24.9%
29.4%
26.8%
41.4%
50.1%
44.5%
Academic Support
Using e-resources for learning, including study skills,
data collection and information retrieval
Using learning support services (tutoring services,
writing centre, specialist librarians, etc.)
Providing support for students' overall well-being
(recreation, health care, counselling, etc.)
Providing support preparing students for
employment
Providing opportunities for professional development
(communication, management, leadership skills)
Quality of your interactions with: Administrative and
support staff
Academic Support Benchmark
Very much/quite a
bit
48.0%
Some
Very little
16.5%
5.3%
40.0%
31.7%
26.4%
31.9%
37.0%
28.9%
34.6%
33.4%
24.3%
38.0%
35.9%
22.7%
Excellent (5-7)
Poor (1-2)
33.6%
Neutral
(3-4)
39.7%
38.5%
30.9%
21.5%
26.7%
Engagement indicators
Academic Challenge
Very
Sometimes/
Never/ Very
18
Analysing an idea, experience, or line of reasoning
in depth
Applying facts, theories or methods to practical
problems or new situations
Evaluating a point of view, decision, or information
source
Forming a new idea or understanding from various
pieces of information
Becoming an independent learner
Spending significant amounts of time studying and
on academic work
Challenging you to do your best work
Academic Challenge Benchmark
often/often
Very much/
Quite a bit
67.1%
Some
little
26.0%
5.7%
70.0%
24.3%
5.0%
60.3%
30.2%
7.1%
57.3%
32.0%
9.5%
83.1%
81.4%
14.9%
14.6%
1.5%
4.0%
58.7%
67.6%
27.8%
25.5%
13.5%
5.8%
Very often/often
17.2%
Sometimes
37.4%
Never
44.3%
12.1%
19.2%
67.2%
13.6%
39.2%
46.3%
20.9%
53.6%
24.8%
19.6%
34.8%
38.1%
43.0%
39.5%
19.7%
Excellent (5-7)
45.6%
Neutral (3-4)
38.3%
Poor (1-2)
16.0%
48.7%
30.6%
9.9%
19.7%
38.4%
40.3%
Very often/often
43.7%
37.3%
Sometimes
50.0%
45.2%
Never
5.8%
15.4%
Excellent (5-7)
74.4%
Neutral (3-4)
19.4%
Poor (1-2)
6.3%
43.4%
33.3%
22.8%
49.7%
36.9%
12.5%
Student Academic Relationships
Talked about your career plans with teaching staff,
advisors or tutors
Worked with academic staff on activities other than
coursework (for example staff/student committees,
student representation, etc)
Discussed ideas from your course with teaching staff
outside taught sessions
Discussed your academic performance and/or
feedback with an academic member of staff
Provided detailed oral feedback on your work
Provided detailed written feedback on your work
Quality of your interactions with: Teaching/academic
staff
Quality of your interactions with: Your personal
tutor
Student-Academic Relationships Benchmark
Learning with Peers
Explained course material to one or more students
Worked with other students on projects or
assignments
Quality of your interactions with: other students on
your course
Quality of your interactions with: other students at
King’s
Learning with Peers Benchmark
19
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